Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome HELP
Based on 7,339 articles published since 2009
||||

These are the 7339 published articles about Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome that originated from Worldwide during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Preexposure Prophylaxis for the Prevention of HIV Infection: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous7741280 / Owens, Douglas K / Davidson, Karina W / Krist, Alex H / Barry, Michael J / Cabana, Michael / Caughey, Aaron B / Curry, Susan J / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Pbert, Lori / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, San Francisco. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · University of Iowa, Iowa City. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #31184747.

ABSTRACT: Importance: An estimated 1.1 million individuals in the United States are currently living with HIV, and more than 700 000 persons have died of AIDS since the first cases were reported in 1981. In 2017, there were 38 281 new diagnoses of HIV infection reported in the United States; 81% of these new diagnoses were among males and 19% were among females. Although treatable, HIV infection has no cure and has significant health consequences. Objective: To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for the prevention of HIV infection. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits of PrEP for the prevention of HIV infection with oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate monotherapy or combined tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine and whether the benefits vary by risk group, population subgroup, or regimen or dosing strategy; the diagnostic accuracy of risk assessment tools to identify persons at high risk of HIV acquisition; the rates of adherence to PrEP in primary care settings; the association between adherence and effectiveness of PrEP; and the harms of PrEP when used for HIV prevention. Findings: The USPSTF found convincing evidence that PrEP is of substantial benefit in decreasing the risk of HIV infection in persons at high risk of HIV acquisition. The USPSTF also found convincing evidence that adherence to PrEP is highly associated with its efficacy in preventing the acquisition of HIV infection; thus, adherence to PrEP is central to realizing its benefit. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that PrEP is associated with small harms, including kidney and gastrointestinal adverse effects. The USPSTF concludes with high certainty that the magnitude of benefit of PrEP with oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-based therapy to reduce the risk of acquisition of HIV infection in persons at high risk is substantial. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends offering PrEP with effective antiretroviral therapy to persons at high risk of HIV acquisition. (A recommendation).

2 Guideline Screening for HIV Infection: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous5161409 / Owens, Douglas K / Davidson, Karina W / Krist, Alex H / Barry, Michael J / Cabana, Michael / Caughey, Aaron B / Curry, Susan J / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Pbert, Lori / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, San Francisco. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · University of Iowa, Iowa City. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #31184701.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Approximately 1.1 million persons in the United States are currently living with HIV, and more than 700 000 persons have died of AIDS since the first cases were reported in 1981. There were approximately 38 300 new diagnoses of HIV infection in 2017. The estimated prevalence of HIV infection among persons 13 years and older in the United States is 0.4%, and data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show a significant increase in HIV diagnoses starting at age 15 years. An estimated 8700 women living with HIV give birth each year in the United States. HIV can be transmitted from mother to child during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and breastfeeding. The incidence of perinatal HIV infection in the United States peaked in 1992 and has declined significantly following the implementation of routine prenatal HIV screening and the use of effective therapies and precautions to prevent mother-to-child transmission. Objective: To update the 2013 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for HIV infection in adolescents, adults, and pregnant women. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for HIV infection in nonpregnant adolescents and adults, the yield of screening for HIV infection at different intervals, the effects of initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a higher vs lower CD4 cell count, and the longer-term harms associated with currently recommended ART regimens. The USPSTF also reviewed the evidence on the benefits (specifically, reduced risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection) and harms of screening for HIV infection in pregnant persons, the yield of repeat screening for HIV at different intervals during pregnancy, the effectiveness of currently recommended ART regimens for reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection, and the harms of ART during pregnancy to the mother and infant. Findings: The USPSTF found convincing evidence that currently recommended HIV tests are highly accurate in diagnosing HIV infection. The USPSTF found convincing evidence that identification and early treatment of HIV infection is of substantial benefit in reducing the risk of AIDS-related events or death. The USPSTF found convincing evidence that the use of ART is of substantial benefit in decreasing the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sex partners. The USPSTF also found convincing evidence that identification and treatment of pregnant women living with HIV infection is of substantial benefit in reducing the rate of mother-to-child transmission. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that ART is associated with some harms, including neuropsychiatric, renal, and hepatic harms, and an increased risk of preterm birth in pregnant women. The USPSTF concludes with high certainty that the net benefit of screening for HIV infection in adolescents, adults, and pregnant women is substantial. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends screening for HIV infection in adolescents and adults aged 15 to 65 years. Younger adolescents and older adults who are at increased risk of infection should also be screened. (A recommendation) The USPSTF recommends screening for HIV infection in all pregnant persons, including those who present in labor or at delivery whose HIV status is unknown. (A recommendation).

3 Guideline Paediatric European Network for Treatment of AIDS (PENTA) guidelines for treatment of paediatric HIV-1 infection 2015: optimizing health in preparation for adult life. 2018

Bamford, A / Turkova, A / Lyall, H / Foster, C / Klein, N / Bastiaans, D / Burger, D / Bernadi, S / Butler, K / Chiappini, E / Clayden, P / Della Negra, M / Giacomet, V / Giaquinto, C / Gibb, D / Galli, L / Hainaut, M / Koros, M / Marques, L / Nastouli, E / Niehues, T / Noguera-Julian, A / Rojo, P / Rudin, C / Scherpbier, H J / Tudor-Williams, G / Welch, S B / Anonymous6140819. ·Department of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK. · Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit, London, UK. · Department of Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK. · Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK. · Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegan, The Netherlands. · University Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin & University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Meyer University Hospital, Florence University, Florence, Italy. · HIV i-Base, London, UK. · Emilio Ribas Institute of Infectious Diseases, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Paediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Luigi Sacco Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Paediatrics, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Health Sciences, Pediatric Unit, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics, CHU Saint-Pierre, Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium. · Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth, UK. · Paediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunodeficiencies Unit, Pediatric Department, Porto Central Hospital, Porto, Portugal. · Department of Clinical Microbiology and Virology, University College London Hospitals, London, UK. · Centre for Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, HELIOS Hospital Krefeld, Krefeld, Germany. · Infectious Diseases Unit, Pediatrics Department, Sant Joan de Déu Hospital, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · 12th of October Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · University Children's Hospital, Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Paediatric Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children's Hospital Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Imperial College, London, UK. · Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, UK. ·HIV Med · Pubmed #25649230.

ABSTRACT: The 2015 Paediatric European Network for Treatment of AIDS (PENTA) guidelines provide practical recommendations on the management of HIV-1 infection in children in Europe and are an update to those published in 2009. Aims of treatment have progressed significantly over the last decade, moving far beyond limitation of short-term morbidity and mortality to optimizing health status for adult life and minimizing the impact of chronic HIV infection on immune system development and health in general. Additionally, there is a greater need for increased awareness and minimization of long-term drug toxicity. The main updates to the previous guidelines include: an increase in the number of indications for antiretroviral therapy (ART) at all ages (higher CD4 thresholds for consideration of ART initiation and additional clinical indications), revised guidance on first- and second-line ART recommendations, including more recently available drug classes, expanded guidance on management of coinfections (including tuberculosis, hepatitis B and hepatitis C) and additional emphasis on the needs of adolescents as they approach transition to adult services. There is a new section on the current ART 'pipeline' of drug development, a comprehensive summary table of currently recommended ART with dosing recommendations. Differences between PENTA and current US and World Health Organization guidelines are highlighted and explained.

4 Guideline Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on Antiretroviral Therapy in Adults Infected by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Updated January 2016). 2016

Anonymous3860864. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #27068257.

ABSTRACT: In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should comprise 3 drugs, namely, 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), and 1 drug from another family. Four of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) as the third drug, are considered a preferred regimen; a further 6 regimens, which are based on an INSTI, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), or a protease inhibitor boosted with cobicistat or ritonavir (PI/COBI, PI/r), are considered alternatives. The reasons and criteria for switching ART are presented both for patients with an undetectable PVL and for patients who experience virological failure, in which case the rescue regimen should include 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against HIV. The specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbid conditions (tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer) are updated.

5 Guideline Executive summary of the GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (updated January 2014). 2014

Anonymous1650799 / Berenguer, Juan / Polo, Rosa / Lozano, Fernando / López Aldeguer, José / Antela, Antonio / Arribas, José Ramón / Asensi, Víctor / Blanco, José Ramón / Clotet, Bonaventura / Domingo, Pere / Galindo, María José / Gatell, José María / González-García, Juan / Iribarren, José Antonio / Locutura, Jaime / López, Juan Carlos / Mallolas, Josep / Martínez, Esteban / Miralles, Celia / Miró, José M / Moreno, Santiago / Palacios, Rosario / Pérez Elías, María Jesús / Pineda, Juan Antonio / Podzamczer, Daniel / Portilla, Joaquín / Pulido, Federico / Ribera, Esteban / Riera, Melchor / Rubio, Rafael / Santos, Jesús / Sanz, Jesús / Tuset, Montserrat / Vidal, Francesc / Rivero, Antonio. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #24986715.

ABSTRACT: In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with clinical circumstances, number of CD4 cells, comorbid conditions and prevention of transmission of HIV. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer).

6 Guideline [GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan: Consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (Updated January 2014)]. 2014

Anonymous1720798 / Anonymous1730798. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #24953253.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This consensus document is an update of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) guidelines for HIV-1 infected adult patients. METHODS: To formulate these recommendations a panel composed of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida reviewed the efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. Recommendations strength and the evidence in which they are supported are based on modified criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. RESULTS: In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with the clinical circumstances: CDC stage B or C disease (A-I), asymptomatic patients (depending on the CD4+ T-lymphocyte count: <350cells/μL, A-I; 350-500 cells/μL, A-II, and >500 cells/μL, B-III), comorbid conditions (HIV nephropathy, chronic hepatitis caused by HBV or HCV, age >55years, high cardiovascular risk, neurocognitive disorders, and cancer, A-II), and prevention of transmission of HIV (mother-to-child or heterosexual, A-I; men who have sex with men, A-III). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). Some of the possible initial regimens have been considered alternatives. This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure where rescue ART should comprise 2 or 3 drugs that are fully active against the virus. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer). CONCLUSIONS: These new guidelines updates previous recommendations related to cART (when to begin and what drugs should be used), how to monitor and what to do in case of viral failure or drug adverse reactions. cART specific criteria in comorbid patients and special situations are equally updated.

7 Guideline [Consensus Statement by GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan Secretariat on antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (Updated January 2013)]. 2013

Anonymous3260773. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #24161378.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This consensus document is an update of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) guidelines for HIV-1 infected adult patients. METHODS: To formulate these recommendations a panel composed of members of the GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan Secretariat (Grupo de Estudio de Sida and the Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) reviewed the efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. The strength of the recommendations and the evidence which support them are based on a modification of the criteria of Infectious Diseases Society of America. RESULTS: cART is recommended in patients with symptoms of HIV infection, in pregnant women, in serodiscordant couples with high risk of transmission, in hepatitisB co-infection requiring treatment, and in HIV nephropathy. cART is recommended in asymptomatic patients if CD4 is <500cells/μl. If CD4 are >500cells/μl cART should be considered in the case of chronic hepatitisC, cirrhosis, high cardiovascular risk, plasma viral load >100.000 copies/ml, proportion of CD4 cells <14%, neurocognitive deficits, and in people aged >55years. The objective of cART is to achieve an undetectable viral load. The first cART should include 2 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI) nucleoside analogs and a third drug (a non-analog RTI, a ritonavir boosted protease inhibitor, or an integrase inhibitor). The panel has consensually selected some drug combinations, for the first cART and specific criteria for cART in acute HIV infection, in tuberculosis and other HIV related opportunistic infections, for the women and in pregnancy, in hepatitisB or C co-infection, in HIV-2 infection, and in post-exposure prophylaxis. CONCLUSIONS: These new guidelines update previous recommendations related to first cART (when to begin and what drugs should be used), how to monitor, and what to do in case of viral failure or adverse drug reactions. cART specific criteria in comorbid patients and special situations are similarly updated.

8 Guideline Executive summary of the Consensus Document of GeSIDA and Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS on combined antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (January 2013). 2013

Anonymous2510773. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #24156952.

ABSTRACT: In the present update of the guidelines, a starting combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) is recommended in symptomatic patients, in pregnant women, in serodiscordant couples with a high risk of transmission, in patients co-infected with hepatitis B virus requiring treatment, and in patients with HIV-related nephropathy. Guidelines on cART are included in the event of a concurrent diagnosis of HIV infection with an AIDS-defining event. In asymptomatic naïve patients, cART is recommended if the CD4(+) lymphocyte count is <500cells/μL; if the CD4(+) lymphocyte count is >500cells/μL, cART can be delayed, although it may be considered in patients with liver cirrhosis, chronic infection due to hepatitis C virus, high cardiovascular risk, plasma viral load (PVL) >10(5)copies/mL, CD4(+) lymphocyte percentage <14%, cognitive impairment, and age >55 years. cART in naïve patients requires a combination of 3 drugs, and its aim is to achieve undetectable PVL. Treatment adherence plays a key role in sustaining a favorable response. cART can, and should be, changed if virological failure occurs, in order to return to undetectable PVL. Approaches to cART in acute HIV infection, in women, in pregnancy, in tuberculosis, and post-exposure prophylaxis are also examined.

9 Guideline Executive summary. Consensus statement of the National AIDS Plan Secretariat, Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine and AIDS Study Group of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology on Emergency and HIV Infection. 2013

Anonymous2010756. ·rpolor@msssi.es ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #23601917.

ABSTRACT: Emergency Services (ES) are the cornerstone of our health system and therefore it cannot remain indifferent to the HIV advances that have drastically changed the landscape of the disease, so, emergency specialist updating is not only necessary, it is also essential. The purpose of this paper is to support non-HIV specialist professionals in treating patients with urgent diseases resulting from HIV infection or related to it.

10 Guideline [The Spanish AIDS Study Group and Spanish National AIDS Plan (GESIDA/Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) recommendations for the treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals (Updated January 2013)]. 2013

Rivero, Antonio / Pulido, Federico / Caylá, Joan / Iribarren, José A / Miró, José M / Moreno, Santiago / Pérez-Camacho, Inés / Anonymous2590754 / Anonymous2600754. ·Panel de Expertos del Grupo de estudio de Sida (GESIDA-SEIMC) y de la Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (SPNS); Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario 1050 Reina Sofía-IMIBIC, Córdoba, España. Electronic address: ariveror@gmail.com. ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #23541879.

ABSTRACT: This consensus document was prepared by an expert panel of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GESIDA [Spanish AIDS Study Group]) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS [Spanish National AIDS Plan]). The document updates current guidelines on the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals contained in the guidelines on the treatment of opportunistic infections published by GESIDA and PNS in 2008. The document aims to facilitate the management and treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in Spain, and includes specific sections and recommendations on the treatment of drug-sensitive TB, multidrug-resistant TB, and extensively drug-resistant TB, in this population. The consensus guidelines also make recommendations on the treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in special situations, such as chronic liver disease, pregnancy, kidney failure, and transplantation. Recommendations are made on the timing and initial regimens of antiretroviral therapy in patients with TB, and on immune reconstitution syndrome in HIV-infected patients with TB who are receiving antiretroviral therapy. The document does not cover the diagnosis of TB, diagnosis/treatment of latent TB, or treatment of TB in children. The quality of the evidence was evaluated and the recommendations graded using the approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group.

11 Guideline Position statement on the use of antiretroviral therapy to reduce HIV transmission, January 2013: the British HIV Association (BHIVA) and the Expert Advisory Group on AIDS (EAGA). 2013

Fidler, S / Anderson, J / Azad, Y / Delpech, V / Evans, C / Fisher, M / Gazzard, B / Gill, N / Lazarus, L / Lowbury, R / Orton, K / Osoro, B / Radcliffe, K / Smith, B / Churchill, D / Rogstad, K / Cairns, G. ·Imperial College London, London, UK. s.fidler@imperial.ac.uk ·HIV Med · Pubmed #23489936.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline The 2010 South African guidelines for the management of HIV and AIDS: a review. 2011

Rossouw, Theresa / Richter, Karin / Martin, Des / Avenant, Theuns / Spencer, David. ·Department of Family Medicine, University of Pretoria. theresa.rossouw@up.ac.za ·S Afr Med J · Pubmed #21786723.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome]. 2010

Anonymous1950678. · ·Rev Chilena Infectol · Pubmed #21046725.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome]. 2010

Anonymous590669. · ·Rev Chilena Infectol · Pubmed #20737127.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline [AIDS Study Group/Spanish AIDS Plan consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults with human immunodeficiency virus infection (updated January 2010)]. 2010

Anonymous2690663 / Anonymous2700663. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #20554079.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This consensus document is an update of antiretroviral therapy recommendations for adult patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. METHODS: To formulate these recommendations a panel made up of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (Gesida, AIDS Study Group) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS, Spanish AIDS Plan) reviewed the advances in the current understanding of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the efficacy and safety of clinical trials, and cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals or presented at scientific meetings. Three levels of evidence were defined according to the data source: randomized studies (level A), cohort or case-control studies (level B), and expert opinion (level C). The decision to recommend, consider or not to recommend ART was established in each situation. RESULTS: Currently, the treatment of choice for chronic HIV infection is the combination of three drugs of two different classes, including 2 nucleosides or nucleotide analogs (NRTI) plus 1 non-nucleoside (NNRTI) or 1 boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r), but other combinations are possible. Initiation of ART is recommended in patients with symptomatic HIV infection. In asymptomatic patients, initiation of ART is recommended on the basis of CD4 lymphocyte counts, plasma viral load and patient co-morbidities, as follows: 1) therapy should be started in patients with CD4 counts below 350 cells/microl; 2) When CD4 counts are between 350 and 500 cells/microl, therapy should be started in case of cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C, high cardiovascular risk, HIV nephropathy, HIV viral load above 100,000 copies/ml, proportion of CD4 cells under 14%, and in people aged over 55; 3) Therapy should be deferred when CD4 are above 500 cells/microl, but could be considered if any of previous considerations concurs. Treatment should be initiated in case of hepatitis B requiring treatment and should be considered for reduce sexual transmission. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable viral load. Adherence to therapy plays an essential role in maintaining antiviral response. Therapeutic options are limited after ART failures but undetectable viral loads maybe possible with the new drugs even in highly drug experienced patients. Genotype studies are useful in these situations. Drug toxicity of ART therapy is losing importance as benefits exceed adverse effects. Criteria for antiretroviral treatment in acute infection, pregnancy and post-exposure prophylaxis are mentioned as well as the management of HIV co-infection with hepatitis B or C. CONCLUSIONS: CD4 cells counts, viral load and patient co-morbidities are the most important reference factors to consider when initiating ART in asymptomatic patients. The large number of available drugs, the increased sensitivity of tests to monitor viral load, and the ability to determine viral resistance is leading to a more individualized therapy approach in order to achieve undetectable viral load under any circumstances.

16 Editorial The HIV/AIDS pandemic will not end by the year 2030 in low and middle income countries. 2019

Bain, Luchuo Engelbert / Tarkang, Elvis Enowbeyang / Ebuenyi, Ikenna Desmond / Kamadjeu, Raoul. ·The Pan African Medical Journal, Nairobi, Kenya. · Athena Institute for Research on Innovation and Communication in Health and Life Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences PMB 31 Ho, Ghana. · HIV/AIDS Prevention Research Network Cameroon PO Box 36 Kumba, Cameroon. ·Pan Afr Med J · Pubmed #31223359.

ABSTRACT: The recent Lancet Commission-International AIDS Society report: Advancing Global health and strengthening the HIV response in the Era of the Sustainable Development Goals; clearly highlights the fact that the world is NOT on track in ending the AIDS pandemic by 2030. Emphasis on massive and early diagnosis and placement on Combined Anti- Retroviral Therapy (cART) remain key cornerstones in reaching these goals. Effective viral load informed care remains very promising in reducing drug resistance, and improving outcomes in infected persons. The authors argue that the current funding trends, management paradigms, research agendas, data collection and information system models, as well as the overall appreciation of the evolution of the pandemic in low and middle- income countries, lead to a logical conclusion that this pandemic will not end, especially in these countries by 2030. Major action areas are proposed for policy makers and researchers for appreciation and action.

17 Editorial Health and AIDS in 2019 and beyond. 2018

Whiteside, Alan / Wilson, David. ·a Global Health Policy, Balsillie School of International Affairs , Waterloo , Ontaria , Canada. · b University of KwaZulu-Natal , Durban , South Africa. · c Global AIDS Program , World Bank , Washington DC , USA. ·Afr J AIDS Res · Pubmed #30560731.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial HIV control: Is getting there the same as staying there? 2018

Goulder, Philip / Deeks, Steven G. ·Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · HIV Pathogenesis Programme, Doris Duke Medical Research Institute, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States of America. ·PLoS Pathog · Pubmed #30383857.

ABSTRACT: In this brief review and perspective, we address the question of whether the immune responses that bring about immune control of acute HIV infection are the same as, or distinct from, those that maintain long-term viral suppression once control of viremia has been achieved. To this end, we describe the natural history of elite and post-treatment control, noting the lack of data regarding what happens acutely. We review the evidence suggesting that the two clinical phenotypes may differ in terms of the mechanisms required to achieve and maintain control, as well as the level of inflammation that persists once a steady state is achieved. We then describe the evidence from longitudinal studies of controllers who fail and studies of biologic sex (male versus female), age (children versus adults), and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (pathogenic/experimental versus nonpathogenic/natural infection). Collectively, these studies demonstrate that the battle between the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways during acute infection has long-term consequences, both for the degree to which control is maintained and the health of the individual. Potent and stringent control of HIV may be required acutely, but once control is established, the chronic inflammatory response can be detrimental. Interventional approaches designed to bring about HIV cure and/or remission should be nuanced accordingly.

19 Editorial Is It Unethical to Use Fear in Public Health Campaigns? 2018

Chapman, Simon. ·Simon Chapman is with the School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·Am J Public Health · Pubmed #30089001.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Is it time prevention had equal billing on the AIDS agenda? 2018

The Lancet Hiv, ?. · ·Lancet HIV · Pubmed #30052502.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Introduction to the Special Issue: Ending the AIDS Pandemic by 2030: Accelerating Efforts to Prevent HIV. 2018

Valdiserri, Ronald O. ·Senior Research Associate and Distinguished Scholar, Department of Health, Behavior & Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. ·AIDS Educ Prev · Pubmed #29969305.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial JC Virus Infection: An Expanding Spectrum of Neurological Disorders. 2018

Jackson, Alan C. ·Departments of Internal Medicine (Neurology) and of Medical Microbiology,University of Manitoba,WinnipegManitoba,Canada. ·Can J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #29923467.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial HIV-No time for complacency. 2018

Abdool Karim, Quarraisha / Abdool Karim, Salim S. ·Quarraisha Abdool Karim (top) and Salim S. Abdool Karim (bottom) are professors at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, New York, NY, USA, and are the associate scientific director and director, respectively, of the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. quarraisha.abdoolkarim@caprisa.org salim.abdoolkarim@caprisa.org. ·Science · Pubmed #29903942.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial The Catholic Church, AIDS, and Sexuality in Ireland: Uncovering Part of the Story. 2018

Oppenheimer, Gerald M. ·Gerald M. Oppenheimer is with the Department of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health, City University of New York, and the Center for the History of Ethics and Public Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. ·Am J Public Health · Pubmed #29874512.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Presenting national HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted disease research in Brazil. 2018

Benzaken, Adele Schwartz / Oliveira, Maria Cristina Pimenta / Pereira, Gerson Fernando Mendes / Giozza, Silvana Pereira / Souza, Flavia Moreno Alves de / Cunha, Alessandro Ricardo Caruso da / Girade, Renato. ·Department of Surveillance, Prevention and Control of STIs, HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis, Ministry of Health, Brasília, Brazil. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #29794602.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

Next