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Back Pain: HELP
Articles by Arthur Ameis
Based on 2 articles published since 2009
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, A. Ameis wrote the following 2 articles about Back Pain.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for the noninvasive management of low back pain: A systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration. 2017

Wong, J J / Côté, P / Sutton, D A / Randhawa, K / Yu, H / Varatharajan, S / Goldgrub, R / Nordin, M / Gross, D P / Shearer, H M / Carroll, L J / Stern, P J / Ameis, A / Southerst, D / Mior, S / Stupar, M / Varatharajan, T / Taylor-Vaisey, A. ·UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC), Oshawa, ON, Canada. · Graduate Education and Research Programs, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Canada Research Chair in Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada. · Undergraduate Education, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Masters Program, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada. · Departments of Orthopedic Surgery and Environmental Medicine, Occupational and Industrial Orthopedic Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York University, USA. · Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · Rehabilitation Research Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · Injury Prevention Centre and School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · Department of Graduate Studies, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Certification Program in Insurance Medicine and Medico-legal Expertise, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, QC, Canada. · Rebecca MacDonald Centre for Arthritis and Autoimmune Disease, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Masters Program, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. ·Eur J Pain · Pubmed #27712027.

ABSTRACT: We conducted a systematic review of guidelines on the management of low back pain (LBP) to assess their methodological quality and guide care. We synthesized guidelines on the management of LBP published from 2005 to 2014 following best evidence synthesis principles. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane, DARE, National Health Services Economic Evaluation Database, Health Technology Assessment Database, Index to Chiropractic Literature and grey literature. Independent reviewers critically appraised eligible guidelines using AGREE II criteria. We screened 2504 citations; 13 guidelines were eligible for critical appraisal, and 10 had a low risk of bias. According to high-quality guidelines: (1) all patients with acute or chronic LBP should receive education, reassurance and instruction on self-management options; (2) patients with acute LBP should be encouraged to return to activity and may benefit from paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or spinal manipulation; (3) the management of chronic LBP may include exercise, paracetamol or NSAIDs, manual therapy, acupuncture, and multimodal rehabilitation (combined physical and psychological treatment); and (4) patients with lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy may benefit from spinal manipulation. Ten guidelines were of high methodological quality, but updating and some methodological improvements are needed. Overall, most guidelines target nonspecific LBP and recommend education, staying active/exercise, manual therapy, and paracetamol or NSAIDs as first-line treatments. The recommendation to use paracetamol for acute LBP is challenged by recent evidence and needs to be revisited. SIGNIFICANCE: Most high-quality guidelines recommend education, staying active/exercise, manual therapy and paracetamol/NSAIDs as first-line treatments for LBP. Recommendation of paracetamol for acute LBP is challenged by recent evidence and needs updating.

2 Article Are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs effective for the management of neck pain and associated disorders, whiplash-associated disorders, or non-specific low back pain? A systematic review of systematic reviews by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration. 2016

Wong, Jessica J / Côté, Pierre / Ameis, Arthur / Varatharajan, Sharanya / Varatharajan, Thepikaa / Shearer, Heather M / Brison, Robert J / Sutton, Deborah / Randhawa, Kristi / Yu, Hainan / Southerst, Danielle / Goldgrub, Rachel / Mior, Silvano / Stupar, Maja / Carroll, Linda J / Taylor-Vaisey, Anne. ·UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC), 6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON, M2H 3J1, Canada. jessica.wong@uoit.ca. · Undergraduate Education, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, 6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON, M2H 3J1, Canada. jessica.wong@uoit.ca. · Division of Graduate Studies, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, 6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON, M2H 3J1, Canada. jessica.wong@uoit.ca. · UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC), 6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON, M2H 3J1, Canada. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7L7, Canada. · Certification Program in Insurance Medicine and Medico-legal Expertise, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, N-414, Roger-Gaudry Building, 2900, Boulevard Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4, Canada. · Graduate Education and Research Programs, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC), 6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON, M2H 3J1, Canada. · Graduate Studies in Masters of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, 104 Clinic Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5E5, Canada. · Kingston General Hospital, 76 Stuart Street, Kingston, ON, K7L 2V7, Canada. · Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. · Rebecca MacDonald Centre for Arthritis and Autoimmune Disease, Mount Sinai Hospital, Joseph and Wolf Lebovic Health Complex, 60 Murray Street, 2nd Floor (Main), Toronto, ON, M5T 3L9, Canada. · Injury Prevention Centre, University of Alberta, 4075 RTF, 8308 114 Street, Edmonton, T6G 2E1, AB, Canada. ·Eur Spine J · Pubmed #25827308.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the management of neck pain and associated disorders (NAD), whiplash-associated disorders, and non-specific low back pain (LBP) with or without radiculopathy. METHODS: We systematically searched six databases from 2000 to 2014. Random pairs of independent reviewers critically appraised eligible systematic reviews using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. We included systematic reviews with a low risk of bias in our best evidence synthesis. RESULTS: We screened 706 citations and 14 systematic reviews were eligible for critical appraisal. Eight systematic reviews had a low risk of bias. For recent-onset NAD, evidence suggests that intramuscular NSAIDs lead to similar outcomes as combined manipulation and soft tissue therapy. For NAD (duration not specified), oral NSAIDs may be more effective than placebo. For recent-onset LBP, evidence suggests that: (1) oral NSAIDs lead to similar outcomes to placebo or a muscle relaxant; and (2) oral NSAIDs with bed rest lead to similar outcomes as placebo with bed rest. For persistent LBP, evidence suggests that: (1) oral NSAIDs are more effective than placebo; and (2) oral NSAIDs may be more effective than acetaminophen. For recent-onset LBP with radiculopathy, there is inconsistent evidence on the effectiveness of oral NSAIDs versus placebo. Finally, different oral NSAIDs lead to similar outcomes for neck and LBP with or without radiculopathy. CONCLUSIONS: For NAD, oral NSAIDs may be more effective than placebo. Oral NSAIDs are more effective than placebo for persistent LBP, but not for recent-onset LBP. Different oral NSAIDs lead to similar outcomes for neck pain and LBP.