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Acute Disease HELP
Based on 41,588 articles published since 2010
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These are the 41588 published articles about Acute Disease that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Editor's Choice - European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS) 2020 Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Management of Acute Limb Ischaemia. 2020

Björck, Martin / Earnshaw, Jonothan J / Acosta, Stefan / Bastos Gonçalves, Frederico / Cochennec, Frederic / Debus, E S / Hinchliffe, Robert / Jongkind, Vincent / Koelemay, Mark J W / Menyhei, Gabor / Svetlikov, Alexei V / Tshomba, Yamume / Van Den Berg, Jos C / Esvs Guidelines Committee, ? / de Borst, Gert J / Chakfé, Nabil / Kakkos, Stavros K / Koncar, Igor / Lindholt, Jes S / Tulamo, Riikka / Vega de Ceniga, Melina / Vermassen, Frank / Document Reviewers, ? / Boyle, Jonathan R / Mani, Kevin / Azuma, Nobuyoshi / Choke, Edward T C / Cohnert, Tina U / Fitridge, Robert A / Forbes, Thomas L / Hamady, Mohamad S / Munoz, Alberto / Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan / Rai, Kumud. · ·Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg · Pubmed #31899099.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Updated Guidelines for the Management of Acute Otitis Media in Children by the Italian Society of Pediatrics: Prevention. 2019

Marchisio, Paola / Bortone, Barbara / Ciarcià, Martina / Motisi, Marco Antonio / Torretta, Sara / Castelli Gattinara, Guido / Picca, Marina / Di Mauro, Giuseppe / Bonino, Marisa / Mansi, Nicola / Varricchio, Alfonso / Marseglia, Gian Luigi / Cardinale, Fabio / Villani, Alberto / Chiappini, Elena. ·From the Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Pediatric highly intensive care unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Department of Human Health Sciences, University of Florence, AOU Firenze, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital (IRCCS), Rome, Italy, Primary care paediatrician, Florence, Italy. · Primary care paediatrician, Milan, Italy. · Primary care paediatrician, Caserta, Italy. · Nurse, Novara, Italy. · Associazione Italiana Vie Aeree (AIVAS): Study Group on Respiratory Infections, Genoa, Italy. · Pediatric Clinic, Department of Pediatrics, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Division of Pulmonology, Allergy, and Immunology, Pediatric Unit, AOU "Policlinico-Giovanni XXIII", Bari, Italy. ·Pediatr Infect Dis J · Pubmed #31876602.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In recent years, new information has been acquired regarding the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of acute otitis media (AOM). The Italian Pediatric Society, therefore, decided to issue an update to the Italian Pediatric Society guidelines published in 2010. METHODS: The search was conducted on Pubmed, and only those studies regarding the pediatric age alone, in English or Italian, published between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2018, were included. Each study included in the review was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) methodology. The quality of the systematic reviews was evaluated using the A MeaSurement Tool to Assess systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) 2 appraisal tool. The guidelines were formulated using the GRADE methodology by a multidisciplinary panel of experts. RESULTS: The importance of eliminating risk factors (passive smoking, environmental pollution, use of pacifier, obesity, limitation of day-care center attendance) and the promotion of breastfeeding and hygiene practices (nasal lavages) was confirmed. The importance of pneumococcal vaccination in the prevention of AOM was reiterated with regard to the prevention of both the first episode of AOM and recurrences. Grommets can be inserted in selected cases of recurrent AOM that did not respond to all other prevention strategies. Antibiotic prophylaxis is not recommended for the prevention of recurrent AOM, except in certain carefully selected cases. The use of complementary therapies, probiotics, xylitol and vitamin D is not recommended. CONCLUSIONS: The prevention of episodes of AOM requires the elimination of risk factors and pneumococcal and influenza vaccination. The use of other products such as probiotics and vitamin D is not supported by adequate evidence.

3 Guideline Updated Guidelines for the Management of Acute Otitis Media in Children by the Italian Society of Pediatrics: Treatment. 2019

Marchisio, Paola / Galli, Luisa / Bortone, Barbara / Ciarcià, Martina / Antonio Motisi, Marco / Novelli, Andrea / Pinto, Luciano / Bottero, Sergio / Pignataro, Lorenzo / Piacentini, Giorgio / Mattina, Roberto / Cutrera, Renato / Varicchio, Attilio / Luigi Marseglia, Gian / Villani, Alberto / Chiappini, Elena / Anonymous2581182. ·From the Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico and Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Human Health Sciences, University of Florence, AOU Firenze, Italy. · Italian Society of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Naples, Italy. · Airway Surgery Unit, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Department of Otolaryngology. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgical Sciences, Dentistry, Gynecology and Pediatrics, Pediatric Clinic, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Biomedical, Surgical, and Odontoiatric Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Respiratory Unit, Academic Department of Pediatrics, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Department of Otolaryngology, Ospedale San Gennaro, Naples, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Pediatric and Infectious Disease Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. ·Pediatr Infect Dis J · Pubmed #31876601.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: New insights into the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of acute otitis media (AOM) have been gained in recent years. For this reason, the Italian Paediatric Society has updated its 2010 guidelines. METHODS: A literature search was carried out on PubMed. Only pediatric studies published between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2018 in English or Italian were included. Each included study was assessed according to the GRADE methodology. The quality of the systematic reviews was assessed using AMSTAR 2. The recommendations were formulated by a multidisciplinary panel of experts. RESULTS: Prompt antibiotic treatment is recommended for children with otorrhea, intracranial complications and/or a history of recurrence and for children under the age of 6 months. For children 6 months to 2 years of age, prompt antibiotic treatment is recommended for all forms of unilateral and bilateral AOM, whether mild or severe. Prompt antibiotic treatment is also recommended for children over 2 years with severe bilateral AOM. A watchful-waiting approach can be applied to children over 2 years with mild or severe unilateral AOM or mild bilateral AOM. High doses of amoxicillin, or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for patients with a high risk of infection by Beta-lactamase producing strains, remain the first-line antibiotics. CONCLUSIONS: AOM should be managed on a case-by-case basis that takes account of the child's age, the severity of the episode and whether it is unilateral or bilateral. In patients under 2 years, prompt antibiotic treatment is always recommended.

4 Guideline Updated Guidelines for the Management of Acute Otitis Media in Children by the Italian Society of Pediatrics: Diagnosis. 2019

Chiappini, Elena / Ciarcià, Martina / Bortone, Barbara / Doria, Mattia / Becherucci, Paolo / Marseglia, Gian Luigi / Motisi, Marco Antonio / de Martino, Maurizio / Galli, Luisa / Licari, Amelia / De Masi, Salvatore / Lubrano, Riccardo / Bettinelli, Maria / Vicini, Claudio / Felisati, Giovanni / Villani, Alberto / Marchisio, Paola / Anonymous2571182. ·From the Department of Human Health Sciences, University of Florence, AOU Firenze, Florence. · Primary care paediatrician, Chioggia, Venice. · Primary care paediatrician, Florence. · Pediatric Clinic, Department of Pediatrics, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, University of Pavia, Pavia. · Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza" UOC di Pediatria e Neonatologia, Polo di Latina, Roma. · Dipartimento sociosanitario di base cure primarie, ATS Città Metropolitana di Milano, Milan. · Department of Head-Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology, Head-Neck and Oral Surgery Unit, Morgagni Pierantoni Hospital, Azienda USL della Romagna, Forlì. · Otorhinolaryngology Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan. · Department of Pediatrics, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital (IRCCS), Rome. · Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Pediatric highly intensive care unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·Pediatr Infect Dis J · Pubmed #31876600.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In recent years, new progress has been made regarding the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of acute otitis media (AOM). The Italian Pediatric Society therefore decided to issue an update to the previous guidelines published in 2010. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted on MEDLINE by Pubmed, including studies in children, in English or Italian, published between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2018. The quality of the included studies was assessed using the grading of recommendations, assessment, development and evaluations (GRADE) methodology. In particular, the quality of the systematic reviews was evaluated using the AMSTAR 2 appraisal tool. The guidelines were formulated using the GRADE methodology by a multidisciplinary panel of experts. RESULTS: The diagnosis of AOM is based on acute clinical symptoms and otoscopic evidence; alternatively, the presence of otorrhea associated with spontaneous tympanic membrane perforation allows the AOM diagnosis. The diagnosis of AOM must be certain and the use of a pneumatic otoscope is of fundamental importance. As an alternative to the pneumatic otoscope, pediatricians can use a static otoscope and a tympanometer. To objectively establish the severity of the episode for the formulation of a correct treatment program, an AOM severity scoring system taking into account clinical signs and otoscopic findings was developed. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnosis of AOM is clinical and requires the introduction of specific medical training programs. The use of pneumatic otoscopes must be promoted, as they are not sufficiently commonly used in routine practice in Italy.

5 Guideline [ESC guidelines 2019 on diagnostics and management of acute pulmonary embolism]. 2019

Osteresch, R / Fach, A / Hambrecht, R / Wienbergen, H. ·Bremer Institut für Herz- und Kreislaufforschung am Klinikum Links der Weser, Stiftung Bremer Herzen, Senator-Weßling-Str. 1, 28277, Bremen, Deutschland. harm.wienbergen@klinikum-bremen-ldw.de. ·Herz · Pubmed #31690957.

ABSTRACT: This article on the new European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for diagnostics and management of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) focusses on new or changed recommendations compared to the previous version of the guidelines from 2014. The current risk-adjusted management algorithm for acute PE includes the clinical severity, aggravating comorbid conditions and right ventricular dysfunction. For low-risk patients early discharge and outpatient treatment are possible, whereas for high-risk patients reperfusion treatment and hemodynamic support have to be considered, depending on the hemodynamic situation and contraindications in the individual patient. Effective therapeutic anticoagulation for at least 3 months is recommended for all patients with PE. Potential indicators for extended anticoagulation are given in the guidelines (class I or class IIa recommendations). New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) are the first choice for anticoagulation in preference to vitamin K antagonists (VKA); however, they are not recommended in patients with severe renal dysfunction, during pregnancy or lactation and in patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Furthermore, a new algorithm for the follow-up after acute PE is proposed in the guidelines. In cases of symptomatic persistent pulmonary hypertension (PH) the transfer to a specialized center is recommended.

6 Guideline Acute subglottic laryngitis. Etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical picture. 2019

Mazurek, Henryk / Bręborowicz, Anna / Doniec, Zbigniew / Emeryk, Andrzej / Krenke, Katarzyna / Kulus, Marek / Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata. ·Department of Pneumology and Cystic Fibrosis, Institute of Tuberculosis and Pulmonary Diseases, Rabka-Zdrój, Poland. hmazurek@igrabka.edu.pl. · State Higher Vocational School, Nowy Sącz, Poland. hmazurek@igrabka.edu.pl. · Department of Pulmonology, Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Science, Poznań, Poland. · Department of Pneumology, Institute of Tuberculosis and Pulmonary Diseases, Rabka-Zdrój, Poland. · Department of Pulmonary Diseases and Children Rheumatology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland. · Department of Pediatric Pneumonology and Allergy, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Otolaryngology, Children's Hospital, Warsaw, Poland. ·Adv Respir Med · Pubmed #31680234.

ABSTRACT: In about 3% of children, viral infections of the airways that develop in early childhood lead to narrowing of the laryngeal lumen in the subglottic region resulting in symptoms such as hoarseness, abarking cough, stridor, and dyspnea. These infections may eventually cause respiratory failure. The disease is often called acute subglottic laryngitis (ASL). Terms such as pseudocroup, croup syndrome, acute obstructive laryngitis and spasmodic croup are used interchangeably when referencing this disease. Although the differential diagnosis should include other rare diseases such as epiglottitis, diphtheria, fibrinous laryngitis and bacterial tracheobronchitis, the diagnosis of ASL should always be made on the basis of clinical criteria.

7 Guideline [ANMCO Position paper: From acute to chronic disease: the needs of complex cardiac patients]. 2019

Radini, Donatella / Mennuni, Mauro / Accardo, Stanislao / Alunni, Gianfranco / Barro, Sabrina / Boscolo Anzoletti, Antonio / Capecchi, Alessandro / D'Errico, Antonella / Egman, Sabrina / Francese, Giuseppina Maura / Iacoviello, Massimo / Imazio, Massimo / Lukic, Vjerica / Magro, Beatrice / Manieri, Antonella / Morichelli, Loredana / Pirazzini, Maria Cristina / Pugiotto, Stefano / Pulignano, Giovanni / Sanna, Fabiola / Sasso, Luigia / Tarantini, Luigi / Tosoni, Sonia / Zumbo, Patrizia / Gabrielli, Domenico / Di Lenarda, Andrea. ·S.C. Cardiovascolare e Medicina dello Sport, Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Trieste. · U.O.C. Cardiologia-UTIC, Ospedale "L. Parodi Delfino", Colleferro (RM). · U.O.S. UTIC, Ospedale Sandro Pertini, Roma. · Cardiologia e Fisiopatologia Cardiovascolare, Unità Integrata Scompenso Cardiaco, Ospedale di Assisi (PG). · U.O. Cardiologia, Ospedale Civile, San Donà di Piave (VE). · Cardiologia, ULSS3 Serenissima, Chioggia (VE). · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Maggiore, Bologna. · Formazione e Sviluppo Organizzativo, Direzione Professioni Sanitarie, Aziende Ospedaliera Universitaria di Parma. · Direzione Sanitaria, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù Roma. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Garibaldi-Nesima, Azienda di Rilievo Nazionale e Alta Specializzazione "Garibaldi", Catania. · U.O. Cardiologia Universitaria, Dipartimento Cardiotoracico, Ospedale Policlinico Universitario, Bari. · Cardiologia, A.O.U. Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino. · U.O.S.D. Diagnostica ed Interventistica Cardiovascolare Endoluminale, Ospedale Civile "S. Maria della Misericordia", ULSS 18, Rovigo. · UTIC-Cardiologia 2, Dipartimento Toraco-Cardiovascolare, A.O.U. Maggiore della Carità, Novara. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ambulatorio Cardiologico, ASL Roma 1, Ospedale San Filippo Neri, Roma. · Assistenza Ambulatoriale Territoriale, e Casa della Salute, AUSL di Bologna. · Scuola di Formazione e Ricerca in Sanità, ULSS 3, Mestre (VE). · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Dipartimento Cardio-Toraco-Vascolare, A.O. San Camillo-Forlanini, Roma. · U.O.A. Cardiologia, Ospedale degli Infermi, ASL 3 Piemonte, Rivoli (TO). · S.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale San Martino, Azienda ULSS 1, Dolomiti (BL). · U.O. Cardiologia, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia. · ASUR Marche - Area Vasta 4 Fermo, Ospedale Civile Augusto Murri, Fermo. ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #31593165.

ABSTRACT: Managing a patient suffering from a chronic disease requires a multidisciplinary team that can take care of them beyond the simple coordination of various specialties. In this context, a central role in the treatment of chronic heart disease is the continuity of care that should promote organic integration among different hospital departments, hospital and community. This position paper of the Italian Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO) aims at defining the general principles to inspire care for complex cardiac patients at different phases of the disease. A multidisciplinary integrated holistic approach uses analytical tools able to understand the elements that characterize complexity and therefore suggest appropriate management strategies: (i) care pathways aimed at optimizing treatments; (ii) care pathways in intensive care and ward in a multidisciplinary perspective; (iii) integration of social and health needs; (iv) nursing role in the context of continuity of outpatient, community and home care; (v) promotion of educational interventions.

8 Guideline Management of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (excluding newborns). Long version with arguments. 2019

Hoen, B / Varon, E / de Debroucker, T / Fantin, B / Grimprel, E / Wolff, M / Duval, X / Anonymous2251070. ·Maladies Infectieuses, CHU de Guadeloupe, route de Chauvel, 97159 Pointe-à-Pitre cedex, France. · Hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France. · Centre Hospitalier Général, 2, rue du Dr-Delafontaine, 93200 Saint-Denis, France. · Hôpital Beaujon, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Hôpital Trousseau, 26, avenue du Dr-Arnold-Netter, 75012 Paris, France. · Hôpital Bichat - Claude Bernard, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75877 Paris, France. · Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre d'investigation clinique, hôpital Bichat - Claude-Bernard, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. Electronic address: xavier.duval@aphp.fr. ·Med Mal Infect · Pubmed #31402154.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline Management of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (excluding newborns). Short text. 2019

Hoen, B / Varon, E / Debroucker, T / Fantin, B / Grimprel, E / Wolff, M / Duval, X / Anonymous2161070. ·Maladies infectieuses, CHU de Guadeloupe, route de Chauvel, 97159 Pointe-à-Pitre cedex, Guadeloupe. · Hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France. · Centre hospitalier général, 2, rue du Dr-Delafontaine, 93200 Saint-Denis, France. · Hôpital Beaujon, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Hôpital Trousseau, 26, avenue du Dr-Arnold-Netter, 75012 Paris, France. · Hôpital Bichat-Claude-Bernard, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75877 Paris, France. · Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre d'investigation clinique, hôpital Bichat-Claude-Bernard, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. Electronic address: xavier.duval@aphp.fr. ·Med Mal Infect · Pubmed #31345498.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in acute circulatory failure: A plea for regulation and better organization. 2019

Flécher, Erwan / Guihaire, Julien / Pozzi, Matteo / Ouattara, Alexandre / Baudry, Guillaume / Berthelot, Emmanuelle / Beauvais, Florence / Radu, Costin / Dorent, Richard / Sebbag, Laurent / Galli, Elena / Roubille, François / Damy, Thibaud / Verhoye, Jean Philippe / Leprince, Pascal / Obadia, Jean-François / Lebreton, Guillaume. ·Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, CHU Pontchaillou, Inserm U1099, 35000 Rennes, France. Electronic address: erwan.flecher@chu-rennes.fr. · Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Marie Lannelongue Hospital, University of Paris Sud, Inserm U999 (Pulmonary Hypertension: Pathophysiology and Novel Therapies [PAH]), 92350 Le Plessis Robinson, France. · Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, CHU Louis Pradel, 69677 Bron, France. · Bordeaux University, INSERM, UMR 1034, Biology of Cardiovascular Diseases, 33604 Pessac, France; Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Magellan Medico-Surgical Centre, CHU Bordeaux, 33604 Pessac, France. · Department of Cardiology, Louis Pradel Cardiologic Hospital, "Claude Bernard" University, 69677 Bron, France. · Department of Cardiology, CHU Kremlin-Bicêtre, AP-HP, University of Paris Sud, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, CHU Henri-Mondor, AP-HP, 94010 Créteil, France. · Department of Cardiology, CHU Bichat-Claude Bernard, AP-HP, Université Paris VII, 75877 Paris, France. · Department of Cardiology, CHU Pontchaillou, Inserm U1099, 35000 Rennes, France. · PhyMedExp, Université de Montpellier, INSERM, CNRS, Cardiology Department, CHU de Montpellier, 34090 Montpellier, France. · Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, CHU Pontchaillou, Inserm U1099, 35000 Rennes, France. · Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cardiology Institute, CHU Pitié Salpétrière, AP-HP, 75013 Paris, France. ·Arch Cardiovasc Dis · Pubmed #31253558.

ABSTRACT: Emergent implantation of temporary mechanical circulatory support using venoarterial ECMO (ECLS for extracorporeal Life Support) is increasingly adopted in various indications of acute circulatory failure refractory to optimal medical treatment. To implant such devices, but also to provide appropriate daily management, expertise and adapted technical platform are required. Organization, coordination and regulation of such program are not clearly established in our country. We propose a dedicated territorial organization to improve and facilitate management of these specific and most severe patients.

11 Guideline Diagnosis, Treatment and Follow Up of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Consensus Practice from the PERT Consortium. 2019

Rivera-Lebron, Belinda / McDaniel, Michael / Ahrar, Kamran / Alrifai, Abdulah / Dudzinski, David M / Fanola, Christina / Blais, Danielle / Janicke, David / Melamed, Roman / Mohrien, Kerry / Rozycki, Elizabeth / Ross, Charles B / Klein, Andrew J / Rali, Parth / Teman, Nicholas R / Yarboro, Leoara / Ichinose, Eugene / Sharma, Aditya M / Bartos, Jason A / Elder, Mahir / Keeling, Brent / Palevsky, Harold / Naydenov, Soophia / Sen, Parijat / Amoroso, Nancy / Rodriguez-Lopez, Josanna M / Davis, George A / Rosovsky, Rachel / Rosenfield, Kenneth / Kabrhel, Christopher / Horowitz, James / Giri, Jay S / Tapson, Victor / Channick, Richard / Anonymous2171034. ·1 University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · 2 Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · 3 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · 4 University of Miami of Palm Beach Regional Campus/JFK Hospital, Atlantis, FL, USA. · 5 Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · 6 University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · 7 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA. · 8 University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA. · 9 Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · 10 Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · 11 Piedmont Heart Institute, Atlanta, GA, USA. · 12 University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. · 13 Oklahoma Heart Institute, Tulsa, OK, USA. · 14 Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA. · 15 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA. · 16 University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · 17 Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA. · 18 Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA. · 19 New York University, New York, NY, USA. · 20 University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA. · 21 Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · 22 University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·Clin Appl Thromb Hemost · Pubmed #31185730.

ABSTRACT: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening condition and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There have been many advances in the field of PE in the last few years, requiring a careful assessment of their impact on patient care. However, variations in recommendations by different clinical guidelines, as well as lack of robust clinical trials, make clinical decisions challenging. The Pulmonary Embolism Response Team Consortium is an international association created to advance the diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of patients with PE. In this consensus practice document, we provide a comprehensive review of the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of acute PE, including both clinical data and consensus opinion to provide guidance for clinicians caring for these patients.

12 Guideline Management of acute appendicitis in adults: A practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma. 2019

Rushing, Amy / Bugaev, Nikolay / Jones, Christian / Como, John J / Fox, Nicole / Cripps, Michael / Robinson, Bryce / Velopulos, Catherine / Haut, Elliott R / Narayan, Mayur. ·From the The Ohio State University (A.R.), Columbus, OH · Tufts Medical Center (N.B.), Boston, Massachusetts · The Johns Hopkins University (C.J., E.R.H.), Baltimore, Maryland · MetroHealth Medical Center (J.J.C.), Cleveland, Ohio · Cooper University (N.F.), Camden, New Jersey · University of Texas Southwestern (M.C.), Dallas, Texas · University of Washington-Harborview (B.R.), Seattle, Washington · University of Colorado (C.V.), Aurora, Colorado · and Weill Cornell Medicine (M.N.), New York, New York. ·J Trauma Acute Care Surg · Pubmed #30908453.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Acute appendicitis (AA) has been considered one of the most common acute surgical conditions in the world. Recent studies, however, have suggested that nonoperative management (NOM) with a course of antibiotics (ABX) may be as effective as surgery in treating appendicitis. As there are evolving perspectives regarding the optimal therapy for appendicitis, we sought to provide recommendations regarding the role of NOM with the administration of antibiotics (antibiotics-first approach) in uncomplicated AA as well as the need for routine interval appendectomy (RIA) in those presenting with appendiceal abscess or phlegmon (AAP) initially managed without appendectomy. METHODS: A writing group from the Guidelines Committee of the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the current literature regarding appendicitis in adult populations. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was applied and meta-analyses and evidence profiles generated. RESULTS: When comparing antibiotics-first therapy to surgery for uncomplicated AA in adult populations, we found that perforation and recurrence of disease were the only outcomes consistently represented in the literature. For perforation, we were unable to make a definitive conclusion based on the degree of heterogeneity among the six randomized controlled trials reviewed. The risk of recurrence at 1 year with antibiotics-first treatment was 15.8% (95% confidence interval, 12.05-118.63). Critical outcomes could not be evaluated with the current literature. In NOM patients for AAP, the risk of recurrence was 24.3% if RIA was not performed (95% confidence interval, 2.74-73.11). CONCLUSION: Based on the completed meta-analysis and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation profiles, we were unable to make a recommendation for or against the antibiotics-first approach as primary treatment for uncomplicated AA. For NOM with AAP, we conditionally recommend against RIA in an otherwise asymptomatic patient. This review reveals multiple limitations of the published literature, leaving ample opportunities for additional research on this topic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Systematic review, level II.

13 Guideline The consensus of integrative diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis-2017. 2019

Li, Junxiang / Chen, Jing / Tang, Wenfu. ·Digestive Disease Committee, Chinese Association of Integrative Medicine. ·J Evid Based Med · Pubmed #30806495.

ABSTRACT: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common acute abdominal diseases. The digestive disease committee, Chinese Association of Integrative Medicine, released Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine for diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis in 2010.

14 Guideline Initial Diagnostic Work-Up of Acute Leukemia: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the College of American Pathologists and American Society of Hematology Guideline. 2019

de Haas, Valérie / Ismaila, Nofisat / Advani, Anjali / Arber, Daniel A / Dabney, Raetasha S / Patel-Donelly, Dipti / Kitlas, Elizabeth / Pieters, Rob / Pui, Ching-Hon / Sweet, Kendra / Zhang, Ling. ·1 Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · 2 American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. · 3 Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. · 4 University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL. · 5 Keesler Medical Center, Ocean Springs, MS. · 6 Virginia Cancer Specialists, Fairfax, VA. · 7 The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Rye Brook, NY. · 8 St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN. · 9 Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #30523709.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The College of American Pathologists (CAP) and the American Society of Hematology (ASH) developed an evidence-based guideline on the initial diagnostic work-up of acute leukemia (AL). Because of the relevance of this topic to the ASCO membership, ASCO reviewed the guideline and applied a set of procedures and policies for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. METHODS: The CAP-ASH guideline on initial diagnostic work-up of AL was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. Then, an ASCO Endorsement Expert Panel updated the literature search and reviewed the content and recommendations. RESULTS: The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the recommendations from the guideline, published in 2016, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO fully endorsed the CAP-ASH guideline on initial diagnostic work-up of AL and included some discussion points according to clinical practice and updated literature. CONCLUSION: Twenty-seven guideline statements were reviewed. Some discussion points were included to better assess CNS involvement in leukemia and to provide novel insights into molecular diagnosis and potential markers for risk stratification and target therapy. These discussions are categorized into four sections: (1) initial diagnosis focusing on basic diagnostics and determination of risk parameters, (2) molecular markers and minimal residual disease detection, (3) context of referral to another institution with expertise in the management of AL, and (4) reporting and record keeping for better outlining and follow-up discussion. Additional information is available at: www.asco.org/hematologic-malignancies-guidelines .

15 Guideline Mechanical Ventilation and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygena tion in Acute Respiratory Insufficiency. 2018

Fichtner, Falk / Moerer, Onnen / Laudi, Sven / Weber-Carstens, Steffen / Nothacker, Monika / Kaisers, Udo / Anonymous3620978. ·Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Leipzig · Center for Anesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Göttingen · Department of Anesthesiology and Operative Intensive Care Medicin, Charité–Universitätsklinikum Berlin · AWMF-Institute for Medical Knowledge Management (AWMF-IMWi), AWMF office Berlin · Board of directors, Ulm University Hospital ·Dtsch Arztebl Int · Pubmed #30722839.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation is life-saving for patients with acute respiratory insufficiency. In a German prevalence study, 13.6% of patients in intensive care units received mechanical ventilation for more than 12 hours; 20% of these patients received mechanical ventilation as treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The new S3 guideline is the first to contain recommendations for the entire process of treatment in these groups of patients (indications, ventilation modes/parameters, ac- companying measures, treatments for refractory impairment of gas exchange, weaning, and follow-up care). METHODS: This guideline was developed according to the GRADE methods. Pertinent publications were identified by a systematic search of the literature, the quality of the evidence was evaluated, a risk/benefit assessment was conducted, and recommendations were issued by interdisciplinary consensus. RESULTS: Mechanical ventilation is recommended as primary treatment for patients with severe ARDS. In other patient groups, non-in- vasive ventilation can lower mortality. If mechanical ventilation is needed, ventilation modes allowing spontaneous breathing seem beneficial (quality of evidence [QoE]: very low). Protective ventilation (high positive end-expiratory pressure, low tidal volume, limited peak pressure) improve the survival of ARDS patients (QoE: high). If a severe impairment of gas exchange is present, prone posi- tioning lessens mortality (QoE: high). Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO) has not unequivocally been shown to improve survival. Early mobilization and weaning protocols can shorten the duration of ventilation (QoE: moderate). CONCLUSION: Recommendations for patients undergoing mechanical ventilation include lung-protective ventilation, early sponta- neous breathing and mobilization, weaning protocols, and, for those with severe impairment of gas exchange, prone positioning. It is further recommended that patients with ARDS and refractory impairment of gas exchange should be transferred to an ARDS/ECMO center, where extracorporeal methods should be applied only after application of all other therapeutic options.

16 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous7130967 / Safdar, Nabile M / Rigsby, Cynthia K / Iyer, Ramesh S / Alazraki, Adina L / Anupindi, Sudha A / Bardo, Dianna M E / Brown, Brandon P / Chan, Sherwin S / Chandra, Tushar / Dillman, Jonathan R / Dorfman, Scott R / Garber, Matthew D / Lam, H F Samuel / Nguyen, Jie C / Siegel, Alan / Widmann, Roger F / Karmazyn, Boaz. ·Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: nmsafdar@gmail.com. · Panel Chair, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Panel Vice-Chair, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington. · Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia. · Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona. · Riley Hospital for Children Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana. · Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri. · Nemours Children's Hospital, Orlando, Florida. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas. · Wolfson Children's Hospital, Jacksonville, Florida; American Academy of Pediatrics. · Sutter Medical Center Sacramento, Sacramento, California; American College of Emergency Physicians. · Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York; American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. · Specialty Chair, Riley Hospital for Children Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392594.

ABSTRACT: Imaging plays in important role in the evaluation of the acutely limping child. The decision-making process about initial imaging must consider the level of suspicion for infection and whether symptoms can be localized. The appropriateness of specific imaging examinations in the acutely limping child to age 5 years is discussed with attention in each clinical scenario to the role of radiography, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Common causes of limping such as toddler's fracture, septic arthritis, transient synovitis, and osteomyelitis are discussed. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

17 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous7120967 / Jokerst, Clinton / Chung, Jonathan H / Ackman, Jeanne B / Carter, Brett / Colletti, Patrick M / Crabtree, Traves D / de Groot, Patricia M / Iannettoni, Mark D / Maldonado, Fabien / McComb, Barbara L / Steiner, Robert M / Kanne, Jeffrey P. ·Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona. Electronic address: jokerst.clinton@mayo.edu. · Panel Chair, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado. · Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois; The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. · University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; American College of Chest Physicians. · Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Columbia University Medical Center New York and Temple University Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Specialty Chair, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392593.

ABSTRACT: Acute respiratory illness, defined as cough, sputum production, chest pain, and/or dyspnea (with or without fever), is a major public health issue, accounting for millions of doctor office and emergency department visits every year. While most cases are due to self-limited viral infections, a significant number of cases are due to more serious respiratory infections where delay in diagnosis can lead to morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays a key role in the initial diagnosis and management of acute respiratory illness. This study reviews the current literature concerning the appropriate role of imaging in the diagnosis and management of the immunocompetent adult patient initially presenting with acute respiratory illness. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

18 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous11731195 / Nikolaidis, Paul / Dogra, Vikram S / Goldfarb, Stanley / Gore, John L / Harvin, Howard J / Heilbrun, Marta E / Heller, Matthew T / Khatri, Gaurav / Purysko, Andrei S / Savage, Stephen J / Smith, Andrew D / Taffel, Myles T / Wang, Zhen J / Wolfman, Darcy J / Wong-You-Cheong, Jade J / Yoo, Don C / Lockhart, Mark E. ·Panel Chair, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: Paulnikolaidis@gmail.com. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; American Society of Nephrology. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; American Urological Association. · Scottsdale Medical Imaging, Scottsdale, Arizona. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; American Urological Association. · University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama. · New York University, New York, New York. · University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia. · University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Rhode Island Hospital/The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Specialty Chair, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392592.

ABSTRACT: Pyelonephritis refers to infection involving the renal parenchyma and renal pelvis. In most patients, uncomplicated pyelonephritis is diagnosed clinically and responds quickly to appropriate antibiotic treatment. If treatment is delayed, the patient is immunocompromised, or for other reasons, microabscesses that form during the acute phase of pyelonephritis may coalesce, forming a renal abscess. Patients with underlying diabetes are more vulnerable to complications, including emphysematous pyelonephritis in addition to abscess formation. Additionally, diabetics may not have the typical flank tenderness that helps to differentiate pyelonephritis from a lower urinary tract infection. Additional high-risk populations may include those with anatomic abnormalities of the urinary tract, vesicoureteral reflux, obstruction, pregnancy, nosocomial infection, or infection by treatment-resistant pathogens. Treatment goals include symptom relief, elimination of infection to avoid renal damage, and identification of predisposing factors to avoid future recurrences. The primary imaging modalities used in patients with pyelonephritis are CT, MRI, and ultrasound. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

19 Guideline None 2018

Anonymous3030967 / Rohde, Luis Eduardo Paim / Montera, Marcelo Westerlund / Bocchi, Edimar Alcides / Clausell, Nadine Oliveira / Albuquerque, Denilson Campos de / Rassi, Salvador / Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano / Freitas, Aguinaldo Figueiredo de / Ferraz, Almir Sergio / Biolo, Andreia / Barretto, Antonio C. Pereira / Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho / Polanczyk, Carisi Anne / Gualandro, Danielle Menosi / Almeida, Dirceu Rodrigues / Silva, Eneida Rejane Rabelo da / Figueiredo, Estêvão Lanna / Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco / Marcondes-Braga, Fabiana G. / Cruz, Fátima das Dores da / Ramires, Felix José Alvarez / Atik, Fernando Antibas / Bacal, Fernando / Souza, Germano Emilio Conceição / Almeida, Gustavo Luiz Gouvêa de / Ribeiro, Gustavo Calado de Aguiar / Villacorta, Humberto / Vieira, Jefferson Luís / Souza, João David de / Rossi, João Manoel / Figueiredo, Jose Albuquerque de / Moura, Lidia Ana Zytynsky / Goldraich, Livia Adams / Beck-da-Silva, Luis / Danzmann, Luiz Claudio / Canesin, Manoel Fernandes / Bittencourt, Marcelo Imbroinise / Garcia, Marcelo Iorio / Bonatto, Marcely Gimenes / Simões, Marcus Vinícius / Moreira, Maria da Consolação Vieira / Silva, Miguel Morita Fernandes da / Olivera, Mucio Tavares de / Silvestre, Odilson Marcos / Schwartzmann, Pedro Vellosa / Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli / Rocha, Ricardo Mourilhe / Simões, Ricardo / Pereira, Sabrina Bernardez / Mangini, Sandrigo / Alves, Sílvia Marinho Martins / Ferreira, Silvia Moreira Ayub / Issa, Victor Sarli / Barzilai, Vitor Salvatore / Martins, Wolney de Andrade. ·Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS - Brasil. · Hospital Moinhos de Vento, Porto Alegre, RS - Brasil. · Hospital Pró-Cardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brasil. · Instituto do Coração do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP - Brasil. · Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brasil. · Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO - Brasil. · Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brasil. · Hospital Santa Paula, São Paulo, SP - Brasil. · Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS - Brasil. · Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG - Brasil. · Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP - Brasil. · Hospital Lifecenter, Belo Horizonte, MG - Brasil. · Hospital Vera Cruz, Belo Horizonte, MG - Brasil. · Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ - Brasil. · Instituto de Cardiologia, Brasília, DF - Brasil. · Hospital Regional de São José dos Campos, São José dos Campos, SP - Brasil. · Casa de Saúde São José, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brasil. · Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Campinas, Campinas, SP - Brasil. · Hospital de Messejana Dr. Carlos Alberto Studart Gomes, Fortaleza, CE - Brasil. · Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP - Brasil. · Universidade Federal do Maranhão, São Luís, MA - Brasil. · Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Campinas, SP - Brasil. · Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Canoas, RS - Brasil. · Hospital da Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS - Brasil. · Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR - Brasil. · Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brasil. · Hospital Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Curitiba, Curitiba, PR - Brasil. · Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP - Brasil. · Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG - Brasil. · Quanta Diagnósticos & Terapia, Curitiba, PR - Brasil. · Universidade Federal do Acre, Rio Branco, AC - Brasil. · Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP - Brasil. · Hospital Unimed Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP - Brasil. · Faculdade Ciências Médicas de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG - Brasil. · Hospital do Coração (HCor), São Paulo, SP - Brasil. · Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP - Brasil. · PROCAPE, Recife, PE - Brasil. · Hospital Português, Recife, PE - Brasil. · Complexo Hospitalar de Niterói, Niterói, RJ - Brasil. ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #30379264.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline Oxygen therapy for acutely ill medical patients: a clinical practice guideline. 2018

Siemieniuk, Reed A C / Chu, Derek K / Kim, Lisa Ha-Yeon / Güell-Rous, Maria-Rosa / Alhazzani, Waleed / Soccal, Paola M / Karanicolas, Paul J / Farhoumand, Pauline D / Siemieniuk, Jillian L K / Satia, Imran / Irusen, Elvis M / Refaat, Marwan M / Mikita, J Stephen / Smith, Maureen / Cohen, Dian N / Vandvik, Per O / Agoritsas, Thomas / Lytvyn, Lyubov / Guyatt, Gordon H. ·Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4K1, Canada reed.siemieniuk@medportal.ca. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4K1, Canada. · Departament de Pneumologia, Hospital de la Santa Creu I Sant Pau. Barcelona, Catalonia 08041, Spain. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4K1, Canada. · Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. · Faculty of Medicine, Geneva University, 1206 Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada. · Division General Internal Medicine, University Hospitals of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland. · Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta T1Y 6J4, Canada reed.siemieniuk@medportal.ca. · Divisions of Pulmonology and Medical Intensive Care, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town 7505, South Africa. · Departments of Internal Medicine and Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics, American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center, Beirut 1107 2020, Lebanon. · Salt Lake City, Utah 84106, USA. · Ottawa, Ontario K2P 1C8, Canada. · Hatley, Quebec J0B 4B0, Canada. · Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Division Clinical Epidemiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, 1205, Switzerland. ·BMJ · Pubmed #30355567.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline Guidelines on treatment of hepatitis C virus infection. Spanish Association for the Study of the Liver (AEEH). 2018

Calleja, Jose L / Macias, Juan / Forns, Xavier / Garcia, Federico / Berenguer, Marina / Garcia Deltoro, Miguel / Buti, Maria / Granados, Rafael / Carrion, Jose A / Morano, Luis / Fernandez, Inmaculada / Coste, Pablo / Pineda, Juan A. ·Servicio de Gastroenterología y Hepatología, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Instituto de Investigación Puerta de Hierro, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Majadahonda, Madrid, España. Electronic address: joseluis.calleja@uam.es. · Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología, Hospital Universitario de Valme, Sevilla, España; Grupo para el Estudio de las Hepatitis Víricas, Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Hepatología, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, España. · Grupo para el Estudio de las Hepatitis Víricas, Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica, Madrid, España; Unidad de Gestión Clínica de Microbiología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs), Red de Investigación en SIDA (Retic ISCiii RD16/0025), Granada, España. · Unidad de Hepatología, Hospital Universitari i Politécnic La Fe, IIS La Fe, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, España. · Grupo para el Estudio de las Hepatitis Víricas, Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica, Madrid, España; Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Consorcio Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Hepatología, Hospital Universitario Vall d'Hebron, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Barcelona, España. · Grupo para el Estudio de las Hepatitis Víricas, Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica, Madrid, España; Servicio de Medicina Interna, Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria Dr. Negrín, Las Palmas, España. · Sección de Hepatología, Servicio de Digestivo, Hospital del Mar, Instituto Hospital del Mar de Investigaciones Médicas (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España. · Grupo para el Estudio de las Hepatitis Víricas, Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica, Madrid, España; Unidad de Patología Infecciosa, Hospital Universitario Álvaro Cunqueiro, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Galicia Sur (IISGS), Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Vigo, Pontevedra, España. · Unidad de Hepatología, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Gastroenterología y Hepatología, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Instituto de Investigación Puerta de Hierro, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Majadahonda, Madrid, España. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #30270150.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline Intestinal failure in adults: Recommendations from the ESPEN expert groups. 2018

Pironi, Loris / Corcos, Olivier / Forbes, Alastair / Holst, Mette / Joly, Francisca / Jonkers, Cora / Klek, Stanislaw / Lal, Simon / Blaser, Annika Reintam / Rollins, Katie E / Sasdelli, Anna S / Shaffer, Jon / Van Gossum, Andre / Wanten, Geert / Zanfi, Chiara / Lobo, Dileep N / Anonymous30530960. ·Center for Chronic Intestinal Failure, Department of Digestive System, St. Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: loris.pironi@unibo.it. · Intestinal Stroke Center (SURVI)/ Gastroenterology, IBD and Nutrition Support Department, Beaujon Hospital, and Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science UMR 1148, University Paris VII, France. · Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Bob Champion Building, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UQ, UK. · Center for Nutrition and Bowel Disease, Department of Gastroenterology, Aalborg University Hospital and Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmark. · Gastroenterology, IBD and Nutrition Support Department, Beaujon Hospital, and Gastrointestinal and Metabolic Dysfunctions in Nutritional Pathologies UMR 1149, University Paris VII, France. · Amsterdam University Medical Center, Location AMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Stanley Dudrick's Memorial Hospital, General Surgery Unit with Intestinal Failure Center, Skawina, Poland. · Intestinal Failure Unit, Salford Royal & Manchester University, Manchester, UK. · Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Lucerne, Switzerland. · Gastrointestinal Surgery, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals and University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK. · Center for Chronic Intestinal Failure, Department of Digestive System, St. Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy. · Clinic of Intestinal Diseases and Nutritional Support, Hopital Erasme, Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium. · Intestinal Failure Unit, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Organ Failure and Transplantation, Sant'Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy. ·Clin Nutr · Pubmed #30172658.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal failure (IF) is defined as "the reduction of gut function below the minimum necessary for the absorption of macronutrients and/or water and electrolytes, such that intravenous supplementation is required to maintain health and/or growth". Functionally, it may be classified as type I acute intestinal failure (AIF), type II prolonged AIF and type III chronic intestinal failure (CIF) The ESPEN Workshop on IF was held in Bologna, Italy, on 15-16 October 2017 and the aims of this document were to highlight the current state of the art and future directions for research in IF. METHODS: This paper represents the opinion of experts in the field, based on current evidence. It is not a formal review, but encompasses the current evidence, with emphasis on epidemiology, classification, diagnosis and management. RESULTS: IF is the rarest form of organ failure and can result from a variety of conditions that affect gastrointestinal anatomy and function adversely. Assessment, diagnosis, and short and long-term management involves a multidisciplinary team with diverse expertise in the field that aims to reduce complications, increase life expectancy and improve quality of life in patients. CONCLUSIONS: Both AIF and CIF are relatively rare conditions and most of the published work presents evidence from small, single-centre studies. Much remains to be investigated to improve the diagnosis and management of IF and future studies should rely on multidisciplinary, multicentre and multinational collaborations that gather data from large cohorts of patients. Emphasis should also be placed on partnership with patients, carers and government agencies in order to improve the quality of research that focuses on patient-centred outcomes that will help to improve both outcomes and quality of life in patients with this devastating condition.

23 Guideline Consensus Statement of the Indian Academy of Pediatrics in Diagnosis and Management of Hemophilia. 2018

Sachdeva, Anupam / Gunasekaran, Vinod / Ramya, H N / Dass, Jasmita / Kotwal, Jyoti / Seth, Tulika / Das, Satyaranjan / Garg, Kapil / Kalra, Manas / Sirisha, Rani S / Prakash, Anand / Anonymous290959. ·Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India. Correspondence to: Dr. Anupam Sachdeva, Director, Pediatric Hematology Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation unit, Institute of Child Health, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi 110 060, India. anupamace@yahoo.co.in. · Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India. · All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. · Army Hospital Research and Referral, New Delhi, India. · Sawai Man Singh Medical College, Jaipur, India. · Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi, India. · Rainbow Children's Hospital, Hyderabad, India. · St Johns Medical College Hospital, Bangalore, India. ·Indian Pediatr · Pubmed #30129541.

ABSTRACT: JUSTIFICATION: Despite having standard principles of management of hemophilia, treatment differs in various countries depending on available resources. Guideline for management of hemophilia in Indian setting is essential. PROCESS: Indian Academy of Pediatrics conducted a consultative meeting on Hemophilia on 18th September, 2016 in New Delhi, which was attended by experts in the field working across India. Scientific literature was reviewed, and guidelines were drafted. All expert committee members reviewed the final manuscript. OBJECTIVE: To bring out consensus guidelines in diagnosis and management of Hemophilia in India. RECOMMENDATIONS: Specific factor assays confirm diagnosis and classify hemophilia according to residual factor activity (mild 5-40%, moderate 1-5%, severe <1%). Genetic testing helps in identifying carriers, and providing genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. Patients with hemophilia should be managed by multi-specialty team approach. Continuous primary prophylaxis (at least low-dose regimen of 10-20 IU/kg twice or thrice per week) is recommended in severe hemophilia with dose tailored as per response. Factor replacement remains the mainstay of treating acute bleeds (dose and duration depends on body weight, site and severity of bleed). Factor concentrates (plasma derived or recombinant), if available, are preferred over blood components. Other supportive measures (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) should be instantly initiated. Long-term complications include musculoskeletal problems, development of inhibitors and transfusion-transmitted infections, which need monitoring. Adequate vaccination of children with hemophilia (with precautions) is emphasized.

24 Guideline Joint BAP NAPICU evidence-based consensus guidelines for the clinical management of acute disturbance: De-escalation and rapid tranquillisation. 2018

Patel, Maxine X / Sethi, Faisil N / Barnes, Thomas Re / Dix, Roland / Dratcu, Luiz / Fox, Bernard / Garriga, Marina / Haste, Julie C / Kahl, Kai G / Lingford-Hughes, Anne / McAllister-Williams, Hamish / O'Brien, Aileen / Parker, Caroline / Paterson, Brodie / Paton, Carol / Posporelis, Sotiris / Taylor, David M / Vieta, Eduard / Völlm, Birgit / Wilson-Jones, Charlotte / Woods, Laura / Anonymous661017. ·1 Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · 2 Maudsley Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · 3 The Centre for Psychiatry, Imperial College London, London, UK. · 4 Wotton Lawn Hospital, together NHS Foundation Trust, Gloucester, UK. · 5 Maudsley Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · 6 National Association of Psychiatric Intensive Care Units, East Kilbride, Glasgow, UK. · 7 Institute of Neuroscience, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Spain. · 8 Mill View Hospital, Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Hove, East Sussex, UK. · 9 Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School, Hanover, Germany. · 10 The Centre for Psychiatry, Imperial College London, London, UK and Central North West London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · 11 Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · 12 Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · 13 South West London and St Georges NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK and St George's University of London, London, UK. · 14 Central & North West London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · 15 CALM Training Ltd, Menstrie, UK. · 16 Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, Dartford, UK. · 17 South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK and Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · 18 South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · 19 Institute of Mental Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · 20 Maudsley Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · 21 The Hellingly Centre, Forensic Health Care Services, Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, East Sussex, UK. ·J Psychopharmacol · Pubmed #29882463.

ABSTRACT: The British Association for Psychopharmacology and the National Association of Psychiatric Intensive Care and Low Secure Units developed this joint evidence-based consensus guideline for the clinical management of acute disturbance. It includes recommendations for clinical practice and an algorithm to guide treatment by healthcare professionals with various options outlined according to their route of administration and category of evidence. Fundamental overarching principles are included and highlight the importance of treating the underlying disorder. There is a focus on three key interventions: de-escalation, pharmacological interventions pre-rapid tranquillisation and rapid tranquillisation (intramuscular and intravenous). Most of the evidence reviewed relates to emergency psychiatric care or acute psychiatric adult inpatient care, although we also sought evidence relevant to other common clinical settings including the general acute hospital and forensic psychiatry. We conclude that the variety of options available for the management of acute disturbance goes beyond the standard choices of lorazepam, haloperidol and promethazine and includes oral-inhaled loxapine, buccal midazolam, as well as a number of oral antipsychotics in addition to parenteral options of intramuscular aripiprazole, intramuscular droperidol and intramuscular olanzapine. Intravenous options, for settings where resuscitation equipment and trained staff are available to manage medical emergencies, are also included.

25 Guideline EASL Recommendations on Treatment of Hepatitis C 2018. 2018

Anonymous511121 / Anonymous521121. · ·J Hepatol · Pubmed #29650333.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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