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Asthma HELP
Based on 38,101 articles published since 2008
|||| 19 

These are the 38101 published articles about Asthma that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline [Guidelines for methacholine provocation testing]. 2018

Plantier, L / Beydon, N / Chambellan, A / Degano, B / Delclaux, C / Dewitte, J-D / Dinh-Xuan, A T / Garcia, G / Kauffmann, C / Paris, C / Perez, T / Poussel, M / Wuyam, B / Zerah-Lancner, F / Chenuel, B / Anonymous3161033. ·CEPR/Inserm UMR1100, CHRU de Tours, service de pneumologie et explorations fonctionnelles respiratoires, université François-Rabelais, 37044 Tours cedex 9, France. Electronic address: laurent.plantier@univ-tours.fr. · Unité fonctionnelle d'exploration fonctionnelle respiratoire et du sommeil, AP-HP, hôpital Armand-Trousseau, 75012 Paris, France. · Inserm UMR1087, explorations fonctionnelles et réhabilitation respiratoire, l'institut du thorax, CHU, 44093 Nantes cedex 1, France. · Service d'explorations fonctionnelles, hôpital Jean-Minjoz, 25000 Besançon, France. · Inserm U1141, DHU PROTECT, service de physiologie explorations fonctionnelles pédiatriques-CPPS, AP-HP, hôpital Robert-Debré, université Paris Diderot, 75019 Paris, France. · Santé au travail-laboratoire d'étude et de recherche en sociologie, UFR médecine et sciences de la santé, université de Bretagne occidentale, 29238 Brest cedex 3, France. · Service de physiologie-explorations fonctionnelles, université Paris Descartes, AP-HP, hôpital Cochin, 75014 Paris, France. · Service de physiologie, Inserm UMR999, AP-HP, hôpital de Bicêtre, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre cedex, France. · Service d'explorations fonctionnelles respiratoires, CHU, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · EA7892, service de pathologie professionnelle, université de Lorraine, CHU de Nancy, 54500 Vandœuvre-Les-Nancy, France. · Clinique de pneumologie, centre de compétences maladies pulmonaires rares, CHRU de Lille, hôpital Albert-Calmette, 59037 Lille, France. · Antenne médicale de prévention du dopage, EA 3450, service des examens de la fonction respiratoire et de l'aptitude à l'exercice médecine du sport, CHRU de Nancy Brabois, 54500 Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · Laboratoire HP2, Inserm 1042, service sport et pathologies, CHU de Grenoble, hôpital Sud, 38130 Echirolles, France. · Service de physiologie-explorations fonctionnelles, AP-HP, hôpital Henri-Mondor, 94000 Créteil, France. ·Rev Mal Respir · Pubmed #30097294.

ABSTRACT: Bronchial challenge with the direct bronchoconstrictor agent methacholine is commonly used for the diagnosis of asthma. The "Lung Function" thematic group of the French Pulmonology Society (SPLF) elaborated a series of guidelines for the performance and the interpretation of methacholine challenge testing, based on French clinical guideline methodology. Specifically, guidelines are provided with regard to the choice of judgment criteria, the management of deep inspirations, and the role of methacholine bronchial challenge in the care of asthma, exercise-induced asthma, and professional asthma.

2 Guideline Asthma and occupation: Diagnosis using serial peak flow measurements. 2018

Domingos Neto, José / Myung, Eduardo / Murta, Guilherme / Lima, Paulo Rogério / Vieira, Anielle / Lessa, Leandro Araújo / Carvalho, Bruna Rafaela Torres de / Buzzini, Renata / Bernardo, Wanderley Marques / Anonymous14410943. ·Associação Nacional de Medicina do Trabalho, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Associação Médica Brasileira, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. ·Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) · Pubmed #29641668.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Diagnosis and Management of Asthma - The Swiss Guidelines. 2018

Rothe, Thomas / Spagnolo, Paolo / Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier / Clarenbach, Christian / Eich-Wanger, Christine / Meyer, Franca / Miedinger, David / Möller, Alexander / Nicod, Laurent P / Nicolet-Chatelain, Geneviève / Sauty, Alain / Steurer-Stey, Claudia / Leuppi, Joerg D. ·Pneumology, Kantonsspital Graubünden, Chur, Switzerland. · University Clinic of Medicine, Kantonsspital Baselland, Liestal, Switzerland. · Medical Faculty of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Service de Pneumologie, Hôpital du Valais, Sion, Switzerland. · Pneumology, University Hospital of Geneva, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Pneumology, University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Lungenpraxis Morgental, Zürich, Switzerland. · Swiss Lung League, Bern, Switzerland. · Pneumology, University Children Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Pneumology, University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland. · Pneumologist, Nyon, Switzerland. · Pneumologist, Service de Pneumologie, Hôpital Neuchâtelois, Neuchâtel, Switzerland. · Epidemiology, Biostatistic and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · mediX group practice Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. ·Respiration · Pubmed #29614508.

ABSTRACT: The Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) is a network of individuals, organizations, and public health officials that was established to disseminate information about the care of patients with asthma and to improve asthma care. The GINA ("Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention") report has been updated annually since 2002. Due to new knowledge and therapeutic development in the field, the Swiss Respiratory Society felt the need to provide a new document that is based on both the available literature and the recommendations of the 2016 GINA report. Key new features of the 2016 GINA report include a "new" definition of asthma, underscoring its heterogeneous nature, and the core elements of variable symptoms and variable expiratory airflow limitation; the importance of confirming the diagnosis of asthma in order to minimize both under- and overtreatment; practical tools for the assessment of symptom control and risk factors for adverse outcomes; a comprehensive approach to asthma management that acknowledges the foundational role of inhaled corticosteroid therapy, but also provides a framework for individualizing patient care; an emphasis on maximizing the benefit of available medications by addressing common problems such as incorrect inhaler technique and poor adherence; a continuum of care for worsening asthma, starting with early self-management and progressing to primary care or acute care management; and diagnosis of the asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. This document is meant to advice the key stakeholders on the diagnosis and management of asthma and highlights the need to individualize the care of each and every asthmatic patient.

4 Guideline Definition and diagnosis of asthma-COPD overlap (ACO). 2018

Yanagisawa, Satoru / Ichinose, Masakazu. ·Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. · Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. Electronic address: ichinose@rm.med.tohoku.ac.jp. ·Allergol Int · Pubmed #29433946.

ABSTRACT: It is now widely recognized that asthma and COPD can coexist as asthma-COPD overlap (ACO), but the preliminary attempts at providing universal guidelines for the diagnosis of ACO still need to be improved. We believe that a case can be made for devising guidelines for the diagnosis of this increasingly common disease that are specific to Japan. In this paper, we present our consensus-based description of ACO which we believe is realistic for use in our country. In addition, we cite the scientific evidence for our own "objective" features used to develop the criteria for COPD and asthma diagnosis. We acknowledge that they will need to be validated and updated over time, but hope the results will encourage further research on the characteristics and treatment of this commonly encountered clinical problem.

5 Guideline Management of airway mucus hypersecretion in chronic airway inflammatory disease: Chinese expert consensus (English edition). 2018

Shen, Yongchun / Huang, Shaoguang / Kang, Jian / Lin, Jiangtao / Lai, Kefang / Sun, Yongchang / Xiao, Wei / Yang, Lan / Yao, Wanzhen / Cai, Shaoxi / Huang, Kewu / Wen, Fuqiang. ·Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, Chengdu. · Department of Pulmonary Disease, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai. · Department of Respiratory Medicine, Institute of Respiratory Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang. · Department of Respiratory Diseases, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing. · State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou. · Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing. · Department of Respiratory Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan. · Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an. · Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China. ·Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis · Pubmed #29430174.

ABSTRACT: Airway mucus hypersecretion is one of the most important characteristics of chronic airway inflammatory diseases. Evaluating and managing airway mucus hypersecretion is of great importance for patients with chronic airway inflammatory diseases. This consensus statement describes the pathogenesis, clinical features, and the management of airway mucus hypersecretion in patients with chronic airway inflammatory diseases in the People's Republic of China. The statement has been written particularly for respiratory researchers, pulmonary physicians, and patients.

6 Guideline Implementation and Improvement of Pediatric Asthma Guideline Improves Hospital-Based Care. 2018

Johnson, David P / Arnold, Donald H / Gay, James C / Grisso, Alison / O'Connor, Michael G / O'Kelley, Ellen / Moore, Paul E. ·Divisions of Hospital Medicine and david.p.johnson.1@vanderbilt.edu. · Division of Emergency Medicine. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, and. · General Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Department of Pharmacy, Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, Tennessee. · Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonary Medicine, and. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #29367203.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Standardized pediatric asthma care has been shown to improve measures in specific hospital areas, but to our knowledge, the implementation of an asthma clinical practice guideline (CPG) has not been demonstrated to be associated with improved hospital-wide outcomes. We sought to implement and refine a pediatric asthma CPG to improve outcomes and throughput for the emergency department (ED), inpatient care, and the ICU. METHODS: An urban, quaternary-care children's hospital developed and implemented an evidence-based, pediatric asthma CPG to standardize care from ED arrival through discharge for all primary diagnosis asthma encounters for patients ≥2 years old without a complex chronic condition. Primary outcomes included ED and inpatient length of stay (LOS), percent ED encounters requiring admission, percent admissions requiring ICU care, and total charges. Balancing measures included the number of asthma discharges between all-cause 30-day readmissions after asthma discharges and asthma relapse within 72 hours. Statistical process control charts were used to monitor and analyze outcomes. RESULTS: Analyses included 3650 and 3467 encounters 2 years pre- and postimplementation, respectively. Postimplementation, reductions were seen in ED LOS for treat-and-release patients (3.9 hours vs 3.3 hours), hospital LOS (1.5 days vs 1.3 days), ED encounters requiring admission (23.5% vs 18.8%), admissions requiring ICU (23.0% vs 13.2%), and total charges ($4457 vs $3651). Guideline implementation was not associated with changes in balancing measures. CONCLUSIONS: The hospital-wide standardization of a pediatric asthma CPG across hospital units can safely reduce overall hospital resource intensity by reducing LOS, admissions, ICU services, and charges.

7 Guideline Recommendations for the prevention and diagnosis of asthma in children: Evidence from international guidelines adapted for Mexico. 2018

Larenas Linnemann, D E S / Del Río Navarro, B E / Luna Pech, J A / Romero Lombard, J / Villaverde Rosas, J / Cano Salas, M C / Fernández Vega, M / Ortega Martell, J A / López Estrada, E C / Mayorga Butrón, J L / Salas Hernández, J / Vázquez García, J C / Ortiz Aldana, I / Vargas Becerra, M H / Bedolla Barajas, M / Rodríguez Pérez, N / Aguilar Aranda, A / Jiménez González, C A / García Bolaños, C / Garrido Galindo, C / Mendoza Hernández, D A / Mendoza López, E / López Pérez, G / Wakida Kuzonoki, G H / Ruiz Gutiérrez, H H / León Molina, H / Martínez de la Lanza, H / Stone Aguilar, H / Gómez Vera, J / Olvera Salinas, J / Oyoqui Flores, J J / Gálvez Romero, J L / Lozano Saenz, J S / Salgado Gama, J I / Jiménez Chobillon, M A / García Avilés, M A / Guinto Balanzar, M P / Medina Ávalos, M A / Camargo Angeles, R / García Torrentera, R / Toral Freyre, S / Montes Narvaez, G / Solorio Gómez, H / Rosas Peña, J / Romero Tapia, S J / Reyes Herrera, A / Cuevas Schacht, F / Esquer Flores, J / Sacre Hazouri, J A / Compean Martínez, L / Medina Sánchez, P J / Garza Salinas, S / Baez Loyola, C / Romero Alvarado, I / Miguel Reyes, J L / Huerta Espinosa, L E / Correa Flores, M Á / Castro Martínez, R. ·Investigational Unit, Hospital Médica Sur, Mexico City, Mexico. Electronic address: marlar1@prodigy.net.mx. · Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Pediatric Hospital of Mexico "Federico Gómez", Mexico City, Mexico; Postgraduate Department, Medical Faculty, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Philosophical, Methodological and Instrumental Disciplines, University Center of Science in Health, Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico. · ISSSTE Hospital Saltillo, Nuevo León, Mexico. · A2DAHT Iberoamerican Agency for Development & Assessment of Health Technologies, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Postgraduate Medicine of the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias "Ismael Cosio Villegas", Mexico City, Mexico. · Dean's Office, of the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias "Ismael Cosio Villegas", Mexico City, Mexico; Pregraduate Pulmonology Department, Medical Faculty, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Pre and Postgraduate Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Hidalgo, Pachuca, Mexico. · Asthma Clinic, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias "Ismael Cosio Villegas", Mexico. · Postgraduate Department, Medical Faculty, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, Mexico; A2DAHT Iberoamerican Agency for Development & Assessment of Health Technologies, Mexico City, Mexico; ENT Department, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Mexico City, Mexico. · General Management Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias "Ismael Cosio Villegas", Mexico City, Mexico. Electronic address: jsalas@iner.gob.mx. · Dean's Office, of the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias "Ismael Cosio Villegas", Mexico City, Mexico. · Secretary of Health of the State of Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Gto), Mexico. · Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias "Ismael Cosio Villegas", Mexico; Unit of Medical Investigations in Respiratory Medicine, of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico. · Civil Hospital of Guadalajara "Dr. Juan I. Menchaca", Guadalajara, Mexico. · Institute of Science and Superior Studies of Tamaulipas, Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, Matamoros, Mexico. · Medical Unit of High-Level Specialization, of Hospital de Pediatría Centro Médico de Occidente, Mexico. · Medical Faculty of the Universidad Autónoma San Luis Potosí, Mexico. · General Hospital "Doctor Gaudencio González Garza" of the Centro Médico Nacional La Raza, Mexico City, Mexico. · Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias "Ismael Cosio Villegas", Mexico. · Allergy Department, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Mexico City, Mexico. · Sistema Tec Salud, Hospital San José, Monterrey (NL), Mexico. · Hospital Central Sur de Alta Especialidad, Petróleos Mexicanos, Mexico. · Servicio de Neumología Pediátrica, Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. · Private Practice, Mexico City, Mexico. · Private Practice, Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico. · Hospital San José de Hermosillo, Mexico. · Allergy Department, Hospital Regional Lic. Adolfo López Mateos, ISSSTE, Mexico City, Mexico. · Private Practice, Uruapan (Michoacan), Mexico. · Instituto de Seguridad y de Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE), Regional, Puebla, Puebla, Mexico. · Private Practice, Jalapa, Veracruz, Mexico. · Clínica del Niño y del Adolescente de Coatzacoalcos (Veracruz), Mexico. · Secretary of Health, National Center for Preventive Programs for Disease Control (CENAPRECE), Mexico City, Mexico. · Instituto de Seguridad y de Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE) of Veracruz, Mexico. · Private Practice, Puebla, Puebla, Mexico. · Private Practice, Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico. · Unit of Education and Investigation, Hospital de Alta Especialidad del Niño "Dr. Rodolfo Nieto Padrón", Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico; Profesor Investigador de la División Académica de la Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Mexico. · National College of Nursing, Mexico. · Department of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Mexico City, Mexico. · Hospital del ISSSSTE, 'Fray Junipero Serra', Tijuana, BC, Mexico. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología del Centenario Hospital Hidalgo de Aguascalientes, Mexico. · Hospital Regional ISSSSTE, León, Guanajuato, Mexico. · Hospital San José del Tecnológico de Monterrey, Mexico. · Emergency Department, Hospital Infantil de México "Federico Gómez", Mexico City, Mexico. · Pediatric Hospital of Legaria of the Secretary of Health, Mexico City, Mexico. · Centro Médico Nacional "La Raza", Mexico City, Mexico. · Private Practice, San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí, Mexico. ·Allergol Immunopathol (Madr) · Pubmed #29288048.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: With the availability of high-quality asthma guidelines worldwide, one possible approach of developing a valid guideline, without re-working the evidence, already analysed by major guidelines, is the ADAPTE approach, as was used for the development of National Guidelines on asthma. METHODS: The guidelines development group (GDG) covered a broad range of experts from medical specialities, primary care physicians and methodologists. The core group of the GDG searched the literature for asthma guidelines 2005 onward, and analysed the 11 best guidelines with AGREE-II to select three mother guidelines. Key clinical questions were formulated covering each step of the asthma management. RESULTS: The selected mother guidelines are British Thoracic Society (BTS), GINA and GEMA 2015. Responses to the questions were formulated according to the evidence in the mother guidelines. Recommendations or suggestions were made for asthma treatment in Mexico by the core group, and adjusted during several rounds of a Delphi process, taking into account: 1. Evidence; 2. Safety; 3. Cost; 4. Patient preference - all these set against the background of the local reality. Here the detailed analysis of the evidence present in BTS/GINA/GEMA sections on prevention and diagnosis in paediatric asthma are presented for three age-groups: children with asthma ≤5 years, 6-11 years and ≥12 years. CONCLUSIONS: For the prevention and diagnosis sections, applying the AGREE-II method is useful to develop a scientifically-sustained document, adjusted to the local reality per country, as is the Mexican Guideline on Asthma.

8 Guideline Spanish Guidelines on the Evaluation and Diagnosis of Bronchiectasis in Adults. 2018

Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel / Máiz, Luis / Olveira, Casilda / Girón, Rosa María / de la Rosa, David / Blanco, Marina / Cantón, Rafael / Vendrell, Montserrat / Polverino, Eva / de Gracia, Javier / Prados, Concepción. ·Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico la Fe, Valencia, España. Electronic address: mianmartinezgarcia@gmail.com. · Servicio de Neumología, Unidad de Bronquiectasias y Fibrosis Quística, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Regional Universitario de Málaga, Instituto de Biomedicina (IBIMA), Universidad de Málaga, Málaga, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario La Princesa, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Neumología, Hospital Platón, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña, La Coruña, España. · Servicio de Microbiología, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal e Instituto Ramón y Cajal de Investigación Sanitaria (IRYCIS), Madrid, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Dr. Josep Trueta, Grupo Bronquiectasias IDIBGI, Universitat de Girona, Gerona, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron (HUVH), Institut de Recerca Vall d'Hebron (VHIR), Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, CIBER Enfermedades Respiratorias (CB06/06/0030), Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Unidad de Bronquiectasias y Fibrosis Quística, Hospital Universitario La Paz y Hospital Universitario La Paz-Cantoblanco-Carlos III, Madrid, España. ·Arch Bronconeumol · Pubmed #29128130.

ABSTRACT: In 2008, the Spanish Society of Pulmonology (SEPAR) published the first guidelines in the world on the diagnosis and treatment of bronchiectasis. Almost 10 years later, considerable scientific advances have been made in both the treatment and the evaluation and diagnosis of this disease, and the original guidelines have been updated to include the latest scientific knowledge on bronchiectasis. These new recommendations have been drafted following a strict methodological process designed to ensure the quality of content, and are linked to a large amount of online information that includes a wealth of references. These guidelines cover aspects ranging from a consensual definition of bronchiectasis to an evaluation of the natural course and prognosis of the disease. The topics of greatest interest and some new areas are addressed, including epidemiology and economic costs of bronchiectasis, pathophysiological aspects, the causes (placing particular emphasis on the relationship with other airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma), clinical and functional aspects, measurement of quality of life, radiological diagnosis and assessment, diagnostic algorithms, microbiological aspects (including the definition of key concepts, such as bacterial eradication or chronic bronchial infection), and the evaluation of severity and disease prognosis using recently published multidimensional tools.

9 Guideline [Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Asthma - Guideline of the German Respiratory Society and the German Atemwegsliga in Cooperation with the Paediatric Respiratory Society and the Austrian Society of Pneumology]. 2017

Anonymous1661155 / Anonymous1671155 / Anonymous1681155 / Buhl, R / Bals, R / Baur, X / Berdel, D / Criée, C-P / Gappa, M / Gillissen, A / Greulich, T / Haidl, P / Hamelmann, E / Kardos, P / Kenn, K / Klimek, L / Korn, S / Lommatzsch, M / Magnussen, H / Nicolai, T / Nowak, D / Pfaar, O / Rabe, K F / Riedler, J / Ritz, T / Schultz, K / Schuster, A / Spindler, T / Taube, C / Taube, K / Vogelmeier, C / von Leupoldt, A / Wantke, F / Weise, S / Wildhaber, J / Worth, H / Zacharasiewicz, A. ·Universitätsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Schwerpunkt Pneumologie, III. Medizinische Klinik, Mainz. · Universitätsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik für Innere Medizin V, Homburg/Saar. · European Society for Environmental and Occupational Medicine, EOM, Berlin. · im Ruhestand, Hamminkeln. · Evangelisches Krankenhaus Göttingen Weende, Abteilung für Pneumologie, Bovenden-Lenglern. · Marien-Hospital gGmbH, Klinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Wesel. · Klinikum Am Steinenberg, Ermstalklinik, Medizinische Klinik III/Innere Medizin und Pneumologie, Reutlingen-Bad Urach. · Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Klinik für Innere Medizin mit Schwerpunkt Pneumologie, Marburg. · Fachkrankenhaus Kloster Grafschaft GmbH, Abteilung Pneumologie II, Schmallenberg. · Evangelisches Klinikum Bethel, Klinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Bielefeld. · Lungenpraxis an der Klinik Maingau vom Roten Kreuz, Frankfurt am Main. · Schön Klinik Berchtesgadener Land, Fachzentrum für Pneumologie, Schönau am Königssee, Philipps Universität Marburg, Standort Schönau. · Zentrum für Rhinologie und Allergologie, Wiesbaden. · Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Abteilung Pneumologie, Rostock. · Pneumologisches Forschungsinstitut an der LungenClinic Grosshansdorf GmbH, Großhansdorf. · Klinikum der Universität München, Kinderklinik und Kinderpoliklinik, LMU München. · Klinikum der Universität München, Institut und Poliklinik für Arbeits-, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin, LMU München. · HNO-Universitätsklinik Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultät Mannheim, Universität Heidelberg, Mannheim. · LungenClinic Grosshansdorf GmbH, Abteilung für Pneumologie, Großhansdorf. · Kardinal Schwarzenberg Klinikum, Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Schwarzach im Pongau, Österreich. · Southern Methodist University, Department of Psychology, Dallas, USA. · Klinik Bad Reichenhall, Fachbereich Pneumologie, Bad Reichenhall. · Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf, Zentrum für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Düsseldorf. · Waldburg-Zeil Kliniken, Fachkliniken Wangen, Klinik für Pädiatrische Pneumologie und Allergologie, Rehabilitationsklinik für Kinder und Jugendliche, Wangen. · Universitätsmedizin Essen, Ruhrlandklinik, Klinik für Pneumologie, Essen. · Atem-Reha GmbH, Hamburg. · University of Leuven, Health Psychology, Leuven, Belgien. · Floridsdorfer Allergiezentrum, Wien, Österreich. · Atem- und Physiotherapie Solln, München. · HFR Freiburg, Kantonsspital, Klinik für Pädiatrie, Freiburg, Schweiz. · Facharztzentrum Fürth, Fürth. · Wilhelminenspital, Lehrkrankenhaus der Medizinischen Universität Wien, Abteilung für Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde, Wien, Österreich. ·Pneumologie · Pubmed #29216678.

ABSTRACT: The present guideline is a new version and an update of the guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of asthma, which replaces the previous version for german speaking countries from the year 2006. The wealth of new data on the pathophysiology and the phenotypes of asthma, and the expanded spectrum of diagnostic and therapeutic options necessitated a new version and an update. This guideline presents the current, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of asthma, for children and adolescents as well as for adults with asthma.

10 Guideline Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines-2016 revision. 2017

Brożek, Jan L / Bousquet, Jean / Agache, Ioana / Agarwal, Arnav / Bachert, Claus / Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia / Brignardello-Petersen, Romina / Canonica, G Walter / Casale, Thomas / Chavannes, Niels H / Correia de Sousa, Jaime / Cruz, Alvaro A / Cuello-Garcia, Carlos A / Demoly, Pascal / Dykewicz, Mark / Etxeandia-Ikobaltzeta, Itziar / Florez, Ivan D / Fokkens, Wytske / Fonseca, Joao / Hellings, Peter W / Klimek, Ludger / Kowalski, Sergio / Kuna, Piotr / Laisaar, Kaja-Triin / Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée E / Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C / Manning, Peter J / Meltzer, Eli / Mullol, Joaquim / Muraro, Antonella / O'Hehir, Robyn / Ohta, Ken / Panzner, Petr / Papadopoulos, Nikolaos / Park, Hae-Sim / Passalacqua, Gianni / Pawankar, Ruby / Price, David / Riva, John J / Roldán, Yetiani / Ryan, Dermot / Sadeghirad, Behnam / Samolinski, Boleslaw / Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter / Sheikh, Aziz / Togias, Alkis / Valero, Antonio / Valiulis, Arunas / Valovirta, Erkka / Ventresca, Matthew / Wallace, Dana / Waserman, Susan / Wickman, Magnus / Wiercioch, Wojtek / Yepes-Nuñez, Juan José / Zhang, Luo / Zhang, Yuan / Zidarn, Mihaela / Zuberbier, Torsten / Schünemann, Holger J. ·Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Division of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: jan.l.brozek@gmail.com. · University Hospital, Montpellier, France. · Faculty of Medicine, Transylvania University, Brasov, Romania. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; School of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Upper Airways Research Laboratory, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Woolcock Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Asthma & Allergy Clinic, Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Division of Allergy and Immunology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Fla. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Braga, and ICVS/3B's-PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães, Portugal. · ProAR-Center of Excellence for Asthma, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil. · University Hospital of Montpellier, Montpellier, and Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Paris 06, UMR-S 1136, IPLESP, Equipe EPAR, Paris, France. · Section of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Mo. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Dirección de Investigación e Innovación Sanitaria, Departamento de Salud, Gobierno Vasco-Eusko Jaurlaritza, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · CINTESIS-Center for Health Technology and Services Research, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto & Allergy, CUF Porto Hospital and Instituto, Porto, Portugal. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospitals Leuven, and the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Center of Rhinology and Allergology, Wiesbaden, Germany. · Division of Internal Medicine Asthma and Allergy, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia. · Hospital Médica Sur, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Paediatrics, Oslo University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Medical School, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy & Immunology, University of California, San Diego, Calif. · Unitat de Rinologia i Clínica de l'Olfacte, Servei d'ORL, Hospital Clínic, Clinical & Experimental Respiratory Immunoallergy, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Women and Child Health & Food Allergy Referral Centre Veneto Region, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Alfred Hospital and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. · National Hospital Organization Tokyo National Hospital, Kiyose-city, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Immunology and Allergology, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Allergy Department, 2nd Pediatric Clinic, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Division of Infection, Immunity & Respiratory Medicine, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea. · Allergy and Respiratory Diseases, IRCCS San Martino, IST, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan. · University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Allergy and Respiratory Research Group, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. · HIV/STI Surveillance Research Center, and World Health Organization Collaborating Center for HIV Surveillance, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran. · Department of Prevention of Environmental Hazards and Allergology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland. · Allergy Unit, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Zürich and Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education CK-CARE, Davos, Switzerland. · Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. · Asthma and Inflammation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. · Department of Pneumology and Allergy, Immunoallèrgia Respiratòria Clínica I Experimental (IDIBAPS), Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Barcelona, Spain. · Vilnius University Clinic of Children's Diseases and Public Health Institute, Vilnius, and the European Academy of Paediatrics (EAP/UEMS-SP), Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Lung Diseases and Clinical Immunology, University of Turku and Allergy Clinic Terveystalo Turku, Turku, Finland. · Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. · Division of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, Sachs' Children's Hospital, South General Hospital and Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; School of Medicine, University of Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing TongRen Hospital and Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Beijing, China. · University Clinic of Pulmonary and Allergic Diseases Golnik, Golnik, Slovenia. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. ·J Allergy Clin Immunol · Pubmed #28602936.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Allergic rhinitis (AR) affects 10% to 40% of the population. It reduces quality of life and school and work performance and is a frequent reason for office visits in general practice. Medical costs are large, but avoidable costs associated with lost work productivity are even larger than those incurred by asthma. New evidence has accumulated since the last revision of the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines in 2010, prompting its update. OBJECTIVE: We sought to provide a targeted update of the ARIA guidelines. METHODS: The ARIA guideline panel identified new clinical questions and selected questions requiring an update. We performed systematic reviews of health effects and the evidence about patients' values and preferences and resource requirements (up to June 2016). We followed the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) evidence-to-decision frameworks to develop recommendations. RESULTS: The 2016 revision of the ARIA guidelines provides both updated and new recommendations about the pharmacologic treatment of AR. Specifically, it addresses the relative merits of using oral H CONCLUSIONS: Appropriate treatment of AR might improve patients' quality of life and school and work productivity. ARIA recommendations support patients, their caregivers, and health care providers in choosing the optimal treatment.

11 Guideline Asthma management: A new phenotype-based approach using presence of eosinophilia and allergy. 2017

Terl, M / Sedlák, V / Cap, P / Dvořáková, R / Kašák, V / Kočí, T / Novotna, B / Seberova, E / Panzner, P / Zindr, V. ·Czech Pneumology and Phthiseology Society, Prague, Czech Republic. · Czech Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, Prague, Czech Republic. ·Allergy · Pubmed #28328094.

ABSTRACT: Asthma is a heterogeneous disease. The Czech Pneumology and Allergology Societies commissioned 10 experts to review the literature and create joint national guidelines for managing asthma, reflecting this heterogeneity. The aim was to develop an easy-to-use diagnostic strategy as a rational approach to the widening opportunities for the use of phenotype-targeted therapy. The guidelines were presented on websites for public comments by members of both the societies. The reviewers' comments contributed to creating the final version of the guidelines. The key hallmark of the diagnostic approach is the pragmatic concept, which assesses the presence of allergy and eosinophilia in each asthmatic patient. The guidelines define three clinically relevant asthma phenotypes: eosinophilic allergic asthma, eosinophilic nonallergic asthma and noneosinophilic nonallergic asthma. The resulting multifunctional classification describing the severity, level of control and phenotype is the starting point for a comprehensive treatment strategy. The level of control is constantly confronted with the intensity of the common stepwise pharmacotherapy, and the concurrently included phenotyping is essential for phenotype-specific therapy. The concept of the asthma approach with assessing the presence of eosinophilia and allergy provides a way for more precise diagnosis, which is a prerequisite for using widening options of personalized therapy.

12 Guideline Quality Indicators of Asthma Care Derived From the Spanish Guidelines for Asthma Management (GEMA 4.0): A Multidisciplinary Team Report. 2017

Quirce, S / Delgado, J / Entrenas, L M / Grande, M / Llorente, C / López Viña, A / Martínez Moragón, E / Mascarós, E / Molina, J / Olaguibel, J M / Pérez de Llano, L A / Perpiñá Tordera, M / Quintano, J A / Rodríguez, M / Román-Rodriguez, M / Sastre, J / Trigueros, J A / Valero, A L / Zoni, A C / Plaza, V / Anonymous560897. ·Servicio de Alergología, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid, Spain. · Unidad de Gestión Clínica de Alergología, Hospital Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, Spain. · Unidad de Gestión Clínica de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, Spain. · Servicio de Medicina Preventiva y Gestión de Calidad, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, SERMAS, Madrid, Spain. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Valencia, Spain. · Medicina de Atención Primaria, Centro de Salud Fuente de San Luis, Valencia, Spain; Departamento de Salud, Hospital Dr. Peset, Valencia, Spain. · Medicina de Atención Primaria, EAP Francia, Fuenlabrada, Madrid, Spain. · Servicio de Alergología, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Lucus Agusti, Lugo, Spain. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain. · Medicina de Atención Primaria, Lucena, Córdoba, Spain. · Servicio de Alergología, Hospital Príncipe de Asturias, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. · Medicina de Atención Primaria, Centro de Salud Son Pisá, Instituto de Investigación de Palma de Mallorca (IdisPa), Palma de Mallorca, Spain. · Servicio de Alergología, Fundación Jiménez Díaz, CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · Medicina de Atención Primaria, Centro de Salud Menasalbas, Toledo, Spain. · Servicio de Neumología, Intitut Clinic Respiratori, Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomédiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Spain. · Área de Epidemiología, Subdirección de Promoción y Prevención de la Salud, Consejería de Salud de la Comunidad de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · Departmento of Medicina Respiratoria, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau. Institut d'Investigació Biomédica Sant Pau (IIB Sant Pau), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Departmento de Medicina, Barcelona, Spain. ·J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol · Pubmed #28211351.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline Cough in the Athlete: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report. 2017

Boulet, Louis-Philippe / Turmel, Julie / Irwin, Richard S / Anonymous760888. ·Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Quebec City, QC, Canada. Electronic address: lpboulet@med.ulaval.ca. · Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Quebec City, QC, Canada. · Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. ·Chest · Pubmed #27865877.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cough is a common symptom experienced by athletes, particularly after exercise. We performed a systematic review to assess the following in this population: (1) the main causes of acute and recurrent cough, either exercise-induced or not, (2) how cough is assessed, and (3) how cough is treated in this population. From the systematic review, suggestions for management were developed. METHODS: This review was performed according to the CHEST methodological guidelines and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation framework until April 2015. To be included, studies had to meet the following criteria: participants had to be athletes and adults and adolescents aged ≥ 12 years and had to complain of cough, regardless of its duration or relationship to exercise. The Expert Cough Panel based their suggestions on the data extracted from the review and final grading by consensus according to a Delphi process. RESULTS: Only 60 reports fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and the results of our analysis revealed only low-quality evidence on the causes of cough and how to assess and treat cough specifically in athletes. Although there was no formal evaluation of causes of cough in the athletic population, the most common causes reported were asthma, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, respiratory tract infection (RTI), upper airway cough syndrome (UACS) (mostly from rhinitis), and environmental exposures. Cough was also reported to be related to exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction among a variety of less common causes. Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is frequent in athletes, we found no publication on cough and GERD in this population. Assessment of the causes of cough was performed mainly with bronchoprovocation tests and suspected disease-specific investigations. The evidence to guide treatment of cough in the athlete was weak or nonexistent, depending on the cause. As data on cough in athletes were hidden in a set of other data (respiratory symptoms), evidence tables were difficult to produce and were done only for cough treatment in athletes. CONCLUSIONS: The causes of cough in the athlete appear to differ slightly from those in the general population. It is often associated with environmental exposures related to the sport training environment and occurs predominantly following intense exercise. Clinical history and specific investigations should allow identification of the cause of cough as well as targeting of the treatment. Until management studies have been performed in the athlete, current guidelines that exist for the general population should be applied for the evaluation and treatment of cough in the athlete, taking into account specific training context and anti-doping regulations.

14 Guideline [Diagnosis and treatment guideline: asthma in children > 6 years. Update 2016. Executive summary]. 2016

Anonymous1300888 / Anonymous1310888 / Anonymous1320888 / Anonymous1330888 / Anonymous1340888 / Anonymous1350888. · ·Arch Argent Pediatr · Pubmed #27869436.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline Clinical Practice Guidelines for Sustained Neuromuscular Blockade in the Adult Critically Ill Patient. 2016

Murray, Michael J / DeBlock, Heidi / Erstad, Brian / Gray, Anthony / Jacobi, Judi / Jordan, Che / McGee, William / McManus, Claire / Meade, Maureen / Nix, Sean / Patterson, Andrew / Sands, M Karen / Pino, Richard / Tescher, Ann / Arbour, Richard / Rochwerg, Bram / Murray, Catherine Friederich / Mehta, Sangeeta. ·1Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA. 2Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY. 3University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Tucson, AZ. 4Clinic Medical Center, Burlington, MA. 5Indiana University, Indiana, IN. 6Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, SC. 7Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA. 8Saint Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, MA. 9University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. 10Riverside Medical Group, Yorktown, VA. 11University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE. 12Novant Health, Clemmons, NC. 13Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. 14Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. 15Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, PA. 16McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 17Medscape, New York, NY. 18University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ·Crit Care Med · Pubmed #27755068.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2002 version of "Clinical practice guidelines for sustained neuromuscular blockade in the adult critically ill patient." DESIGN: A Task Force comprising 17 members of the Society of Critical Medicine with particular expertise in the use of neuromuscular-blocking agents; a Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation expert; and a medical writer met via teleconference and three face-to-face meetings and communicated via e-mail to examine the evidence and develop these practice guidelines. Annually, all members completed conflict of interest statements; no conflicts were identified. This activity was funded by the Society for Critical Care Medicine, and no industry support was provided. METHODS: Using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation expert on the Task Force created profiles for the evidence related to six of the 21 questions and assigned quality-of-evidence scores to these and the additional 15 questions for which insufficient evidence was available to create a profile. Task Force members reviewed this material and all available evidence and provided recommendations, suggestions, or good practice statements for these 21 questions. RESULTS: The Task Force developed a single strong recommendation: we recommend scheduled eye care that includes lubricating drops or gel and eyelid closure for patients receiving continuous infusions of neuromuscular-blocking agents. The Task Force developed 10 weak recommendations. 1) We suggest that a neuromuscular-blocking agent be administered by continuous intravenous infusion early in the course of acute respiratory distress syndrome for patients with a PaO2/FIO2 less than 150. 2) We suggest against the routine administration of an neuromuscular-blocking agents to mechanically ventilated patients with status asthmaticus. 3) We suggest a trial of a neuromuscular-blocking agents in life-threatening situations associated with profound hypoxemia, respiratory acidosis, or hemodynamic compromise. 4) We suggest that neuromuscular-blocking agents may be used to manage overt shivering in therapeutic hypothermia. 5) We suggest that peripheral nerve stimulation with train-of-four monitoring may be a useful tool for monitoring the depth of neuromuscular blockade but only if it is incorporated into a more inclusive assessment of the patient that includes clinical assessment. 6) We suggest against the use of peripheral nerve stimulation with train of four alone for monitoring the depth of neuromuscular blockade in patients receiving continuous infusion of neuromuscular-blocking agents. 7) We suggest that patients receiving a continuous infusion of neuromuscular-blocking agent receive a structured physiotherapy regimen. 8) We suggest that clinicians target a blood glucose level of less than 180 mg/dL in patients receiving neuromuscular-blocking agents. 9) We suggest that clinicians not use actual body weight and instead use a consistent weight (ideal body weight or adjusted body weight) when calculating neuromuscular-blocking agents doses for obese patients. 10) We suggest that neuromuscular-blocking agents be discontinued at the end of life or when life support is withdrawn. In situations in which evidence was lacking or insufficient and the study results were equivocal or optimal clinical practice varies, the Task Force made no recommendations for nine of the topics. 1) We make no recommendation as to whether neuromuscular blockade is beneficial or harmful when used in patients with acute brain injury and raised intracranial pressure. 2) We make no recommendation on the routine use of neuromuscular-blocking agents for patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest. 3) We make no recommendation on the use of peripheral nerve stimulation to monitor degree of block in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. 4) We make no recommendation on the use of neuromuscular blockade to improve the accuracy of intravascular-volume assessment in mechanically ventilated patients. 5) We make no recommendation concerning the use of electroencephalogram-derived parameters as a measure of sedation during continuous administration of neuromuscular-blocking agents. 6) We make no recommendation regarding nutritional requirements specific to patients receiving infusions of neuromuscular-blocking agents. 7) We make no recommendation concerning the use of one measure of consistent weight over another when calculating neuromuscular-blocking agent doses in obese patients. 8) We make no recommendation on the use of neuromuscular-blocking agents in pregnant patients. 9) We make no recommendation on which muscle group should be monitored in patients with myasthenia gravis receiving neuromuscular-blocking agents. Finally, in situations in which evidence was lacking or insufficient but expert consensus was unanimous, the Task Force developed six good practice statements. 1) If peripheral nerve stimulation is used, optimal clinical practice suggests that it should be done in conjunction with assessment of other clinical findings (e.g., triggering of the ventilator and degree of shivering) to assess the degree of neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. 2) Optimal clinical practice suggests that a protocol should include guidance on neuromuscular-blocking agent administration in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. 3) Optimal clinical practice suggests that analgesic and sedative drugs should be used prior to and during neuromuscular blockade, with the goal of achieving deep sedation. 4) Optimal clinical practice suggests that clinicians at the bedside implement measure to attenuate the risk of unintended extubation in patients receiving neuromuscular-blocking agents. 5) Optimal clinical practice suggests that a reduced dose of an neuromuscular-blocking agent be used for patients with myasthenia gravis and that the dose should be based on peripheral nerve stimulation with train-of-four monitoring. 6) Optimal clinical practice suggests that neuromuscular-blocking agents be discontinued prior to the clinical determination of brain death.

16 Guideline Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction update-2016. 2016

Weiler, John M / Brannan, John D / Randolph, Christopher C / Hallstrand, Teal S / Parsons, Jonathan / Silvers, William / Storms, William / Zeiger, Joanna / Bernstein, David I / Blessing-Moore, Joann / Greenhawt, Matthew / Khan, David / Lang, David / Nicklas, Richard A / Oppenheimer, John / Portnoy, Jay M / Schuller, Diane E / Tilles, Stephen A / Wallace, Dana. · ·J Allergy Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27665489.

ABSTRACT: The first practice parameter on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) was published in 2010. This updated practice parameter was prepared 5 years later. In the ensuing years, there has been increased understanding of the pathogenesis of EIB and improved diagnosis of this disorder by using objective testing. At the time of this publication, observations included the following: dry powder mannitol for inhalation as a bronchial provocation test is FDA approved however not currently available in the United States; if baseline pulmonary function test results are normal to near normal (before and after bronchodilator) in a person with suspected EIB, then further testing should be performed by using standardized exercise challenge or eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH); and the efficacy of nonpharmaceutical interventions (omega-3 fatty acids) has been challenged. The workgroup preparing this practice parameter updated contemporary practice guidelines based on a current systematic literature review. The group obtained supplementary literature and consensus expert opinions when the published literature was insufficient. A search of the medical literature on PubMed was conducted, and search terms included pathogenesis, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and therapy (both pharmaceutical and nonpharmaceutical) of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction or exercise-induced asthma (which is no longer a preferred term); asthma; and exercise and asthma. References assessed as relevant to the topic were evaluated to search for additional relevant references. Published clinical studies were appraised by category of evidence and used to document the strength of the recommendation. The parameter was then evaluated by Joint Task Force reviewers and then by reviewers assigned by the parent organizations, as well as the general membership. Based on this process, the parameter can be characterized as an evidence- and consensus-based document.

17 Guideline Updated guidelines (2015) for management and monitoring of adult and adolescent asthmatic patients (from 12 years and older) of the Société de Pneumologie de Langue Française (SPLF) (Full length text). 2016

Raherison, C / Bourdin, A / Bonniaud, P / Deslée, G / Garcia, G / Leroyer, C / Taillé, C / De Blic, J / Dubus, J-C / Tillié-Leblond, I / Chanez, P. ·Inserm U1219, ISPED, service des maladies respiratoires, pôle cardio-thoracique, CHU de Bordeaux, université de Bordeaux, 33000 Bordeaux, France. Electronic address: chantal.raherison@chu-bordeaux.fr. · Inserm U1046, département de pneumologie et addictologie, hôpital Arnaud-de-Villeneuve, CHU de Montpellier, université Montpellier 1, 34000 Montpellier, France. · Inserm U866, service de pneumologie et soins intensifs respiratoires, CHU de Bourgogne, université de Bourgogne, 21079 Dijon, France. · Service de pneumologie, CHU Maison-Blanche, université de Reims - Champagne-Ardennes, 51000 Reims, France. · Inserm, UMRS 999, service de pneumologie, département hospitalo-universitaire (DHU) thorax innovation, hôpital de Bicêtre, Centre national de référence de l'hypertension pulmonaire sévère, faculté de médecine, université Paris-Sud, AP-HP, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Département de médecine interne et de pneumologie, CHU de la Cavale-Blanche, université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29000 Brest, France. · Service de pneumologie, département hospitalo-universitaire FIRE, centre de compétence des maladies pulmonaires rares, hôpital Bichat, université Paris-Diderot, AP-HP, 75018 Paris, France. · Service de pneumologie et allergologie pédiatriques, hôpital Necker-Enfants-Malades, 75743 Paris, France. · Unité de pneumologie et médecine infantile, hôpital Nord, 13000 Marseille, France. · Service de pneumo-allergologie, CHRU de Lille, 59000 Lille, France. · UMR 7333 Inserm U 1067, service de pneumologie, hôpital Nord, université Aix Marseille, AP-HM, 13000 Marseille, France. ·Rev Mal Respir · Pubmed #27147308.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline Updated guidelines (2015) for management and monitoring of adult and adolescent asthmatic patients (from 12 years and older) of the Société de pneumologie de langue française (SPLF) (summary). 2016

Raherison, C / Bourdin, A / Bonniaud, P / Deslée, G / Garcia, G / Leroyer, C / Taillé, C / De Blic, J / Dubus, J-C / Tillié-Leblond, I / Chanez, P. ·Université de Bordeaux, Inserm U1219, ISPED, CHU de Bordeaux, service des maladies respiratoires, pôle cardio-thoracique, 33000 Bordeaux, France. Electronic address: chantal.raherison@chu-bordeaux.fr. · Université Montpellier 1, Inserm U1046, CHU de Montpellier, département de pneumologie et addictologie, hôpital Arnaud-de-Villeneuve, 34000 Montpellier, France. · Université de Bourgogne, Inserm U866, CHU de Bourgogne, service de pneumologie et soins intensifs respiratoires, 21079 Dijon, France. · Université de Reims-Champagne-Ardennes, CHU Maison-Blanche, service de pneumologie, 51000 Reims, France. · Université Paris-Sud, Faculté de Médecine, AP-HP, Centre National de Référence de l'Hypertension Pulmonaire Sévère, Département Hospitalo-Universitaire (DHU) Thorax Innovation, UMRS 999, Inserm, Hôpital de Bicêtre, service de pneumologie, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Université de Bretagne Occidentale, CHU de la Cavale-Blanche, département de médecine interne et de pneumologie, 29000 Brest, France. · Université Paris-Diderot, AP-HP, hôpital Bichat, service de pneumologie, Centre de compétence des maladies pulmonaires rares, département hospitalo-universitaire FIRE, 75018 Paris, France. · Hôpital Necker-Enfants-Malades, service de pneumologie et allergologie pédiatriques, 75743 Paris, France. · Hôpital Nord, unité de pneumologie et médecine infantile, 13000 Marseille, France. · CHRU de Lille, service de pneumo-allergologie, 59000 Lille, France. · Université Aix-Marseille, UMR 7333 Inserm U 1067, AP-HM, hôpital Nord, service de pneumologie, 13000 Marseille, France. ·Rev Mal Respir · Pubmed #27117926.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Bronchial Asthma: Joint Recommendations of National College of Chest Physicians (India) and Indian Chest Society. 2015

Agarwal, Ritesh / Dhooria, Sahajal / Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath / Maturu, Venkata N / Sehgal, Inderpaul S / Muthu, Valliappan / Prasad, K T / Yenge, Lakshmikant B / Singh, Navneet / Behera, Digambar / Jindal, Surinder K / Gupta, Dheeraj / Balamugesh, Thanagakunam / Bhalla, Ashish / Chaudhry, Dhruva / Chhabra, S K / Chokhani, Ramesh / Chopra, Vishal / Dadhwal, Devendra S / D'Souza, George / Garg, Mandeep / Gaur, S N / Gopal, Bharat / Ghoshal, Aloke G / Guleria, Randeep / Gupta, K B / Haldar, Indranil / Jain, Sanjay / Jain, Nirmal K / Jain, V K / Janmeja, A K / Kant, Surya / Kashyap, Surender / Khilnani, G C / Kishan, Jai / Kumar, Raj / Koul, Parvaiz / Mahashur, Ashok / Mandal, Amit K / Malhotra, Samir / Mohammed, Sabir / Mohapatra, Prasanta R / Patel, Dharmesh / Prasad, Rajendra / Samaria, J K / Sarat, P / Sawhney, Honey / Shafiq, Nusrat / Sidhu, U P S / Singla, Rupak / Suri, J C / Talwar, Deepak / Varma, Subhash. · ·Indian J Chest Dis Allied Sci · Pubmed #26987256.

ABSTRACT: Bronchial asthma is an important public health problem in India with significant morbidity. Several international guidelines for diagnosis and management of asthma are available, however there is a need for country-specific guidelines due to vast differences in availability and affordability of health-care facilities across the globe. The Indian Chest Society (ICS) and the National College of Chest Physicians (NCCP) of India have collaborated to develop evidence-based guidelines with an aim to assist physicians at all levels of health-care in diagnosis and management of asthma in a scientific manner. Besides a systematic review of the literature, Indian studies were specifically analysed to arrive at simple and practical recommendations. The evidence is presented under these five headings: (1) definitions, epidemiology and impact, (2) diagnosis, (3) pharmacologic management of stable disease, (4) management of acute exacerbations, and (5) non-pharmacologic management and special situations. The modified grade system was used for classifying the quality of evidence as 1, 2, 3, or usual practice point (UPP). The strength of recommendation was graded as A or B depending upon the level of evidence.

20 Guideline [GEMA(4.0). Guidelines for Asthma Management]. 2015

Plaza Moral, Vicente / Anonymous1970853. ·En representación de los coordinadores, redactores y revisores de la GEMA(4.0). Electronic address: VPlaza@santpau.cat. ·Arch Bronconeumol · Pubmed #26707419.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline Part 9: First Aid: 2015 International Consensus on First Aid Science With Treatment Recommendations. 2015

Singletary, Eunice M / Zideman, David A / De Buck, Emmy D J / Chang, Wei-Tien / Jensen, Jan L / Swain, Janel M / Woodin, Jeff A / Blanchard, Ian E / Herrington, Rita A / Pellegrino, Jeffrey L / Hood, Natalie A / Lojero-Wheatley, Luis F / Markenson, David S / Yang, Hyuk Jun / Anonymous6730845. · ·Circulation · Pubmed #26472857.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline Work-Related Asthma. 2015

Jolly, Athena T / Klees, Julia E / Pacheco, Karin A / Guidotti, Tee L / Kipen, Howard M / Biggs, Jeremy J / Hyman, Mark H / Bohnker, Bruce K / Thiese, Matthew S / Hegmann, Kurt T / Harber, Philip. · ·J Occup Environ Med · Pubmed #26461873.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Summarize developed evidence-based diagnostic and treatment guidelines for work-related asthma (WRA). METHODS: Comprehensive literature reviews conducted with article critiquing and grading. Guidelines developed by a multidisciplinary expert panel and peer-reviewed. RESULTS: Evidence supports spirometric testing as an essential early test. Serial peak expiratory flow rates measurement is moderately recommended for employees diagnosed with asthma to establish work-relatedness. Bronchial provocation testing is moderately recommended. IgE and skin prick testing for specific high-molecular weight (HMW) antigens are highly recommended. IgG testing for HMW antigens, IgE testing for low-molecular weight antigens, and nitric oxide testing for diagnosis are not recommended. Removal from exposure is associated with the highest probability of improvement, but may not lead to complete recovery. CONCLUSION: Quality evidence supports these clinical practice recommendations. The guidelines may be useful to providers who diagnose and/or treat WRA.

23 Guideline [Recommendations for the management of the child with allergic diseases at school]. 2015

Anonymous6420830 / Saranz, Ricardo J / Lozano, Alejandro / Mariño, Andrea / Boudet, Raúl V / Sarraquigne, María Paula / Cáceres, María Elena / Bandín, Gloria / Lukin, Alicia / Skrie, Víctor / Cassaniti, María Cristina / Agüero, Claudio / Chorny, Marta / Reichbach, Débora S / Arnolt, Roque Gustavo / Cavallo, Aldo. · ·Arch Argent Pediatr · Pubmed #25996328.

ABSTRACT: Allergic diseases cause great impact on the health related quality of life in children and adolescents, resulting in increased school absenteeism and deficiencies in school performance. Although the bibliographic framework on allergic diseases is wide, in our country, there are no guidelines for proper management of the allergic child at school. It is necessary to establish guidelines for coordinated action among the educational community, the families, the pediatrician, the health team and governmental and non-governmental authorities. This position paper aims to provide information about the impact of allergic diseases on school activities, establish standards of competence of the various stakeholders at school and consider the legal framework for the intervention of the school staff about the child with allergies at school.

24 Guideline Contribution of exhaled nitric oxide measurement in airway inflammation assessment in asthma. A position paper from the French Speaking Respiratory Society. 2015

Dinh-Xuan, A T / Annesi-Maesano, I / Berger, P / Chambellan, A / Chanez, P / Chinet, T / Degano, B / Delclaux, C / Demange, V / Didier, A / Garcia, G / Magnan, A / Mahut, B / Roche, N / Anonymous5390821. ·Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Service de physiologie-explorations fonctionnelles, université Paris-Descartes, hôpital Cochin, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France. Electronic address: anh-tuan.dinh-xuan@cch.aphp.fr. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Inserm et université de médecine Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Centre de recherche cardio-thoracique Inserm U1045, université de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux cedex, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Inserm UMR 1087, institut du thorax, 44007 Nantes cedex, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Service de pneumologie, hôpital Nord, chemin des Bourrelly, 13015 Marseille, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Service de pneumologie, CHU Ambroise-Paré, 92104 Boulogne, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Explorations fonctionnelles, hôpital Jean-Minjoz, centre hospitalier régional universitaire, 25000 Besançon, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 75015 Paris, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Département épidémiologie en entreprise, INRS, rue du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Service de pneumologie, CHU de Toulouse, 24, chemin de Pouvourville - TSA, 31059 Toulouse cedex 9, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Service de physiologie, hôpital Bicêtre, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 94275 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Inserm UMR 915, institut du thorax, CHU de Nantes, 44007 Nantes cedex, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Cabinet de pédiatrie, 4, avenue de la Providence, 92160 Antony, France. · Groupe d'experts de la société de pneumologie de langue française sur la mesure du NO expiré dans l'asthme, société de pneumologie de langue française, 66, boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France; Service de pneumologie et soins intensifs respiratoires, Hôtel Dieu, groupe hospitalier Cochin-Broca, 75014 Paris, France. ·Rev Mal Respir · Pubmed #25704902.

ABSTRACT: Nitric oxide (NO) is both a gas and a ubiquitous inter- and intracellular messenger with numerous physiological functions. As its synthesis is markedly increased during inflammatory processes, NO can be used as a surrogate marker of acute and/or chronic inflammation. It is possible to quantify fractional concentration of NO in exhaled breath (FENO) to detect airway inflammation, and thus improve the diagnosis of asthma by better characterizing asthmatic patients with eosinophilic bronchial inflammation, and eventually improve the management of targeted asthmatic patients. FENO measurement can therefore be viewed as a new, reproducible and easy to perform pulmonary function test. Measuring FENO is the only non-invasive pulmonary function test allowing (1) detecting, (2) quantifying and (3) monitoring changes in inflammatory processes during the course of various respiratory disorders, including corticosensitive asthma.

25 Guideline Guidelines for severe uncontrolled asthma. 2015

Cisneros Serrano, Carolina / Melero Moreno, Carlos / Almonacid Sánchez, Carlos / Perpiñá Tordera, Miguel / Picado Valles, César / Martínez Moragón, Eva / Pérez de Llano, Luis / Soto Campos, José Gregorio / Urrutia Landa, Isabel / García Hernández, Gloria. ·Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario La Princesa, Madrid, España. Electronic address: Carol9199@yahoo.es. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Neumología y Alergia Respiratoria, Hospital Clinic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Lucus Augusti, Lugo, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital de Galdakao-Usansolo, Galdakao, España. · UGC Neumología y Alergia, Hospital de Jerez, Cádiz, España. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. ·Arch Bronconeumol · Pubmed #25677358.

ABSTRACT: Since the publication, 9 years ago, of the latest SEPAR (Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery) Guidelines on Difficult-to-Control Asthma (DCA), much progress has been made in the understanding of asthmatic disease. These new data need to be reviewed, analyzed and incorporated into the guidelines according to their level of evidence and recommendation. Recently, consensus documents and clinical practice guidelines (CPG) addressing this issue have been published. In these guidelines, specific mention will be made of what the previous DCA guidelines defined as "true difficult-to-control asthma". This is asthma that remains uncontrolled after diagnosis and a systematic evaluation to rule out factors unrelated to the disease itself that lead to poor control ("false difficult-to-control asthma"), and despite an appropriate treatment strategy (Spanish Guidelines for the Management of Asthma [GEMA] steps 5 and 6): severe uncontrolled asthma. In this respect, the guidelines propose a revised definition, an attempt to classify the various manifestations of this type of asthma, a proposal for a stepwise diagnostic procedure, and phenotype-targeted treatment. A specific section has also been included on DCA in childhood, aimed at assisting healthcare professionals to improve the care of these patients.

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