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Bacterial Infections HELP
Based on 99,997 articles published since 2010
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These are the 99997 published articles about Bacterial Infections that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Screening for Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnant Persons to Prevent Preterm Delivery: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2020

Anonymous3611165 / Owens, Douglas K / Davidson, Karina W / Krist, Alex H / Barry, Michael J / Cabana, Michael / Caughey, Aaron B / Donahue, Katrina / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kubik, Martha / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Pbert, Lori / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, San Francisco. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · New York University, New York, New York. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #32259236.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Bacterial vaginosis is common and is caused by a disruption of the microbiological environment in the lower genital tract. In the US, reported prevalence of bacterial vaginosis among pregnant women ranges from 5.8% to 19.3% and is higher in some races/ethnicities. Bacterial vaginosis during pregnancy has been associated with adverse obstetrical outcomes including preterm delivery, early miscarriage, postpartum endometritis, and low birth weight. Objective: To update its 2008 recommendation, the USPSTF commissioned a review of the evidence on the accuracy of screening and the benefits and harms of screening for and treatment of bacterial vaginosis in asymptomatic pregnant persons to prevent preterm delivery. Population: This recommendation applies to pregnant persons without symptoms of bacterial vaginosis. Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that screening for asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis in pregnant persons not at increased risk for preterm delivery has no net benefit in preventing preterm delivery. The USPSTF concludes that for pregnant persons at increased risk for preterm delivery, the evidence is conflicting and insufficient, and the balance of benefits and harms cannot be determined. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends against screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnant persons not at increased risk for preterm delivery. (D recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnant persons at increased risk for preterm delivery. (I statement).

2 Guideline [Guidelines for the use of post-traumatic tetanus vaccines and passive immune preparation]. 2020

Wang, C L / Liu, S / Shao, Z J / Yin, Z D / Chen, Q J / Ma, X / Ma, C / Wang, Q / Wang, L H / Deng, J K / Li, Y X / Zhao, Z X / Wu, D / Wu, J / Zhang, L / Yao, K H / Gao, Y / Xie, X. ·Emergency Department/Trauma Center, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing 100044, China. · Emergency Department, First Hospital of Peking University, Beijing 100034, China. · National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China. · National Immunization Programme, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100050, China. · Emergency Department, Beijing Hepingli Hospital, Beijing 100013, China. · National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing 102629, China. · Chongqing Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Chongqing 400042, China. · Emergency of Infectious Disease, Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100015, China. · Division of Infectious Diseases, Shenzhen Children's Hospital, Shenzhen 518038, China. · Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Kunming 650022, China. · Beijing Center for Disease Prevention and Control,Beijing 100013, China. · Shandong Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Jinan 250012, China. · Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University/Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing 100045, China. · Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055, China. ·Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi · Pubmed #32164124.

ABSTRACT: Post-traumatic tetanus is the main type of non-neonatal tetanus. To reduce the incidence and mortality rateof tetanus and guide the primary medical institutions to prevent and control tetanus after trauma, the National Immunization Planning Technical Working Group of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention has compiled this document in the reference with Position Paper by World Health Organization, and the latest research progress both at home and abroad. The guidelines focus on the basic procedures for the prevention and treatment of post-traumatic tetanus, the application of tetanus vaccines and immune preparation, and pre-exposure immunization in high-risk populations of trauma.

3 Guideline [Intersociety guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Clostridioides difficile infections]. 2020

Barcán, Laura / Ducatenzeiler, Laura / Bangher, María Del Carmen / Barcelona, Laura / Cornistein, Wanda / Daciuk, Lucía / De Paula, Juan / Desse, Jaier / Dictar, Miguel / Fernández-Canigia, Liliana / Nacinovich, Fancisco / Scapellato, Pablo / Martínez, Jorge Víctor / Anonymous9911112 / Anonymous9921112 / Anonymous9931112 / Anonymous9941112 / Anonymous9951112 / Anonymous9961112 / Anonymous9971112 / Anonymous9981112 / Anonymous9991112 / Anonymous10001112. ·Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. E-mail: laura.barcan@hospitalitaliano.org.ar. · Sociedad Argentina de Infectología (SADI). · Hospital Italiano de San Justo Agustín Rocca, San Justo. Pcia. de Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Instituto de Cardiología de Corrientes, Corrientes, Argentina. · Hospital Municipal Dr. Bernardo Houssay, Vicente López, Pcia. de Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Dr. Stamboulian, Servicio de Salud, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Hospital Universitario Austral, Pilar, Pcia. de Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Hospital Nacional Alejandro Posadas, El Palomar, Pcia. de Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Sociedad Argentina de Gastroenterología (SAGE). · Hospital Zonal Dr. Enrique Erill, Pcia. de Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Instituto Alexander Fleming, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Hospital Alemán, Buenos Aires. · Subcomisión de Bacterias Anaerobias, Sociedad Argentina de Bacteriología, Micología y Parasitología Clínicas (SADEBAC), Asociación Argentina de Microbiología (AAM). · Instituto Cardiovascular Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Hospital Donación Francisco Santojanni, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Hospital Británico, Buenos Aires, Argentina. ·Medicina (B Aires) · Pubmed #31961792.

ABSTRACT: Clostridioides difficile infections (CDI) are among the leading causes of health care-associated infections. The epidemiology of CDI has undergone major changes in the last decade, showing an increase in incidence, severity, and rate of relapse. These guidelines were developed by specialists from four scientific societies: Sociedad Argentina de Infectología (SADI), Sociedad Argentina de Gastroenterología (SAGE), Sociedad Argentina de Bacteriología, Micología y Parasitología Clínicas (SADEBAC) and Asociación de Enfermeras en Control de Infecciones (ADECI). The objective of these intersociety guidelines is to provide national recommendations on CDI diagnosis, treatment and prevention. The methodology used involved the systematic review of the bibliography available up to December 2018, which was performed by six groups formed ad hoc: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, Fecal Microbiota Transplantation, Special Populations, and Infection Control. The conclusions were presented and discussed in meetings held by each individual group and plenary meetings. In this document, updated diagnosis algorithms, therapeutic options (including fecal microbiota transplant) for immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients are presented, as well as strategies for the control of C. difficile infection.

4 Guideline AGA Clinical Practice Guidelines on Management of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia. 2020

Gupta, Samir / Li, Dan / El Serag, Hashem B / Davitkov, Perica / Altayar, Osama / Sultan, Shahnaz / Falck-Ytter, Yngve / Mustafa, Reem A. ·Department of Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California; Division of Gastroenterology and the Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California. · Department of Gastroenterology, Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center, Santa Clara, California; Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California. · Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Veterans Administration, Northeast Ohio Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio; Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Gastroenterology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Department of Veterans Affairs Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio; Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #31816298.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline [Multidrug-resistant bacteria detection in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)]. 2020

Brissot, Eolia / Villate, Alban / Alsuliman, Tamim / Beauvais, David / Bonnin, Agnès / Mear, Jean-Baptiste / Souchet, Laetitia / Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim / Bazarbachi, Ali. ·Sorbonne université, hôpital Saint-Antoine, service d'hématologie clinique et thérapie cellulaire, Inserm, UMRs 938, 75012 Paris, France. Electronic address: eolia.brissot@aphp.fr. · CHRU de Tours, service d'hématologie clinique, 37000 Tours, France. · Sorbonne université, hôpital Saint-Antoine, service d'hématologie clinique et thérapie cellulaire, Inserm, UMRs 938, 75012 Paris, France. · CHU de Lille, université de Lille, LIRIC, Inserm U995, 59000 Lille, France. · CHRU de Rennes, service d'hématologie clinique, 35000 Rennes, France. · Sorbonne université, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, service d'hématologie clinique, 75013 Paris, France. · American university of Beirut, department of internal medicine, Beyrouth, Liban. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #31635753.

ABSTRACT: The Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC) organizes annual workshops in the attempt to harmonize clinical practices among different francophone transplantation centers. Here we report our recommendations regarding detection of the multidrug-resistant bacteria in hematology.

6 Guideline Best Practice Statement on Urologic Procedures and Antimicrobial Prophylaxis. 2020

Lightner, Deborah J / Wymer, Kevin / Sanchez, Joyce / Kavoussi, Louis. ·American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc., Linthicum, Maryland. ·J Urol · Pubmed #31441676.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The primary rationale for antimicrobial prophylaxis (AP) is to decrease the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) and other preventable periprocedural infections, with the secondary goal of reducing antibiotic overuse. This Best Practice Statement (BPS) updates the prior American Urological Association (AUA) BPS and creates a comprehensive and user-friendly reference for clinicians caring for adult patients who are undergoing urologic procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Recommendations are based on a review of English language peer-reviewed literature from 2006 through October 2018 and were made by consensus by a multidisciplinary panel. The search parameters included timing, re-dosing, and duration of AP across urologic procedures where there was the possibility of SSI. Excluded from the search were the management of infections outside the genitourinary (GU) tract and pediatric procedures. RESULTS: Single-dose AP is recommended for most urologic cases and antimicrobials should only be used when medically necessary, for the shortest duration possible, and not beyond case completion. Surgeons are the most accurate discerners of an SSI, and should use standard definitions to make better calculations of patient risk. The risk classification developed is dependent on the likelihood of developing SSI, and not the associated consequences of SSI. CONCLUSIONS: The AUA developed a multi-disciplinary BPS to guide clinicians on the proper usage of AP across urologic procedures and wound classifications. It is recommended that the lowest dose of antimicrobials be administered to decrease the risk of infection and to minimize the risk of drug-resistant organisms.

7 Guideline 2019 update of EULAR recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases. 2020

Furer, Victoria / Rondaan, Christien / Heijstek, Marloes W / Agmon-Levin, Nancy / van Assen, Sander / Bijl, Marc / Breedveld, Ferry C / D'Amelio, Raffaele / Dougados, Maxime / Kapetanovic, Meliha Crnkic / van Laar, Jacob M / de Thurah, A / Landewé, Robert Bm / Molto, Anna / Müller-Ladner, Ulf / Schreiber, Karen / Smolar, Leo / Walker, Jim / Warnatz, Klaus / Wulffraat, Nico M / Elkayam, Ori. ·Rheumatology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel furer.rheum@gmail.com. · Tel Aviv University Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Medical Microbiology and Infection Prevention, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Internal Medicine and Allergology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel. · Department of Internal Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Treant Care Group, Hoogeveen, The Netherlands. · Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Martini Hospital Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Molecolare, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy. · Hopital Cochin, Rheumatology, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund, Sweden. · Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology, University Medical Centre Utrecht and Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Rheumatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, AMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Rheumatology, Zuyderland MC, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Giessen University, Bad Nauheim, Germany. · Department of Thrombosis and Haemophilia, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, King Christian X's Hospital for Rheumatology Diseases, Graasten, Denmark. · Patient Research Partner, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Patient Research Partner, Elgin, UK. · Center for Chronic Immunodeficiency (CCI), University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Pediatrics Immunology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Rheumatology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #31413005.

ABSTRACT: To update the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD) published in 2011. Four systematic literature reviews were performed regarding the incidence/prevalence of vaccine-preventable infections among patients with AIIRD; efficacy, immunogenicity and safety of vaccines; effect of anti-rheumatic drugs on the response to vaccines; effect of vaccination of household of AIIRDs patients. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and expert opinion. The updated recommendations comprise six overarching principles and nine recommendations. The former address the need for an annual vaccination status assessment, shared decision-making and timing of vaccination, favouring vaccination during quiescent disease, preferably prior to the initiation of immunosuppression. Non-live vaccines can be safely provided to AIIRD patients regardless of underlying therapy, whereas live-attenuated vaccines may be considered with caution. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination should be strongly considered for the majority of patients with AIIRD. Tetanus toxoid and human papilloma virus vaccination should be provided to AIIRD patients as recommended for the general population. Hepatitis A, hepatitis B and herpes zoster vaccination should be administered to AIIRD patients at risk. Immunocompetent household members of patients with AIIRD should receive vaccines according to national guidelines, except for the oral poliomyelitis vaccine. Live-attenuated vaccines should be avoided during the first 6 months of life in newborns of mothers treated with biologics during the second half of pregnancy. These 2019 EULAR recommendations provide an up-to-date guidance on the management of vaccinations in patients with AIIRD.

8 Guideline Use of Anthrax Vaccine in the United States: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2019. 2019

Bower, William A / Schiffer, Jarad / Atmar, Robert L / Keitel, Wendy A / Friedlander, Arthur M / Liu, Lindy / Yu, Yon / Stephens, David S / Quinn, Conrad P / Hendricks, Katherine / Anonymous2651037. · ·MMWR Recomm Rep · Pubmed #31834290.

ABSTRACT: This report updates the 2009 recommendations from the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding use of anthrax vaccine in the United States (Wright JG, Quinn CP, Shadomy S, Messonnier N. Use of anthrax vaccine in the United States: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP)], 2009. MMWR Recomm Rep 2010;59[No. RR-6]). The report 1) summarizes data on estimated efficacy in humans using a correlates of protection model and safety data published since the last ACIP review, 2) provides updated guidance for use of anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and in conjunction with antimicrobials for postexposure prophylaxis (PEP), 3) provides updated guidance regarding PrEP vaccination of emergency and other responders, 4) summarizes the available data on an investigational anthrax vaccine (AV7909), and 5) discusses the use of anthrax antitoxins for PEP. Changes from previous guidance in this report include the following: 1) a booster dose of AVA for PrEP can be given every 3 years instead of annually to persons not at high risk for exposure to Bacillus anthracis who have previously received the initial AVA 3-dose priming and 2-dose booster series and want to maintain protection; 2) during a large-scale emergency response, AVA for PEP can be administered using an intramuscular route if the subcutaneous route of administration poses significant materiel, personnel, or clinical challenges that might delay or preclude vaccination; 3) recommendations on dose-sparing AVA PEP regimens if the anthrax vaccine supply is insufficient to vaccinate all potentially exposed persons; and 4) clarification on the duration of antimicrobial therapy when used in conjunction with vaccine for PEP.These updated recommendations can be used by health care providers and guide emergency preparedness officials and planners who are developing plans to provide anthrax vaccine, including preparations for a wide-area aerosol release of B. anthracis spores. The recommendations also provide guidance on dose-sparing options, if needed, to extend the supply of vaccine to increase the number of persons receiving PEP in a mass casualty event.

9 Guideline Protocol for the management of newly diagnosed cases of tuberculosis. 2019

Katiyar, S K / Katiyar, Sandeep. ·Department of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur, India. Electronic address: skkatiyar_in@yahoo.com. · Apollo Spectra Hospital, Kanpur, India. ·Indian J Tuberc · Pubmed #31813442.

ABSTRACT: To achieve the targets and milestones set by the World Health Organization (3) to their 'End TB Strategy' to stop the global TB epidemic by 2035 and India's commitment to eliminate this disease from the country by 2025 (4), it will be important to improve the case finding and effectively treat cases of tuberculosis both in the public and the private sector, the latter still holding a major share. To strengthen the management of tuberculosis in the private sector and to have uniformity in the treatment, we need to have a protocol, suitable to our socio-economic conditions, which will not only provide guidance in getting better treatment outcomes, but also help to interrupt transmission of the disease in the community, besides curbing the development of drug resistance. Several guidelines on the management of tuberculosis are available, but these are considered as very good starting points for treatment but not the only treatment option, since guidelines cannot address every possible situation and substitute for good clinical judgment (5).Hence to meet these requirements and shortcomings following protocol is provided to manage cases of tuberculosis and resolve several issues related to it.

10 Guideline Treatment of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis. An Official ATS/CDC/ERS/IDSA Clinical Practice Guideline. 2019

Nahid, Payam / Mase, Sundari R / Migliori, Giovanni Battista / Sotgiu, Giovanni / Bothamley, Graham H / Brozek, Jan L / Cattamanchi, Adithya / Cegielski, J Peter / Chen, Lisa / Daley, Charles L / Dalton, Tracy L / Duarte, Raquel / Fregonese, Federica / Horsburgh, C Robert / Ahmad Khan, Faiz / Kheir, Fayez / Lan, Zhiyi / Lardizabal, Alfred / Lauzardo, Michael / Mangan, Joan M / Marks, Suzanne M / McKenna, Lindsay / Menzies, Dick / Mitnick, Carole D / Nilsen, Diana M / Parvez, Farah / Peloquin, Charles A / Raftery, Ann / Schaaf, H Simon / Shah, Neha S / Starke, Jeffrey R / Wilson, John W / Wortham, Jonathan M / Chorba, Terence / Seaworth, Barbara. · ·Am J Respir Crit Care Med · Pubmed #31729908.

ABSTRACT:

11 Guideline Acute subglottic laryngitis. Etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical picture. 2019

Mazurek, Henryk / Bręborowicz, Anna / Doniec, Zbigniew / Emeryk, Andrzej / Krenke, Katarzyna / Kulus, Marek / Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata. ·Department of Pneumology and Cystic Fibrosis, Institute of Tuberculosis and Pulmonary Diseases, Rabka-Zdrój, Poland. hmazurek@igrabka.edu.pl. · State Higher Vocational School, Nowy Sącz, Poland. hmazurek@igrabka.edu.pl. · Department of Pulmonology, Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Science, Poznań, Poland. · Department of Pneumology, Institute of Tuberculosis and Pulmonary Diseases, Rabka-Zdrój, Poland. · Department of Pulmonary Diseases and Children Rheumatology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland. · Department of Pediatric Pneumonology and Allergy, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Otolaryngology, Children's Hospital, Warsaw, Poland. ·Adv Respir Med · Pubmed #31680234.

ABSTRACT: In about 3% of children, viral infections of the airways that develop in early childhood lead to narrowing of the laryngeal lumen in the subglottic region resulting in symptoms such as hoarseness, abarking cough, stridor, and dyspnea. These infections may eventually cause respiratory failure. The disease is often called acute subglottic laryngitis (ASL). Terms such as pseudocroup, croup syndrome, acute obstructive laryngitis and spasmodic croup are used interchangeably when referencing this disease. Although the differential diagnosis should include other rare diseases such as epiglottitis, diphtheria, fibrinous laryngitis and bacterial tracheobronchitis, the diagnosis of ASL should always be made on the basis of clinical criteria.

12 Guideline [Position statement of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics-Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (AEP-SEIP) on the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections]. 2019

Aguilera-Alonso, David / Escosa-García, Luis / Goycochea-Valdivia, Walter Alfredo / Soler-Palacín, Pere / Saavedra-Lozano, Jesús / Rodrigo, Carlos / Cercenado, Emilia / Ramos, José Tomás / Baquero-Artigao, Fernando. ·Sección de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Servicio de Pediatría, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, España. Electronic address: david.aguilera@salud.madrid.org. · Servicio de Pediatría, Enfermedades Infecciosas y Patología Tropical, Hospital La Paz, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Inmunología, Reumatología e Infectología Pediátrica, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, España. · Unitat de Patologia Infecciosa i Immunodeficiències de Pediatria, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España. · Sección de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Servicio de Pediatría, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, España; Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Microbiología y Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, España; CIBERES, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias, CB06/06/0058, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, España. ·An Pediatr (Barc) · Pubmed #31635925.

ABSTRACT: A progressive increase in the incidence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant microorganisms is being reported. Among these resistant microorganisms, the main threats are extended-spectrum β-lactamase-, AmpC-, and carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. To address this important problem, it is essential to establish pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship programs, perform active epidemiological surveillance and develop an adequate infection control policy. The therapeutic approach of these infections is often complex, frequently requiring antibiotics with less experience in children. In this position document made by the Spanish Association of Pediatrics and the Spanish Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, the epidemiology and treatment of these infections are reviewed according to the best available evidence.

13 Guideline Diagnosis and Treatment of Adults with Community-acquired Pneumonia. An Official Clinical Practice Guideline of the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2019

Metlay, Joshua P / Waterer, Grant W / Long, Ann C / Anzueto, Antonio / Brozek, Jan / Crothers, Kristina / Cooley, Laura A / Dean, Nathan C / Fine, Michael J / Flanders, Scott A / Griffin, Marie R / Metersky, Mark L / Musher, Daniel M / Restrepo, Marcos I / Whitney, Cynthia G. · ·Am J Respir Crit Care Med · Pubmed #31573350.

ABSTRACT:

14 Guideline Management of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (excluding newborns). Long version with arguments. 2019

Hoen, B / Varon, E / de Debroucker, T / Fantin, B / Grimprel, E / Wolff, M / Duval, X / Anonymous2251070. ·Maladies Infectieuses, CHU de Guadeloupe, route de Chauvel, 97159 Pointe-à-Pitre cedex, France. · Hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France. · Centre Hospitalier Général, 2, rue du Dr-Delafontaine, 93200 Saint-Denis, France. · Hôpital Beaujon, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Hôpital Trousseau, 26, avenue du Dr-Arnold-Netter, 75012 Paris, France. · Hôpital Bichat - Claude Bernard, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75877 Paris, France. · Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre d'investigation clinique, hôpital Bichat - Claude-Bernard, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. Electronic address: xavier.duval@aphp.fr. ·Med Mal Infect · Pubmed #31402154.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline Guide to the safe use of needlefree connectors. 2019

Harrold, Karen. ·IV Access Nurse Consultant, East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust. ·Br J Nurs · Pubmed #31347377.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline Management of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (excluding newborns). Short text. 2019

Hoen, B / Varon, E / Debroucker, T / Fantin, B / Grimprel, E / Wolff, M / Duval, X / Anonymous2161070. ·Maladies infectieuses, CHU de Guadeloupe, route de Chauvel, 97159 Pointe-à-Pitre cedex, Guadeloupe. · Hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France. · Centre hospitalier général, 2, rue du Dr-Delafontaine, 93200 Saint-Denis, France. · Hôpital Beaujon, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Hôpital Trousseau, 26, avenue du Dr-Arnold-Netter, 75012 Paris, France. · Hôpital Bichat-Claude-Bernard, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75877 Paris, France. · Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre d'investigation clinique, hôpital Bichat-Claude-Bernard, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. Electronic address: xavier.duval@aphp.fr. ·Med Mal Infect · Pubmed #31345498.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline British Society of Gastroenterology guidelines on the diagnosis and management of patients at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma. 2019

Banks, Matthew / Graham, David / Jansen, Marnix / Gotoda, Takuji / Coda, Sergio / di Pietro, Massimiliano / Uedo, Noriya / Bhandari, Pradeep / Pritchard, D Mark / Kuipers, Ernst J / Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel / Novelli, Marco R / Ragunath, Krish / Shepherd, Neil / Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario. ·University College London Hospital, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Research Department of Targeted Intervention, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London Division of Biosciences, London, UK. · Department of Histopathology, University College London, London, UK. · Gastroenterology, Nihon University School of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, Japan. · Endoscopy, Inhealth Group, London, UK. · MRC Cancer Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Gastroenterology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Endoscopic Training and Learning Center, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka, Japan. · Gastroenterology, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK. · Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, Nottingham University Hospital, Nottingham, UK. · Gloucestershire Cellular Pathology Laboratory, Cheltenham General Hospital, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, UK. · Gastroenterology, IPO Porto, Porto, Portugal. ·Gut · Pubmed #31278206.

ABSTRACT: Gastric adenocarcinoma carries a poor prognosis, in part due to the late stage of diagnosis. Risk factors include

18 Guideline Lyme borreliosis and other tick-borne diseases. Guidelines from the French scientific societies. 2019

Gocko, X / Lenormand, C / Lemogne, C / Bouiller, K / Gehanno, J-F / Rabaud, C / Perrot, S / Eldin, C / de Broucker, T / Roblot, F / Toubiana, J / Sellal, F / Vuillemet, F / Sordet, C / Fantin, B / Lina, G / Sobas, C / Jaulhac, B / Figoni, J / Chirouze, C / Hansmann, Y / Hentgen, V / Caumes, E / Dieudonné, M / Picone, O / Bodaghi, B / Gangneux, J-P / Degeilh, B / Partouche, H / Saunier, A / Sotto, A / Raffetin, A / Monsuez, J-J / Michel, C / Boulanger, N / Cathebras, P / Tattevin, P / Anonymous1041059. ·Département de médecine générale, faculté de médecine, 42000 Saint-Étienne, France. · Dermatologie, hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg et faculté de médecine, université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Psychiatrie, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, AP-HP.5, Inserm U1266, université Paris, 75015 Descartes, Paris, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, UMR CNRS 6249 université Bourgogne Franche Comté, 25000 Besançon, France. · Médecine du travail, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 76000 Rouen, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 54100 Nancy, France. · Centre d'étude et de traitement de la douleur, hôpital Cochin, 75014 Paris, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, IHU Méditerranée infection, centre hospitalo-universitaire Timone, 13000 Marseille, France. · Neurologie, hôpital Delafontaine, 93200 Saint-DenisFrance. · Inserm U1070, Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 86000 Poitiers, France. · Service de pédiatrie générale et maladies infectieuses, hôpital Necker-Enfants malades, AP-HP, 75014 Paris, France. · Département de neurologie, hôpitaux Civil, 68000 Colmar, France. · Rhumatologie, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Médecine interne, hôpital Beaujon, université Paris Diderot, Inserm UMR 1137 IAME, 92110 Clichy, France. · Laboratoire de bactériologie et CNR des Borrelia, faculté de médecine et centre hospitalo-universitaire, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Microbiologie, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 69000 Lyon, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, hôpital Avicenne, 930222 Bobigny, France; Santé publique France, 94410 St.-Maurice, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Pédiatrie, centre hospitalier, 78000 Versailles, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Centre Max-Weber, CNRS, université Lyon 2, 69000 Lyon, France. · Maternité Louis-Mourier, 92700 Colombes, France. · Ophtalmologie, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Laboratoire de parasitologie-mycologie, UMR_S 1085 Irset, université Rennes1-Inserm-EHESP, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 35000 Rennes, France. · Cabinet de médecine générale, 93400 Saint-Ouen, département de médecine générale, faculté de médecine, université Paris Descartes, 75006 Paris, France. · Médecine interne et maladies infectieuses, centre hospitalier, 24750 Périgueux, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 30000 Nîmes, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalier intercommunal, 94190 Villeneuve-St-Georges, France. · Cardiologie, hôpital René-Muret, 93270 Sevran, France. · Médecine générale, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Médecine interne, hôpital Nord, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 42000 Saint-Étienne, France. · Maladies infectieuses et reanimation médicale, hôpital Pontchaillou, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 35000 Rennes, France. Electronic address: pierre.tattevin@chu-rennes.fr. ·Med Mal Infect · Pubmed #31257066.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline 2019 European guideline on the management of lymphogranuloma venereum. 2019

de Vries, H J C / de Barbeyrac, B / de Vrieze, N H N / Viset, J D / White, J A / Vall-Mayans, M / Unemo, M. ·STI Outpatient Clinic, Infectious Diseases Department, Public Health Service Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Institute for Infection and Immunity (AI&II), Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Mycoplasmal and Chlamydial Infections in Humans, University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Mycoplasmal and Chlamydial Infections in Humans, INRA, Bordeaux, France. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, Laboratoire de Bacteriologie, French National Reference Center for Bacterial STIs, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Dermatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Genitourinary Medicine, Western Health & Social Care Trust, Londonderry, UK. · STI Unit Vall d'Hebron-Drassanes, Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #31243838.

ABSTRACT: New or important issues in this updated version of the 2013 European guideline on the management of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV): EPIDEMIOLOGY: Lymphogranuloma venereum continues to be endemic among European men who have sex with men (MSM) since 2003. Lymphogranuloma venereum infections in heterosexuals are extremely rare in Europe, and there is no evidence of transmission of LGV in the European heterosexual population. AETIOLOGY AND TRANSMISSION: Chlamydia trachomatis serovars/genovars L2b and L2 are the causative strains in the majority of cases in Europe. CLINICAL FEATURES: Among MSM, about 25% of the anorectal LGV infections are asymptomatic. Genital infections among MSM are rare; the ratio of genital vs. anorectal LGV infections is 1 in 15. DIAGNOSIS: To diagnose LGV, a sample tested C. trachomatis positive with a commercial nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) platform should be confirmed with an LGV discriminatory NAAT. TREATMENT: Doxycycline 100 mg twice a day orally for 21 days is the recommended treatment for LGV. This same treatment is recommended also in asymptomatic patients and contacts of LGV patients. If another regimen is used, a test of cure (TOC) must be performed.

20 Guideline [Management of common bacterial skin infections]. 2019

Anonymous3360994. ·Service des bonnes pratiques professionnelles, 5, avenue du Stade-de-France, 93218 Saint-Denis-La-Plaine cedex, France. ·J Med Vasc · Pubmed #31213300.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline Consensus on the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa - Brazilian Society of Dermatology. 2019

Magalhães, Renata Ferreira / Rivitti-Machado, Maria Cecília / Duarte, Gleison Vieira / Souto, Roberto / Nunes, Daniel Holthausen / Chaves, Mario / Hirata, Sérgio Henrique / Ramos, Andrea Machado Coelho. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brazil. · Dermatology Outpatient Clinic, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Department of Dermatology, Instituto Bahiano de Imunoterapia, Salvador, BA, Brasil. · Dermatology Service, Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. · Department of Dermatology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. ·An Bras Dermatol · Pubmed #31166401.

ABSTRACT: Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic immune mediated disease of universal distribution that causes great damage to the quality of life of the affected individual, whose prevalence is estimated at 0.41% in the Brazilian population. The objective of this work was update on physiopathogenesis, diagnosis and classification of hidradenitis suppurativa and to establish therapeutic recommendations in the Brazilian reality. It was organized as a work group composed of eight dermatologists from several institutions of the country with experience in the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa and carried out review on the topic. Recommendations were elaborated and voted by modified Delphi system and statistical analysis of the results was performed. The Brazilian consensus on the clinical approach of hidradenitis suppurativa had the support of the Brazilian Society of Dermatology.

22 Guideline Lyme borreliosis and other tick-borne diseases. Guidelines from the French scientific societies (II). Biological diagnosis, treatment, persistent symptoms after documented or suspected Lyme borreliosis. 2019

Jaulhac, B / Saunier, A / Caumes, E / Bouiller, K / Gehanno, J F / Rabaud, C / Perrot, S / Eldin, C / de Broucker, T / Roblot, F / Toubiana, J / Sellal, F / Vuillemet, F / Sordet, C / Fantin, B / Lina, G / Sobas, C / Gocko, X / Figoni, J / Chirouze, C / Hansmann, Y / Hentgen, V / Cathebras, P / Dieudonné, M / Picone, O / Bodaghi, B / Gangneux, J P / Degeilh, B / Partouche, H / Lenormand, C / Sotto, A / Raffetin, A / Monsuez, J J / Michel, C / Boulanger, N / Lemogne, C / Tattevin, P / Anonymous941059. ·Laboratoire de bactériologie et cnr des Borrelia, faculté de médecine et centre hospitalo-universitaire, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Médecine interne et maladies infectieuses, centre hospitalier, 24750 Périgueux, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, UMR CNRS 6249 Université Bourgogne Franche Comté, 25000 Besançon, France. · Médecine du travail, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 76000 Rouen, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 54100 Nancy, France. · Centre d'étude et de traitement de la douleur, hôpital Cochin, 75014 Paris, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, ihu méditerranée infection, centre hospitalo-universitaire Timone, 13000 Marseille, France. · Neurologie, hôpital Delafontaine, 92300 Saint-Denis, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, inserm U1070, 86000 Poitiers, France. · Service de pédiatrie générale et maladies infectieuses, hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP, 75014 Paris, France. · Département de neurologie, hôpitaux civil, 68000 Colmar, France. · Rhumatologie, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Médecine interne, hôpital Beaujon, université Paris Diderot, Inserm UMR 1137 IAME, 92110 Clichy, France. · Microbiologie, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 69000 Lyon, France. · Département de médecine générale, faculté de médecine, 42000 Saint-Etienne, France. · Maladies Infectieuses et tropicales, hôpital Avicenne, 93022 Bobigny, France; Santé publique France, 94410 St Maurice, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Pédiatrie, centre hospitalier, 78000 Versailles, France. · Médecine interne, hôpital Nord, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 42000 Saint-Etienne, France. · Centre Max Weber, CNRS, Université Lyon 2, 69000 Lyon, France. · Maternité Louis Mourier, 92700 Colombes, France. · Ophtalmologie, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Laboratoire de parasitologie-Mycologie, UMR_S 1085 Irset université Rennes1-Inserm-EHESP, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 35000 Rennes, France. · Cabinet de médecine générale, Saint-Ouen, département de médecine Générale, faculté de médecine. université Paris Descartes, 93400 Paris, France. · Dermatologie, hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg et faculté de médecine, université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 30000 Nîmes, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalier intercommunal, 94190 Villeneuve-St-Georges, France. · Cardiologie, hôpital René Muret, 93270 Sevran, France. · Médecine générale, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Psychiatrie, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, AP-HP.5, Inserm U1266; Université Paris Descartes, 75015 Paris, France. · Maladies infectieuses et réanimation médicale, hôpital Pontchaillou, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 35033 Rennes, France. Electronic address: pierre.tattevin@chu-rennes.fr. ·Med Mal Infect · Pubmed #31155367.

ABSTRACT: The serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis is based on a two-tier strategy: a screening test using an immunoenzymatic technique (ELISA), followed if positive by a confirmatory test with a western blot technique for its better specificity. Lyme serology has poor sensitivity (30-40%) for erythema migrans and should not be performed. The seroconversion occurs after approximately 6 weeks, with IgG detection (sensitivity and specificity both>90%). Serological follow-up is not recommended as therapeutic success is defined by clinical criteria only. For neuroborreliosis, it is recommended to simultaneously perform ELISA tests in samples of blood and cerebrospinal fluid to test for intrathecal synthesis of Lyme antibodies. Given the continuum between early localized and disseminated borreliosis, and the efficacy of doxycycline for the treatment of neuroborreliosis, doxycycline is preferred as the first-line regimen of erythema migrans (duration, 14 days; alternative: amoxicillin) and neuroborreliosis (duration, 14 days if early, 21 days if late; alternative: ceftriaxone). Treatment of articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis is based on doxycycline, ceftriaxone, or amoxicillin for 28 days. Patients with persistent symptoms after appropriate treatment of Lyme borreliosis should not be prescribed repeated or prolonged antibacterial treatment. Some patients present with persistent and pleomorphic symptoms after documented or suspected Lyme borreliosis. Another condition is eventually diagnosed in 80% of them.

23 Guideline Tuberculosis Screening, Testing, and Treatment of U.S. Health Care Personnel: Recommendations from the National Tuberculosis Controllers Association and CDC, 2019. 2019

Sosa, Lynn E / Njie, Gibril J / Lobato, Mark N / Bamrah Morris, Sapna / Buchta, William / Casey, Megan L / Goswami, Neela D / Gruden, MaryAnn / Hurst, Bobbi Jo / Khan, Amera R / Kuhar, David T / Lewinsohn, David M / Mathew, Trini A / Mazurek, Gerald H / Reves, Randall / Paulos, Lisa / Thanassi, Wendy / Will, Lorna / Belknap, Robert. · ·MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep · Pubmed #31099768.

ABSTRACT: The 2005 CDC guidelines for preventing Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in health care settings include recommendations for baseline tuberculosis (TB) screening of all U.S. health care personnel and annual testing for health care personnel working in medium-risk settings or settings with potential for ongoing transmission (1). Using evidence from a systematic review conducted by a National Tuberculosis Controllers Association (NTCA)-CDC work group, and following methods adapted from the Guide to Community Preventive Services (2,3), the 2005 CDC recommendations for testing U.S. health care personnel have been updated and now include 1) TB screening with an individual risk assessment and symptom evaluation at baseline (preplacement); 2) TB testing with an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) or a tuberculin skin test (TST) for persons without documented prior TB disease or latent TB infection (LTBI); 3) no routine serial TB testing at any interval after baseline in the absence of a known exposure or ongoing transmission; 4) encouragement of treatment for all health care personnel with untreated LTBI, unless treatment is contraindicated; 5) annual symptom screening for health care personnel with untreated LTBI; and 6) annual TB education of all health care personnel.

24 Guideline Lyme borreliosis and other tick-borne diseases. Guidelines from the French Scientific Societies (I): prevention, epidemiology, diagnosis. 2019

Figoni, J / Chirouze, C / Hansmann, Y / Lemogne, C / Hentgen, V / Saunier, A / Bouiller, K / Gehanno, J F / Rabaud, C / Perrot, S / Caumes, E / Eldin, C / de Broucker, T / Jaulhac, B / Roblot, F / Toubiana, J / Sellal, F / Vuillemet, F / Sordet, C / Fantin, B / Lina, G / Gocko, X / Dieudonné, M / Picone, O / Bodaghi, B / Gangneux, J P / Degeilh, B / Partouche, H / Lenormand, C / Sotto, A / Raffetin, A / Monsuez, J J / Michel, C / Boulanger, N / Cathebras, P / Tattevin, P / Anonymous761059. ·Santé Publique France, 94410 St Maurice, France; Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, hôpital Avicenne, 93022 Bobigny, France. · UMR CNRS 6249, maladies infectieuses et tropicales, université Bourgogne Franche Comté, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 25000 Besançon, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Inserm U1266, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, université Paris Descartes, AP-HP, 75015 Paris, France. · Centre hospitalier, 78000 Versailles, France. · Médecine interne et maladies infectieuses, centre hospitalier, 24750 Périgueux, France. · Médecine du travail, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 76000 Rouen, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 54100 Nancy, France. · Centre d'étude et de traitement de la douleur, hôpital Cochin, 75014 Paris, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, IHU Méditerranée Infection, centre hospitalo-universitaire Timone, 13000 Marseille, France. · Neurologie, hôpital Delafontaine, 93200 Saint-Denis, France. · Laboratoire de bactériologie et CNR des Borrelia, faculté de médecine et centre hospitalo-universitaire, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Inserm U1070, maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 86000 Poitiers, France. · Service de pédiatrie générale et maladies infectieuses, hôpital Necker - Enfants Malades, AP-HP, 75014 Paris, France. · Département de neurologie, hôpitaux Civil, 68000 Colmar, France. · Rhumatologie, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Inserm UMR 1137 IAME, médecine interne, hôpital Beaujon, université Paris Diderot, 92110 Clichy, France. · Microbiologie, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 69000 Lyon, France. · Département de médecine générale, faculté de médecine, 42000 Saint-Étienne, France. · Centre Max Weber, CNRS, université Lyon 2, 69000 Lyon, France. · Maternité Louis-Mourier, 92700 Colombes, France. · Ophtalmologie, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · UMR_S 1085, Inserm-EHESP, laboratoire de parasitologie-mycologie, Irset université Rennes1, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 35000 Rennes, France. · Cabinet de médecine générale, 93400 Saint-Ouen, France; Département de médecine générale, faculté de médecine, université Paris Descartes, 75006 Paris, France. · Dermatologie, hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg et faculté de médecine, université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 30000 Nîmes, France. · Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, centre hospitalier intercommunal, 94190 Villeneuve-St-Georges, France. · Cardiologie, hôpital René Muret, 93270 Sevran, France. · Médecine générale, Strasbourg, 67000 France. · Médecine interne, hôpital Nord, centre hospitalo-universitaire, 42000 Saint-Étienne, France. · Service des maladies infectieuses et réanimation médicale, hôpital Pontchaillou, CHU Pontchaillou, 35033 Rennes cedex, France. Electronic address: pierre.tattevin@chu-rennes.fr. ·Med Mal Infect · Pubmed #31097370.

ABSTRACT: Lyme borreliosis is transmitted en France by the tick Ixodes ricinus, endemic in metropolitan France. In the absence of vaccine licensed for use in humans, primary prevention mostly relies on mechanical protection (clothes covering most parts of the body) that may be completed by chemical protection (repulsives). Secondary prevention relies on early detection of ticks after exposure, and mechanical extraction. There is currently no situation in France when prophylactic antibiotics would be recommended. The incidence of Lyme borreliosis in France, estimated through a network of general practitioners (réseau Sentinelles), and nationwide coding system for hospital stays, has not significantly changed between 2009 and 2017, with a mean incidence estimated at 53 cases/100,000 inhabitants/year, leading to 1.3 hospital admission/100,000 inhabitants/year. Other tick-borne diseases are much more seldom in France: tick-borne encephalitis (around 20 cases/year), spotted-fever rickettsiosis (primarily mediterranean spotted fever, around 10 cases/year), tularemia (50-100 cases/year, of which 20% are transmitted by ticks), human granulocytic anaplasmosis (<10 cases/year), and babesiosis (<5 cases/year). The main circumstances of diagnosis for Lyme borreliosis are cutaneous manifestations (primarily erythema migrans, much more rarely borrelial lymphocytoma and atrophic chronic acrodermatitis), neurological (<15% of cases, mostly meningoradiculitis and cranial nerve palsy, especially facial nerve) and rheumatologic (mostly knee monoarthritis, with recurrences). Cardiac and ophtalmologic manifestations are very rarely encountered.

25 Guideline International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases (ISCAID) guidelines for the diagnosis and management of bacterial urinary tract infections in dogs and cats. 2019

Weese, J Scott / Blondeau, Joseph / Boothe, Dawn / Guardabassi, Luca G / Gumley, Nigel / Papich, Mark / Jessen, Lisbeth Rem / Lappin, Michael / Rankin, Shelley / Westropp, Jodi L / Sykes, Jane. ·Dept of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G2W1, Canada. Electronic address: jsweese@uoguelph.ca. · Clinical Microbiology, Royal University Hospital and the Saskatchewan Health Authority, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; Departments of Microbiology and Immunology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Ophthalmology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. · Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, Auburn University, 36849, USA. · Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Stigbøjlen 4, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark; Department of Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts, AL9 7TA, United Kingdom. · Cedarview Animal Hospital, 4100 Strandherd Dr, #106, Ottawa, ON K2J 0V2, Canada. · Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine,4700 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA. · Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlaegevej 16, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, 300 West Drake Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. · School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. · School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Medicine & Epidemiology, 2108 Tupper Hall, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA. ·Vet J · Pubmed #30971357.

ABSTRACT: Urinary tract disease is a common clinical presentation in dogs and cats, and a common reason for antimicrobial prescription. This document is a revision and expansion on the 2011 Antimicrobial Use Guidelines for Treatment of Urinary Tract Disease in Dogs and Cats, providing recommendations for diagnosis and management of sporadic bacterial cystitis, recurrent bacterial cystitis, pyelonephritis, bacterial prostatitis, and subclinical bacteriuria. Issues pertaining to urinary catheters, medical dissolution of uroliths and prophylaxis for urological procedures are also addressed.

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