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Bipolar Disorder: HELP
Articles by Nicolas Hoertel
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Nicolas Hoertel wrote the following 8 articles about Bipolar Disorder.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Bipolar Depression. 2016

McMahon, Kibby / Herr, Nathaniel R / Zerubavel, Noga / Hoertel, Nicolas / Neacsiu, Andrada D. ·Cognitive-Behavioral Research and Treatment Program, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, 3026, 2213 Elba Street, Room 123, Durham, NC 27710, USA. · Department of Psychology, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20016, USA. · Cognitive-Behavioral Research and Treatment Program, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Duke University Medical Center, 3026, 2213 Elba Street, Room 123, Durham, NC 27710, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Corentin Celton Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), 4 parvis Corentin Celton, Issy-les-Moulineaux 92130, France; INSERM UMR 894, Psychiatry and Neurosciences Center, 2 ter rue d'Alésia, Paris 75014, France; PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris Descartes University, 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Paris 75006, France. · Cognitive-Behavioral Research and Treatment Program, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Duke University Medical Center, 3026, 2213 Elba Street, Room 123, Durham, NC 27710, USA. Electronic address: andrada.neacsiu@duke.edu. ·Psychiatr Clin North Am · Pubmed #26876317.

ABSTRACT: The gold standard for treating bipolar depression is based on the combination of mood stabilizers and psychotherapy. Therefore, the authors present evidence-based models and promising approaches for psychotherapy for bipolar depression. Cognitive-behavioral therapy, family focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and dialectical behavior therapy are discussed. Behavioral activation, the cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy, and the unified protocol as promising future directions are presented. This review informs medical providers of the most appropriate referral guidelines for psychotherapy for bipolar depression. The authors conclude with a decision tree delineating optimal referrals to each psychotherapy approach.

2 Review Novel routes to bipolar disorder drug discovery. 2013

Hoertel, Nicolas / de Maricourt, Pierre / Gorwood, Philip. ·Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Corentin-Celton, Service de psychiatrie, Issy-les-Moulineaux, Paris, France. ·Expert Opin Drug Discov · Pubmed #23706065.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and chronic medical condition typified by episodic recurrent mania (or hypomania) in addition to major depression. BD is associated with a number of negative outcomes including premature death, reduced quality of life and can also lead to other complications including impaired cognitive function. Unfortunately, the currently available pharmacological treatments for BD are insufficient for many with the condition. AREAS COVERED: This review focuses on known therapeutic targets of mood stabilizing drugs including: the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), the phosphoinositide pathway and protein kinase C (PKC), the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and histone deacetylases (HDACs). This article also presents new promising therapeutic targets including: the glutamatergic pathway, mitochondrial modulators, neuropeptide-converting endopeptidases, the insulin transduction pathway, the purinergic system and the melatoninergic system. EXPERT OPINION: Challenges in improving methods and tools to generate, integrate and analyze high-dimensional data are required to allow opening novel routes to BD drug discovery. Through the application of systems biology approaches and the use of bioinformatical tools to integrate all omics data, it will be possible in the near future to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology of BD. This will in turn lead to the identification and exploitation of new potential therapeutic approaches.

3 Article Psychiatric and physical outcomes of long-term use of lithium in older adults with bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: A cross-sectional multicenter study. 2019

Morlet, Elise / Costemale-Lacoste, Jean-François / Poulet, Emmanuel / McMahon, Kibby / Hoertel, Nicolas / Limosin, Frédéric / Anonymous931002. ·Department of Psychiatry, Corentin Celton Hospital, 4 Parvis Corentin Celton, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. · Department of Psychiatry, Corentin Celton Hospital, 4 Parvis Corentin Celton, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; INSERM UMRS 1178, CESP, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. Electronic address: dr.jfclacoste@gmail.com. · INSERM, U1028, CNRS, UMR5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, PSY-R2 Team, Lyon F-69000, France. · Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University, 2213 Elba Street, Durham, NC 27710, United States. · Department of Psychiatry, Corentin Celton Hospital, 4 Parvis Corentin Celton, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; INSERM UMR 894, Psychiatry and Neurosciences Center, Paris, France; Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #31446382.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Although lithium is widely used in current practice to treat bipolar disorder (BD) and treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) among older adults, little is known about its efficacy and tolerability in this population, which is generally excluded from randomized clinical trials. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of long-term use of lithium among older adults with BD and MDD. METHOD: Data from the Cohort of individuals with Schizophrenia and mood disorders Aged 55 years or more (CSA) were used. Two groups of patients with BD and MDD were compared: those who were currently receiving lithium versus those who were not. The effects of lithium on psychiatric (i.e., depressive symptoms severity, perceived clinical severity, rates of psychiatric admissions in the past-year), geriatric (overall and cognitive functioning) and physical outcomes (i.e., rates of non-psychiatric medical comorbidities and general hospital admissions in the past-year) were evaluated. All analyses were adjusted for age, sex, duration of disorder, diagnosis, smoking status, alcohol use, and use of antipsychotics, antiepileptics or antidepressants. RESULTS: Among the 281 older participants with BD or MDD, 15.7% were taking lithium for a mean duration of 12.5(SD = 11.6) years. Lithium use was associated with lower intensity of depressive symptoms, reduced perceived clinical global severity and lower benzodiazepine use (all p < 0.05), without being linked to greater rates of medical comorbidities, except for hypothyroidism. LIMITATIONS: Data were cross-sectional and data on lifetime history of psychotropic medications was not assessed. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that long-term lithium use may be efficient and relatively well-tolerated in older adults with BD or treatment-resistant MDD.

4 Article Insomnia and hypersomnia in major depressive episode: Prevalence, sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in a population-based study. 2018

Geoffroy, Pierre A / Hoertel, Nicolas / Etain, Bruno / Bellivier, Frank / Delorme, Richard / Limosin, Frédéric / Peyre, Hugo. ·Inserm, U1144, Paris F-75006, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1144, Paris F-75013, France; AP-HP, GH Saint-Louis - Lariboisière - F. Widal, Département de Psychiatrie et de Médecine Addictologique, 75475 Paris cedex 10, France; Fondation FondaMental, Créteil 94000, France. Electronic address: pierre.a.geoffroy@gmail.com. · Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), Corentin Celton Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; INSERM UMR 894, Psychiatry and Neurosciences Center; Paris Descartes University, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Paris Descartes University, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Inserm, U1144, Paris F-75006, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1144, Paris F-75013, France; AP-HP, GH Saint-Louis - Lariboisière - F. Widal, Département de Psychiatrie et de Médecine Addictologique, 75475 Paris cedex 10, France; Fondation FondaMental, Créteil 94000, France. · Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Robert Debré Hospital, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department, Paris, France. · Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Robert Debré Hospital, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department, Paris, France; Cognitive Sciences and Psycholinguistic Laboratory, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #28972930.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To examine (i) the frequency of different sleep complaints (early wake-up, trouble falling asleep, hypersomnia) and their co-occurrence and (ii) the sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity associated with each type of sleep profiles. METHODS: Data were drawn from the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a nationally representative survey of the US adult population (wave 1, 2001-2002; wave 2, 2004-2005). The primary analyses were limited to 3573 participants who had a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of major depressive episode (MDE) between the two waves. We used a multiple regression model to estimate the strength of independent associations between self-reported sleep complaints, sociodemographic characteristics and lifetime psychiatric comorbidity. RESULTS: Most of participants with MDE (92%) reported significant sleep complaints, from whom 85.2% had insomnia and 47.5% hypersomnia symptoms. The prevalence rates were for insomnia "only" of 48.5%, hypersomnia "only" of 13.7%, and their co-occurrence of 30.2%. We found that several sociodemographic characteristics (gender, age, education, individual and familial income, marital status) and psychiatric disorders (bipolar disorders, post-traumatic disorders and panic disorder) were significantly and independently associated with different sleep profiles. The co-occurrence of insomnia (especially early wake-up) and hypersomnia presented with a two-/three- fold increase risk of bipolar disorders. LIMITATIONS: Definitions of sleep complaints were qualitative and subjective. CONCLUSION: Sleep complaints are prevalent and heterogeneous in expression during MDE. Sleep disturbance profiles are associated with specific patterns of comorbidity. Our findings highlight the importance of continued research on sleep complaints during MDE while taking into account psychiatric comorbidity.

5 Article Differences in symptom expression between unipolar and bipolar spectrum depression: Results from a nationally representative sample using item response theory (IRT). 2016

Hoertel, Nicolas / Blanco, Carlos / Peyre, Hugo / Wall, Melanie M / McMahon, Kibby / Gorwood, Philip / Lemogne, Cédric / Limosin, Frédéric. ·Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, USA; AP-HP, Corentin Celton Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; Paris Descartes University, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; INSERM UMR 894, Psychiatry and Neurosciences Center, Paris, France. Electronic address: nico.hoertel@yahoo.fr. · Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, USA. · Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), Robert Debré Hospital, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department, Paris, France; Cognitive Sciences and Psycholinguistic Laboratory, Ecole Normale Supérieure, CNRS, EHESS, Paris, France. · Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, USA. · Paris Descartes University, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Groupe Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, CMME, Paris, France. · AP-HP, Corentin Celton Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; Paris Descartes University, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; INSERM UMR 894, Psychiatry and Neurosciences Center, Paris, France. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #27318596.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The inclusion of subsyndromal forms of bipolarity in the fifth edition of the DSM has major implications for the way in which we approach the diagnosis of individuals with depressive symptoms. The aim of the present study was to use methods based on item response theory (IRT) to examine whether, when equating for levels of depression severity, there are differences in the likelihood of reporting DSM-IV symptoms of major depressive episode (MDE) between subjects with and without a lifetime history of manic symptoms. METHODS: We conducted these analyses using a large, nationally representative sample from the USA (n=34,653), the second wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. RESULTS: The items sadness, appetite disturbance and psychomotor symptoms were better indicators of depression severity in participants without a lifetime history of manic symptoms, in a clinically meaningful way. DSM-IV symptoms of MDE were substantially less informative in participants with a lifetime history of manic symptoms than in those without such history. LIMITATIONS: Clinical information on DSM-IV depressive and manic symptoms was based on retrospective self-report CONCLUSIONS: The clinical presentation of depressive symptoms may substantially differ in individuals with and without a lifetime history of manic symptoms. These findings alert to the possibility of atypical symptomatic presentations among individuals with co-occurring symptoms or disorders and highlight the importance of continued research into specific pathophysiology differentiating unipolar and bipolar depression.

6 Article Generalizability of clinical trial results for bipolar disorder to community samples: findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. 2013

Hoertel, Nicolas / Le Strat, Yann / Lavaud, Pierre / Dubertret, Caroline / Limosin, Frédéric. ·Department of Psychiatry, Corentin-Celton Hospital, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. nico.hoertel@yahoo.fr ·J Clin Psychiatry · Pubmed #23561233.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Research on the generalizability of clinical trial results for bipolar disorder is limited. The present post hoc study sought to quantify the generalizability of clinical trial results in individuals with DSM-IV bipolar disorder to a large representative community sample. METHOD: Data were derived from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a large, nationally representative sample of 43,093 adults from the United States population. We applied a standard set of eligibility criteria representative of clinical trials to all adults with DSM-IV bipolar depression (n = 785) or mania (n = 724) in the past 12 months and then to a subsample of participants seeking treatment for bipolar depression (n = 276). Our aim was to determine the proportion of participants with bipolar depression or acute mania who would have been excluded from a clinical trial by typical eligibility criteria. RESULTS: We found that more than 5 of 10 participants with bipolar depression (58.17%) or mania (55.75%) would have been excluded by at least 1 eligibility criterion. In the subgroup of participants with bipolar depression who sought treatment, the exclusion rate by at least 1 criterion was higher (63.87%). Having a significant risk of suicide was the criterion excluding the highest percentage of participants in the bipolar depression samples, while having a current DSM-IV diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence was the one leading to the greatest exclusion rate in clinical trials for participants with acute mania. Exclusion rates were higher for participants with bipolar I depression compared with those with bipolar II depression. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional clinical trials tend to exclude a majority of individuals with bipolar disorder. Clinical trials should carefully consider the impact of eligibility criteria on the generalizability of their results and explain the rationale for their use. Future trials should weigh the trade-offs between internal validity and the representativeness of the study.

7 Article Prevalence of subthreshold hypomania and impact on internal validity of RCTs for major depressive disorder: results from a national epidemiological sample. 2013

Hoertel, Nicolas / Le Strat, Yann / Limosin, Frédéric / Dubertret, Caroline / Gorwood, Philip. ·Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Corentin-Celton, Service de Psychiatrie, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. nico.hoertel@yahoo.fr ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23405152.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Growing evidence supports the validity of distinguishing major depressive disorder (MDD) plus a lifetime history of subthreshold hypomania (D(m)) from pure MDD in psychiatric classifications. The present study sought to estimate the proportion of individuals with D(m) that would have been included in RCTs for MDD using typical eligibility criteria, and examine the potential impact of including these participants on internal validity. METHODS: Data were derived from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a national representative sample of 43,093 adults of the United States population. We examined the proportion of participants with a current diagnosis of pure MDD and D(m) that would have been eligible in clinical trials for MDD with a traditional set of eligibility criteria, and compared it with that of participants with bipolar 2 disorder if the same set of eligibility criteria was applied. We considered 4 models including different definitions of subthreshold hypomania. RESULTS: We found that more than 7 out of ten participants with pure MDD and with D(m) would have been excluded by at least one classical eligibility criterion. Prevalence rate of individuals with D(m) in RCTs for MDD with traditional eligibility criteria would have ranged from 7.98% to 22.59%. Overall exclusion rate of individuals with MDD plus at least 4 lifetime concomitant hypomanic probes significantly differ from those with pure MDD, whereas it was not significantly different in those with at least 2 lifetime concomitant hypomanic probes compared to those with bipolar 2 disorder. CONCLUSIONS: The current design of clinical trials for MDD may suffer from impaired external validity and potential impaired internal validity, due to the inclusion of a substantial proportion of individuals with subthreshold hypomania presenting with similar pattern of exclusion rates to those with bipolar 2 disorder, possibly resulting in a selection bias.

8 Article Subthreshold bipolar disorder in a U.S. national representative sample: prevalence, correlates and perspectives for psychiatric nosography. 2013

Hoertel, Nicolas / Le Strat, Yann / Angst, Jules / Dubertret, Caroline. ·AP-HP (Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris), Service de psychiatrie, Hôpital Louis Mourier, Colombes, France. nico.hoertel@yahoo.fr ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #23040874.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: There is growing clinical and epidemiological evidence that undiagnosed bipolar features are source of clinical heterogeneity in major depressive disorder (MDD). This study examined and compared the prevalence and correlates of lifetime major depressive episode plus subthreshold hypomania D(m) with pure MDD, bipolar II disorder, and bipolar I disorder. METHOD: Data were drawn from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a large cross-sectional survey (n=43,093) representative of the U.S. population. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalences were 2.53% for D(m), 1.12% for bipolar II disorder, 2.19% for bipolar I disorder and 10.70% for pure MDD. All bipolar disorders (i.e., D(m), BP-II, and BP-I) were half as frequent as MDD. Lifetime and 12-month psychiatric comorbidity, course and clinical characteristics, symptoms, health status and treatment-seeking rates were significantly different in participants with lifetime D(m) when compared to participants with pure MDD, but not when compared to participants with bipolar II disorder. LIMITATIONS: Subthreshold hypomania diagnostic was based on the lifetime presence of at least one of the three screening questions for criterion A for hypomania, without a lifetime history of manic or hypomanic episode. This narrow definition, both in terms of the choice of hypomanic symptoms and their duration, could have led to an underestimation of the proportion of participants with a lifetime history of D(m). In addition, the cross-sectional nature of this study does not allow causal associations to be drawn. CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirm and extend evidence of the clinical significance and validity of a subthreshold bipolarity-specifier applied to individuals with DSM-IV MDD. Major depression with subthreshold hypomania could be more accurately incorporated into the bipolar II disorder diagnosis.