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Bipolar Disorder: HELP
Articles by Kibby McMahon
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Kibby McMahon wrote the following 3 articles about Bipolar Disorder.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Bipolar Depression. 2016

McMahon, Kibby / Herr, Nathaniel R / Zerubavel, Noga / Hoertel, Nicolas / Neacsiu, Andrada D. ·Cognitive-Behavioral Research and Treatment Program, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, 3026, 2213 Elba Street, Room 123, Durham, NC 27710, USA. · Department of Psychology, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20016, USA. · Cognitive-Behavioral Research and Treatment Program, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Duke University Medical Center, 3026, 2213 Elba Street, Room 123, Durham, NC 27710, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Corentin Celton Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), 4 parvis Corentin Celton, Issy-les-Moulineaux 92130, France; INSERM UMR 894, Psychiatry and Neurosciences Center, 2 ter rue d'Alésia, Paris 75014, France; PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris Descartes University, 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Paris 75006, France. · Cognitive-Behavioral Research and Treatment Program, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Duke University Medical Center, 3026, 2213 Elba Street, Room 123, Durham, NC 27710, USA. Electronic address: andrada.neacsiu@duke.edu. ·Psychiatr Clin North Am · Pubmed #26876317.

ABSTRACT: The gold standard for treating bipolar depression is based on the combination of mood stabilizers and psychotherapy. Therefore, the authors present evidence-based models and promising approaches for psychotherapy for bipolar depression. Cognitive-behavioral therapy, family focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and dialectical behavior therapy are discussed. Behavioral activation, the cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy, and the unified protocol as promising future directions are presented. This review informs medical providers of the most appropriate referral guidelines for psychotherapy for bipolar depression. The authors conclude with a decision tree delineating optimal referrals to each psychotherapy approach.

2 Article Psychiatric and physical outcomes of long-term use of lithium in older adults with bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: A cross-sectional multicenter study. 2019

Morlet, Elise / Costemale-Lacoste, Jean-François / Poulet, Emmanuel / McMahon, Kibby / Hoertel, Nicolas / Limosin, Frédéric / Anonymous931002. ·Department of Psychiatry, Corentin Celton Hospital, 4 Parvis Corentin Celton, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. · Department of Psychiatry, Corentin Celton Hospital, 4 Parvis Corentin Celton, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; INSERM UMRS 1178, CESP, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. Electronic address: dr.jfclacoste@gmail.com. · INSERM, U1028, CNRS, UMR5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, PSY-R2 Team, Lyon F-69000, France. · Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University, 2213 Elba Street, Durham, NC 27710, United States. · Department of Psychiatry, Corentin Celton Hospital, 4 Parvis Corentin Celton, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; INSERM UMR 894, Psychiatry and Neurosciences Center, Paris, France; Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #31446382.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Although lithium is widely used in current practice to treat bipolar disorder (BD) and treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) among older adults, little is known about its efficacy and tolerability in this population, which is generally excluded from randomized clinical trials. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of long-term use of lithium among older adults with BD and MDD. METHOD: Data from the Cohort of individuals with Schizophrenia and mood disorders Aged 55 years or more (CSA) were used. Two groups of patients with BD and MDD were compared: those who were currently receiving lithium versus those who were not. The effects of lithium on psychiatric (i.e., depressive symptoms severity, perceived clinical severity, rates of psychiatric admissions in the past-year), geriatric (overall and cognitive functioning) and physical outcomes (i.e., rates of non-psychiatric medical comorbidities and general hospital admissions in the past-year) were evaluated. All analyses were adjusted for age, sex, duration of disorder, diagnosis, smoking status, alcohol use, and use of antipsychotics, antiepileptics or antidepressants. RESULTS: Among the 281 older participants with BD or MDD, 15.7% were taking lithium for a mean duration of 12.5(SD = 11.6) years. Lithium use was associated with lower intensity of depressive symptoms, reduced perceived clinical global severity and lower benzodiazepine use (all p < 0.05), without being linked to greater rates of medical comorbidities, except for hypothyroidism. LIMITATIONS: Data were cross-sectional and data on lifetime history of psychotropic medications was not assessed. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that long-term lithium use may be efficient and relatively well-tolerated in older adults with BD or treatment-resistant MDD.

3 Article Differences in symptom expression between unipolar and bipolar spectrum depression: Results from a nationally representative sample using item response theory (IRT). 2016

Hoertel, Nicolas / Blanco, Carlos / Peyre, Hugo / Wall, Melanie M / McMahon, Kibby / Gorwood, Philip / Lemogne, Cédric / Limosin, Frédéric. ·Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, USA; AP-HP, Corentin Celton Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; Paris Descartes University, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; INSERM UMR 894, Psychiatry and Neurosciences Center, Paris, France. Electronic address: nico.hoertel@yahoo.fr. · Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, USA. · Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), Robert Debré Hospital, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department, Paris, France; Cognitive Sciences and Psycholinguistic Laboratory, Ecole Normale Supérieure, CNRS, EHESS, Paris, France. · Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, USA. · Paris Descartes University, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Groupe Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, CMME, Paris, France. · AP-HP, Corentin Celton Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; Paris Descartes University, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; INSERM UMR 894, Psychiatry and Neurosciences Center, Paris, France. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #27318596.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The inclusion of subsyndromal forms of bipolarity in the fifth edition of the DSM has major implications for the way in which we approach the diagnosis of individuals with depressive symptoms. The aim of the present study was to use methods based on item response theory (IRT) to examine whether, when equating for levels of depression severity, there are differences in the likelihood of reporting DSM-IV symptoms of major depressive episode (MDE) between subjects with and without a lifetime history of manic symptoms. METHODS: We conducted these analyses using a large, nationally representative sample from the USA (n=34,653), the second wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. RESULTS: The items sadness, appetite disturbance and psychomotor symptoms were better indicators of depression severity in participants without a lifetime history of manic symptoms, in a clinically meaningful way. DSM-IV symptoms of MDE were substantially less informative in participants with a lifetime history of manic symptoms than in those without such history. LIMITATIONS: Clinical information on DSM-IV depressive and manic symptoms was based on retrospective self-report CONCLUSIONS: The clinical presentation of depressive symptoms may substantially differ in individuals with and without a lifetime history of manic symptoms. These findings alert to the possibility of atypical symptomatic presentations among individuals with co-occurring symptoms or disorders and highlight the importance of continued research into specific pathophysiology differentiating unipolar and bipolar depression.