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Breast Neoplasms HELP
Based on 97,729 articles since 2008
|||| 59 

These are the 97729 published articles about Breast Neoplasms that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2017.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline 3rd ESO-ESMO international consensus guidelines for Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC 3). 2017

Cardoso, F / Costa, A / Senkus, E / Aapro, M / André, F / Barrios, C H / Bergh, J / Bhattacharyya, G / Biganzoli, L / Cardoso, M J / Carey, L / Corneliussen-James, D / Curigliano, G / Dieras, V / El Saghir, N / Eniu, A / Fallowfield, L / Fenech, D / Francis, P / Gelmon, K / Gennari, A / Harbeck, N / Hudis, C / Kaufman, B / Krop, I / Mayer, M / Meijer, H / Mertz, S / Ohno, S / Pagani, O / Papadopoulos, E / Peccatori, F / Pernault-Llorca, F / Piccart, M J / Pierga, J Y / Rugo, H / Shockney, L / Sledge, G / Swain, S / Thomssen, C / Tutt, A / Vorobiof, D / Xu, B / Norton, L / Winer, E. ·European School of Oncology & Breast Unit, Champalimaud Clinical Center, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: fatimacardoso@fundacaochampalimaud.pt. · European School of Oncology, Milan, Italy; European School of Oncology, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland. · Breast Center, Genolier Cancer Center, Genolier, Switzerland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France. · Department of Medicine, PUCRS School of Medicine, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Department of Oncology/Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Institutet & Cancer Center Karolinska and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fortis Hospital, Kolkata, India. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital of Prato, Prato, Italy. · Breast Unit, Champalimaud Clinical Center, Lisbon, Portugal. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, USA. · METAvivor Research and Support, Annapolis, USA. · Division of Experimental Therapeutics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris, France. · NK Basile Cancer Institute Breast Center of Excellence, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. · Department of Breast Tumors, Cancer Institute 'I. Chiricuta', Cluj-Napoca, Romania. · Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, UK. · Breast Care Support Group, Europa Donna Malta, Mtarfa, Malta. · Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. · BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medical Oncology, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy. · Brustzentrum der Universitat München, Munich, Germany. · Breast Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, USA. · Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA. · Advanced BC.org, New York, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Radvoud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Metastatic Breast Cancer Network US, Inversness, USA. · Breast Oncology Centre, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and Breast Unit of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Europa Donna, Nicosia, Cyprus. · Jean Perrin Centre, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Clermont Ferrand, France. · Department of Medicine, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Department of Medicine, Breast Oncology Program, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, USA. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Johns Hopkins Breast Center, Baltimore, USA. · Indiana University Medical CTR, Indianapolis, USA. · Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, USA. · Department of Gynaecology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle an der Saale, DE, Germany. · Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Unit, King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas's NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Sandton Oncology Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa. · Department of Medical Oncology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Breast Cancer Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, USA. ·Breast · Pubmed #27927580.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Osteoporosis management in patients with breast cancer: EMAS position statement. 2017

Trémollieres, Florence A / Ceausu, Iuliana / Depypere, Herman / Lambrinoudaki, Irene / Mueck, Alfred / Pérez-López, Faustino R / van der Schouw, Yvonne T / Senturk, Levent M / Simoncini, Tommaso / Stevenson, John C / Stute, Petra / Rees, Margaret. ·Menopause and Metabolic Bone Disease Unit, Hôpital Paule de Viguier, CHU Toulouse, Toulouse, France. Electronic address: tremollieres.fr@chu-toulouse.fr. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Carol Davila' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Dr. I. Cantacuzino' Hospital, Bucharest, Romania. · Breast Clinic and Menopause Clinic, University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent, Belgium. · Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National and Kapodestrian University of Athens, Greece. · University Women's Hospital of Tuebingen, Calwer Street 7, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zaragoza University Faculty of Medicine, Lozano-Blesa University Hospital, Zaragoza 50009, Spain. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Istanbul University Cerrahpasa School of Medicine. Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, IVF Unit, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67, 56100, Pisa, Italy. · National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Royal Brompton Campus Hospital, London SW3 6NP, UK. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Women's Hospital, Bern, Switzerland. · Women's Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #27802892.

ABSTRACT: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the first-line recommended standard of care for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Because they cause a profound suppression of estrogen levels, concerns regarding their potential to increase the risk of fracture were rapidly raised. There is currently a general consensus that a careful baseline evaluation is needed of the risk of fracture in postmenopausal women about to start treatment with AIs but also in all premenopausal women with early disease. Bisphosphonates have been shown in several phase III trials to prevent the bone loss induced by cancer treatment, although no fracture data are available. Even though they do not have regulatory approval for this indication, their use must be discussed with women at high risk of fracture. Accordingly, several guidelines recommend considering treatment in women with a T-score ≤-2 or those with two or more clinical risk factors. Moreover, recent data suggest that bisphosphonates, especially intravenous zoledronic acid, may have an anticancer effect, in that they reduce bone recurrence as well as extra-skeletal metastasis and breast cancer mortality in postmenopausal women. The anti-RANK ligand antibody denosumab is also emerging as a new adjuvant therapeutic option to prevent AI-induced bone loss. It has been shown to extend the time to first fracture in postmenopausal women treated with AIs. Several issues still need to be addressed regarding the use of these different agents in an adjuvant setting. The purpose of this position statement is to review the literature on antifracture therapy and to discuss the current guidelines for the management of osteoporosis in women with early breast cancer.

3 Guideline Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update. 2016

Recht, Abram / Comen, Elizabeth A / Fine, Richard E / Fleming, Gini F / Hardenbergh, Patricia H / Ho, Alice Y / Hudis, Clifford A / Hwang, E Shelley / Kirshner, Jeffrey J / Morrow, Monica / Salerno, Kilian E / Sledge, George W / Solin, Lawrence J / Spears, Patricia A / Whelan, Timothy J / Somerfield, Mark R / Edge, Stephen B. ·Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York. · West Clinic Comprehensive Breast Center, Germantown, TN. · University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL. · Shaw Regional Cancer Center, Edwards, CO. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. · Hematology Oncology Associates of Central New York, East Syracuse. · Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY. · Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA. · Albert Einstein Healthcare Network, Philadelphia, PA. · North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. · Juravinski Cancer Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. Electronic address: mark.somerfield@asco.org. ·Pract Radiat Oncol · Pubmed #27659727.

ABSTRACT: A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). METHODS: A recent systematic literature review by Cancer Care Ontario provided the primary evidentiary basis. The joint panel also reviewed targeted literature searches to identify new, potentially practice-changing data. RECOMMENDATIONS: The panel unanimously agreed that available evidence shows that PMRT reduces the risks of locoregional failure (LRF), any recurrence, and breast cancer mortality for patients with T1-2 breast cancer with one to three positive axillary nodes. However, some subsets of these patients are likely to have such a low risk of LRF that the absolute benefit of PMRT is outweighed by its potential toxicities. In addition, the acceptable ratio of benefit to toxicity varies among patients and physicians. Thus, the decision to recommend PMRT requires a great deal of clinical judgment. The panel agreed clinicians making such recommendations for individual patients should consider factors that may decrease the risk of LRF, attenuate the benefit of reduced breast cancer-specific mortality, and/or increase risk of complications resulting from PMRT. When clinicians and patients elect to omit axillary dissection after a positive sentinel node biopsy, the panel recommends that these patients receive PMRT only if there is already sufficient information to justify its use without needing to know additional axillary nodes are involved. Patients with axillary nodal involvement after neoadjuvant systemic therapy should receive PMRT. The panel recommends treatment generally be administered to both the internal mammary nodes and the supraclavicular-axillary apical nodes in addition to the chest wall or reconstructed breast.

4 Guideline [Radiotherapy of breast cancer]. 2016

Hennequin, C / Barillot, I / Azria, D / Belkacémi, Y / Bollet, M / Chauvet, B / Cowen, D / Cutuli, B / Fourquet, A / Hannoun-Lévi, J M / Leblanc, M / Mahé, M A. ·Service de cancérologie-radiothérapie, hôpital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris, France. Electronic address: christophe.hennequin2@aphp.fr. · Centre universitaire de cancérologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU de Tours, 37000 Tours, France. · Institut régional du cancer, 208, avenue des Apothicaires Parc Euromédecine, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5, France. · CHU Henri-Mondor, AP-HP, 51, avenue du Maréchal-de-Lattre-de-Tassigny, 94000 Créteil, France. · Institut Hartmann, 4, rue Kléber, CS 90004, 92309 Levallois-Perret cedex, France. · Institut Saint-Catherine, 250, chemin de Baigne-Pieds, 84918 Avignon cedex 9, France. · CHU Nord, AP-HM, chemin des Bourrely, 13915 Marseille cedex 20, France. · Clinique Courlancy, 38 bis, rue de Courlancy, 51100 Reims, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06100 Nice, France. · Centre René-Gauducheau, boulevard Professeur-Jacques-Monod, 44805 Saint-Herblain, France. ·Cancer Radiother · Pubmed #27522187.

ABSTRACT: In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with radiotherapy.

5 Guideline Screening for Breast Cancer: Recommendation Statement. 2016

Anonymous941105. · ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #27175847.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2015 for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer. 2016

Komiyama, Shinichi / Katabuchi, Hidetaka / Mikami, Mikio / Nagase, Satoru / Okamoto, Aikou / Ito, Kiyoshi / Morishige, Kenichiro / Suzuki, Nao / Kaneuchi, Masanori / Yaegashi, Nobuo / Udagawa, Yasuhiro / Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki. ·Department of Gynecology, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8515, Japan. komiyama@med.toho-u.ac.jp. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Yamagata, Japan. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Disaster Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine St. Marianna University, Kawasaki, Japan. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan. · Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Ibaraki, Japan. ·Int J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27142770.

ABSTRACT: The fourth edition of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer was published in 2015. The guidelines contain seven chapters and six flow charts. The major changes in this new edition are as follows-(1) the format has been changed from reviews to clinical questions (CQ), and the guidelines for optimal clinical practice in Japan are now shown as 41 CQs and answers; (2) the 'flow charts' have been improved and placed near the beginning of the guidelines; (3) the 'basic points', including tumor staging, histological classification, surgical procedures, chemotherapy, and palliative care, are described before the chapter; (4) the FIGO surgical staging of ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, and primary peritoneal cancer was revised in 2014 and the guideline has been revised accordingly to take the updated version of this classification into account; (5) the procedures for examination and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer are described; (6) information on molecular targeting therapy has been added; (7) guidelines for the treatment of recurrent cancer based on tumor markers alone are described, as well as guidelines for providing hormone replacement therapy after treatment.

7 Guideline Surgical resection margins after breast-conserving surgery: Senonetwork recommendations. 2016

Galimberti, Viviana / Taffurelli, Mario / Leonardi, Maria Cristina / Aristei, Cynthia / Trentin, Chiara / Cassano, Enrico / Pietribiasi, Francesca / Corso, Giovanni / Munzone, Elisabetta / Tondini, Carlo / Frigerio, Alfonso / Cataliotti, Luigi / Santini, Donatella. ·Molecular Senology Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milan - Italy. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna - Italy. · Radiation Oncology Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milan - Italy. · Radiation Oncology Section, University of Perugia and Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia - Italy. · Breast Imaging Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milan - Italy. · Pathology Unit, S. Croce Hospital, ASL TO 5, Moncalieri (Turin) - Italy. · Division of Medical Senology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan - Italy. · Unit of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology and Hematology, Hospital Pope John XXIII, Bergamo - Italy. · Regional Reference Center for Breast Cancer Screening, Turin - Italy. · University of Florence, Senonetwork Italia, Florence - Italy. · Pathology Unit, University of Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna - Italy. ·Tumori · Pubmed #27103209.

ABSTRACT: This paper reports findings of the "Focus on Controversial Areas" Working Party of the Italian Senonetwork, which was set up to improve the care of breast cancer patients. After reviewing articles in English on the MEDLINE system on breast conserving surgery for invasive carcinoma, the Working Party presents their recommendations for identifying risk factors for positive margins, suggests how to manage them so as to achieve the highest possible percentage of negative margins, and proposes standards for investigating resection margins and therapeutic approaches according to margin status. When margins are positive, approaches include re-excision, mastectomy, or, as second-line treatment, radiotherapy with a high boost dose. When margins are negative, boost administration and its dose depend on the risk of local recurrence, which is linked to biopathological tumor features and surgical margin width. Although margin status does not affect the choice of systemic therapy, it may delay the start of chemotherapy when further surgery is required.

8 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society clinical practice guidelines for screening and imaging diagnosis of breast cancer, 2015 edition. 2016

Tozaki, Mitsuhiro / Kuroki, Yoshifumi / Kikuchi, Mari / Kojima, Yasuyuki / Kubota, Kazunori / Nakahara, Hiroshi / Ito, Yoshinori / Mukai, Hirofumi. ·Department of Radiology, Sagara Hospital Affiliated Breast Center, 3-28 Tenokuchi-cho, Kagoshima, 892-0845, Japan. e-tozaki@keh.biglobe.ne.jp. · Department of Radiology, Niimura hospital, Kagoshima, Japan. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan. · Department of Medical Informatics, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Radiology, Breastopia Miyazaki Hospital, Miyazaki, Japan. · Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Oncology/Hematology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan. ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #27052720.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline [Not Available]. 2016

Anonymous3820864. · ·Rofo · Pubmed #27050543.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Second international consensus guidelines for breast cancer in young women (BCY2). 2016

Paluch-Shimon, Shani / Pagani, Olivia / Partridge, Ann H / Bar-Meir, Eran / Fallowfield, Lesley / Fenlon, Deborah / Friedman, Eitan / Gelmon, Karen / Gentilini, Oreste / Geraghty, James / Harbeck, Nadia / Higgins, Stephen / Loibl, Sibylle / Moser, Elizabeth / Peccatori, Fedro / Raanani, Hila / Kaufman, Bella / Cardoso, Fatima. ·Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel. · Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and Breast Unit of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Faculty of Medicine, Bar-Ilan University, Israel. · SHORE-C, Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, UK. · University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada. · Breast Surgery Unit, San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy. · St Vincent Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Breast Center, Dept. OB&GYN, University of Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany. · Tallaght Hospital & Our Lady's Hospice, Dublin, Ireland. · German Breast Group, Neu-Isenburg, & Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Germany. · Breast Unit, Champalimaud Cancer Center, Lisbon, Portugal. · European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Breast Unit, Champalimaud Cancer Center, Lisbon, Portugal; European School of Oncology, Italy. Electronic address: fatimacardoso@fundacaochampalimaud.pt. ·Breast · Pubmed #27017247.

ABSTRACT: The 2nd International Consensus Conference for Breast Cancer in Young Women (BCY2) took place in November 2014, in Dublin, Ireland organized by the European School of Oncology (ESO). Consensus recommendations for the management of breast cancer in young women (BCYW) were updated from BCY1 with incorporation of new evidence to inform the guidelines, and areas of research priorities were identified. This manuscript summarizes these international consensus recommendations, which are also endorsed by the European Society of Breast Specialists (EUSOMA).

11 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF): benign breast tumors - short text. 2016

Lavoué, Vincent / Fritel, Xavier / Antoine, Martine / Beltjens, Françoise / Bendifallah, Sofiane / Boisserie-Lacroix, Martine / Boulanger, Loic / Canlorbe, Geoffroy / Catteau-Jonard, Sophie / Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie / Chamming's, Foucauld / Chéreau, Elisabeth / Chopier, Jocelyne / Coutant, Charles / Demetz, Julie / Guilhen, Nicolas / Fauvet, Raffaele / Kerdraon, Olivier / Laas, Enora / Legendre, Guillaume / Mathelin, Carole / Nadeau, Cédric / Naggara, Isabelle Thomassin / Ngô, Charlotte / Ouldamer, Lobna / Rafii, Arash / Roedlich, Marie-Noelle / Seror, Jérémy / Séror, Jean-Yves / Touboul, Cyril / Uzan, Catherine / Daraï, Emile / Anonymous581047. ·Department of Gynecology, Rennes University Hospital, France; ER440, Oncogenesis, Stress and Signaling, INSERM Labeled, CRLCC Eugène Marquis, Rennes, France; University of Rennes 1, France. Electronic address: cngof@club-internet.fr. · University of Poitiers, CIC 1402, Poitiers University Hospital, Poitiers, France; CESP Inserm U1018, Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Hôpital Tenon, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Centre Régional de Lutte contre le cancer Georges-François Leclerc, Dijon, France. · Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Reproductive Medicine, Hôpital Tenon, AP-HP, INSERM UMRS707, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Department of Radiology, Centre Régional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Bergognié, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Hôpital Jeanne de Flandre, Lille, France. · Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Reproductive Medicine, Hôpital Tenon, AP-HP, Inserm UMRS938, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Department of Endocrine Gynecology, Hopital Jeanne de Flandre, Lille, France. · Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Reproductive Medicine, Hôpital Tenon, AP-HP, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Department of Radiology, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, AP-HP, 15 rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France. · Department of Surgery, Centre régional de lutte contre le cancer Paoli Calmettes, Marseille, France. · Department of Radiology, Hôpital Tenon, AP-HP, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Department of Surgery, Centre Régional de Lutte contre le cancer Georges-François Leclerc, Dijon, France. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Poitiers University Hospital, 2 rue de la Milétrie, BP 577, 86021 Poitiers Cedex, France. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Caen University Hospital, Avenue de la Côte de Nacre, 14 033 Caen Cedex 09, France; University of Caen Normandy, INSERM U1199, BIOTICLA, France. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Hopital Jeanne de Flandre, Lille, France. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Angers University Hospital, France; CESP INSERM U1018, France. · Mastology Unit, CHRU Strasbourg, Hôpital de Hautepierre, Avenue Molière, 67200 Strasbourg, France. · Department of Oncological, Gynecological and Breast Surgery, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, AP-HP, 15 rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France; Paris-Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Gynecology, Tours University Hospital, Hôpital Bretonneau, 2 boulevard Tonnellé, 37044 Tours, France; Faculty of Medicine François-Rabelais, 37044 Tours, France; Unité INSERM 1069, 37044 Tours, France. · Department of Obstetric Gynecology, Montpellier University Hospital, France. · Department of Radiology, Hôpital Hautepierre, 1 av Molière, 67100 Strasbourg, France. · Medical Practice, 146 Avenue Ledru Rollin, 75011 Paris, France; Ultrasound Department, AP-HP, Hôpital Tenon, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Imagerie Duroc, R Boulevard du Montparnasse, 75006 Paris, France. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, CHI, 40 avenue de Verdun, 94000 Créteil, France. · Department of Gynecological and Breast Surgery and Oncology, AP-HP, Pitié-Salpêtrière, 83 Bd de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Pierre et Marie Curie University, Paris 6, France. · ·Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol · Pubmed #26967341.

ABSTRACT: Screening with breast ultrasound in combination with mammography is needed to investigate a clinical breast mass (Grade B), colored single-pore breast nipple discharge (Grade C), or mastitis (Grade C). The BI-RADS system is recommended for describing and classifying abnormal breast imaging findings. For a breast abscess, a percutaneous biopsy is recommended in the case of a mass or persistent symptoms (Grade C). For mastalgia, when breast imaging is normal, no MRI or breast biopsy is recommended (Grade C). Percutaneous biopsy is recommended for a BI-RADS category 4-5 mass (Grade B). For persistent erythematous nipple or atypical eczema lesions, a nipple biopsy is recommended (Grade C). For distortion and asymmetry, a vacuum core-needle biopsy is recommended due to the risk of underestimation by simple core-needle biopsy (Grade C). For BI-RADS category 4-5 microcalcifications without any ultrasound signal, a minimum 11-G vacuum core-needle biopsy is recommended (Grade B). In the absence of microcalcifications on radiography cores additional samples are recommended (Grade B). For atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, flat epithelial atypia, radial scar and mucocele with atypia, surgical excision is commonly recommended (Grade C). Expectant management is feasible after multidisciplinary consensus. For these lesions, when excision margins are not clear, no new excision is recommended except for LCIS characterized as pleomorphic or with necrosis (Grade C). For grade 1 phyllodes tumor, surgical resection with clear margins is recommended. For grade 2 phyllodes tumor, 10mm margins are recommended (Grade C). For papillary breast lesions without atypia, complete disappearance of the radiological signal is recommended (Grade C). For papillary breast lesions with atypia, complete surgical excision is recommended (Grade C).

12 Guideline Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Adjuvant Systemic Therapy for Women With Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Summary. 2016

Harris, Lyndsay N / Ismaila, Nofisat / McShane, Lisa M / Hayes, Daniel F. ·Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; and University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #26957642.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline Invasive Breast Cancer Version 1.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Gradishar, William J / Anderson, Benjamin O / Balassanian, Ron / Blair, Sarah L / Burstein, Harold J / Cyr, Amy / Elias, Anthony D / Farrar, William B / Forero, Andres / Giordano, Sharon Hermes / Goetz, Matthew / Goldstein, Lori J / Hudis, Clifford A / Isakoff, Steven J / Marcom, P Kelly / Mayer, Ingrid A / McCormick, Beryl / Moran, Meena / Patel, Sameer A / Pierce, Lori J / Reed, Elizabeth C / Salerno, Kilian E / Schwartzberg, Lee S / Smith, Karen Lisa / Smith, Mary Lou / Soliman, Hatem / Somlo, George / Telli, Melinda / Ward, John H / Shead, Dorothy A / Kumar, Rashmi. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #26957618.

ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the United States and is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer death. The overall management of breast cancer includes the treatment of local disease with surgery, radiation therapy, or both, and the treatment of systemic disease with cytotoxic chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, biologic therapy, or combinations of these. This article outlines the NCCN Guidelines specific to breast cancer that is locoregional (restricted to one region of the body), and discusses the management of clinical stage I, II, and IIIA (T3N1M0) tumors. For NCCN Guidelines on systemic adjuvant therapy after locoregional management of clinical stage I, II and IIIA (T3N1M0) and for management for other clinical stages of breast cancer, see the complete version of these guidelines at NCCN.org.

14 Guideline Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Women With Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Ovarian Suppression Summary. 2016

Burstein, Harold J / Lacchetti, Christina / Griggs, Jennifer J. ·Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; ASCO, Alexandria, VA; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; ASCO, Alexandria, VA; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI guidelines@asco.org. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #26931400.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences. 2016

Harms, Wolfgang / Budach, W / Dunst, J / Feyer, P / Fietkau, R / Haase, W / Krug, D / Piroth, M D / Sautter-Bihl, M-L / Sedlmayer, F / Souchon, R / Wenz, F / Sauer, R / Anonymous5220860. ·Abteilung für Radioonkologie, St. Claraspital, Kleinriehenstrasse 30, 4016, Basel, Switzerland. wolfgang.harms@claraspital.ch. · Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf, Germany. · University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin, Germany. · University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Formerly St.-Vincentius-Hospital, Karlsruhe, Germany. · University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · HELIOS-Hospital Wuppertal, Witten/Herdecke University, Wuppertal, Germany. · Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe, Germany. · Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg, Austria. · Formerly University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany. · University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany. · ·Strahlenther Onkol · Pubmed #26931319.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. METHODS: A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases "locoregional breast cancer recurrence", "chest wall recurrence", "local recurrence", "regional recurrence", and "breast cancer" was performed, using the limits "clinical trials", "randomized trials", "meta-analysis", "systematic review", and "guidelines". CONCLUSIONS: Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts depend on the time interval to first radiotherapy, presence of late radiation effects, and concurrent or sequential systemic treatment. Combination with hyperthermia can further improve tumor control. In patients with isolated axillary or supraclavicular recurrence, durable disease control is best achieved with multimodality therapy including surgery and radiotherapy. Radiation therapy significantly improves local control and should be applied whenever feasible.

16 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society clinical practice guideline for surgical treatment of breast cancer, 2015 edition. 2016

Jinno, Hiromitsu / Inokuchi, Masafumi / Ito, Toshikazu / Kitamura, Kaoru / Kutomi, Goro / Sakai, Takehiko / Kijima, Yuko / Wada, Noriaki / Ito, Yoshinori / Mukai, Hirofumi. ·Department of Surgery, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi, Tokyo, 1738606, Japan. jinno@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp. · Department of Breast Oncology, Kanazawa University Hospital, Ishikawa, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Rinku General Medical Center, Osaka, Japan. · Department of Breast Surgery, Nagumo Clinic Fukuoka, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Surgical Oncology and Science, Sapporo Medical University Hospital Hokkaido, Sapporo, Japan. · Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Kagoshima University School of Medicine, Kagoshima, Japan. · Department of General and Breast Surgery, Tokyo Dental College Ichikawa General Hospital, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #26921084.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society clinical practice guidelines for pathological diagnosis of breast cancer, 2015 edition. 2016

Horii, Rie / Honma, Naoko / Ogiya, Akiko / Kozuka, Yuji / Yoshida, Kazuya / Yoshida, Masayuki / Horiguchi, Shin-Ichiro / Ito, Yoshinori / Mukai, Hirofumi. ·Department of Pathology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo, 135-8550, Japan. rhorii-pathology@jfcr.or.jp. · Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Toho University, Tokyo, Japan. · Breast Surgical Oncology, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Mie University Hospital, Mie, Japan. · Breast Center, Northern Fukushima Medical Center, Fukushima, Japan. · Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious disease Center Komagome Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Breast Medical Oncology, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Breast and Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan. ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #26914491.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society Clinical Practice Guideline for systemic treatment of breast cancer, 2015 edition. 2016

Aihara, Tomohiko / Toyama, Tatsuya / Takahashi, Masato / Yamamoto, Yutaka / Hara, Fumikata / Akabane, Hiromitsu / Fujisawa, Tomomi / Ishikawa, Takashi / Nagai, Shigenori / Nakamura, Rikiya / Tsurutani, Junji / Ito, Yoshinori / Mukai, Hirofumi. ·Breast Center, Aihara Hospital, 3-4-30, Makiochi, Minoh, Osaka, 562-0004, Japan. aiharat@aiharabreast.com. · Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Nagoya City University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Breast Surgery, National Hospital Organization Hokkaido Cancer Center, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan. · Department of Breast Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama, Japan. · Department of Breast Surgery, Asahikawa-Kosei General Hospital, Asahikawa, Japan. · Department of Breast Oncology, Gunma Prefectural Cancer Center, Ota, Japan. · Department of Breast Surgery, Tokyo Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Division of Breast Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Inamachi, Japan. · Division of Breast Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osakasayama, Japan. · Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Division of Breast and Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Japan. ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #26910609.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society Clinical Practice Guideline for radiation treatment of breast cancer, 2015 edition. 2016

Yamauchi, Chikako / Sekiguchi, Kenji / Nishioka, Akihito / Arahira, Satoko / Yoshimura, Michio / Ogo, Etsuyo / Oguchi, Masahiko / Ito, Yoshinori / Mukai, Hirofumi. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, 5-4-30 Moriyama Moriyama-shi, Shiga, 524-8524, Japan. chikay@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sonoda-kai Radiation Oncology Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. · Division of Radiation Therapy, Kochi Health Sciences Center, Kochi, Japan. · Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan. · Radiation Oncology Department, The Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital of The Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Oncology/Hematology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan. ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #26883534.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society clinical practice guidelines for epidemiology and prevention of breast cancer, 2015 edition. 2016

Taira, Naruto / Arai, Masami / Ikeda, Masahiko / Iwasaki, Motoki / Okamura, Hitoshi / Takamatsu, Kiyoshi / Nomura, Tsunehisa / Yamamoto, Seiichiro / Ito, Yoshinori / Mukai, Hirofumi. ·Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Okayama University Hospital, Shikata-cho 2-5-1, Okayama, Okayama, 700-8558, Japan. ntaira@md.okayama-u.ac.jp. · Department of Clinical Genetic Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Fukuyama City Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. · Division of Epidemiology, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Psychosocial Rehabilitation, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tokyo Dental College Ichikawa General Hospital, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School Hospital, Okayama, Japan. · Public Health Policy Research Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Oncology/Hematology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan. ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #26873619.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Adjuvant Systemic Therapy for Women With Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline. 2016

Harris, Lyndsay N / Ismaila, Nofisat / McShane, Lisa M / Andre, Fabrice / Collyar, Deborah E / Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M / Hammond, Elizabeth H / Kuderer, Nicole M / Liu, Minetta C / Mennel, Robert G / Van Poznak, Catherine / Bast, Robert C / Hayes, Daniel F / Anonymous2750937. ·Lyndsay N. Harris, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; Nofisat Ismaila, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; Lisa M. McShane, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; Fabrice Andre, Institute Gustave Roussy, Paris, France; Deborah E. Collyar, Patient Advocates in Research; Elizabeth H. Hammond, University of Utah and Intermountain Health Care, Salt Lake City, UT; Ana M. Gonzalez-Angulo and Robert C. Bast, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston; Robert G.Mennel, Baylor University Medical Center and Texas Oncology PA, Dallas, TX; Nicole M. Kuderer, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA; Minetta C. Liu, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN; and Catherine Van Poznak and Daniel F. Hayes, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI. · Lyndsay N. Harris, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; Nofisat Ismaila, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; Lisa M. McShane, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; Fabrice Andre, Institute Gustave Roussy, Paris, France; Deborah E. Collyar, Patient Advocates in Research; Elizabeth H. Hammond, University of Utah and Intermountain Health Care, Salt Lake City, UT; Ana M. Gonzalez-Angulo and Robert C. Bast, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston; Robert G.Mennel, Baylor University Medical Center and Texas Oncology PA, Dallas, TX; Nicole M. Kuderer, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA; Minetta C. Liu, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN; and Catherine Van Poznak and Daniel F. Hayes, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI. guidelines@asco.org. · ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26858339.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To provide recommendations on appropriate use of breast tumor biomarker assay results to guide decisions on adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. METHODS: A literature search and prospectively defined study selection sought systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, prospective-retrospective studies, and prospective comparative observational studies published from 2006 through 2014. Outcomes of interest included overall survival and disease-free or recurrence-free survival. Expert panel members used informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. RESULTS: The literature search identified 50 relevant studies. One randomized clinical trial and 18 prospective-retrospective studies were found to have evaluated the clinical utility, as defined by the guideline, of specific biomarkers for guiding decisions on the need for adjuvant systemic therapy. No studies that met guideline criteria for clinical utility were found to guide choice of specific treatments or regimens. RECOMMENDATIONS: In addition to estrogen and progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, the panel found sufficient evidence of clinical utility for the biomarker assays Oncotype DX, EndoPredict, PAM50, Breast Cancer Index, and urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in specific subgroups of breast cancer. No biomarker except for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 was found to guide choices of specific treatment regimens. Treatment decisions should also consider disease stage, comorbidities, and patient preferences.

22 Guideline Screening for Breast Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2016

Siu, Albert L / Anonymous1830855. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #26757170.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2009 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for breast cancer. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the following: effectiveness of breast cancer screening in reducing breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, as well as the incidence of advanced breast cancer and treatment-related morbidity; harms of breast cancer screening; test performance characteristics of digital breast tomosynthesis as a primary screening strategy; and adjunctive screening in women with increased breast density. In addition, the USPSTF reviewed comparative decision models on optimal starting and stopping ages and intervals for screening mammography; how breast density, breast cancer risk, and comorbidity level affect the balance of benefit and harms of screening mammography; and the number of radiation-induced breast cancer cases and deaths associated with different screening mammography strategies over the course of a woman's lifetime. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to asymptomatic women aged 40 years or older who do not have preexisting breast cancer or a previously diagnosed high-risk breast lesion and who are not at high risk for breast cancer because of a known underlying genetic mutation (such as a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation or other familial breast cancer syndrome) or a history of chest radiation at a young age. RECOMMENDATIONS: The USPSTF recommends biennial screening mammography for women aged 50 to 74 years. (B recommendation) The decision to start screening mammography in women prior to age 50 years should be an individual one. Women who place a higher value on the potential benefit than the potential harms may choose to begin biennial screening between the ages of 40 and 49 years. (C recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening mammography in women aged 75 years or older. (I statement) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the benefits and harms of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) as a primary screening method for breast cancer. (I statement) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of adjunctive screening for breast cancer using breast ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), DBT, or other methods in women identified to have dense breasts on an otherwise negative screening mammogram. (I statement).

23 Guideline American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Runowicz, Carolyn D / Leach, Corinne R / Henry, N Lynn / Henry, Karen S / Mackey, Heather T / Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L / Cannady, Rachel S / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L / Edge, Stephen B / Jacobs, Linda A / Hurria, Arti / Marks, Lawrence B / LaMonte, Samuel J / Warner, Ellen / Lyman, Gary H / Ganz, Patricia A. ·Carolyn D. Runowicz, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University; Karen S. Henry, Sylvester Cancer Center at the University of Miami, Miami, FL; Corinne R. Leach, Rebecca L. Cowens-Alvarado, Rachel S. Cannady, and Samuel J. LaMonte, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA; N. Lynn Henry, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; Heather T. Mackey, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh; Linda A. Jacobs, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Mandi L. Pratt-Chapman, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC; Stephen B. Edge, Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN; Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte; Patricia A. Ganz, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Lawrence B. Marks, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; Ellen Warner, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Gary H. Lyman, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA doi: 10.3322/caac.21319. Available online at cacancerjournal.com. · Carolyn D. Runowicz, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University; Karen S. Henry, Sylvester Cancer Center at the University of Miami, Miami, FL; Corinne R. Leach, Rebecca L. Cowens-Alvarado, Rachel S. Cannady, and Samuel J. LaMonte, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA; N. Lynn Henry, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; Heather T. Mackey, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh; Linda A. Jacobs, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Mandi L. Pratt-Chapman, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC; Stephen B. Edge, Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN; Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte; Patricia A. Ganz, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Lawrence B. Marks, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; Ellen Warner, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Gary H. Lyman, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA doi: 10.3322/caac.21319. Available online at cacancerjournal.com. corinne.leach@cancer.org. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26644543.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and Journal of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by the American Cancer Society or the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

24 Guideline American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Runowicz, Carolyn D / Leach, Corinne R / Henry, N Lynn / Henry, Karen S / Mackey, Heather T / Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L / Cannady, Rachel S / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L / Edge, Stephen B / Jacobs, Linda A / Hurria, Arti / Marks, Lawrence B / LaMonte, Samuel J / Warner, Ellen / Lyman, Gary H / Ganz, Patricia A. ·Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Florida International University, Miami, FL. · Director, Cancer and Aging Research, Behavioral Research Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Associate Professor, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI. · Nurse Practitioner, Oncology/Hematology Sylvester Cancer Center at the University of Miami, Miami, FL. · Member/Volunteer, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh, PA. · Vice President, South Atlantic Division Health Systems, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Behavioral Scientist, Behavioral Research Center/National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Director, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC. · Director, Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN. · Clinical Professor of Nursing, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Associate Professor and Director, Cancer and Aging Research Program, City of Hope, Duarte, CA. · Sidney K. Simon Distinguished Professor of Oncology Research and Chairman, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. · Retired Head and Neck Surgeon, Survivorship Workgroup Member and Volunteer, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, Division of Medical Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON. · Co-Director Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. · Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Health Policy & Management, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #26641959.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

25 Guideline Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) Guidelines for Referral for Genetic Evaluation of Common Hereditary Cancer Syndromes. 2015

Anonymous791041. · ·Ann Acad Med Singapore · Pubmed #26763067.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The SCAN cancer genetics workgroup aimed to develop Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) clinical practice guidelines for referral for genetic evaluation of common hereditary cancer syndromes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The workgroup utilised a modified ADAPTE process to calibrate high quality international evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to our local setting. RESULTS: To formulate referral guidelines for the 3 most commonly encountered hereditary cancer syndromes to guide healthcare providers in Singapore who care for cancer patients and/or their family members, 7, 5, and 3 sets of international guidelines respectively for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome, Lynch syndrome (LS), and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) were evaluated. For each syndrome, the most applicable one was selected, with modifications made such that they would be appropriate to the local context. CONCLUSION: These adapted guidelines form the SCAN Guidelines 2015 for referral for genetic evaluation of common hereditary cancer syndromes.

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