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Anxiety Disorders: HELP
Articles by Lauren M. Osborne
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Lauren M. Osborne wrote the following 4 articles about Anxiety Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Primary and Preventive Care Review. 2017

Osborne, Lauren M / Payne, Jennifer L. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28832483.

ABSTRACT: The management of psychiatric disorders in women is complicated by reproductive life cycle events. Psychiatric disorders can be initiated or exacerbated during times of hormonal change (such as menarche, the premenstrual period, the postpartum period, and perimenopause), and during the childbearing years, treatment is complicated by pregnancy and breastfeeding. These issues make determining the appropriate psychiatric medications to use in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders in women complex. This monograph addresses practical approaches in the provision of thorough and individualized care for women with mood or anxiety disorders.

2 Article Innate immune activation and depressive and anxious symptoms across the peripartum: An exploratory study. 2019

Osborne, Lauren M / Yenokyan, Gayane / Fei, Kezhen / Kraus, Thomas / Moran, Thomas / Monk, Catherine / Sperling, Rhoda. ·Women's Mood Disorders Center, Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and Gynecology & Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 550 N. Broadway, Suite 305C, Baltimore, MD 21205, United States. Electronic address: lmosborne@jhmi.edu. · Johns Hopkins Biostatistics Center, Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States. · Departments of Psychiatry and Obstetrics & Gynecology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, United States; New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, United States. ·Psychoneuroendocrinology · Pubmed #30195110.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There are complex associations between immune function and mental illness, yet studies in the perinatal period focus primarily on individual inflammatory markers and depressive symptoms only, cross-sectionally. We sought to examine associations between both depressive and anxious symptoms and immune activation longitudinally across the peripartum. METHODS: We measured mood (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI-1 A) and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STATE) and levels of 23 cytokines at 5 points in pregnancy and postpartum in 51 women. Within subject cytokine trajectories over time by depressive and anxious symptom grouping were assessed using linear mixed effects models with random intercept and slope. We also undertook an exploratory cluster analysis based on third trimester cytokine values. RESULTS: Based on categorical BDI scores, IL-6 (p <  0.001), IL-15 (p =  0.047), GCSF (p = 0.003), and CCL3 (p < .001) were significantly different across time, with IL-6 (p <  0.001), IL-15 (p =  0.003), and CCL3 (p <  0.001) higher at the third trimester visit in more depressed subjects. Based on categorical STATE scores, GM-CSF significantly decreased across pregnancy for the less anxious group (p = 0.016), but not for the more anxious, and CCL3 (p = 0.017), CXCL8 (p = 0.011), and IL-6 (p < 0.001) were higher at the third trimester visit for more anxious subjects. In exploratory cluster analysis based on cytokine level, there were no differences in mood or anxiety scores, but significant differences by race/ethnicity and overweight/obesity status. Women with higher pro-inflammatory cytokine values are more likely to be Hispanics (69.2% vs. 21.4%, p =  0.015), but less likely to be African American (23.1% vs. 60.7%, p = 0.015) or overweight/obese (25% vs. 69.2%, p =  0.016) compared to women with lower pro-inflammatory cytokine values. CONCLUSION: We identified a pro-inflammatory burst at the third trimester, indicative of innate immune activation, in women with higher levels of both depressive and anxious symptoms, as well as differences in pro-inflammatory changes across time. We also found significant differences in cytokine levels by race, ethnicity, and overweight/obesity status. These results point the way toward future longitudinal work that considers race/ethnicity, timing, and weight status, and evaluates perinatal mood and anxiety disorders in the context of changing immune functioning across the peripartum.

3 Article Eighteen-year-old man with autism, obsessive compulsive disorder and a 2018

Lu, Zhen A / Mu, Weiyi / Osborne, Lauren M / Cordner, Zachary A. ·Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·BMJ Case Rep · Pubmed #29991577.

ABSTRACT: The

4 Article Oxytocin receptor DNA methylation in postpartum depression. 2016

Kimmel, Mary / Clive, Makena / Gispen, Fiona / Guintivano, Jerry / Brown, Tori / Cox, Olivia / Beckmann, Matthias W / Kornhuber, Johannes / Fasching, Peter A / Osborne, Lauren M / Binder, Elisabeth / Payne, Jennifer L / Kaminsky, Zachary. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Translational Research in Psychiatry, Max-Planck Institute of Psychiatry, 80804 Munich, Germany. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA; Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Electronic address: zkamins1@jhmi.edu. ·Psychoneuroendocrinology · Pubmed #27108164.

ABSTRACT: The oxytocin receptor (OXTR) is a key regulator of stress and anxiety and may be regulated by both psychosocial risk factors and gonadal hormones, making it an attractive candidate for study in postpartum depression (PPD). The objective of this study was to investigate both serum hormone and PPD specific DNA methylation variation in the OXTR. Illumina HM450 microarray data generated in a prospective PPD cohort identified significant associations (P=0.014) with PPD in an intronic region in the OXTR located 4bp proximal to an estrogen receptor (ER) binding region. Pyrosequencing confirmed moderate evidence for an interaction of CpGs in the region with childhood abuse status to mediate PPD. These CpGs located on chr3 at positions 8810078 and 8810069 exhibited significant associations with postpartum depression scores from an independent cohort of 240 women with no prior psychiatric history. Hormone analysis suggested a PPD specific negative correlation of DNA methylation in the region with serum estradiol levels. Estradiol levels and OXTR DNA methylation exhibited a significant interaction to associate with the ratio of allopregnanolone to progesterone. Cumulatively, the data corroborate our previous hypotheses of a PPD specific increased sensitivity of epigenetic reprogramming at estrogen target genes and suggests that OXTR epigenetic variation may be an important mediator of mood relevant neuroactive steroid production.