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Addison Disease: HELP
Articles from Minnesota
Based on 8 articles published since 2008
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These are the 8 published articles about Addison Disease that originated from Minnesota during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Diagnosis--Addison's disease secondary to tuberculosis of the adrenal glands. 2008

Patnaik, Mrinal M / Deshpande, Alaka K. ·Department of Internal Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA. mrinal.patnaik@gmail.com ·Clin Med Res · Pubmed #18591375.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Article Primary adrenal insufficiency due to bilateral infiltrative disease. 2018

Herndon, Justine / Nadeau, Ashley M / Davidge-Pitts, Caroline J / Young, William F / Bancos, Irina. ·Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Bancos.Irina@mayo.edu. ·Endocrine · Pubmed #30178435.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Evidence on clinical presentation, evaluation, and management of patients with primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) due to bilateral adrenal infiltrative disease is scarce. Our objective was to review the clinical presentation, biochemical work-up, imaging findings, and management of patients with PAI due to infiltrative adrenal disease in order to determine the best diagnostic and management approach. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients with PAI due to bilateral infiltrative adrenal disease referred for adrenal biopsy during 2000-2014 at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Two additional patients evaluated after 2014 were included. RESULTS: Seven patients (six males and one female) were diagnosed with PAI caused by bilateral adrenal infiltrative disease at a median age of 54 (range 36-80) years. Duration of symptoms prior to the diagnosis of PAI and initiating treatment was 6 months (range 3 months-4 years). All patients demonstrated bilateral adrenal masses on adrenal imaging. The underlying diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology and included: bilateral adrenal metastases (lung and breast adenocarcinoma), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, tuberculosis, cryptococcus, histoplasmosis, and, Erdheim-Chester disease. CONCLUSION: In patients with newly diagnosed PAI, the differential diagnosis should include bilateral infiltrative adrenal disease, especially when testing for autoimmune adrenalitis is negative, or if there is clinical history suggesting another etiology. Patients who present with known bilateral adrenal infiltrative disease should be counseled and tested for PAI periodically, particularly if presenting with suggestive signs or symptoms.

3 Article Lymphocyte Subsets in the Adrenal Glands of Dogs With Primary Hypoadrenocorticism. 2018

Friedenberg, S G / Brown, D L / Meurs, K M / Law, J McHugh. ·1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA. · 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN, USA. · 3 WIL Research (a Charles River Company), Hillsborough, NC, USA. · 4 Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA. ·Vet Pathol · Pubmed #28005496.

ABSTRACT: Primary hypoadrenocorticism, or Addison's disease, is an autoimmune condition common in certain dog breeds that leads to the destruction of the adrenal cortex and a clinical syndrome involving anorexia, gastrointestinal upset, and electrolyte imbalances. Previous studies have demonstrated that this destruction is strongly associated with lymphocytic-plasmacytic inflammation and that the lymphocytes are primarily T cells. In this study, we used both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to characterize the T-cell subtypes involved. We collected postmortem specimens of 5 dogs with primary hypoadrenocorticism and 2 control dogs and, using the aforementioned techniques, showed that the lymphocytes are primarily CD4+ rather than CD8+. These findings have important implications for improving our understanding of the pathogenesis and in searching for the underlying causative genetic polymorphisms.

4 Article Primary adrenal insufficiency is associated with impaired natural killer cell function: a potential link to increased mortality. 2017

Bancos, Irina / Hazeldine, Jon / Chortis, Vasileios / Hampson, Peter / Taylor, Angela E / Lord, Janet M / Arlt, Wiebke. ·Institute of Metabolism and Systems ResearchUniversity of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Division of EndocrinologyDiabetes, Metabolism, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Institute of Inflammation and Ageing. · Medical Research Council-Arthritis Research UK (MRC-ARUK) Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing ResearchUniversity of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Centre for EndocrinologyDiabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK. ·Eur J Endocrinol · Pubmed #28223394.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Mortality in patients with primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) is significantly increased, with respiratory infections as a major cause of death. Moreover, patients with PAI report an increased rate of non-fatal infections. Neutrophils and natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune cells that provide frontline protection against invading pathogens. Thus, we compared the function and phenotype of NK cells and neutrophils isolated from PAI patients and healthy controls to ascertain whether altered innate immune responses could be a contributory factor for the increased susceptibility of PAI patients to infection. DESIGN AND METHODS: We undertook a cross-sectional study of 42 patients with PAI due to autoimmune adrenalitis ( RESULTS: Neutrophil function did not differ between PAI and controls. However, NKCC was significantly reduced in PAI (12.0 ± 1.5% vs 21.1 ± 2.6%, CONCLUSIONS: Adrenal insufficiency is associated with significantly decreased NKCC, thereby potentially compromising early recognition and elimination of virally infected cells. This potential impairment in anti-viral immune defense may contribute to the increased rate of respiratory infections and ultimately mortality in PAI.

5 Article Evaluation of the genetic basis of primary hypoadrenocorticism in Standard Poodles using SNP array genotyping and whole-genome sequencing. 2017

Friedenberg, Steven G / Lunn, Katharine F / Meurs, Kathryn M. ·Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 1060 William Moore Drive, Raleigh, NC, 27607, USA. steven_friedenberg@ncsu.edu. · Comparative Medicine Institute, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 27607, USA. steven_friedenberg@ncsu.edu. · Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Avenue, Saint Paul, MN, 55108, USA. steven_friedenberg@ncsu.edu. · Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 1060 William Moore Drive, Raleigh, NC, 27607, USA. · Comparative Medicine Institute, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 27607, USA. ·Mamm Genome · Pubmed #27864587.

ABSTRACT: Primary hypoadrenocorticism, also known as Addison's disease, is an autoimmune disorder leading to the destruction of the adrenal cortex and subsequent loss of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid hormones. The disease is prevalent in Standard Poodles and is believed to be highly heritable in the breed. Using genotypes derived from the Illumina Canine HD SNP array, we performed a genome-wide association study of 133 carefully phenotyped Standard Poodles (61 affected, 72 unaffected) and found no markers significantly associated with the disease. We also sequenced the entire genomes of 20 Standard Poodles (13 affected, 7 unaffected) and analyzed the data to identify common variants (including SNPs, indels, structural variants, and copy number variants) across affected dogs and variants segregating within a single pedigree of highly affected dogs. We identified several candidate genes that may be fixed in both Standard Poodles and a small population of dogs of related breeds. Further studies are required to confirm these findings more broadly, as well as additional gene-mapping efforts aimed at fully understanding the genetic basis of what is likely a complex inherited disorder.

6 Article 52-year-old woman with hypotension, hypothyroidism, and hyponatremia. 2014

Blevins, Christopher H / Killu, Ammar M / Greenlund, Andrew C. ·Resident in Internal Medicine, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Fellow in Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Advisor to resident and fellow and Consultant in Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: greenlund.andrew@mayo.edu. ·Mayo Clin Proc · Pubmed #25092365.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article 58-year-old woman with progressive nausea and fatigue. 2014

Visrodia, Kavel / Shivashankar, Raina / Wang, Amy T. ·Resident in Internal Medicine, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Gastroenterology, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Advisor to residents and Consultant in General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: wang.amy@mayo.edu. ·Mayo Clin Proc · Pubmed #24996236.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Article Early diagnosis of cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in boys with Addison's disease improves survival and neurological outcomes. 2011

Polgreen, Lynda E / Chahla, Saydi / Miller, Weston / Rothman, Steven / Tolar, Jakub / Kivisto, Teresa / Nascene, David / Orchard, Paul J / Petryk, Anna. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, 516 Delaware St. S.E., PWB 13-124, MMC 8404, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. ·Eur J Pediatr · Pubmed #21279382.

ABSTRACT: Approximately one third of boys with X-linked adrenoleukodystophy (X-ALD) develop an acute, progressive inflammatory process of the central nervous system, resulting in rapid neurologic deterioration and death. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can halt the progression of neurologic disease if performed early in the course of the cerebral form of X-ALD. We describe a retrospective cohort study of 90 boys with X-ALD evaluated at our institution between 2000 and 2009, to determine if early diagnosis of X-ALD following the diagnosis of unexplained adrenal insufficiency (AI) improves outcomes. We describe seven cases with a delay in the diagnosis of X-ALD and compare their outcomes to ten controls with the diagnosis of ALD made within 12 months following diagnosis of AI. At the time of evaluation for HCT, boys with a delay in the diagnosis of X-ALD had more extensive cerebral involvement and more limited functioning. These boys also were 3.9 times more likely to die and had significant advancement of cerebral disease after HCT, compared with boys with a timely diagnosis of X-ALD. In conclusion, the early diagnosis of cerebral X-ALD following the diagnosis of unexplained AI, and subsequent treatment with HCT improves both neurological outcomes and survival in boys with cerebral X-ALD.