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Brain Neoplasms HELP
Based on 50,025 articles published since 2010
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These are the 50025 published articles about Brain Neoplasms that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Management of epilepsy in brain tumors. 2019

Maschio, Marta / Aguglia, Umberto / Avanzini, Giuliano / Banfi, Paola / Buttinelli, Carla / Capovilla, Giuseppe / Casazza, Marina Maria Luisa / Colicchio, Gabriella / Coppola, Antonietta / Costa, Cinzia / Dainese, Filippo / Daniele, Ornella / De Simone, Roberto / Eoli, Marica / Gasparini, Sara / Giallonardo, Anna Teresa / La Neve, Angela / Maialetti, Andrea / Mecarelli, Oriano / Melis, Marta / Michelucci, Roberto / Paladin, Francesco / Pauletto, Giada / Piccioli, Marta / Quadri, Stefano / Ranzato, Federica / Rossi, Rosario / Salmaggi, Andrea / Terenzi, Riccardo / Tisei, Paolo / Villani, Flavio / Vitali, Paolo / Vivalda, Lucina Carla / Zaccara, Gaetano / Zarabla, Alessia / Beghi, Ettore / Anonymous3161077. ·Center for Brain Tumor-Related Epilepsy, UOSD Neuro-Oncology, I.R.C.C.S. Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Via Elio Chianesi 53, 00144, Rome, Italy. marta.maschio@ifo.gov.it. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy. · Department of Neurophysiology and Experimental Epileptology, Carlo Besta Neurological Institute, Milan, Italy. · Neurology Unit, Department of Emergency, Medicine Epilepsy Center, Circolo Hospital, Varese, Italy. · Department of Neuroscience, Mental Health and Sensory Organs, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy. · Department of Mental Health, Epilepsy Center, C. Poma Hospital, Mantua, Italy. · Neurophysiopatology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, Milan, Italy. · Institute of Neurosurgery, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, Epilepsy Centre, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Neurological Clinic, Department of Medicine, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. · Epilepsy Centre, UOC Neurology, SS. Giovanni e Paolo Hospital, Venice, Italy. · Epilepsy Center-U.O.C. Neurology, Policlinico Paolo Giaccone, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience Department (BioNeC), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Neurology and Stroke Unit, Epilepsy and Sleep Disorders Center, St. Eugenio Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Molecular Neuro-Oncology Unit, IRCCS-Fondazione Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan, Italy. · Neurology Unit, Human Neurosciences Department, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, Centre for Epilepsy, University of Bari, Bari, Italy. · Center for Brain Tumor-Related Epilepsy, UOSD Neuro-Oncology, I.R.C.C.S. Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Via Elio Chianesi 53, 00144, Rome, Italy. · Neurology Unit, Human Neurosciences Department, Sapienza University, Umberto 1 Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences and Public Health, Institute of Neurology, University of Cagliari, Monserrato, Cagliari, Italy. · Unit of Neurology, Bellaria Hospital, IRCCS Istituto delle Scienze Neurologiche di Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Epilepsy Center, UOC Neurology, Ospedale Santi Giovanni e Paolo, Venice, Italy. · Department of Neurosciences, Santa Maria della Misericordia University Hospital, Udine, Italy. · UOC Neurology, PO San Filippo Neri, ASL Roma 1, Rome, Italy. · USC Neurology, Epilepsy Center, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Epilepsy Centre, Neuroscience Department, S. Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy. · Neurology and Stroke Unit, San Francesco Hospital, 08100, Nuoro, Italy. · Neurological Department, ASST, Lecco, Italy. · Epilepsy Consultation Room, Neurology Unit, S. Pietro Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Neurology-University "La Sapienza", S. Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Clinical Epileptology and Experimental Neurophysiology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, Milan, Italy. · Neuroradiology and Brain MRI 3T Mondino Research Center, IRCCS Mondino Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · Epilepsy Consultation Room, U.O.C. Neurology, Rivoli Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Regional Health Agency of Tuscany, Via P Dazzi 1, 50141, Florence, Italy. · Department of Neurosciences, IRCCS Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. ·Neurol Sci · Pubmed #31392641.

ABSTRACT: Epilepsy in brain tumors (BTE) may require medical attention for a variety of unique concerns: epileptic seizures, possible serious adverse effects of antineoplastic and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), physical disability, and/or neurocognitive disturbances correlated to tumor site. Guidelines for the management of tumor-related epilepsies are lacking. Treatment is not standardized, and overall management might differ according to different specialists. The aim of this document was to provide directives on the procedures to be adopted for a correct diagnostic-therapeutic path of the patient with BTE, evaluating indications, risks, and benefits. A board comprising neurologists, epileptologists, neurophysiologists, neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, neuro-oncologists, neuropsychologists, and patients' representatives was formed. The board converted diagnostic and therapeutic problems into seventeen questions. A literature search was performed in September-October 2017, and a total of 7827 unique records were retrieved, of which 148 constituted the core literature. There is no evidence that histological type or localization of the brain tumor affects the response to an AED. The board recommended to avoid enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs because of their interference with antitumoral drugs and consider as first-choice newer generation drugs (among them, levetiracetam, lamotrigine, and topiramate). Valproic acid should also be considered. Both short-term and long-term prophylaxes are not recommended in primary and metastatic brain tumors. Management of seizures in patients with BTE should be multidisciplinary. The panel evidenced conflicting or lacking data regarding the role of EEG, the choice of therapeutic strategy, and timing to withdraw AEDs and recommended high-quality long-term studies to standardize BTE care.

2 Guideline Multidisciplinary expert opinion on the treatment consensus for patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC with brain metastases. 2019

Ponce, Santiago / Bruna, Jordi / Juan, Oscar / López, Rafael / Navarro, Alejandro / Ortega, Ana Laura / Puente, Javier / Verger, Eugènia / Bartolomé, Adela / Nadal, Ernest. ·Lung Cancer Clinical Research Unit, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Av. Cordoba, s/n, 28041 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: sponceaix@gmail.com. · Neuro-Oncology Unit, Bellvitge University Hospital-ICO, Carrer de la Feixa Llarga, s/n, 08907, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Clinical Research in Solid Tumors (CReST) and Neuro-Oncology Group. Oncobell, IDIBELL, Avda Gran Via 199-203, 08907, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: jbruna@bellvitgehospital.cat. · Medical Oncology Service, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Avda. de Fernando Abril Martorell, nº 106, 46026, Valencia, Spain. Electronic address: juan_osc@gva.es. · Medical Oncology Unit. Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valladolid, Av. Ramón y Cajal, 3, 47003, Valladolid, Spain. Electronic address: rafalopezcastro@yahoo.es. · Medical Oncology. Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebron, 119-129, 08035, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: alexnavarro84@gmail.com. · Oncology Research Unit, Complejo Hospitalario de Jaén, Av. del Ejército Español, 10, 23007, Jaén, Spain. Electronic address: analauraortega@gmail.com. · GU, Thoracic and Melanoma Cancer Unit, Medical Oncology Department, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Complutense University. Hospital Clinico Universitario San Carlos, Calle del Prof Martín Lagos, s/n, 28040, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: javierpuente.hcsc@gmail.com. · Radiation Oncology Department, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Carrer de Villarroel, 170, 08036, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: everger@clinic.cat. · Radiotherapy Oncology Department. Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Av. Cordoba, s/n, 28041, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: adelabartolome@gmail.com. · Clinical Research in Solid Tumors (CReST) and Neuro-Oncology Group. Oncobell, IDIBELL, Avda Gran Via 199-203, 08907, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Thoracic Oncology Unit, Department of Medical Oncology, Catalan Institute of Oncology. Avda Gran Via 199-203, 08907, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: esnadal@iconcologia.net. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #31092376.

ABSTRACT: The presence of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation is associated with higher incidence of brain metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, patients with synchronous brain metastases at diagnosis have generally been excluded from clinical trials. As there is limited clinical evidence for managing this patient population, a multidisciplinary group of Spanish medical and radiation oncologists, and neuro-oncologist with expertise treating brain metastases in lung cancer patients met with the aim of reaching and developing an expert opinion consensus on the management of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC with brain metastases. This consensus contains 26 recommendations and 20 conclusion statements across 21 questions in 7 areas, as well as a first-line treatment algorithm.

3 Guideline Anticonvulsant Prophylaxis and Steroid Use in Adults With Metastatic Brain Tumors: ASCO and SNO Endorsement of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Guidelines. 2019

Chang, Susan M / Messersmith, Hans / Ahluwalia, Manmeet / Andrews, David / Brastianos, Priscilla K / Gaspar, Laurie E / Gatson, Na Tosha N / Jordan, Justin T / Khasraw, Mustafa / Lassman, Andrew B / Maues, Julia / Mrugala, Maciej / Raizer, Jeffrey / Schiff, David / Stevens, Glen / Sumrall, Ashley / van den Bent, Martin / Vogelbaum, Michael A. ·1 University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · 2 American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. · 3 Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. · 4 Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · 5 Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. · 6 University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO. · 7 Geisinger Neuroscience and Cancer Institutes, Danville, PA. · 8 The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · 9 Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY. · 10 Georgetown Breast Cancer Advocates, Washington, DC. · 11 Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ. · 12 Northwestern University, Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. · 13 University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville, VA. · 14 Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, NC. · 15 Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #30883246.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) has developed a series of guidelines for the treatment of adults with metastatic brain tumors, including systemic therapy and supportive care topics. ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. METHODS: Two CNS guidelines were reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, and an independent multidisciplinary Expert Panel was formed to review the content and assess agreement with the recommendations. The Expert Panel voted to endorse the two guidelines, and ASCO and Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) independently reviewed and approved the ASCO/SNO guideline endorsement. RESULTS: The ASCO/SNO Expert Panel determined that the recommendations from the CNS anticonvulsants and steroids guidelines, published January 9, 2019, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO/SNO endorsed these two CNS guidelines with minor alterations. RECOMMENDATIONS: Key recommendations include the following: prophylactic antiepileptic drugs were not recommended for routine use; and corticosteroids, specifically dexamethasone, were recommended for temporary symptomatic relief in patients with neurologic symptoms and signs related to mass effect from brain metastases. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/neurooncology-guidelines .

4 Guideline ISNO consensus guidelines for practical adaptation of the WHO 2016 classification of adult diffuse gliomas. 2019

Santosh, Vani / Sravya, Palavalasa / Gupta, Tejpal / Muzumdar, Dattatraya / Chacko, Geeta / Suri, Vaishali / Epari, Sridhar / Balasubramaniam, Anandh / Radotra, Bishan Dass / Chatterjee, Sandip / Sarkar, Chitra / Jalali, Rakesh. ·Department of Neuropathology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. · Department of Neurosurgery, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. · Department of Neuropathology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India. · Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. · Department of Pathology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. · Department of Neurosurgery, Yashoda Superspeciality Hospitals, Secunderabad, Telangana, India. · Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India. · Department of Neurosurgery, Park Clinic, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Apollo Proton Cancer Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. ·Neurol India · Pubmed #30860119.

ABSTRACT: Introduction: Recent advances in the molecular biology of adult diffuse gliomas have brought about a paradigm shift in their diagnostic criteria, as witnessed in the World Health Organization (WHO) 2016 guidelines for central nervous system tumors. It is now mandatory to perform several molecular tests to reach a definitive integrated diagnosis in most of the cases. This comes with additional cost and higher turnaround time, which is not always affordable in developing countries like India. In addition, the non-uniform distribution of advanced research and diagnostic testing centers adds to the difficulty. Methods: The Indian Society of Neuro-oncology (ISNO) multidisciplinary expert panel consisting of neuropathologists, neurosurgeons, and radiation/medical oncologists convened to prepare the national consensus guidelines for approach to diagnosis of adult diffuse gliomas. Results: Algorithms for arriving at an integrated diagnosis of adult diffuse gliomas predominantly using immunohistochemistry and with minimum possible additional molecular testing were agreed upon, thus addressing the problems of cost, accessibility, and turnaround time. Mandatory and optional tests were proposed for each case scenario. Conclusion: This document represents the consensus of the various neuro-oncology disciplines involved in diagnosis and management of patients with adult diffuse gliomas. The article reflects a practical adaptation of the WHO recommendations to suit a resource constrained setup.

5 Guideline Australasian Gastrointestinal Pathology Society (AGPS) consensus guidelines for universal defective mismatch repair testing in colorectal carcinoma. 2019

Yozu, Masato / Kumarasinghe, M Priyanthi / Brown, Ian S / Gill, Anthony J / Rosty, Christophe. ·Histopathology Department, Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. · PathWest, QEII Medical Centre and School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia. · Envoi Specialist Pathologists, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Pathology Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia; NSW Health Pathology, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Envoi Specialist Pathologists, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic, Australia. Electronic address: c.rosty@uq.edu.au. ·Pathology · Pubmed #30851981.

ABSTRACT: Lynch syndrome is the most common hereditary form of colorectal carcinoma caused by a constitutional pathogenic mutation in a DNA mismatch repair gene. Identifying Lynch syndrome is essential to initiate intensive surveillance program for the patient and affected relatives. On behalf of the Australasian Gastrointestinal Pathology Society (AGPS), we present in this manuscript consensus guidelines for Lynch syndrome screening in patients with colorectal carcinoma. The goal of this consensus document is to provide recommendations to pathologists for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome with discussion of the benefits and limitations of each test. Universal screening for defective mismatch repair is recommended, in agreement with the recent endorsement of universal testing by the National Health and Medical Research Council in Australia and the New Zealand Ministry of Health. The value of evaluating defective mismatch repair is acknowledged not only for Lynch syndrome screening but also for therapeutic decision information in patient management. AGPS advocates appropriate government funding for the molecular tests necessary for Lynch syndrome screening (BRAF mutation, MLH1 methylation testing).

6 Guideline Practical procedures for the integrated diagnosis of astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors. 2019

Sonoda, Yukihiko / Yokoo, Hideaki / Tanaka, Shinya / Kinoshita, Manabu / Nakada, Mitsutoshi / Nishihara, Hiroshi / Anonymous3760982. ·Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, 2-2-2, Iida-Nishi, Yamagata, 990-9585, Japan. ysonoda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp. · Department of Human Pathology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan. · Department of Cancer Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. · Department of Neurosurgery, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Kanazawa, Japan. · Genomics Unit, Keio Cancer Center, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. ·Brain Tumor Pathol · Pubmed #30847711.

ABSTRACT: The publication of the 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System (2016 WHO CNS) represented a major change in the classification of brain tumors. However, many pathologists in Japan cannot diagnose astrocytic or oligodendroglial tumors according to the 2016 WHO CNS due to financial or technical problems. Therefore, the Japan Society of Brain Tumor Pathology established a committee for molecular diagnosis to facilitate the integrated diagnosis of astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors in Japan. We created three levels of diagnoses: Level 1 was defined as simple histopathological diagnosis using hematoxylin and eosin staining and routine cell lineage-based immunostaining. Level 2 was defined as immunohistochemical diagnosis using immunohistochemical examinations using R132H mutation-specific IDH1, ATRX, and/or p53 antibodies. Level 3 was defined as molecular diagnosis, such as diagnosis based on 1p/19q status or the mutation status of the IDH1 and IDH2 genes. In principle, astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors should be diagnosed based on the 2016 WHO CNS and/or cIMPACT-NOW criteria; however, the findings obtained through our diagnostic flowchart can be added to the histological diagnosis in parentheses. This classification system would be helpful for pathologists with limited resources.

7 Guideline Diagnostics and treatment of acromegaly - updated recommendations of the Polish Society of Endocrinology. 2019

Bolanowski, Marek / Ruchała, Marek / Zgliczyński, Wojciech / Kos-Kudła, Beata / Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja / Lewiński, Andrzej. ·Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Isotope Therapy, Medical University Wroclaw, Wrocław, Poland. marek.bolanowski@umed.wroc.pl. · Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal Medicine, University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland, Poznan, Poland. · Department of Endocrinology, The Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw, Poland. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pathophysiology and Endocrinology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland. · Department of Endocrinology, Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum, Kraków, Poland. · Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Disorders, Medical University, Lodz, Poland. ·Endokrynol Pol · Pubmed #30843181.

ABSTRACT: Acromegaly is a rare disease caused by excessive production of growth hormone (GH), typically by a pituitary tumour. The diagnosis is usually delayed, and patients frequently develop various complications that cause premature mortality. In patients with hypertension, heart failure, diabetes, and arthropathies that are not age-specific, attention should be paid to signs of acromegaly. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) assay should be used as a screening test whenever acromegaly is suspected. Further diagnostic investigations and treatment should be carried out at specialist centres. First-line treatment involves selective excision of pituitary adenoma using transsphenoidal access. Patients with chances of cure with surgical removal of the pituitary tumour should be referred to centres that have experience in this type of procedure, following pharmacological preparation. Other patients, as well as patients after failed neurosurgical treatment, should first receive chronic treatment with first-generation somatostatin analogues. For second-line treatment, pasireotide, pegvisomant, cabergoline, or combinations thereof should be considered. In every case, acromegaly sequelae require life-long monitoring and active treatment. Current recommendations, being an updated version of the recommendations published in Endokrynologia Polska in 2014, which take into account the Polish situation, should prove useful in the management of patients with acromegaly.

8 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Small Cell Lung Cancer, Version 2.2018. 2018

Kalemkerian, Gregory P / Loo, Billy W / Akerley, Wallace / Attia, Albert / Bassetti, Michael / Boumber, Yanis / Decker, Roy / Dobelbower, M Chris / Dowlati, Afshin / Downey, Robert J / Florsheim, Charles / Ganti, Apar Kishor P / Grecula, John C / Gubens, Matthew A / Hann, Christine L / Hayman, James A / Heist, Rebecca Suk / Koczywas, Marianna / Merritt, Robert E / Mohindra, Nisha / Molina, Julian / Moran, Cesar A / Morgensztern, Daniel / Pokharel, Saraswati / Portnoy, David C / Rhodes, Deborah / Rusthoven, Chad / Sands, Jacob / Santana-Davila, Rafael / Williams, Charles C / Hoffmann, Karin G / Hughes, Miranda. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #30323087.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) address all aspects of disease management. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates to the NCCN Guidelines for SCLC regarding immunotherapy, systemic therapy, and radiation therapy. For the 2018 update, new sections were added on "Signs and Symptoms of SCLC" and "Principles of Pathologic Review."

9 Guideline Metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. 2018

Planchard, D / Popat, S / Kerr, K / Novello, S / Smit, E F / Faivre-Finn, C / Mok, T S / Reck, M / Van Schil, P E / Hellmann, M D / Peters, S / Anonymous831090. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Thoracic Group, Gustave-Roussy Villejuif, France. · Royal Marsden Hospital, London. · Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen University Medical School, Aberdeen, UK. · Department of Oncology, University of Turin, San Luigi Hospital, Orbassano, Italy. · Thoracic Oncology Service, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Clinical Oncology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, China. · LungenClinic Airway Research Center North (ARCN), German Center for Lung Research, Grosshansdorf, Germany. · Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Antwerp University Hospital and Antwerp University, Antwerp, Belgium. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA. · Medical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #30285222.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Recommendations on Disease Management for Patients With Advanced Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Update Summary. 2018

Ramakrishna, Naren / Temin, Sarah / Lin, Nancy U. ·University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando, FL; American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #29989840.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline Recommendations on Disease Management for Patients With Advanced Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Update. 2018

Ramakrishna, Naren / Temin, Sarah / Chandarlapaty, Sarat / Crews, Jennie R / Davidson, Nancy E / Esteva, Francisco J / Giordano, Sharon H / Kirshner, Jeffrey J / Krop, Ian E / Levinson, Jennifer / Modi, Shanu / Patt, Debra A / Perlmutter, Jane / Winer, Eric P / Lin, Nancy U. ·Naren Ramakrishna, University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando · Jennifer Levinson, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL · Sarah Temin, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Sarat Chandarlapaty and Shanu Modi, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center · Francisco J. Esteva, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York · Jeffrey J. Kirshner, Hematology/Oncology Associates of Central New York, East Syracuse, NY · Jennie R. Crews, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA · Nancy E. Davidson, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Washington, Seattle, WA · Sharon H. Giordano, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston · Debra A. Patt, Texas Oncology, Austin, TX · Ian E. Krop, Eric P. Winer, and Nancy U. Lin, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA · and Jane Perlmutter, Ann Arbor, MI. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29939840.

ABSTRACT: Purpose To update the formal expert consensus-based guideline recommendations for practicing oncologists and others on the management of brain metastases for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive advanced breast cancer to 2018. Methods An Expert Panel conducted a targeted systematic literature review (for both systemic treatment and CNS metastases) and identified 622 articles. Outcomes of interest included overall survival, progression-free survival, and adverse events. In 2014, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a panel of medical oncology, radiation oncology, guideline implementation, and advocacy experts, and conducted a systematic review of the literature. When that failed to yield sufficiently strong quality evidence, the Expert Panel undertook a formal expert consensus-based process to produce these recommendations. ASCO used a modified Delphi process. The panel members drafted recommendations, and a group of other experts joined them for two rounds of formal ratings of the recommendations. Results Of the 622 publications identified and reviewed, no additional evidence was identified that would warrant a change to the 2014 recommendations. Recommendations Patients with brain metastases should receive appropriate local therapy and systemic therapy, if indicated. Local therapies include surgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. Treatments depend on factors such as patient prognosis, presence of symptoms, resectability, number and size of metastases, prior therapy, and whether metastases are diffuse. Other options include systemic therapy, best supportive care, enrollment in a clinical trial, and/or palliative care. Clinicians should not perform routine magnetic resonance imaging to screen for brain metastases, but rather should have a low threshold for magnetic resonance imaging of the brain because of the high incidence of brain metastases among patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines .

12 Guideline SIOPE - Brain tumor group consensus guideline on craniospinal target volume delineation for high-precision radiotherapy. 2018

Ajithkumar, Thankamma / Horan, Gail / Padovani, Laetitia / Thorp, Nicky / Timmermann, Beate / Alapetite, Claire / Gandola, Lorenza / Ramos, Monica / Van Beek, Karen / Christiaens, Melissa / Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin / Magelssen, Henriette / Nilsson, Kristina / Saran, Frank / Rombi, Barbara / Kortmann, Rolf / Janssens, Geert O / Anonymous6940945. ·Department of Oncology, Cambridge University Hospitals, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Thankamma.ajithkumar@addenbrookes.nhs.uk. · Department of Oncology, Cambridge University Hospitals, United Kingdom. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille, France. · Department of Oncology, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · West German Proton Centre, University of Essen, Germany. · Radiation Oncology department and Proton Centre, Institute Curie, Paris and Orsay, France. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Hospital Universitari de la Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · Radiotherapie-Oncologie, UZ Leuven, Belgium. · Danish Centre for Particle Therapy, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital (The Norwegian Radium Hospital), Norway. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology, Clinical Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. · Department of Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, United Kingdom. · Proton Therapy Center, Santa Chiara Hospital, Trento, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, and Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, The Netherlands. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #29729847.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop a consensus guideline for craniospinal target volume (TV) delineation in children and young adults participating in SIOPE studies in the era of high-precision radiotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: During four consensus meetings (Cambridge, Essen, Liverpool, and Marseille), conventional field-based TV has been translated into image-guided high-precision craniospinal TV by a group of expert paediatric radiation oncologists and enhanced by MRI images of liquor distribution. RESULTS: The CTV CONCLUSION: This consensus guideline has the potential to improve consistency of craniospinal TV delineation in an era of high-precision radiotherapy. This proposal will be incorporated in the RTQA guidelines of future SIOPE-BTG trials using CSI.

13 Guideline Clinical trial design for local therapies for brain metastases: a guideline by the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Brain Metastases working group. 2018

Alexander, Brian M / Brown, Paul D / Ahluwalia, Manmeet S / Aoyama, Hidefumi / Baumert, Brigitta G / Chang, Susan M / Gaspar, Laurie E / Kalkanis, Steven N / Macdonald, David R / Mehta, Minesh P / Soffietti, Riccardo / Suh, John H / van den Bent, Martin J / Vogelbaum, Michael A / Wefel, Jeffrey S / Lee, Eudocia Q / Wen, Patrick Y / Anonymous941186. ·Harvard Program in Therapeutic Science, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: brian_alexander@dfci.harvard.edu. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Paracelsus Clinic Osnabrück, University of Münster, Münster, Germany; Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, Netherlands. · Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Henry Ford Health System, Wayne State University, Department of Neurosurgery, Detroit, MI, USA. · London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON, Canada. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami Cancer Institute, Miami, FL, USA. · Department of Neuro-Oncology, University of Turin and City of Health and Science Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Brain Tumor Center, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Neuro-Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #29304360.

ABSTRACT: The goals of therapeutic and biomarker development form the foundation of clinical trial design, and change considerably from early-phase to late-phase trials. From these goals, decisions on specific clinical trial design elements, such as endpoint selection and statistical approaches, are formed. Whereas early-phase trials might focus on finding a therapeutic signal to make decisions on further development, late-phase trials focus on the confirmation of therapeutic impact by considering clinically meaningful endpoints. In this guideline from the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Brain Metastases (RANO-BM) working group, we highlight issues related to, and provide recommendations for, the design of clinical trials on local therapies for CNS metastases from solid tumours. We discuss endpoint selection criteria, the analysis appropriate for early-phase and late-phase trials, the association between tumour-specific and clinically meaningful endpoints, and possible issues related to the estimation of local control in the context of competing risks. In light of these discussions, we make specific recommendations on the clinical trial design of local therapies for brain metastases.

14 Guideline Clinical trial design for systemic agents in patients with brain metastases from solid tumours: a guideline by the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Brain Metastases working group. 2018

Camidge, D Ross / Lee, Eudocia Q / Lin, Nancy U / Margolin, Kim / Ahluwalia, Manmeet S / Bendszus, Martin / Chang, Susan M / Dancey, Janet / de Vries, Elisabeth G E / Harris, Gordon J / Hodi, F Stephen / Lassman, Andrew B / Macdonald, David R / Peereboom, David M / Schiff, David / Soffietti, Ricardo / van den Bent, Martin J / Wefel, Jeffrey S / Wen, Patrick Y. ·Anschutz Medical Campus, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA. Electronic address: ross.camidge@ucdenver.edu. · Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, USA. · Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Solid Tumor Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Neuroradiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Oncology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, 3D Imaging Lab, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Neurology and Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, Columbia University, NY, USA. · Department of Oncology and Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON, Canada. · Division of Neuro-Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. · Department of Neurology/Neuro-Oncology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Brain Tumor Institute, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Neuro-Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #29304358.

ABSTRACT: Patients with active CNS disease are often excluded from clinical trials, and data regarding the CNS efficacy of systemic agents are usually obtained late in the drug development process or not at all. In this guideline from the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Brain Metastases (RANO-BM) working group, we provide detailed recommendations on when patients with brain metastases from solid tumours should be included or excluded in clinical trials of systemic agents. We also discuss the limitations of retrospective studies in determining the CNS efficacy of systemic drugs. Inclusion of patients with brain metastases early on in the clinical development of a drug or a regimen is needed to generate appropriate CNS efficacy or non-efficacy signals. We consider how to optimally incorporate or exclude such patients in systemic therapy trials depending on the likelihood of CNS activity of the agent by considering three scenarios: drugs that are considered very unlikely to have CNS antitumour activity or efficacy; drugs that are considered very likely to have CNS activity or efficacy; and drugs with minimal baseline information on CNS activity or efficacy. We also address trial design issues unique to patients with brain metastases, including the selection of appropriate CNS endpoints in systemic therapy trials.

15 Guideline Stereotactic Radiosurgery in the Management of Limited (1-4) Brain Metasteses: Systematic Review and International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Practice Guideline. 2018

Chao, Samuel T / De Salles, Antonio / Hayashi, Motohiro / Levivier, Marc / Ma, Lijun / Martinez, Roberto / Paddick, Ian / Régis, Jean / Ryu, Samuel / Slotman, Ben J / Sahgal, Arjun. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neurooncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · HCor Neuroscience, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Neurosurgery Service and Gamma Knife Center, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Division Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Department Neurosurgery, Ruber International Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Division Physics, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK. · Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Timone University Hospital, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France. · Department of Radiation Oncology and Neurosurgery, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York. · Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Neurosurgery · Pubmed #29126142.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Guidelines regarding stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases are missing recently published evidence. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and provide an objective summary of publications regarding SRS in managing patients with 1 to 4 brain metastases. METHODS: Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, a systematic review was conducted using PubMed and Medline up to November 2016. A separate search was conducted for SRS for larger brain metastases. RESULTS: Twenty-seven prospective studies, critical reviews, meta-analyses, and published consensus guidelines were reviewed. Four key points came from these studies. First, there is no detriment to survival by withholding whole brain radiation (WBRT) in the upfront management of brain metastases with SRS. Second, while SRS on its own provides a high rate of local control (LC), WBRT may provide further increase in LC. Next, WBRT does provide distant brain control with less need for salvage therapy. Finally, the addition of WBRT does affect neurocognitive function and quality of life more than SRS alone. For larger brain metastases, surgical resection should be considered, especially when factoring lower LC with single-session radiosurgery. There is emerging data showing good LC and/or decreased toxicity with multisession radiosurgery. CONCLUSION: A number of well-conducted prospective and meta-analyses studies demonstrate good LC, without compromising survival, using SRS alone for patients with a limited number of brain metastases. Some also demonstrated less impact on neurocognitive function with SRS alone. Practice guidelines were developed using these data with International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society consensus.

16 Guideline SEOM clinical guideline of diagnosis and management of low-grade glioma (2017). 2018

Sepúlveda-Sánchez, J M / Muñoz Langa, J / Arráez, M Á / Fuster, J / Hernández Laín, A / Reynés, G / Rodríguez González, V / Vicente, E / Vidal Denis, M / Gallego, Ó. ·Neurooncology Unit, Hospital Universitario, 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. juanmanuel.sepulveda@salud.madrid.org. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitari I Politècnic la Fe, Valencia, Spain. · Neurosurgery Department, HRU Carlos Haya, Málaga, Spain. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain. · Neuropathology Department, Hospital Universitario, 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Radiation Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario, 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Medical Oncology Department, C.H.U. Insular-Materno Infantil de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain. · Neuroradiology Unit, HRU Carlos Haya, Málaga, Spain. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu I Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #29124520.

ABSTRACT: Diffuse infiltrating low-grade gliomas include oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas, and account for about 5% of all primary brain tumors. Treatment strategies for these low-grade gliomas in adults have recently changed. The 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification has updated the definition of these tumors to include their molecular characterization, including the presence of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation and 1p/19p codeletion. In this new classification, the histologic subtype of grade II-mixed oligoastrocytoma has also been eliminated. The precise optimal management of patients with low-grade glioma after resection remains to be determined. The risk-benefit ratio of adjuvant treatment must be weighed for each individual.

17 Guideline SEOM clinical guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of glioblastoma (2017). 2018

Martínez-Garcia, M / Álvarez-Linera, J / Carrato, C / Ley, L / Luque, R / Maldonado, X / Martínez-Aguillo, M / Navarro, L M / Vaz-Salgado, M A / Gil-Gil, M. ·Oncología Médica, Hospital del Mar-Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Neuro-radiología, Hospital Ruber Internacional, Madrid, Spain. · Anatomía Patológica, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol de Badalona, Barcelona, Spain. · Neurocirugía, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Oncología Médica, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Granada Virgen de las Nieves, Granada, Spain. · Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · Oncología Médica, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca-IBSAL, Salamanca, Spain. · Oncología Médica, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Unidad de Neuro-oncologia. Oncología Médica Institut Català d'Oncologia (ICO)-Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge IDIBELL L'Hospitalet, C/de la Feixa Llarga, s/n, Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08907, Barcelona, Spain. mgilgil@iconcologia.net. ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #29086250.

ABSTRACT: Glioblastoma (GB) is the most common brain malignancy and accounts for over 50% of all high-grade gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy is the current standard of care for patients with newly diagnosed GB up to age 70. Recently, a new standard of care has been adopted for elderly patients (≥ 65 years) based on short course of RT and TMZ. Several clinically relevant molecular markers that assist in diagnosis and prognosis have recently been identified. The treatment for recurrent GB is not well defined, and decision-making is usually based on prior strategies as well as several clinical and radiological factors. The presence of neurologic deficits and seizures can significantly impact quality of life.

18 Guideline SEOM clinical guidelines for anaplastic gliomas (2017). 2018

Balañá, C / Alonso, M / Hernandez-Lain, A / Hernandez, A / Perez-Segura, P / Pineda, E / Ramos, A / Sanchez, A R / Teixidor, P / Verger, E / Benavides, M. ·Institut Català Oncologia Badalona, Ct. Canyet, s/n, 08916, Barcelona, Spain. cbalana@iconcologia.net. · Complejo Hospitalario Virgen del Rocío, Seville, Spain. · Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital Universitario Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital Clínic i Provincial, Barcelona, Spain. · Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, León, Spain. · Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol Badalona, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital Universitario Regional y Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, Spain. ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #29058264.

ABSTRACT: The SEOM/GEINO clinical guidelines provide recommendations for radiological, and molecular diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of adult patients with anaplastic gliomas (AG). We followed the 2016 WHO classification which specifies the major diagnostic/prognostic and predictive value of IDH1/IDH2 missense mutations and 1p/19q codeletions in AG. The diagnosis of anaplastic oligoastrocytoma is discouraged. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy with PCV or TMZ are the first-line standard of care for AG with slight modifications according to molecular variables. A multidisciplinary team is highly recommended in the management of these tumors.

19 Guideline European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of aggressive pituitary tumours and carcinomas. 2018

Raverot, Gerald / Burman, Pia / McCormack, Ann / Heaney, Anthony / Petersenn, Stephan / Popovic, Vera / Trouillas, Jacqueline / Dekkers, Olaf M / Anonymous7350923. ·Fédération d'Endocrinologie, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares Hypophysaires HYPO, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron, France. · Faculté de Médecine Lyon Est, Université Lyon 1, Lyon, France. · INSERM U1052, CNRS UMR5286, Cancer Research Centre of Lyon, Lyon, France. · Department of Endocrinology, Skane University Hospital Malmö, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden. · Garvan Institute, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Endocrinology, St Vincent's Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · ENDOC Center for Endocrine Tumors, Hamburg, Germany. · Medical Faculty, University Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Centre de Pathologie et de Biologie Est, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron, France. · Departments of Internal Medicine (Section Endocrinology) & Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. ·Eur J Endocrinol · Pubmed #29046323.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pituitary tumours are common and easily treated by surgery or medical treatment in most cases. However, a small subset of pituitary tumours does not respond to standard medical treatment and presents with multiple local recurrences (aggressive pituitary tumours) and in rare occasion with metastases (pituitary carcinoma). The present European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) guideline aims to provide clinical guidance on diagnosis, treatment and follow-up in aggressive pituitary tumours and carcinomas. METHODS: We decided upfront, while acknowledging that literature on aggressive pituitary tumours and carcinomas is scarce, to systematically review the literature according to the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. The review focused primarily on first- and second-line treatment in aggressive pituitary tumours and carcinomas. We included 14 single-arm cohort studies (total number of patients = 116) most on temozolomide treatment (

20 Guideline [Neurophysiological monitoring options in brain tumour resections. Consensus statement from the Spanish Society of Neurosurgery's (SENEC) Neuro-oncology Working Group and the Spanish Society of Clinical Neurophysiology (SENFC)]. 2018

de Quintana-Schmidt, Cristian / Lladó-Carbo, Estela / Cortés-Doñate, Victoria Eugenia / Anonymous40922. ·Servicio de Neurocirugía, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España. Electronic address: cqs_7@hotmail.com. · Servicio de Neurofisiología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Neurofisiología, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia, España. ·Neurocirugia (Astur) · Pubmed #28988668.

ABSTRACT: Brain tumours located in or in proximity to eloquent areas are a significant neurosurgical challenge. Performing this kind of surgery with neurophysiological monitoring to improve resections with reduced permanent focal neurological deficit has become widely accepted in the literature. However, how to conduct this monitoring, the exact definition of an eloquent area and whether to perform this surgery with the patient awake or asleep are still subject to rigorous scientific debate. Members of the Neuro-oncology Working Group (GTNO) of the Spanish Society of Neurosurgery (SENEC) and members of the Spanish Society of Clinical Neurophysiology (SENFC) have published a consensus statement to explain the different neurophysiological monitoring options currently available in awake and asleep patients to obtain better surgical resection without neurological deficits. An exhaustive review of the literature has also been conducted.

21 Guideline SIOP PODC Adapted treatment guidelines for low grade gliomas in low and middle income settings. 2017

Hessissen, Laila / Parkes, Jeannette / Amayiri, Nisreen / Mushtaq, Naureen / Sirachainan, Nongnuch / Anacak, Yavuz / Mitra, Dipayan / Figaji, Anthony / Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette / Sullivan, Michael / Burger, Hester / Davidson, Alan / Bouffet, Eric / Bailey, Simon. ·Department of Hematology and Pediatric Oncology, Hospital University Ibn Sina, Rabat, Morocco. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Centre, Amman, Jordan. · Department of Pediatric Haematology and Oncology, Aga Khan University Hopsital, Karachi, Pakistan. · Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Ege University School of Medicine & Hospital, Izmir, Turkey. · Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. · Department of Neurosurgery, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital and University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · Department of Paediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department Medical Physics, Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · Haematology Oncology Service, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Cape Town, South Africa. · Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Great North Children's Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. ·Pediatr Blood Cancer · Pubmed #29297618.

ABSTRACT: Effective treatment of children with low grade glioma (LGG) requires a functioning multi-disciplinary team with adequate neurosurgical, neuroradiological, pathological, radiotherapy and chemotherapy facilities and personnel. In addition, the treating centre should have the capacity to manage a variety of LGG and treatment-associated complications. These requirements have made it difficult for many centers in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) to offer effective treatment and follow up. This article provides management recommendations for children with LGG according to the level of facilities available.

22 Guideline Guidelines for the treatment of central nervous system metastases using radiosurgery. 2017

Anonymous4700921 / Marta, Gustavo Nader / Baraldi, Helena Espindola / Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de. ·Sociedade Brasileira de Radioterapia (SBR). ·Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) · Pubmed #28977079.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline European Association for Neuro-Oncology (EANO) guidelines for palliative care in adults with glioma. 2017

Pace, Andrea / Dirven, Linda / Koekkoek, Johan A F / Golla, Heidrun / Fleming, Jane / Rudà, Roberta / Marosi, Christine / Rhun, Emilie Le / Grant, Robin / Oliver, Kathy / Oberg, Ingela / Bulbeck, Helen J / Rooney, Alasdair G / Henriksson, Roger / Pasman, H Roeline W / Oberndorfer, Stefan / Weller, Michael / Taphoorn, Martin J B / Anonymous1860909. ·Neuro-Oncology Unit, Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy. · Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands; Department of Neurology, Haaglanden Medical Center, The Hague, Netherlands. · Department of Palliative Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. · Department of Palliative Medicine, University Hospital Waterford, Waterford, Ireland. · Department of Neuro-Oncology, University and City of Health and Science Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine I, Clinical Division of Medical Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Neuro-Oncology Unit, Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Lille, France; Breast Unit, Department of Medical Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille, France. · Edinburgh Centre for Neuro-Oncology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK. · International Brain Tumour Alliance, Tadworth, UK. · Department of Neuroscience, Cambridge University Hospitals, Cambridge, UK. · brainstrust, Cowes, Isle of Wight, UK. · Division of Psychiatry, University of Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, Edinburgh, UK. · Regional Cancer Center Stockholm Gotland, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Radiation Sciences and Oncology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Department of Public and Occupational Health, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Neurology, University Clinic St Pölten, Karl Landsteiner Private University and Karl Landsteiner Institute for Neurology and Neuropsychology, St Pölten, Austria. · Department of Neurology, University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands; Department of Neurology, Haaglanden Medical Center, The Hague, Netherlands. Electronic address: m.taphoorn@haaglandenmc.nl. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #28593859.

ABSTRACT: Patients with glioma present with complex palliative care needs throughout their disease trajectory. The life-limiting nature of gliomas and the presence of specific symptoms related to neurological deterioration necessitate an appropriate and early palliative care approach. The multidisciplinary palliative care task force of the European Association of Neuro-Oncology did a systematic review of the available scientific literature to formulate the best possible evidence-based recommendations for the palliative care of adult patients with glioma, with the aim to reduce symptom burden and improve the quality of life of patients and their caregivers, particularly in the end-of-life phase. When recommendations could not be made because of the scarcity of evidence, the task force either used evidence from studies of patients with systemic cancer or formulated expert opinion. Areas of palliative care that currently lack evidence and thus deserve attention for further research are fatigue, disorders of behaviour and mood, interventions for the needs of caregivers, and timing of advance care planning.

24 Guideline [Recommendations for the organ donation from patients with brain or medullary primitive tumors on behalf of the Association of the Neuro-oncologists of French Expression (ANOCEF) and the Club of Neuro-oncology of the French Society of Neurosurgery]. 2017

Frappaz, Didier / Le Rhun, Emilie / Dagain, Arnaud / Averland, Benoît / Bauchet, Luc / Faure, Alexandre / Guillaume, Christian / Zouaoui, Sonia / Provot, François / Vachiery, Florence / Taillandier, Luc / Hoang-Xuan, Khê. ·Centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69673 Lyon, France. Electronic address: Didier.frappaz@lyon.unicancer.fr. · University hospital, department of neurosurgery, neuro-oncology, 59037 Lille, France; Oscar-Lambret center, department of medical oncology, Breast unit, 59037 Lille, France; Lille university, Inserm U-1192, laboratoire de protéomique, réponse inflammatoire, spectrométrie de masse (PRISM), 59037 Lille, France. · HIA Sainte-Anne, 2, boulevard Sainte-Anne, 83800 Toulon, France. · Agence de la biomédecine, 1, avenue du Stade de France, 93210 Saint-Denis, France. · CHRU Gui-de-Chauliac, CHU de Montpellier, 80, avenue Augustin-Fliche, 34000 Montpellier, France. · CHU de Lyon, 3, quai des Célestins, 69002 Lyon, France. · CHRU de Lille, 2, avenue Oscar-Lambret, 59000 Lille, France. · CHU de Nancy, 5, rue du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · APHP, UMPC-Sorbonne universités, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #28549594.

ABSTRACT: Requests of organs to be transplanted increase. As a matter of urgency, it is not always easy to decide if a patient carrier of a brain tumor can be candidate in the donation. After a review of the literature, the members of the Association of the Neuro-oncologists of French Expression (ANOCEF) and the Club of Neuro-oncology of the French Society of Neurosurgery propose consensual recommendations in case of donor carrier of primitive tumor intra-cranial or intra-medullary. A contact with the neuro-oncologist/neurosurgeon will allow to discuss the indication in case of glioma of grade I/II/III, according to the grade, the current status (absence of progressive disease), the number of surgeries and of lines of treatment. The taking is disadvised in case of glioma of grade IV (glioblastoma), of lymphoma or meningioma of grade III. No contraindication for the meningiomas of grade I, and individual discussion for the meningiomas of grade II. It is advisable to remain careful in case of hemangiopericytoma and of meningeal solitary fibrous tumor. The patients in first complete remission of a medulloblastoma or intra-cranial primitive germinoma seem good candidates for the taking of organ if the follow-up is of at least 10 years (3 years for non germinomas). In every case, a multidisciplinary discussion is desirable when it is materially possible.

25 Guideline European Association for Neuro-Oncology (EANO) guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of adult astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas. 2017

Weller, Michael / van den Bent, Martin / Tonn, Jörg C / Stupp, Roger / Preusser, Matthias / Cohen-Jonathan-Moyal, Elizabeth / Henriksson, Roger / Rhun, Emilie Le / Balana, Carmen / Chinot, Olivier / Bendszus, Martin / Reijneveld, Jaap C / Dhermain, Frederick / French, Pim / Marosi, Christine / Watts, Colin / Oberg, Ingela / Pilkington, Geoffrey / Baumert, Brigitta G / Taphoorn, Martin J B / Hegi, Monika / Westphal, Manfred / Reifenberger, Guido / Soffietti, Riccardo / Wick, Wolfgang / Anonymous5180905. ·Department of Neurology, Brain Tumour Centre, University Hospital and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address: michael.weller@usz.ch. · Neurooncology Unit, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Neurosurgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Brain Tumour Centre, University Hospital and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Medicine, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Département de Radiotherapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, L'Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse-Oncopole, Toulouse, France. · Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm-Gotland and Department of Radiation Sciences and Oncology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. · Neuro-Oncology, Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Lille, France. · Catalan Institute of Oncology, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Neuro-Oncology, Aix-Marseille Université, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Marseille, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Timone, Marseilles, France. · Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Neurology and Brain Tumour Centre Amsterdam, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave Roussy University Hospital, Villejuif, France. · Department of Neurology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Division of Neurosurgery, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Division of Neurosurgery, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Brain Tumour Research Centre, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK. · Department of Radiation Oncology, MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and Clinical Cooperation Unit Neurooncology, University of Bonn Medical Centre, Bonn, Germany. · Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Centre and Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University Hospital Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Essen/Düsseldorf, Germany. · Department of Neuro-Oncology, University Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Neurology Clinic and National Centre for Tumour Diseases, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; German Consortium of Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Clinical Cooperation Unit Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #28483413.

ABSTRACT: The European Association for Neuro-Oncology guideline provides recommendations for the clinical care of adult patients with astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas, including glioblastomas. The guideline is based on the 2016 WHO classification of tumours of the central nervous system and on scientific developments since the 2014 guideline. The recommendations focus on pathological and radiological diagnostics, and the main treatment modalities of surgery, radiotherapy, and pharmacotherapy. In this guideline we have also integrated the results from contemporary clinical trials that have changed clinical practice. The guideline aims to provide guidance for diagnostic and management decisions, while limiting unnecessary treatments and costs. The recommendations are a resource for professionals involved in the management of patients with glioma, for patients and caregivers, and for health-care providers in Europe. The implementation of this guideline requires multidisciplinary structures of care, and defined processes of diagnosis and treatment.

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