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Alzheimer Disease: HELP
Articles by Amer M. Burhan
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Amer M. Burhan wrote the following 3 articles about Alzheimer Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Role of Hybrid Brain Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders. 2015

Burhan, Amer M / Marlatt, Nicole M / Palaniyappan, Lena / Anazodo, Udunna C / Prato, Frank S. ·St. Joseph's Health Care London, Parkwood Institute, 550 Wellington Road, London, ON N6C 0A7, Canada. amer.burhan@sjhc.london.on.ca. · Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6C 2R6, Canada. amer.burhan@sjhc.london.on.ca. · St. Joseph's Health Care London, Parkwood Institute, 550 Wellington Road, London, ON N6C 0A7, Canada. nicole.marlatt@sjhc.london.on.ca. · Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6C 2R6, Canada. Lena.Palaniyappan@lhsc.on.ca. · Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON N6C 2R5, Canada. uanazodo@lawsonimaging.ca. · Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON N6C 2R5, Canada. prato@lawsonimaging.ca. ·Diagnostics (Basel) · Pubmed #26854172.

ABSTRACT: This is a focused review of imaging literature to scope the utility of hybrid brain imaging in neuropsychiatric disorders. The review focuses on brain imaging modalities that utilize hybrid (fusion) techniques to characterize abnormal brain molecular signals in combination with structural and functional changes that have been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders. An overview of clinical hybrid brain imaging technologies for human use is followed by a selective review of the literature that conceptualizes the use of these technologies in understanding basic mechanisms of major neuropsychiatric disorders and their therapeutics. Neuronal network abnormalities are highlighted throughout this review to scope the utility of hybrid imaging as a potential biomarker for each disorder.

2 Article Sequential drug treatment algorithm for agitation and aggression in Alzheimer's and mixed dementia. 2018

Davies, Simon Jc / Burhan, Amer M / Kim, Donna / Gerretsen, Philip / Graff-Guerrero, Ariel / Woo, Vincent L / Kumar, Sanjeev / Colman, Sarah / Pollock, Bruce G / Mulsant, Benoit H / Rajji, Tarek K. ·1 Geriatric Psychiatry Division, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. · 2 Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, ON, Canada. · 3 Dementia Integrated Pathway Working Group, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. · 4 Geriatric Psychiatry, Western University, London, ON, Canada. · 5 Multimodal Imaging Group, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. ·J Psychopharmacol · Pubmed #29338602.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) include agitation and aggression in people with dementia. BPSD is common on inpatient psychogeriatric units and may prevent individuals from living at home or in residential/nursing home settings. Several drugs and non-pharmacological treatments have been shown to be effective in reducing behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Algorithmic treatment may address the challenge of synthesizing this evidence-based knowledge. METHODS: A multidisciplinary team created evidence-based algorithms for the treatment of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. We present drug treatment algorithms for agitation and aggression associated with Alzheimer's and mixed Alzheimer's/vascular dementia. Drugs were appraised by psychiatrists based on strength of evidence of efficacy, time to onset of clinical effect, tolerability, ease of use, and efficacy for indications other than behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. RESULTS: After baseline assessment and discontinuation of potentially exacerbating medications, sequential trials are recommended with risperidone, aripiprazole or quetiapine, carbamazepine, citalopram, gabapentin, and prazosin. Titration schedules are proposed, with adjustments for frailty. Additional guidance is given on use of electroconvulsive therapy, optimization of existing cholinesterase inhibitors/memantine, and use of pro re nata medications. CONCLUSION: This algorithm-based approach for drug treatment of agitation/aggression in Alzheimer's/mixed dementia has been implemented in several Canadian Hospital Inpatient Units. Impact should be assessed in future research.

3 Article The Effect of Task-Irrelevant Fearful-Face Distractor on Working Memory Processing in Mild Cognitive Impairment versus Healthy Controls: An Exploratory fMRI Study in Female Participants. 2016

Burhan, Amer M / Anazodo, Udunna C / Chung, Jun Ku / Arena, Amanda / Graff-Guerrero, Ariel / Mitchell, Derek G V. ·Division of Geriatric Psychiatry at Schulich School of Medicine, Parkwood Institute, Mental Health Care Building, F2-349, London, ON, Canada N6C 0A7. · Lawson Imaging, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON, Canada N6A 4V2. · CAMH, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 1R8. · Department of Psychiatry at Schulich School of Medicine, The Brain and Mind Institute, Natural Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada N6A 5B7. ·Behav Neurol · Pubmed #26949290.

ABSTRACT: In mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a risk state for Alzheimer's disease, patients have objective cognitive deficits with relatively preserved functioning. fMRI studies have identified anomalies during working memory (WM) processing in individuals with MCI. The effect of task-irrelevant emotional face distractor on WM processing in MCI remains unclear. We aim to explore the impact of fearful-face task-irrelevant distractor on WM processing in MCI using fMRI. Hypothesis. Compared to healthy controls (HC), MCI patients will show significantly higher BOLD signal in a priori identified regions of interest (ROIs) during a WM task with a task-irrelevant emotional face distractor. Methods. 9 right-handed female participants with MCI and 12 matched HC performed a WM task with standardized task-irrelevant fearful versus neutral face distractors randomized and counterbalanced across WM trials. MRI images were acquired during the WM task and BOLD signal was analyzed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) to identify signal patterns during the task response phase. Results. Task-irrelevant fearful-face distractor resulted in higher activation in the amygdala, anterior cingulate, and frontal areas, in MCI participants compared to HC. Conclusions. This exploratory study suggests altered WM processing as a result of fearful-face distractor in MCI.