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Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome HELP
Based on 8,566 articles published since 2007
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These are the 8566 published articles about Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome that originated from Worldwide during 2007-2017.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Executive summary of the GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (updated January 2014). 2014

Anonymous2100799 / Berenguer, Juan / Polo, Rosa / Lozano, Fernando / López Aldeguer, José / Antela, Antonio / Arribas, José Ramón / Asensi, Víctor / Blanco, José Ramón / Clotet, Bonaventura / Domingo, Pere / Galindo, María José / Gatell, José María / González-García, Juan / Iribarren, José Antonio / Locutura, Jaime / López, Juan Carlos / Mallolas, Josep / Martínez, Esteban / Miralles, Celia / Miró, José M / Moreno, Santiago / Palacios, Rosario / Pérez Elías, María Jesús / Pineda, Juan Antonio / Podzamczer, Daniel / Portilla, Joaquín / Pulido, Federico / Ribera, Esteban / Riera, Melchor / Rubio, Rafael / Santos, Jesús / Sanz, Jesús / Tuset, Montserrat / Vidal, Francesc / Rivero, Antonio. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #24986715.

ABSTRACT: In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with clinical circumstances, number of CD4 cells, comorbid conditions and prevention of transmission of HIV. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer).

2 Guideline [GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan: Consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (Updated January 2014)]. 2014

Anonymous2130798 / Anonymous2140798. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #24953253.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This consensus document is an update of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) guidelines for HIV-1 infected adult patients. METHODS: To formulate these recommendations a panel composed of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida reviewed the efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. Recommendations strength and the evidence in which they are supported are based on modified criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. RESULTS: In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with the clinical circumstances: CDC stage B or C disease (A-I), asymptomatic patients (depending on the CD4+ T-lymphocyte count: <350cells/μL, A-I; 350-500 cells/μL, A-II, and >500 cells/μL, B-III), comorbid conditions (HIV nephropathy, chronic hepatitis caused by HBV or HCV, age >55years, high cardiovascular risk, neurocognitive disorders, and cancer, A-II), and prevention of transmission of HIV (mother-to-child or heterosexual, A-I; men who have sex with men, A-III). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). Some of the possible initial regimens have been considered alternatives. This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure where rescue ART should comprise 2 or 3 drugs that are fully active against the virus. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer). CONCLUSIONS: These new guidelines updates previous recommendations related to cART (when to begin and what drugs should be used), how to monitor and what to do in case of viral failure or drug adverse reactions. cART specific criteria in comorbid patients and special situations are equally updated.

3 Guideline [Consensus Statement by GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan Secretariat on antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (Updated January 2013)]. 2013

Anonymous3460773. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #24161378.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This consensus document is an update of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) guidelines for HIV-1 infected adult patients. METHODS: To formulate these recommendations a panel composed of members of the GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan Secretariat (Grupo de Estudio de Sida and the Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) reviewed the efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. The strength of the recommendations and the evidence which support them are based on a modification of the criteria of Infectious Diseases Society of America. RESULTS: cART is recommended in patients with symptoms of HIV infection, in pregnant women, in serodiscordant couples with high risk of transmission, in hepatitisB co-infection requiring treatment, and in HIV nephropathy. cART is recommended in asymptomatic patients if CD4 is <500cells/μl. If CD4 are >500cells/μl cART should be considered in the case of chronic hepatitisC, cirrhosis, high cardiovascular risk, plasma viral load >100.000 copies/ml, proportion of CD4 cells <14%, neurocognitive deficits, and in people aged >55years. The objective of cART is to achieve an undetectable viral load. The first cART should include 2 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI) nucleoside analogs and a third drug (a non-analog RTI, a ritonavir boosted protease inhibitor, or an integrase inhibitor). The panel has consensually selected some drug combinations, for the first cART and specific criteria for cART in acute HIV infection, in tuberculosis and other HIV related opportunistic infections, for the women and in pregnancy, in hepatitisB or C co-infection, in HIV-2 infection, and in post-exposure prophylaxis. CONCLUSIONS: These new guidelines update previous recommendations related to first cART (when to begin and what drugs should be used), how to monitor, and what to do in case of viral failure or adverse drug reactions. cART specific criteria in comorbid patients and special situations are similarly updated.

4 Guideline Executive summary of the Consensus Document of GeSIDA and Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS on combined antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (January 2013). 2013

Anonymous2710773. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #24156952.

ABSTRACT: In the present update of the guidelines, a starting combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) is recommended in symptomatic patients, in pregnant women, in serodiscordant couples with a high risk of transmission, in patients co-infected with hepatitis B virus requiring treatment, and in patients with HIV-related nephropathy. Guidelines on cART are included in the event of a concurrent diagnosis of HIV infection with an AIDS-defining event. In asymptomatic naïve patients, cART is recommended if the CD4(+) lymphocyte count is <500cells/μL; if the CD4(+) lymphocyte count is >500cells/μL, cART can be delayed, although it may be considered in patients with liver cirrhosis, chronic infection due to hepatitis C virus, high cardiovascular risk, plasma viral load (PVL) >10(5)copies/mL, CD4(+) lymphocyte percentage <14%, cognitive impairment, and age >55 years. cART in naïve patients requires a combination of 3 drugs, and its aim is to achieve undetectable PVL. Treatment adherence plays a key role in sustaining a favorable response. cART can, and should be, changed if virological failure occurs, in order to return to undetectable PVL. Approaches to cART in acute HIV infection, in women, in pregnancy, in tuberculosis, and post-exposure prophylaxis are also examined.

5 Guideline Executive summary. Consensus statement of the National AIDS Plan Secretariat, Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine and AIDS Study Group of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology on Emergency and HIV Infection. 2013

Anonymous2110756. ·rpolor@msssi.es ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #23601917.

ABSTRACT: Emergency Services (ES) are the cornerstone of our health system and therefore it cannot remain indifferent to the HIV advances that have drastically changed the landscape of the disease, so, emergency specialist updating is not only necessary, it is also essential. The purpose of this paper is to support non-HIV specialist professionals in treating patients with urgent diseases resulting from HIV infection or related to it.

6 Guideline [The Spanish AIDS Study Group and Spanish National AIDS Plan (GESIDA/Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) recommendations for the treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals (Updated January 2013)]. 2013

Rivero, Antonio / Pulido, Federico / Caylá, Joan / Iribarren, José A / Miró, José M / Moreno, Santiago / Pérez-Camacho, Inés / Anonymous2920754 / Anonymous2930754. ·Panel de Expertos del Grupo de estudio de Sida (GESIDA-SEIMC) y de la Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (SPNS); Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario 1050 Reina Sofía-IMIBIC, Córdoba, España. Electronic address: ariveror@gmail.com. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #23541879.

ABSTRACT: This consensus document was prepared by an expert panel of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GESIDA [Spanish AIDS Study Group]) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS [Spanish National AIDS Plan]). The document updates current guidelines on the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals contained in the guidelines on the treatment of opportunistic infections published by GESIDA and PNS in 2008. The document aims to facilitate the management and treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in Spain, and includes specific sections and recommendations on the treatment of drug-sensitive TB, multidrug-resistant TB, and extensively drug-resistant TB, in this population. The consensus guidelines also make recommendations on the treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in special situations, such as chronic liver disease, pregnancy, kidney failure, and transplantation. Recommendations are made on the timing and initial regimens of antiretroviral therapy in patients with TB, and on immune reconstitution syndrome in HIV-infected patients with TB who are receiving antiretroviral therapy. The document does not cover the diagnosis of TB, diagnosis/treatment of latent TB, or treatment of TB in children. The quality of the evidence was evaluated and the recommendations graded using the approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group.

7 Guideline Position statement on the use of antiretroviral therapy to reduce HIV transmission, January 2013: the British HIV Association (BHIVA) and the Expert Advisory Group on AIDS (EAGA). 2013

Fidler, S / Anderson, J / Azad, Y / Delpech, V / Evans, C / Fisher, M / Gazzard, B / Gill, N / Lazarus, L / Lowbury, R / Orton, K / Osoro, B / Radcliffe, K / Smith, B / Churchill, D / Rogstad, K / Cairns, G. ·Imperial College London, London, UK. s.fidler@imperial.ac.uk · ·HIV Med · Pubmed #23489936.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline The 2010 South African guidelines for the management of HIV and AIDS: a review. 2011

Rossouw, Theresa / Richter, Karin / Martin, Des / Avenant, Theuns / Spencer, David. ·Department of Family Medicine, University of Pretoria. theresa.rossouw@up.ac.za · ·S Afr Med J · Pubmed #21786723.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome]. 2010

Anonymous1980678. · ·Rev Chilena Infectol · Pubmed #21046725.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome]. 2010

Anonymous590669. · ·Rev Chilena Infectol · Pubmed #20737127.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline [AIDS Study Group/Spanish AIDS Plan consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults with human immunodeficiency virus infection (updated January 2010)]. 2010

Anonymous2780663 / Anonymous2790663. · ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #20554079.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This consensus document is an update of antiretroviral therapy recommendations for adult patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. METHODS: To formulate these recommendations a panel made up of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (Gesida, AIDS Study Group) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS, Spanish AIDS Plan) reviewed the advances in the current understanding of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the efficacy and safety of clinical trials, and cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals or presented at scientific meetings. Three levels of evidence were defined according to the data source: randomized studies (level A), cohort or case-control studies (level B), and expert opinion (level C). The decision to recommend, consider or not to recommend ART was established in each situation. RESULTS: Currently, the treatment of choice for chronic HIV infection is the combination of three drugs of two different classes, including 2 nucleosides or nucleotide analogs (NRTI) plus 1 non-nucleoside (NNRTI) or 1 boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r), but other combinations are possible. Initiation of ART is recommended in patients with symptomatic HIV infection. In asymptomatic patients, initiation of ART is recommended on the basis of CD4 lymphocyte counts, plasma viral load and patient co-morbidities, as follows: 1) therapy should be started in patients with CD4 counts below 350 cells/microl; 2) When CD4 counts are between 350 and 500 cells/microl, therapy should be started in case of cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C, high cardiovascular risk, HIV nephropathy, HIV viral load above 100,000 copies/ml, proportion of CD4 cells under 14%, and in people aged over 55; 3) Therapy should be deferred when CD4 are above 500 cells/microl, but could be considered if any of previous considerations concurs. Treatment should be initiated in case of hepatitis B requiring treatment and should be considered for reduce sexual transmission. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable viral load. Adherence to therapy plays an essential role in maintaining antiviral response. Therapeutic options are limited after ART failures but undetectable viral loads maybe possible with the new drugs even in highly drug experienced patients. Genotype studies are useful in these situations. Drug toxicity of ART therapy is losing importance as benefits exceed adverse effects. Criteria for antiretroviral treatment in acute infection, pregnancy and post-exposure prophylaxis are mentioned as well as the management of HIV co-infection with hepatitis B or C. CONCLUSIONS: CD4 cells counts, viral load and patient co-morbidities are the most important reference factors to consider when initiating ART in asymptomatic patients. The large number of available drugs, the increased sensitivity of tests to monitor viral load, and the ability to determine viral resistance is leading to a more individualized therapy approach in order to achieve undetectable viral load under any circumstances.

12 Guideline [Prevention of infectious diseases]. 2007

Alvarez Pasquín, M J / Batalla Martínez, C / Comín Bertrán, E / Gómez Marco, J J / Pericas Bosch, J / Pachón del Amo, I / Rufino González, J / Mayer Pujadas, M A / Martín Martín, S / Agustí Morató, M L / Puig Barberá, J / Anonymous1630624. ·Grupo de Prevención de Enfermedades Infecciosas. · ·Aten Primaria · Pubmed #19288697.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial The global HIV/AIDS epidemic-progress and challenges. 2017

The Lancet, ?. · ·Lancet · Pubmed #28745587.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Farewell Mark. 2017

Hankins, Catherine. ·Deputy Director, Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development; Professor of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC. catherine.hankins@mcgill.ca. ·Can J Public Health · Pubmed #28621644.

ABSTRACT: No abstract available.

15 Editorial Preventing HIV and Hepatitis Infections Among People Who Inject Drugs: Leveraging an Indiana Outbreak Response to Break the Impasse. 2017

Crowley, Jeffrey S / Millett, Gregorio A. ·O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University, 600 New Jersey Avenue, Washington, DC, 20001, USA. jeffrey.crowley@law.georgetown.edu. · amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research, Washington, DC, USA. ·AIDS Behav · Pubmed #28220312.

ABSTRACT: Providing clean needles through syringe services programs (SSPs) prevents the spread of disease among people who inject drugs (PWID). The recent HIV outbreak in Scott County, Indiana was a wakeup call with particular significance because modeling suggests that Scott County is but one of many counties in the United States highly vulnerable to an HIV outbreak among PWID. It is a painful recognition that some policy makers ignored the evidence in support of SSPs when it was primarily blacks in inner cities that were affected, yet swung into action in the wake of Scott County where 99% of the cases were white. Too many Americans have been taught to shame and shun drug users (irrespective or race or ethnicity). Therefore, we need lessons that afford benefits to all communities. We need to understand what made opinion leaders change their views and then change more hearts and minds before, not after the next outbreak.

16 Editorial Pence, Putin, Mbeki and Their HIV/AIDS-Related Crimes Against Humanity: Call for Social Justice and Behavioral Science Advocacy. 2017

Kalichman, Seth C. ·University of Connecticut, Storrs, USA. seth.k@uconn.edu. ·AIDS Behav · Pubmed #28130629.

ABSTRACT: Indiana, a large rural state in the Midwestern United States, suffered the worst North American HIV outbreak among injection drug users in years. The Indiana state government under former Governor and current US Vice President Mike Pence fueled the HIV outbreak by prohibiting needle/syringe exchange and failed to take substantive action once the outbreak was identified. This failure in public health policy parallels the HIV epidemics driven by oppressive drug laws in current day Russia and is reminiscent of the anti-science AIDS denialism of 1999-2007 South Africa. The argument that Russian President Putin and former South African President Mbeki should be held accountable for their AIDS policies as crimes against humanity can be extended to Vice President Pence. Social and behavioral scientists have a responsibility to inform the public of HIV prevention realities and to advocate for evidence-based public health policies to prevent future outbreaks of HIV infection.

17 Editorial An Explosive Idea for the Nobel Prize in Medicine! 2017

Wormser, Gary P. ·Division of Infectious Diseases, New York Medical College, Valhalla. Electronic address: g_wormser@nymc.edu. ·Am J Med · Pubmed #27818227.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Improving the Quality and Quantity of HIV Data in the Middle East and North Africa: Key Challenges and Ways Forward. 2016

Karamouzian, Mohammad / Madani, Navid / Doroudi, Fardad / Haghdoost, Ali Akbar. ·HIV/STI Surveillance Research Center, and WHO Collaborating Center for HIV Surveillance, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.; School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · UNAIDS - The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), Tehran, Iran. · HIV/STI Surveillance Research Center, and WHO Collaborating Center for HIV Surveillance, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran. ·Int J Health Policy Manag · Pubmed #28812781.

ABSTRACT: Although the HIV pandemic is witnessing a decline in the number of new infections in most regions of the world, the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has a rapidly growing HIV problem. While generating HIV data has been consistently increasing since 2005, MENA's contribution to the global HIV literature is just over 1% and the existing evidence often falls behind the academic standards. Several factors could be at play that contribute to the limited quantity and quality of HIV data in MENA. This editorial tries to explore and explain the barriers to collecting high-quality HIV data and generating precise estimates in MENA. These barriers include a number of logistic and socio-political challenges faced by researchers, public health officials, and policy-makers. Looking at successful regional HIV programs, we explore examples were policies have shifted and lessons could be learned in developing appropriate responses to HIV across the region.

19 Editorial AIDS at 35: A midlife crisis. 2016

Wilson, David / Whiteside, Alan. ·a Global AIDS Program, World Bank , Washington DC , USA. · b Global Health Policy, Balsillie School of International Affairs , Waterloo , Ontario , Canada.; c University of KwaZulu-Natal , Durban , South Africa. ·Afr J AIDS Res · Pubmed #27974020.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Preventing HIV among Women - A Step Forward, but Much Farther to Go. 2016

Adimora, Adaora A. ·From the Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine and Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #27959756.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Building a More Diverse Workforce in HIV/AIDS Research: The Time has Come. 2016

Stoff, David M / Cargill, Victoria A. ·Division of AIDS Research, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, USA. dstoff@mail.nih.gov. · Office of AIDS Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA. ·AIDS Behav · Pubmed #27484058.

ABSTRACT: POPULATION: As a result of this underrepresentation of all sectors of the U.S. populace, the majority of the HIV research involving minority populations-those disproportionately impacted by HIV infection-will be conducted by investigators who do not resemble them. Although this does not necessarily preclude scientifically valid and important research, it produces research without the important cultural and contextual issues that can enhance the utility and generalizability of specific findings or interventions. The goal of this review is to not only raise awareness of the small numbers of minority investigators engaged in biomedical research, but also to identify the challenges to recruiting and retaining these investigators. In this article, while we discuss issues of diversity in general, the focus will be upon the mental health aspects of the HIV epidemic for illustrative purposes: to demonstrate the issues associated with enhancing investigator diversity as a strategy for remediating the chronic shortage of historically underrepresented investigators in scientific research. After presenting the magnitude of the problem and a rationale for enhancing diversity of the biomedical research workforce, we identify a number of potential reasons and challenges for the shortage of minority investigators. Aspects of the mentoring process, together with ten key suggestions, are discussed as the backdrop for the supplement papers that follow (dealing with mentoring principles, challenges, and mentoring-related issues on mentee, mentor, mentee-mentor relationship, and programs). By identifying these realities we hope to: (1) promote greater discussions of these challenges in academic institutions and settings; (2) suggest meaningful strategies to address these challenges; and (3) foster a national discussion about the long-term investment necessary for permanent change, as there are no easy 'fixes' for these challenges.

22 Editorial Visions for an AIDS-Free Generation: Red Ribbons of Hope. 2016

Malani, Preeti N. ·Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan2Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan3Associate Editor, JAMA. ·JAMA · Pubmed #27404183.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial [Everyday life with HIV: everything "normal"?]. 2016

Bogner, Johannes. · ·MMW Fortschr Med · Pubmed #27259884.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Editorial Commentary: Malaria and HIV/AIDS Interaction in Ugandan Children. 2016

Fehintola, Fatai A / Adedeji, Waheed A / Morse, Gene D. ·Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University College Hospital Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. · Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University College Hospital. · Center for Integrated Global Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, New York. ·Clin Infect Dis · Pubmed #27143664.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Philippine epidemic calls for urgent action on HIV. 2016

Anonymous4700860. · ·Lancet HIV · Pubmed #26939729.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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