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Alzheimer Disease: HELP
Articles by Asmus Vogel
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Asmus Vogel wrote the following 13 articles about Alzheimer Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Change in Fitness and the Relation to Change in Cognition and Neuropsychiatric Symptoms After Aerobic Exercise in Patients with Mild Alzheimer's Disease. 2018

Sobol, Nanna A / Dall, Christian Have / Høgh, Peter / Hoffmann, Kristine / Frederiksen, Kristian Steen / Vogel, Asmus / Siersma, Volkert / Waldemar, Gunhild / Hasselbalch, Steen G / Beyer, Nina. ·Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy and Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Zealand University Hospital, Regional Dementia Research Centre, Department of Neurology, Denmark and Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Danish Dementia Research Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. · The Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·J Alzheimers Dis · Pubmed #30040719.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Physical activity has the potential to improve physical function in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may contribute to modify disease processes and cognitive function. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate 1) the effect of moderate-high-intensity aerobic exercise on cardiorespiratory fitness, i.e., peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) determined by direct breath-by-breath cardiopulmonary exercise test, and 2) the association between changes in VO2peak and changes in cognition and neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with mild AD. METHODS: The study is based on secondary outcome analyses from the large single-blinded multi-center study ADEX (Preserving Cognition, Quality of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of Physical Exercise). A preselected sub-group of 55 participants (age 52-83 years), 29 from the intervention group (IG) and 26 from the control group (CG), was included. IG performed 16 weeks of supervised moderate-to-high intensity aerobic exercise. Assessments of VO2peak, mental speed and attention (Symbol Digit Modalities Test, SDMT), and neuropsychiatric symptoms (Neuropsychiatric Inventory, NPI) were performed at baseline and at 16 weeks. RESULT: VO2peak increased 13% in the IG and a between-group difference in mean change (3.92 ml/kg/min, 95% CI 6.34-1.51, p = 0.003) was present in favor of the IG. Combined data from IG and CG showed positive associations between changes in VO2peak and changes in NPI (Rho = - 0.41, p = 0.042) and changes in SDMT (Rho = 0.36, p = 0.010), respectively. CONCLUSION: Aerobic exercise improves VO2peak in community-dwelling patients with mild AD. Furthermore, changes in VO2peak appear to be associated to changes in cognition and neuropsychiatric symptoms.

2 Article A Danish adaptation of the Boston Naming Test: preliminary norms for older adults and validity in mild Alzheimer's disease. 2017

Jørgensen, Kasper / Johannsen, Peter / Vogel, Asmus. ·a Danish Dementia Research Centre, Department of Neurology , Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark. · b Department of Psychology , University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark. ·Clin Neuropsychol · Pubmed #28854839.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to develop a Danish adaptation of the Boston Naming Test (BNT) including a shortened 30-item version of the BNT for routine clinical use and two parallel 15-item versions for screening purposes. METHOD: The Danish adaptation of the BNT was based on ranking of items according to difficulty in a sample of older non-patients (n = 99). By selecting those items with the largest discrepancy in difficulty for non-patients compared to a mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) sample (n = 53), the shortened versions of the BNT were developed. Using an overlapping cells approach preliminary education and age norms for older Danes were constructed. RESULTS: The Danish adaptation of the BNT had adequate reliability and the short versions were all highly correlated with the full 60-item BNT (BNT-60). The sensitivity and specificity of the BNT-60 was .83 and .86, respectively. The shortened versions displayed some reduction in sensitivity (.70-.77) but similar or better specificity (.86-.91). Post-test probabilities of mild AD associated with performances along selected score ranges of the BNT were estimated. Likelihood ratios were presented that can be combined with information regarding the base rate of AD in any setting in order to assist in interpreting the clinical significance of a given performance. CONCLUSION: The short Danish versions of the BNT were highly correlated with the full BNT indicating that they measure the same construct. The Danish versions had acceptable diagnostic accuracy discriminating between mild AD and older non-patients.

3 Article Effect of aerobic exercise on physical performance in patients with Alzheimer's disease. 2016

Sobol, Nanna Aue / Hoffmann, Kristine / Frederiksen, Kristian Steen / Vogel, Asmus / Vestergaard, Karsten / Brændgaard, Hans / Gottrup, Hanne / Lolk, Annette / Wermuth, Lene / Jakobsen, Søren / Laugesen, Lars / Gergelyffy, Robert / Høgh, Peter / Bjerregaard, Eva / Siersma, Volkert / Andersen, Birgitte Bo / Johannsen, Peter / Waldemar, Gunhild / Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers / Beyer, Nina. ·Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Unit and Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Danish Dementia Research Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Danish Dementia Research Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Dementia Clinic, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Dementia Clinic, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark. · Dementia Clinic, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Geriatrics, Odense University Hospital, Svendborg Hospital, Svendborg, Denmark. · Department of Geriatrics, Slagelse Hospital, Slagelse, Denmark. · Zeland University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Regional Dementia Research Centre, Roskilde, Denmark. · Memory Clinic, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark. · Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Unit and Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: ninabeyer.privat@gmail.com. ·Alzheimers Dement · Pubmed #27344641.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Knowledge about the feasibility and effects of exercise programs to persons with Alzheimer's disease is lacking. This study investigated the effect of aerobic exercise on physical performance in community-dwelling persons with mild Alzheimer's disease. METHODS: The single blinded multi-center RCT (ADEX) included 200 patients, median age 71 yrs (50-89). The intervention group received supervised moderate-to-high intensity aerobic exercise 1 hour × 3/week for 16 weeks. Assessments included cardiorespiratory fitness, single-task physical performance, dual-task performance and exercise self-efficacy. RESULTS: Significant between-group differences in change from baseline (mean [95%CI]) favored the intervention group for cardiorespiratory fitness (4.0 [2.3-5.8] ml/kg/min, P <0.0001) and exercise self-efficacy (1.7 [0.5-2.8] points, P =0.004). Furthermore, an exercise attendance of ≥66.6% resulted in significant positive effects on single-task physical performance and dual-task performance. DISCUSSION: Aerobic exercise has the potential to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, single-task physical performance, dual-task performance and exercise self-efficacy in community-dwelling patients with mild Alzheimer's disease.

4 Article Moderate-to-High Intensity Physical Exercise in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial. 2016

Hoffmann, Kristine / Sobol, Nanna A / Frederiksen, Kristian S / Beyer, Nina / Vogel, Asmus / Vestergaard, Karsten / Brændgaard, Hans / Gottrup, Hanne / Lolk, Annette / Wermuth, Lene / Jacobsen, Søren / Laugesen, Lars P / Gergelyffy, Robert G / Høgh, Peter / Bjerregaard, Eva / Andersen, Birgitte B / Siersma, Volkert / Johannsen, Peter / Cotman, Carl W / Waldemar, Gunhild / Hasselbalch, Steen G. ·Danish Dementia Research Centre, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Unit, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Memory Clinic, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark. · Dementia Clinic, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. · Dementia Clinic, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Geriatrics, Odense University Hospital, Svendborg Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Geriatrics, Slagelse Hospital, Denmark. · Regional Dementia Research Center, Region Zealand, Roskilde Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Memory Clinic, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California-Irvine, CA, USA. ·J Alzheimers Dis · Pubmed #26682695.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Studies of physical exercise in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are few and results have been inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a moderate-to-high intensity aerobic exercise program in patients with mild AD. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial, we recruited 200 patients with mild AD to a supervised exercise group (60-min sessions three times a week for 16 weeks) or to a control group. Primary outcome was changed from baseline in cognitive performance estimated by Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) in the intention-to-treat (ITT) group. Secondary outcomes included changes in quality of life, ability to perform activities of daily living, and in neuropsychiatric and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The ITT analysis showed no significant differences between intervention and control groups in change from baseline of SDMT, other cognitive tests, quality of life, or activities of daily living. The change from baseline in Neuropsychiatric Inventory differed significantly in favor of the intervention group (mean: -3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) -5.8 to -1.3, p = 0.002). In subjects who adhered to the protocol, we found a significant effect on change from baseline in SDMT as compared with the control group (mean: 4.2, 95% CI 0.5 to 7.9, p = 0.028), suggesting a dose-response relationship between exercise and cognition. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first randomized controlled trial with supervised moderate-to-high intensity exercise in patients with mild AD. Exercise reduced neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with mild AD, with possible additional benefits of preserved cognition in a subgroup of patients exercising with high attendance and intensity.

5 Article Associations between physical function, dual-task performance and cognition in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. 2016

Sobol, Nanna Aue / Hoffmann, Kristine / Vogel, Asmus / Lolk, Annette / Gottrup, Hanne / Høgh, Peter / Hasselbalch, Steen G / Beyer, Nina. ·a Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Unit, Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, and Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital , University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark. · b Danish Dementia Research Centre, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet , Copenhagen University Hospital , Copenhagen , Denmark. · c Dementia Clinic , Odense University Hospital , Odense , Denmark. · d Dementia Clinic, Department of Neurology , Aarhus University Hospital , Aarhus , Denmark. · e Regional Dementia Research Center, Region Zealand, Roskilde Hospital , University of Copenhagen , Roskilde , Denmark. ·Aging Ment Health · Pubmed #26161932.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes a gradual decline in cognition, limitations of dual-tasking and physical function leading to total dependence. Hence, information about the interaction between physical function, dual-task performance and cognition may lead to new treatment strategies with the purpose of preserving function and quality of life. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between physical function, dual-task performance and cognition in community-dwelling patients with mild AD. METHODS: Baseline results from 185 participants (50-90 years old) in the single blinded multicenter RCT 'ADEX' (Alzheimer's disease: the effect of physical exercise) were used. Assessments included tests of physical function: 400-m walk test, 10-m walk test, Timed Up and Go test and 30-s chair stand test; dual-task performance, i.e., 10-m walk while counting backwards from 50 or naming the months backwards; and cognition, i.e., Mini Mental State Examination, Symbol Digit Modalities Test, the Stroop Color and Word Test, and Lexical verbal fluency test. RESULTS: Results in the 30-s chair stand test correlated significantly with all tests of cognition (r = .208-.242) while the other physical function tests only randomly correlated with tests of cognition. Results in the dual-task counting backwards correlated significantly with results in all tests of cognition (r = .259-.388), which accounted for 7%-15% of the variation indicating that a faster time to complete dual-task performance was associated with better cognitive performance. CONCLUSION: The evidence of the associations between physical function, dual-task performance and cognition is important when creating new rehabilitation interventions to patients with mild AD.

6 Article Longitudinal changes in awareness over 36 months in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. 2015

Vogel, Asmus / Waldorff, Frans Boch / Waldemar, Gunhild. ·Danish Dementia Research Center,Department of Neurology,Rigshospitalet,University of Copenhagen,Denmark. · The Research Unit and Department of General Practice,University of Copenhagen,Denmark. ·Int Psychogeriatr · Pubmed #25075811.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Longitudinal changes in awareness in dementia have been studied with short follow-up time and mostly in small patient groups (including patients with moderate dementia). We investigated awareness in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) over 36 months and studied if a decline in awareness was associated with decline in cognition and increase in neuropsychiatric symptoms. METHODS: Awareness was measured on a categorical scale in 95 AD patients (age ≥50 years, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score ≥20). Awareness was rated at three time points (follow-up at 12 and 36 months) where MMSE, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-Q), and Cornell scale for Depression in Dementia also were applied. RESULTS: At 12 months, 26% had lower awareness rating as compared to baseline and at 36 months lower awareness ratings were found in 39%. At both visits, 16% had higher awareness rating as compared to baseline. Patients with lower awareness at 36 months as compared to baseline had a more rapid increase in NPI-Q score (p = 0.002) over 36 months as compared to patients with stable or improved awareness over 36 months. A more rapid decline in MMSE score was observed for patients with lower awareness at 36 months (as compared to baseline) but only when compared to patients in whom awareness improved over time. CONCLUSIONS: The results show essentially no clear relationship between cognitive decline over three years and awareness. In some cases, awareness remained stable or even improved despite significant cognitive decline. In the subgroup where awareness declined over time, overall ratings of neuropsychiatric symptoms declined more rapidly than in the remaining patients.

7 Article The six-item Clock Drawing Test - reliability and validity in mild Alzheimer's disease. 2015

Jørgensen, Kasper / Kristensen, Maria K / Waldemar, Gunhild / Vogel, Asmus. ·a Department of Neurology , Danish Dementia Research Centre, Rigshospitalet , Copenhagen , Denmark. ·Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn · Pubmed #24974730.

ABSTRACT: This study presents a reliable, short and practical version of the Clock Drawing Test (CDT) for clinical use and examines its diagnostic accuracy in mild Alzheimer's disease versus elderly nonpatients. Clock drawings from 231 participants were scored independently by four clinical neuropsychologists blind to diagnostic classification. The interrater agreement of individual scoring criteria was analyzed and items with poor or moderate reliability were excluded. The classification accuracy of the resulting scoring system - the six-item CDT - was examined. We explored the effect of further reducing the number of scoring items on classification accuracy and estimated classification accuracy associated with performances deviating from the optimal cutoff score. At a cutoff of 5/6, the six-item CDT had a sensitivity (SN) of 0.65 and a specificity of 0.80. Stepwise removal of up to three items reduced SN slightly. Classification accuracy associated with a score of four or less out of six was very high.

8 Article Preserving cognition, quality of life, physical health and functional ability in Alzheimer's disease: the effect of physical exercise (ADEX trial): rationale and design. 2013

Hoffmann, Kristine / Frederiksen, Kristian S / Sobol, Nanna Aue / Beyer, Nina / Vogel, Asmus / Simonsen, Anja Hviid / Johannsen, Peter / Lolk, Annette / Terkelsen, Ole / Cotman, Carl W / Hasselbalch, Steen G / Waldemar, Gunhild. ·Memory Disorders Research Group, Danish Dementia Research Center, Department of Neurology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Neuroepidemiology · Pubmed #24135720.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Exercise is hypothesized to improve cognition, physical performance, functional ability and quality of life, but evidence is scarce. Previous studies were of short duration, often underpowered and involving home-based light exercise programs in patients with undefined dementia. The aim of the ADEX ('Preserving Cognition, Quality of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: the Effect of Physical Exercise') trial is to establish whether aerobic exercise is effective in improving cognition as well as in reducing the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS: The ADEX study is a multicenter, single-blind, randomized trial with two arms: an intervention group attending 16 weeks of continuously supervised moderate-to-high intensity aerobic exercise and a control group receiving usual care. We plan to recruit 192 patients with mild AD. The primary outcome measure is change from baseline in cognitive performance at 16 weeks (as measured by the Symbol Digit Modalities test). CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge this is the first large-scale controlled study to investigate the effects of supervised moderate aerobic exercise on cognition in patients with AD. Recruitment began in January 2012 and results are expected to be available in 2014. We summarize the methodological challenges we and other studies have faced in this type of complex multicenter intervention with unique challenges to study design.

9 Article Discrepancy between self- and proxy-rated pain in Alzheimer's disease: results from the Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study. 2012

Jensen-Dahm, Christina / Vogel, Asmus / Waldorff, Frans B / Waldemar, Gunhild. ·Memory Disorders Research Group, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. christina.jensen-dahm@rh.regionh.dk ·J Am Geriatr Soc · Pubmed #22702408.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of self- and proxy-reported pain in a cohort with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to identify characteristics of individuals with AD reporting pain. DESIGN: Data were collected at the baseline visit of the Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study. SETTING: Community. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred twenty-one community-living individuals with AD (MMSE ≥ 20) and their primary caregivers. MEASUREMENTS: Pain was assessed as part of the EuroQol EQ-5D (caregiver- and self-rated). The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease Scale, EQ-5D visual analog scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, and Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire were also used. RESULTS: Fair agreement was found between self- and proxy ratings on pain (kappa = 0.34). Thirty-three percent of individuals with AD reported pain, whereas caregivers reported that 52% had pain ( P < .001). Individuals who had self- or proxy-rated pain were significantly more likely to be female, had more depressive and other neuropsychiatric symptoms, and rated their quality of life lower. CONCLUSION: Self- and proxy-reported pain differ in individuals with mild AD, with proxies rating more pain than the individuals with AD. Self- and proxy-rated pain was significantly associated with more neuropsychiatric and depressive symptoms and lower quality of life. In general, this study indicates that pain occurs frequently even in individuals with mild AD and that pain assessment may require self- and proxy report to identify individuals with need for possible treatment.

10 Article Proxy-rated quality of life in Alzheimer's disease: a three-year longitudinal study. 2012

Vogel, Asmus / Bhattacharya, Suvosree / Waldorff, Frans B / Waldemar, Gunhild. ·Memory Disorders Research Group, Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. asmus.vogel@rh.regionh.dk ·Int Psychogeriatr · Pubmed #21729415.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The study investigated the change in proxy rated quality of life (QoL) of a large cohort of home living patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) over a period of 36 months. METHODS: The sample consisted of 102 patients with mild AD and their primary caregivers from the Danish Alzheimer's Disease Intervention Study. QoL was assessed with the proxy-rated (primary caregivers) Quality of Life in Alzheimer Disease scale (QOL-AD) and the EuroQuol Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-VAS) scale. The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study, Activities of Daily living Inventory (ADCS-ADL), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-Q) were also applied. Evaluations were conducted at baseline and at 12 and 36 months follow-up. RESULTS: There was a significant decline in mean QoL assessed by both the QOL-AD and the EQ-VAS (p < 0.001). There were vast individual differences in the QoL scores on both scales at 12 and 36 months' follow-up. Mean change from baseline in QOL-AD was significantly associated with change in CSDD, ADCS-ADL and MMSE scores at 12 months and with ADCS-ADL score at 36 months. CONCLUSION: QoL is a subjective concept and may not be influenced by the degree of cognitive dysfunction. Future studies should investigate the factors for individual variations in order to understand the nature of change of QoL in AD and the wide variation in QoL scores over time.

11 Article Assessment of dementia in ethnic minority patients in Europe: a European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium survey. 2011

Nielsen, T Rune / Vogel, Asmus / Riepe, Matthias W / de Mendonça, Alexandre / Rodriguez, Guido / Nobili, Flavio / Gade, Anders / Waldemar, Gunhild. ·Memory Disorders Research Group, Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Center, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. rune.nielsen@rh.regionh.dk ·Int Psychogeriatr · Pubmed #20602861.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In most European countries the ethnic minority migrant populations are currently reaching an age where dementia becomes an increasingly important issue. There is no European consensus on good clinical practice with these patient groups, who often have special needs and expectations with regard to dementia services. METHODS: A survey was conducted in clinical dementia centers in 15 European countries. Questionnaires focusing on different points in the clinical assessment of dementia in ethnic minority patients were mailed to leading dementia experts of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium. RESULTS: Thirty-six centers from 15 countries responded to the survey. Ethnic minority patients were seen on a regular basis in 69% of these centers. The diagnostic evaluation was in accordance with evidence-based clinical guidelines in 84-100% of the centers, but most centers performed cognitive assessment with instruments that are only validated in Western cultures and frequently relied on family members for interpretation. Diagnostic evaluation of the patients was considered to be challenging in 64% of the centers, mainly because of communication problems and lack of adequate assessment tools. In general, there were few indicators of culturally sensitive dementia services in the centers. CONCLUSIONS: Ethnic minority patients are seen on a regular basis in European dementia clinics. Assessment of such patients is difficult for a number of reasons. Results from this study show that the most challenging issues are communication problems and assessment of cognitive function where there is a need to develop specific tests for ethnic minority patients.

12 Article Generic and disease-specific measures of quality of life in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. 2010

Bhattacharya, Suvosree / Vogel, Asmus / Hansen, Marie-Louise H / Waldorff, Frans B / Waldemar, Gunhild. ·Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. ·Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord · Pubmed #20924186.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the pattern of association of generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) scales with standard clinical outcome variables in Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS: The participants were 321 home-living patients with mild AD and their primary caregivers from the Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study. QoL was assessed using the generic EuroQol-5D with visual analogue scale (VAS) and the disease-specific Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease (QOL-AD) scales (both caregiver and patient rated). Depression, activities of daily living, cognitive performance and neuropsychiatric symptom severity were also assessed. RESULTS: All 3 caregiver-rated QoL scales correlated significantly with each other (p < 0.001) and with clinical measures. Patient-rated QoL versions correlated inversely with depression (p < 0.001) but not significantly with any other clinical variables. CONCLUSION: The caregiver-rated QoL scales showed stronger interscale correlation as well as a similar correlation pattern with standard clinical outcome variables compared to the patient-rated versions. There is some indication that the EQ-5D + VAS could be a suitable alternative to the QOL-AD scale in specific research designs.

13 Article Impaired awareness of deficits and neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease: the Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY). 2010

Vogel, Asmus / Waldorff, Frans Boch / Waldemar, Gunhild. ·Memory Disorders Research Group, Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. asmus.vogel@rh.regionh.dk ·J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci · Pubmed #20160215.

ABSTRACT: Impaired awareness may be associated with increased neuropsychiatric symptoms in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, but relatively little is known about the association in early Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if impaired awareness was associated with a higher frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease. In a Danish multicenter study, 321 patients with MMSE score > or =20 were evaluated. Patients with poor insight had significantly more neuropsychiatric symptoms than patients with full insight. When patients had increasing neuropsychiatric symptoms, caregivers reported higher levels of distress.