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Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Sumanta Kumar Pal
Based on 23 articles published since 2009
(Why 23 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Sumanta Pal wrote the following 23 articles about Urinary Bladder Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Bladder Cancer, Version 5.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2017

Spiess, Philippe E / Agarwal, Neeraj / Bangs, Rick / Boorjian, Stephen A / Buyyounouski, Mark K / Clark, Peter E / Downs, Tracy M / Efstathiou, Jason A / Flaig, Thomas W / Friedlander, Terence / Greenberg, Richard E / Guru, Khurshid A / Hahn, Noah / Herr, Harry W / Hoimes, Christopher / Inman, Brant A / Jimbo, Masahito / Kader, A Karim / Lele, Subodh M / Meeks, Joshua J / Michalski, Jeff / Montgomery, Jeffrey S / Pagliaro, Lance C / Pal, Sumanta K / Patterson, Anthony / Plimack, Elizabeth R / Pohar, Kamal S / Porter, Michael P / Preston, Mark A / Sexton, Wade J / Siefker-Radtke, Arlene O / Sonpavde, Guru / Tward, Jonathan / Wile, Geoffrey / Dwyer, Mary A / Gurski, Lisa A. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #28982750.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Bladder Cancer focuses on systemic therapy for muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer, as substantial revisions were made in the 2017 updates, such as new recommendations for nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab. The complete version of the NCCN Guidelines for Bladder Cancer addresses additional aspects of the management of bladder cancer, including non-muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer and nonurothelial histologies, as well as staging, evaluation, and follow-up.

2 Guideline Bladder cancer. 2013

Clark, Peter E / Agarwal, Neeraj / Biagioli, Matthew C / Eisenberger, Mario A / Greenberg, Richard E / Herr, Harry W / Inman, Brant A / Kuban, Deborah A / Kuzel, Timothy M / Lele, Subodh M / Michalski, Jeff / Pagliaro, Lance C / Pal, Sumanta K / Patterson, Anthony / Plimack, Elizabeth R / Pohar, Kamal S / Porter, Michael P / Richie, Jerome P / Sexton, Wade J / Shipley, William U / Small, Eric J / Spiess, Philippe E / Trump, Donald L / Wile, Geoffrey / Wilson, Timothy G / Dwyer, Mary / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4320755. ·Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584347.

ABSTRACT: Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the United States. Urothelial carcinoma that originates from the urinary bladder is the most common subtype. These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) provide recommendations on the diagnosis and management of non-muscle-invasive and muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. This version of the guidelines provides extensive reorganization and updates on the principles of chemotherapy management.

3 Editorial Circulating Tumor DNA in Bladder Cancer: Novel Applications and Future Directions. 2018

Maia, Manuel Caitano / Grivas, Petros / Agarwal, Neeraj / Pal, Sumanta K. ·Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. · Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Division of Medical Oncology, University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. Electronic address: spal@coh.org. ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #29097099.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Which checkpoint inhibitor? An embarrassment of riches for bladder cancer. 2017

Gill, David M / Sonpavde, Guru / Pal, Sumanta K / Agarwal, Neeraj. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. · Division of Hematology & Oncology, University of Alabama Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology & Experimental Therapeutics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA 91010, USA. ·Immunotherapy · Pubmed #28472906.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer: Using Population-Based Data to Fill a Void of Prospective Evidence. 2016

Pal, Sumanta K / Agarwal, Neeraj / Grivas, Petros / Choueiri, Toni. ·City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA spal@coh.org. · Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT. · Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26786913.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review Optimizing systemic therapy for bladder cancer. 2013

Pal, Sumanta K / Milowsky, Matthew I / Plimack, Elizabeth R. ·Department of Medical Oncology & Experimental Therapeutics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California 91010, USA. spal@coh.org ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23847217.

ABSTRACT: Over the past several decades, few new systemic agents have been incorporated into the treatment paradigm for bladder cancer. Platinum-based therapy remains the cornerstone of treatment in the perioperative and metastatic settings. Despite level one evidence, use of cisplatin-based therapy in the neoadjuvant setting has been dismal. Second-line therapy for metastatic disease has only modest activity with no survival benefit. However, the elucidation and investigation of novel molecular targets, new therapeutics, and associated biomarkers with strong biologic rationale are actively changing the landscape in bladder cancer. Although the field is moving rapidly, no new drug approvals are currently pending and a need remains to continue to educate the medical oncology and urology communities on the optimal use of currently available treatments. This article outlines the evidence, including that from prospective studies and meta-analyses, providing the basis for the current recommendations from NCCN, and details previous and ongoing studies of targeted therapy for bladder cancer.

7 Review Pooled analysis of clinical outcomes with neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. 2013

Yuh, Bertram E / Ruel, Nora / Wilson, Timothy G / Vogelzang, Nicholas / Pal, Sumanta K. ·Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California 91010, USA. byuh@coh.org ·J Urol · Pubmed #23123547.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer has been shown to confer a survival advantage in phase III studies. Although cisplatin and gemcitabine are often used in this setting, a comprehensive evaluation of this regimen is lacking. In this review we summarize the efficacy of neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer based on currently published studies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted in April 2012 searching MEDLINE® databases. Articles were selected if they included patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer, evaluated the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine as neoadjuvant treatment, and reported pathological data after cystectomy. Cisplatin and gemcitabine dosing regimens and clinical data were further summarized using weighted averages. RESULTS: Seven studies encompassing 164 patients were published between 2007 and 2012. The majority of patients (79%) received cisplatin and gemcitabine on a 21-day cycle. A weighted average of 19.2 lymph nodes was obtained at cystectomy, and 29.7% of patients were found to have pN1 disease. Pathological down staging to pT0 and less than pT2 occurred in 42 (25.6%) and 67 (46.5%) patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine yield appreciable pathological response rates in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Since pathological response has been implicated as a potential surrogate for survival in muscle invasive bladder cancer, these data suggest that neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine may warrant further prospective assessment.

8 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Bladder Cancer, Version 2.2016. 2016

Clark, Peter E / Spiess, Philippe E / Agarwal, Neeraj / Bangs, Rick / Boorjian, Stephen A / Buyyounouski, Mark K / Efstathiou, Jason A / Flaig, Thomas W / Friedlander, Terence / Greenberg, Richard E / Guru, Khurshid A / Hahn, Noah / Herr, Harry W / Hoimes, Christopher / Inman, Brant A / Kader, A Karim / Kibel, Adam S / Kuzel, Timothy M / Lele, Subodh M / Meeks, Joshua J / Michalski, Jeff / Montgomery, Jeffrey S / Pagliaro, Lance C / Pal, Sumanta K / Patterson, Anthony / Petrylak, Daniel / Plimack, Elizabeth R / Pohar, Kamal S / Porter, Michael P / Sexton, Wade J / Siefker-Radtke, Arlene O / Sonpavde, Guru / Tward, Jonathan / Wile, Geoffrey / Dwyer, Mary A / Smith, Courtney. ·From Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; Patient Advocate; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; University of Colorado Cancer Center; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; Duke Cancer Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; University of Washington/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27697976.

ABSTRACT: These NCCN Guidelines Insights discuss the major recent updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Bladder Cancer based on the review of the evidence in conjunction with the expert opinion of the panel. Recent updates include (1) refining the recommendation of intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin, (2) strengthening the recommendations for perioperative systemic chemotherapy, and (3) incorporating immunotherapy into second-line therapy for locally advanced or metastatic disease. These NCCN Guidelines Insights further discuss factors that affect integration of these recommendations into clinical practice.

9 Article Radical cystectomy or bladder preservation with radiochemotherapy in elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer: Retrospective International Study of Cancers of the Urothelial Tract (RISC) Investigators. 2018

Boustani, Jihane / Bertaut, Aurélie / Galsky, Matthew D / Rosenberg, Jonathan E / Bellmunt, Joaquim / Powles, Thomas / Recine, Federica / Harshman, Lauren C / Chowdhury, Simon / Niegisch, Guenter / Yu, Evan Y / Pal, Sumanta K / De Giorgi, Ugo / Crabb, Simon J / Caubet, Matthieu / Balssa, Loïc / Milowsky, Matthew I / Ladoire, Sylvain / Créhange, Gilles / Anonymous1711261. ·a Department of Radiation Oncology , University Hospital of Besançon , Besançon , France. · b Department of Biostatistics , Georges François Leclerc Center, University of Burgundy , Dijon , France. · c Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai , New York , NY , USA. · d Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center , New York , NY , USA. · e Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA , USA. · f Barts Cancer Institute ECMC, Barts Health and the Royal Free NHS Trust, Queen Mary University of London , London , UK. · g Medical Oncology Department , Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS , Meldola , Italy. · h Department of Medical Oncology , Dana-Farber Cancer Institute , Boston , MA , USA. · i Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospital , London , UK. · j Heinrich-Heine-University , Düsseldorf , Germany. · k Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center , Seattle , WA , USA. · l City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center , Duarte , CA , USA. · m Department of Medical Oncology , Southampton General Hospital , Southampton , UK. · n Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , USA. · o Department of Medical Oncology , Georges François Leclerc Cancer Center, University of Burgundy , Dijon , France. · p Department of Radiation Oncology , Georges François Leclerc Cancer Center, University of Burgundy , Dijon , France. ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #28853615.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Radical cystectomy (RC) and radiochemotherapy (RCT) are curative options for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). Optimal treatment strategy remains unclear in elderly patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients aged 80 years old and above with T2-T4aN0-2M0-Mx MIBC were identified in the Retrospective International Study of Cancers of the Urothelial Tract (RISC) database. Patients treated with RC were compared with those treated with RCT. The impact of surgery on overall survival (OS) was assessed using a Cox proportional hazard model. Progression included locoregional and metastatic relapse and was considered a time-dependent variable. RESULTS: Between 1988 and 2015, 92 patients underwent RC and 72 patients had RCT. Median age was 82.5 years (range 80-100) and median follow-up was 2.90 years (range 0.04-11.10). Median OS was 1.99 years (95%CI 1.17-2.76) after RC and 1.97 years (95%CI 1.35-2.64) after RCT (p = .73). Median progression-free survival (PFS) after RC and RCT were 1.25 years (95%CI 0.80-1.75) and 1.52 years (95%CI 1.01-2.04), respectively (p = .54). In multivariate analyses, only disease progression was significantly associated with worse OS (HR = 10.27 (95%CI 6.63-15.91), p < .0001). Treatment modality was not a prognostic factor. CONCLUSIONS: RCT offers survival rates comparable to those observed with RC for patients aged ≥80 years.

10 Article Robot-assisted Versus Open Radical Cystectomy in Patients Receiving Perioperative Chemotherapy for Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: The Oncologist's Perspective from a Multicentre Study. 2018

Necchi, Andrea / Pond, Gregory R / Smaldone, Marc C / Pal, Sumanta K / Chan, Kevin / Wong, Yu-Ning / Viterbo, Rosalia / Sonpavde, Guru / Harshman, Lauren C / Crabb, Simon / Alva, Ajjai / Chowdhury, Simon / De Giorgi, Ugo / Srinivas, Sandy / Agarwal, Neeraj / Bamias, Aristotelis / Baniel, Jack / Golshayan, Ali-Reza / Ladoire, Sylvain / Sternberg, Cora N / Cerbone, Linda / Yu, Evan Y / Bellmunt, Joaquim / Vaishampayan, Ulka / Niegisch, Gunter / Hussain, Syed / Bowles, Daniel W / Morales-Barrera, Rafael / Milowsky, Matthew I / Theodore, Christine / Berthold, Dominik R / Sridhar, Srikala S / Powles, Thomas / Rosenberg, Jonathan E / Galsky, Matthew D / Anonymous1221193. ·Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: andrea.necchi@istitutotumori.mi.it. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. · UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · IRCCS Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola, Italy. · Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. · University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tikva, Israel. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Centre Georges-François Leclerc, Dijon, France. · San Camillo Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy. · University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, USA. · Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Germany. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, CO, USA. · Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, NC, USA. · Hopital Foch, Suresnes, France. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. · Barts Health and the Royal Free NHS Trust, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Tisch Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA. ·Eur Urol Focus · Pubmed #28753879.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little is known about the outcomes of robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) compared to open radical cystectomy (ORC) combined with perioperative chemotherapy for muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer (UBC). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate surgical and oncological outcomes for RARC and ORC in multimodal treatment. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Data from 28 centres were collected for cystectomies performed between January 2000 and July 2013. INTERVENTION: RARC or ORC combined with perioperative chemotherapy for UBC. OUTCOME MEASURES AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Fisher's exact tests, χ RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: A total of 688 patients (n=603 ORC and n=85 RARC) were analysed; 60.6% received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and 45.1% adjuvant chemotherapy. No significant differences in baseline characteristics were found between the groups. The median time from surgery to adjuvant chemotherapy was 1.9 mo for both RARC and ORC groups. The median number of lymph nodes removed was 21 (interquartile range [IQR] 14-35) for RARC and 13 (IQR 8-21) for ORC (p<0.001); the results were confirmed in subgroup analyses. Multivariable analyses revealed no difference in the rate of positive surgical margins (p=0.54 and p=0.78), rate of neobladder diversion (p=0.33 and p=0.51), relapse-free survival (p=0.31 and p=0.23), and overall survival (p=0.63 and p=0.69). The retrospective nature of the data is the major limitation. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, no differences in efficacy outcomes or ability to deliver adjuvant chemotherapy were observed between RARC and ORC. The increasing use of RARC is justifiable from an oncological viewpoint. PATIENT SUMMARY: In a retrospective study of patients who received perioperative chemotherapy for urothelial bladder cancer, we found no difference in key outcomes between robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) and open radical cystectomy. Performing RARC seems to be justifiable in the multidisciplinary setting.

11 Article Prognostic Significance of Neutrophilic Infiltration in Benign Lymph Nodes in Patients with Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer. 2017

Pal, Sumanta K / Pham, Anh / Vuong, Winston / Liu, Xueli / Lin, Yulan / Ruel, Nora / Yuh, Bertram E / Chan, Kevin / Wilson, Timothy / Lerner, Seth P / McConkey, David / Jove, Richard / Liang, Wei. ·Department of Medical Oncology, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. Electronic address: spal@coh.org. · Department of Medical Oncology, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. · Department of Urology, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. · Department of Urology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Tx, USA. · Department of Urology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Tx, USA. · Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute of Florida, Port Saint Lucie, FL, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. ·Eur Urol Focus · Pubmed #28720358.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies suggest that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-mediated recruitment of neutrophils to premetastatic tissue occurs prior to metastatic progression. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine if neutrophilic infiltration in benign nodal tissue is associated with poor clinical outcome in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue was secured from 55 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who had undergone cystectomy at our institution. Sections of benign lymph nodes were obtained and stained with primary antibodies against 3-fucosyl-N-acetyl-lactosamine, phosphorylated STAT3, and interleukin-17, the latter being a key mediator of neutrophil infiltration and STAT3 activation. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The Kaplan-Meier method was used to interrogate differences in overall survival (OS) in patients with high versus low biomarker expression. Cohorts stratified by receipt and nonreceipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were separately explored. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Of the 55 patients examined, 19 patients (35%) had no prior neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Amongst these patients, median OS was improved in patients with low 3-fucosyl-N-acetyl-lactosamine CONCLUSIONS: The results herein support the hypothesis that bladder cancer metastasis may be driven by STAT3-mediated neutrophilic infiltration in premetastatic sites. Validation of these findings using tissues derived from a phase 3 surgical trial (Southwest Oncology Group 1011) is currently underway. PATIENT SUMMARY: Lymph node metastases occur in up to 25% of patients with muscle-invasive cancer and it represents one of the most frequent sites of bladder cancer metastasis. This report provides preliminary evidence that neutrophil levels in benign lymph nodes may predict clinical outcome.

12 Article Venous thromboembolism in metastatic urothelial carcinoma or variant histologies: incidence, associative factors, and effect on survival. 2017

Ramos, Jorge D / Casey, Martin F / Crabb, Simon J / Bamias, Aristotelis / Harshman, Lauren C / Wong, Yu-Ning / Bellmunt, Joaquim / De Giorgi, Ugo / Ladoire, Sylvain / Powles, Thomas / Pal, Sumanta K / Niegisch, Guenter / Recine, Federica / Alva, Ajjai / Agarwal, Neeraj / Necchi, Andrea / Vaishampayan, Ulka N / Rosenberg, Jonathan E / Galsky, Matthew D / Yu, Evan Y / Anonymous2881008. ·University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Southampton, Southampton, England. · National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Georges François Leclerc Center, Dijon, France. · Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France. · Barts and the London School of Medicine, London, England. · City of Hope, Duarte, California. · Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Germany. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·Cancer Med · Pubmed #28000388.

ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common in cancer patients. However, little is known about VTE risk in metastatic urothelial carcinoma or variant histologies (UC/VH). We sought to characterize the incidence, associative factors, including whether various chemotherapy regimens portend different risk, and impact of VTE on survival in metastatic UC/VH patients. Patients diagnosed with metastatic UC/VH from 2000 to 2013 were included in this multicenter retrospective, international study from 29 academic institutions. Cumulative and 6-month VTE incidence rates were determined. The association of first-line chemotherapy (divided into six groups) and other baseline characteristics on VTE were analyzed. Each chemotherapy treatment group and statistically significant baseline clinical characteristics were assessed in a multivariate, competing-risk regression model. VTE patients were matched to non-VTE patients to determine the impact of VTE on overall survival. In all, 1762 patients were eligible for analysis. There were 144 (8.2%) and 90 (5.1%) events cumulative and within the first 6 months, respectively. VTE rates based on chemotherapy group demonstrated no statistical difference when gemcitabine/cisplatin was used as the comparator. Non-urotheilal histology (SHR: 2.67; 95% CI: 1.72-4.16, P < 0.001), moderate to severe renal dysfunction (SHR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.26-3.59, P = 0.005), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) or CVD risk factors (SHR: 2.27; 95% CI: 1.49-3.45, P = 0.001) were associated with increased VTE rates. Overall survival was worse in patients with VTE (median 6.0 m vs. 10.2 m, P < 0.001). Thus, in metastatic UC/VH patients, VTE is common and has a negative impact on survival. We identified multiple associated potential risk factors, although different chemotherapy regimens did not alter risk.

13 Article National Comprehensive Cancer Network Recommendations on Molecular Profiling of Advanced Bladder Cancer. 2016

Pal, Sumanta Kumar / Agarwal, Neeraj / Boorjian, Stephen Anthony / Hahn, Noah M / Siefker-Radtke, Arlene O / Clark, Peter E / Plimack, Elizabeth R. ·Sumanta Kumar Pal, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA · Neeraj Agarwal, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT · Stephen Anthony Boorjian, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN · Noah M. Hahn, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD · Arlene O. Siefker-Radtke, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN · Peter E. Clark, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX · and Elizabeth R. Plimack, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27458279.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Article Re: Immediate Versus Deferred Chemotherapy After Radical Cystectomy in Patients with pT3-pT4 or N+ M0 Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder (EORTC 30994): An Intergroup, Open-label, Randomised Phase 3 Trial. 2016

Sonpavde, Guru / Pal, Sumanta. ·Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology-Oncology, University of Alabama (UAB) School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL, USA. Electronic address: gsonpavde@uabmc.edu. · Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology-Oncology, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #27302289.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Article Relationship of smoking status to genomic profile, chemotherapy response and clinical outcome in patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma. 2016

Joshi, Monika / Vasekar, Monali / Grivas, Petros / Emamekhoo, Hamid / Hsu, JoAnn / Miller, Vincent A / Stephens, Philip J / Ali, Siraj M / Ross, Jeffrey S / Zhu, Junjia / Warrick, Joshua / Drabick, Joseph J / Holder, Sheldon L / Kaag, Matthew / Li, Min / Pal, Sumanta Kumar. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA, USA. · Department of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. · Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, USA. · Department of Pathology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27213592.

ABSTRACT: Smoking has been linked to urothelial carcinoma (UC), but the implications on genomic profile and therapeutic response are poorly understood. To determine how smoking history impacts genomic profile and chemotherapy response, clinicopathologic data was collected for patients with metastatic UC (mUC) across 3 academic medical centers and comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) was performed through a CLIA-certified lab. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering based on smoking status was used to categorize the frequency of genomic alterations (GAs) amongst current smokers (CS), ex-smokers (ES) and non-smokers (NS), and survival was compared in these subsets. Fisher's exact test identified significant associations between GAs and smoking status. Amongst 83 patients, 23%, 55% and 22% were CS, ES, and NS, respectively, and 95% of patients had stage IV disease. With a median follow up of 14.4 months, the median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in NS and ES (combined) as compared to CS (51.6 vs 15.6 months; P = 0.04). Of 315 cancer-related genes and 31 genes often related to rearrangement tested, heatmaps show some variations amongst the subsets. GAs in NSD1 were more frequent in CS as compared to other groups (P < 0.001). CS status negatively impacts OS in patients with mUC and is associated with genomic alterations that could have therapeutic implications.

16 Article Comprehensive genomic profiling of 295 cases of clinically advanced urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder reveals a high frequency of clinically relevant genomic alterations. 2016

Ross, Jeffrey S / Wang, Kai / Khaira, Depinder / Ali, Siraj M / Fisher, Huge A G / Mian, Badar / Nazeer, Tipu / Elvin, Julia A / Palma, Norma / Yelensky, Roman / Lipson, Doron / Miller, Vincent A / Stephens, Philip J / Subbiah, Vivek / Pal, Sumanta K. ·Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Albany Medical College Albany, New York. · Department of Clinical Development, Foundation Medicine Inc, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medical Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, California. ·Cancer · Pubmed #26651075.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the current study, the authors present a comprehensive genomic profile (CGP)-based study of advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC) designed to detect clinically relevant genomic alterations (CRGAs). METHODS: DNA was extracted from 40 µm of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 295 consecutive cases of recurrent/metastatic UC. CGP was performed on hybridization-captured, adaptor ligation-based libraries to a mean coverage depth of 688X for all coding exons of 236 cancer-related genes plus 47 introns from 19 genes frequently rearranged in cancer, using process-matched normal control samples as a reference. CRGAs were defined as GAs linked to drugs on the market or currently under evaluation in mechanism-driven clinical trials. RESULTS: All 295 patients assessed were classified with high-grade (International Society of Urological Pathology classification) and advanced stage (stage III/IV American Joint Committee on Cancer) disease, and 294 of 295 patients (99.7%) had at least 1 GA on CGP with a mean of 6.4 GAs per UC (61% substitutions/insertions/deletions, 37% copy number alterations, and 2% fusions). Furthermore, 275 patients (93%) had at least 1 CRGA involving 75 individual genes with a mean of 2.6 CRGAs per UC. The most common CRGAs involved cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) (34%), fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) (21%), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) (20%), and ERBB2 (17%). FGFR3 GAs were diverse types and included 10% fusions. ERBB2 GAs were equally divided between amplifications and substitutions. ERBB2 substitutions were predominantly within the extracellular domain and were highly enriched in patients with micropapillary UC (38% of 32 cases vs 5% of 263 nonmicropapillary UC cases; P<.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Using a CGP assay capable of detecting all classes of GA simultaneously, an extraordinarily high frequency of CRGA was identified in a large series of patients with advanced UC. Cancer 2016;122:702-711. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

17 Article Comparative effectiveness of gemcitabine plus cisplatin versus methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, plus cisplatin as neoadjuvant therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. 2015

Galsky, Matthew D / Pal, Sumanta K / Chowdhury, Simon / Harshman, Lauren C / Crabb, Simon J / Wong, Yu-Ning / Yu, Evan Y / Powles, Thomas / Moshier, Erin L / Ladoire, Sylvain / Hussain, Syed A / Agarwal, Neeraj / Vaishampayan, Ulka N / Recine, Federica / Berthold, Dominik / Necchi, Andrea / Theodore, Christine / Milowsky, Matthew I / Bellmunt, Joaquim / Rosenberg, Jonathan E / Anonymous7310826. ·Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York. · Department of Medical Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California. · Department of Urology, Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Medical Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom. · Division of Biostatistics, Department of Preventative Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York. · Department of Medical Oncology, Georges François Leclerc Center, Dijon, France. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Medical Oncology, Samuel and Barbara Sternberg Cancer Research Foundation, Rome, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Foundation IRCCS National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Hospital Foch, Suresnes, France. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Division of Genitourinary Oncology, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·Cancer · Pubmed #25872978.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) has been adopted as a neoadjuvant regimen for muscle-invasive bladder cancer despite the lack of Level I evidence in this setting. METHODS: Data were collected using an electronic data-capture platform from 28 international centers. Eligible patients had clinical T-classification 2 (cT2) through cT4aN0M0 urothelial cancer of the bladder and received neoadjuvant GC or methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, plus cisplatin (MVAC) before undergoing cystectomy. Logistic regression was used to compute propensity scores as the predicted probabilities of patients being assigned to MVAC versus GC given their baseline characteristics. These propensity scores were then included in a new logistic regression model to estimate an adjusted odds ratio comparing the odds of attaining a pathologic complete response (pCR) between patients who received MVAC and those who received GC. RESULTS: In total, 212 patients (146 patients in the GC cohort and 66 patients in the MVAC cohort) met criteria for inclusion in the analysis. The majority of patients in the MVAC cohort (77%) received dose-dense MVAC. The median age of patients was 63 years, they were predominantly men (74%), and they received a median of 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The pCR rate was 29% in the MVAC cohort and 31% in the GC cohort. There was no significant difference in the pCR rate when adjusted for propensity scores between the 2 regimens (odds ratio, 0.91; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-1.72; P = .77). In an exploratory analysis evaluating survival, the hazard ratio comparing hazard rates for MVAC versus GC adjusted for propensity scores was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-1.54; P = .48). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who received neoadjuvant GC and MVAC achieved comparable pCR rates in the current analysis, providing evidence to support what has become routine practice.

18 Article Cisplatin-based first-line therapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma after previous perioperative cisplatin-based therapy. 2015

Necchi, Andrea / Pond, Gregory R / Giannatempo, Patrizia / Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe / Eigl, Bernhard J / Locke, Jenn / Pal, Sumanta K / Agarwal, Neeraj / Poole, Austin / Vaishampayan, Ulka N / Niegisch, Guenter / Hussain, Syed A / Singh, Parminder / Bellmunt, Joaquim / Sonpavde, Guru. ·Department of Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Statistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Department of Medicine, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Medicine, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, CA. · Department of Medicine, University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT. · Department of Medicine, Wayne State University Cancer Center, Detroit, MI. · Department of Urology, Heinrich Heine University, Dusseldorf, Germany. · Department of Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. · Department of Medicine, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. · Department of Medicine, UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL. Electronic address: gsonpavde@uabmc.edu. ·Clin Genitourin Cancer · Pubmed #25450035.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Outcomes with cisplatin-based first-line therapy for advanced UC after previous perioperative cisplatin-based chemotherapy are unclear. In this study we evaluated outcomes with a focus on the effect of time from previous cisplatin-based perioperative chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were collected for patients who received cisplatin-based first-line therapy for advanced UC after previous perioperative cisplatin-based therapy. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the prognostic ability of visceral metastasis, ECOG PS, TFPC, anemia, leukocytosis, and albumin on overall survival (OS). RESULTS: Data were available for 41 patients from 8 institutions including 31 men (75.6%). The median age was 61 (range, 41-77) years, most received gemcitabine plus cisplatin (n = 26; 63.4%), and the median number of cycles was 4 (range, 1-8). The median OS was 68 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI], 48.0-81.0). Multivariable Cox regression analysis results showed an independent prognostic effect on OS for PS > 0 versus 0 (hazard ratio [HR], 4.56 [95% CI, 1.66-12.52]; P = .003) and TFPC ≥ 78 weeks versus < 78 weeks (HR, 0.48 [95% CI, 0.21-1.07]; P = .072). The prognostic model for OS was internally validated with c-index = 0.68. Patients with TFPC < 52 weeks, 52 to 104 weeks, and ≥ 104 weeks had median survival of 42, 70, and 162 weeks, respectively. CONCLUSION: Longer TFPC ≥ 78 weeks and ECOG PS = 0 were independently prognostic for better survival with cisplatin-based first-line chemotherapy for advanced UC after previous perioperative cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The data support using TFPC ≥ 52 weeks to rechallenge with cisplatin-based first-line chemotherapy for metastatic disease.

19 Article CKD-EPI and cockcroft-gault equations identify similar candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. 2014

Pal, Sumanta K / Ruel, Nora / Villegas, Sergio / Chang, Mark / DeWalt, Kara / Wilson, Timothy G / Vogelzang, Nicholas J / Yuh, Bertram E. ·Department of Medical Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California, United States of America. · Division of Biostatistics, Department of Information Science, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California, United States of America. · Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California, United States of America. · US Oncology Research, Comprehensive Cancer Centers, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24722472.

ABSTRACT: Clinical guidelines suggest neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy prior to cystectomy in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). A creatinine clearance (CrCl) >60 mL/min is frequently used to characterize cisplatin-eligible patients, and use of the CKD-EPI equation to estimate CrCl has been advocated. From a prospectively maintained institutional database, patients with MIBC who received cystectomy were identified and clinicopathologic information was ascertained. CrCl prior to surgery was computed using three equations: (1) Cockcroft-Gault (CG), (2) CKD-EPI, and (3) MDRD. The primary objective was to determine if the CG and CKD-EPI equations identified a different proportion of patients who were cisplatin-eligible, based on an estimated CrCl of >60 mL/min. Cisplatin-eligibility was also assessed in subsets based on age, CCI score and race. Actuarial rates of neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy use were also reported. Of 126 patients, 70% and 71% of patients were found to be cisplatin-eligible by the CKD-EPI and CG equations, respectively (P = 0.9). The MDRD did not result in significantly different characterization of cisplatin-eligibility as compared to the CKD-EPI and CG equations. In the subset of patients age >80, the CKD-EPI equation identified a much smaller proportion of cisplatin-eligible patients (25%) as compared to the CG equation (50%) or the MDRD equation (63%). Only 34 patients (27%) received neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Of the 92 patients who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 64% had a CrCl >60 mL/min by CG. In contrast to previous reports, the CKD-EPI equation does not appear to characterize a broader span of patients as cisplatin-eligible. Older patients (age >80) may less frequently be characterized as cisplatin-eligible by CKD-EPI. The discordance between actual rates of neoadjuvant chemotherapy use and rates of cisplatin eligibility suggest that other factors (e.g., patient and physician preference) may guide clinical decision-making.

20 Article TLR9 signaling in the tumor microenvironment initiates cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. 2013

Gao, Chan / Kozlowska, Anna / Nechaev, Sergey / Li, Haiqing / Zhang, Qifang / Hossain, Dewan M S / Kowolik, Claudia M / Chu, Peiguo / Swiderski, Piotr / Diamond, Don J / Pal, Sumanta K / Raubitschek, Andrew / Kortylewski, Marcin. ·Authors' Affiliations: Departments of Cancer Immunotherapeutics and Tumor Immunology, Medical Oncology, and Pathology; Bioinformatics Core Facility; DNA/RNA Synthesis Core Facility; Division of Translational Vaccine Research; Irell and Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Beckman Research Institute at City of Hope, Duarte, California; and Medical Biotechnology, University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #24154870.

ABSTRACT: Cancer radiotherapy may be immunogenic, but it is unclear why its immunogenic effects are rarely sufficient to prevent tumor recurrence. Here, we report a novel Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-dependent mechanism that initiates tumor regrowth after local radiotherapy. Systemic inhibition of TLR9, but not TLR4, delayed tumor recurrence in mouse models of B16 melanoma, MB49 bladder cancer, and CT26 colon cancer after localized high-dose tumor irradiation. Soluble factors in the microenvironment of regressing tumors triggered TLR9 signaling in freshly recruited myeloid cells appearing within four days of radiotherapy. The tumorigenic effects of TLR9 depended on MyD88/NF-κB-mediated upregulation of interleukin (IL)-6 expression, which in turn resulted in downstream activation of Jak/STAT3 signaling in myeloid cells. In comparing global gene expression in wild-type, TLR9-, or STAT3-deficient myeloid cells derived from irradiated tumors, we identified a unique set of TLR9/STAT3-regulated genes involved in tumor-promoting inflammation and revascularization. Blocking STAT3 function by two myeloid-specific genetic strategies corrected TLR9-mediated cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. Our results suggest that combining localized tumor irradiation with myeloid cell-specific inhibition of TLR9/STAT3 signaling may help eliminate radioresistant cancers.

21 Article Retrospective analysis of clinical outcomes with neoadjuvant cisplatin-based regimens for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. 2012

Pal, Sumanta K / Ruel, Nora H / Wilson, Timothy G / Yuh, Bertram E. ·Department of Medical Oncology & Experimental Therapeutics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. spal@coh.org ·Clin Genitourin Cancer · Pubmed #22981208.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The benefit of neoadjuvant methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), and cisplatin (MVAC) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) has been prospectively demonstrated in a phase III study. Extrapolating from comparative data in the metastatic setting, platinum doublets such as cisplatin-gemcitabine (CG) have been adopted. We sought to compare clinical outcomes in patients treated for MIBC with neoadjuvant CG and MVAC at our institution. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with MIBC were identified from a prospectively maintained registry. Clinicopathologic information and clinical outcome data were obtained directly from the registry. When available, pharmacy records were reviewed to ascertain the use of growth factors and chemotherapy dose intensity (DI). Survival was compared in subgroups divided by the regimen of chemotherapy rendered (ie, CG vs. MVAC) using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Median overall survival (OS) in the overall cohort (N = 61) was 23 months. OS was improved in patients receiving either MVAC or CG chemotherapy compared with patients receiving "other" chemotherapy (35.3 vs. 16.3 months; P = .055). Although the median OS associated with neoadjuvant CG numerically exceeded the survival associated with neoadjuvant MVAC (104.3 and 21.8 months, respectively), this was not statistically significant (P = .73). Pathologic downstaging predicted improved OS with both neoadjuvant CG and MVAC, and the rates of downstaging were similar with both regimens. CONCLUSIONS: Although warranting prospective validation, our data suggest that CG is a possible alternative neoadjuvant approach to traditional regimens such as MVAC for patients with MIBC.

22 Article S1PR1-STAT3 signaling is crucial for myeloid cell colonization at future metastatic sites. 2012

Deng, Jiehui / Liu, Yong / Lee, Heehyoung / Herrmann, Andreas / Zhang, Wang / Zhang, Chunyan / Shen, Shudan / Priceman, Saul J / Kujawski, Maciej / Pal, Sumanta K / Raubitschek, Andrew / Hoon, Dave S B / Forman, Stephen / Figlin, Robert A / Liu, Jie / Jove, Richard / Yu, Hua. ·Department of Cancer Immunotherapeutics and Tumor Immunology, Beckman Research Institute and City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA 91010, USA. ·Cancer Cell · Pubmed #22624714.

ABSTRACT: Recent studies underscore the importance of myeloid cells in rendering distant organs hospitable for disseminating tumor cells to colonize. However, what enables myeloid cells to have an apparently superior capacity to colonize distant organs is unclear. Here, we show that S1PR1-STAT3 upregulation in tumor cells induces factors that activate S1PR1-STAT3 in various cells in premetastatic sites, leading to premetastatic niche formation. Targeting either S1PR1 or STAT3 in myeloid cells disrupts existing premetastatic niches. S1PR1-STAT3 pathway enables myeloid cells to intravasate, prime the distant organ microenvironment and mediate sustained proliferation and survival of their own and other stromal cells at future metastatic sites. Analyzing tumor-free lymph nodes from cancer patients shows elevated myeloid infiltrates, STAT3 activity, and increased survival signal.

23 Minor Exceptional Response to Pazopanib in a Patient with Urothelial Carcinoma Harboring FGFR3 Activating Mutation and Amplification. 2015

Palma, Norma / Morris, John C / Ali, Siraj M / Ross, Jeffrey S / Pal, Sumanta Kumar. ·Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, MA, USA; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA. Electronic address: spal@coh.org. ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #25766722.

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