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Breast Neoplasms HELP
Based on 98,270 articles since 2006
|||| 49 

These are the 98270 published articles about Breast Neoplasms that originated from Worldwide during 2006-2015.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Diagnosis and management of menopause: summary of NICE guidance. 2015

Sarri, Grammati / Davies, Melanie / Lumsden, Mary Ann / Anonymous1640975. ·National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health, Royal College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians, London NW1 4RG, UK gsarri@rcog.org.uk. · National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health, Royal College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians; University College London Hospitals, London, UK. · Reproductive and Maternal Medicine, University of Glasgow; Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · ·BMJ · Pubmed #26563259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Breast Cancer Screening for Women at Average Risk: 2015 Guideline Update From the American Cancer Society. 2015

Oeffinger, Kevin C / Fontham, Elizabeth T H / Etzioni, Ruth / Herzig, Abbe / Michaelson, James S / Shih, Ya-Chen Tina / Walter, Louise C / Church, Timothy R / Flowers, Christopher R / LaMonte, Samuel J / Wolf, Andrew M D / DeSantis, Carol / Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie / Andrews, Kimberly / Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana / Saslow, Debbie / Smith, Robert A / Brawley, Otis W / Wender, Richard / Anonymous780983. ·Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Louisiana State University School of Public Health, New Orleans. · University of Washington and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle. · Patient advocate, Troy, New York. · Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston. · University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. · University of California, San Francisco, and San Francisco VA Medical Center. · Masonic Cancer Center and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Emory University School of Medicine and Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia. · Independent retired physician and patient advocate. · University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville. · American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia. · ·JAMA · Pubmed #26501536.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Breast cancer is a leading cause of premature mortality among US women. Early detection has been shown to be associated with reduced breast cancer morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To update the American Cancer Society (ACS) 2003 breast cancer screening guideline for women at average risk for breast cancer. PROCESS: The ACS commissioned a systematic evidence review of the breast cancer screening literature to inform the update and a supplemental analysis of mammography registry data to address questions related to the screening interval. Formulation of recommendations was based on the quality of the evidence and judgment (incorporating values and preferences) about the balance of benefits and harms. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Screening mammography in women aged 40 to 69 years is associated with a reduction in breast cancer deaths across a range of study designs, and inferential evidence supports breast cancer screening for women 70 years and older who are in good health. Estimates of the cumulative lifetime risk of false-positive examination results are greater if screening begins at younger ages because of the greater number of mammograms, as well as the higher recall rate in younger women. The quality of the evidence for overdiagnosis is not sufficient to estimate a lifetime risk with confidence. Analysis examining the screening interval demonstrates more favorable tumor characteristics when premenopausal women are screened annually vs biennially. Evidence does not support routine clinical breast examination as a screening method for women at average risk. RECOMMENDATIONS: The ACS recommends that women with an average risk of breast cancer should undergo regular screening mammography starting at age 45 years (strong recommendation). Women aged 45 to 54 years should be screened annually (qualified recommendation). Women 55 years and older should transition to biennial screening or have the opportunity to continue screening annually (qualified recommendation). Women should have the opportunity to begin annual screening between the ages of 40 and 44 years (qualified recommendation). Women should continue screening mammography as long as their overall health is good and they have a life expectancy of 10 years or longer (qualified recommendation). The ACS does not recommend clinical breast examination for breast cancer screening among average-risk women at any age (qualified recommendation). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: These updated ACS guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for breast cancer screening for women at average risk of breast cancer. These recommendations should be considered by physicians and women in discussions about breast cancer screening.

3 Guideline Treatment of Symptoms of the Menopause: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. 2015

Stuenkel, Cynthia A / Davis, Susan R / Gompel, Anne / Lumsden, Mary Ann / Murad, M Hassan / Pinkerton, JoAnn V / Santen, Richard J. ·University of California, San Diego, Endocrine/Metabolism (C.A.S.), La Jolla, California 92093; Monash University, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (S.R.D.), Melbourne 03004, Australia; Université Paris Descartes, Hôpitaux Universitaires Port Royal-Cochin Unit de Gynécologie Endocrnienne (A.G.), Paris 75014, France; University of Glasgow School of Medicine (M.A.L.), Glasgow G31 2ER, Scotland; Mayo Clinic, Division of Preventive Medicine (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; University of Virginia, Obstetrics and Gynecology (J.V.P.), Charlottesville, Virginia 22908; and University of Virginia Health System (R.J.S.), Charlottesville, Virginia 22903. ·J Clin Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #26444994.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this document is to generate a practice guideline for the management and treatment of symptoms of the menopause. PARTICIPANTS: The Treatment of Symptoms of the Menopause Task Force included six experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer, all appointed by The Endocrine Society. EVIDENCE: The Task Force developed this evidenced-based guideline using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned three systematic reviews of published data and considered several other existing meta-analyses and trials. CONSENSUS PROCESS: Multiple e-mail communications, conference calls, and one face-to-face meeting determined consensus. Committees of The Endocrine Society, representatives from endorsing societies, and members of The Endocrine Society reviewed and commented on the drafts of the guidelines. The Australasian Menopause Society, the British Menopause Society, European Menopause and Andropause Society, the European Society of Endocrinology, and the International Menopause Society (co-sponsors of the guideline) reviewed and commented on the draft. CONCLUSIONS: Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms and other symptoms of the climacteric. Benefits may exceed risks for the majority of symptomatic postmenopausal women who are under age 60 or under 10 years since the onset of menopause. Health care professionals should individualize therapy based on clinical factors and patient preference. They should screen women before initiating MHT for cardiovascular and breast cancer risk and recommend the most appropriate therapy depending on risk/benefit considerations. Current evidence does not justify the use of MHT to prevent coronary heart disease, breast cancer, or dementia. Other options are available for those with vasomotor symptoms who prefer not to use MHT or who have contraindications because these patients should not use MHT. Low-dose vaginal estrogen and ospemifene provide effective therapy for the genitourinary syndrome of menopause, and vaginal moisturizers and lubricants are available for those not choosing hormonal therapy. All postmenopausal women should embrace appropriate lifestyle measures.

4 Guideline [CLINICAL GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND MONITORING OF PATIENTS WITH INVASIVE BREAST CANCER--CROATIAN ONCOLOGY SOCIETY]. 2015

Šeparović, Robert / Ban, Marija / Silovska, Tajana / Oresković, Lidija Beketić / Soldić, Željko / Podolski, Paula / Pleština, Stjepko / Gugić, Damir / Petković, Marija / Jakić-Razumović, Jasminka / Vojnović, Zeljko / Miše, Branka Petrić / Tomić, Snježana / Stanec, Zdenko / Vrdoljak, Danko Velemir / Drinković, Ivan / Brkljačić, Boris / Mustać, Elvira / Utrobičić, Ivan / Vrdoljak, Eduard / Anonymous2490812. · ·Lijec Vjesn · Pubmed #26380471.

ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It can be diagnosed in early stage through screening, early detection and educational programs, and when diagnosed early it can be efficiently treated. Treatment modalities include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy and targeted biologic therapy, according to the stage of the disease and patient condition. Treatment decisions should be made after multidisciplinary team discussion. Due to the significance of this disease it is important to define and implement standardized approach for diagnostic, treatment and monitoring algorithm as well. The following text presents the clinical guidelines in order to standardize the procedures and criteria for diagnosis, management, treatment and monitoring of patients with breast cancer in the Republic of Croatia.

5 Guideline Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto. 2015

Tot, T / Viale, G / Rutgers, E / Bergsten-Nordström, E / Costa, A / Anonymous560934. ·Uppsala University and Head of Laboratory Medicine Dalarna at the County Hospital, Falun, Sweden. Electronic address: tibor.tot@ltdalarna.se. · Department of Pathology, European Institute of Oncology and University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Europa Donna Patient Advocate, Sweden. · European School of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #26283037.

ABSTRACT: This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way.

6 Guideline [uPA/PAI-1, Oncotype DX™, MammaPrint(®). Prognosis and predictive values for clinical utility in breast cancer management]. 2015

Luporsi, Elisabeth / Bellocq, Jean-Pierre / Barrière, Jérôme / Bonastre, Julia / Chetritt, Jérôme / Le Corroller, Anne-Gaëlle / de Cremoux, Patricia / Fina, Frédéric / Gauchez, Anne-Sophie / Lamy, Pierre-Jean / Martin, Pierre-Marie / Mazouni, Chafika / Peyrat, Jean-Philippe / Romieu, Gilles / Verdoni, Laetitia / Mazeau-Woynar, Valérie / Kassab-Chahmi, Diana / Anonymous2390860. ·Institut de cancérologie de Lorraine, 6, avenue de Bourgogne, 54519 Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy cedex, France. · CHRU, 1, place de l'Hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Institut Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex, France. · Institut d'histopathologie, 55, rue Amiral-du-Chaffault, 44100 Nantes, France. · UMR 912 Inserm, institut Paoli-Calmettes, 232, boulevard Sainte-Marguerite, 13009 Marseille, France. · Hôpital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75010 Paris, France. · AP-HM, faculté de médecine-secteur Nord, chemin des Bourrely, 13915 Marseille cedex 20, France. · CHU Grenoble, 29, avenue Maquis-du-Grésivaudan, 38701 La Tronche, France. · Institut régional du cancer, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt cedex, France. · Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt cedex, France. Electronic address: recommandations@institutcancer.fr. · ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #26235416.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Systemic Therapy for Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline. 2015

Van Poznak, Catherine / Somerfield, Mark R / Bast, Robert C / Cristofanilli, Massimo / Goetz, Matthew P / Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M / Hicks, David G / Hill, Elizabeth G / Liu, Minetta C / Lucas, Wanda / Mayer, Ingrid A / Mennel, Robert G / Symmans, William F / Hayes, Daniel F / Harris, Lyndsay N. ·Catherine Van Poznak and Daniel F. Hayes, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; Mark R. Somerfield, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; Robert C. Bast, Ana M. Gonzalez-Angulo, and William F. Symmans, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston; Robert G. Mennel, Texas Oncology, Dallas, TX; Massimo Cristofanilli, Thomas Jefferson University-Kimmel Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Matthew P. Goetz and Minetta C. Liu, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; David G. Hicks, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY; Elizabeth G. Hill, Medical University of South Carolina, Hollings Cancer Center, Charleston, SC; Wanda Lucas, Georgetown University, Washington, DC; Ingrid A. Mayer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Lyndsay N. Harris, Seidman Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26195705.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To provide recommendations on the appropriate use of breast tumor biomarker assay results to guide decisions on systemic therapy for metastatic breast cancer. METHODS: A literature search and prospectively defined study selection identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective-retrospective studies, and prospective comparative observational studies published from 2006 through September 2014. RESULTS: The literature search revealed 17 articles that met criteria for further review: 11 studies reporting discordances between primary tumors and metastases in expression of hormone receptors or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), one RCT that addressed the use of a biomarker to decide whether to change or continue a treatment regimen, and five prospective-retrospective studies that evaluated the clinical utility of biomarkers. RECOMMENDATIONS: In patients with accessible metastases, biopsy for confirmation of disease process and retesting of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 status should be offered, but evidence is lacking to determine whether changing anticancer treatment on the basis of change in receptor status affects clinical outcomes. With discordance of results between primary and metastatic tissues, the Panel consensus is to use preferentially the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 status of the metastasis to direct therapy if supported by the clinical scenario and patient's goals for care. Carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen 15-3, and cancer antigen 27-29 may be used as adjunctive assessments, but not alone, to contribute to decisions regarding therapy. Recommendations for tumor rebiopsy and use of circulating tumor markers are based on clinical experience and Panel informal consensus in the absence of studies designed to evaluate the clinical utility of the markers. As such, it is also reasonable for clinicians to not use these markers as adjunctive assessments.

8 Guideline [Guideline for testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer]. 2015

Anonymous5330808. · ·Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi · Pubmed #25975904.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer V: Therapy for locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, as well as local therapy in cases with synchronous distant metastases. 2015

Budach, Wilfried / Matuschek, Christiane / Bölke, Edwin / Dunst, Jürgen / Feyer, Petra / Fietkau, Rainer / Haase, Wulf / Harms, Wolfgang / Piroth, Marc D / Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise / Sedlmayer, Felix / Souchon, Rainer / Wenz, Frederik / Sauer, Rolf / Anonymous10260810. ·Klinik für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, University Hospital, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Moorenstraße 5, 40225, Düsseldorf, Germany, Wilfried.Budach@med.uni-duesseldorf.de. · ·Strahlenther Onkol · Pubmed #25963557.

ABSTRACT: AIM: The purpose of this work is to give practical guidelines for radiotherapy of locally advanced, inflammatory and metastatic breast cancer at first presentation. METHODS: A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases "locally advanced breast cancer", "inflammatory breast cancer", "breast cancer and synchronous metastases", "de novo stage IV and breast cancer", and "metastatic breast cancer" and "at first presentation" restricted to "clinical trials", "randomized trials", "meta-analysis", "systematic review", and "guideline" was performed and supplemented by using references of the respective publications. Based on the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, updated in 2012, this publication addresses indications, sequence to other therapies, target volumes, dose, and fractionation of radiotherapy. RESULTS: International and national guidelines are in agreement that locally advanced, at least if regarded primarily unresectable and inflammatory breast cancer should receive neoadjuvant systemic therapy first, followed by surgery and radiotherapy. If surgery is not amenable after systemic therapy, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice followed by surgery, if possible. Surgery and radiotherapy should be administered independent of response to neoadjuvant systemic treatment. In patients with a de novo diagnosis of breast cancer with synchronous distant metastases, surgery and radiotherapy result in considerably better locoregional tumor control. An improvement in survival has not been consistently proven, but may exist in subgroups of patients. CONCLUSION: Radiotherapy is an important part in the treatment of locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer that should be given to all patients regardless to the intensity and effect of neoadjuvant systemic treatment and the extent of surgery. Locoregional radiotherapy in patients with primarily distant metastatic disease should be prescribed on an individual basis.

10 Guideline Breast Cancer Version 2.2015. 2015

Gradishar, William J / Anderson, Benjamin O / Balassanian, Ron / Blair, Sarah L / Burstein, Harold J / Cyr, Amy / Elias, Anthony D / Farrar, William B / Forero, Andres / Giordano, Sharon Hermes / Goetz, Matthew / Goldstein, Lori J / Hudis, Clifford A / Isakoff, Steven J / Marcom, P Kelly / Mayer, Ingrid A / McCormick, Beryl / Moran, Meena / Patel, Sameer A / Pierce, Lori J / Reed, Elizabeth C / Salerno, Kilian E / Schwartzberg, Lee S / Smith, Karen Lisa / Smith, Mary Lou / Soliman, Hatem / Somlo, George / Telli, Melinda / Ward, John H / Shead, Dorothy A / Kumar, Rashmi. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #25870381.

ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the United States and is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer death. The overall management of breast cancer includes the treatment of local disease with surgery, radiation therapy, or both, and the treatment of systemic disease with cytotoxic chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, biologic therapy, or combinations of these. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines discusses recommendations specific to the locoregional management of clinical stage I, II, and IIIA (T3N1M0) tumors.

11 Guideline Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas: field and dose guidelines from the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group. 2015

Yahalom, Joachim / Illidge, Tim / Specht, Lena / Hoppe, Richard T / Li, Ye-Xiong / Tsang, Richard / Wirth, Andrew / Anonymous70832. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: yahalomj@mskcc.org. · Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People's Republic of China. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St. Andrews Place, East Melbourne, Australia. · ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #25863750.

ABSTRACT: Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

12 Guideline Optimisation of the continuum of supportive and palliative care for patients with breast cancer in low-income and middle-income countries: executive summary of the Breast Health Global Initiative, 2014. 2015

Distelhorst, Sandra R / Cleary, James F / Ganz, Patricia A / Bese, Nuran / Camacho-Rodriguez, Rolando / Cardoso, Fatima / Ddungu, Henry / Gralow, Julie R / Yip, Cheng-Har / Anderson, Benjamin O / Anonymous7470805. ·Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Northwest Health Communications, Edmonds, WA, USA. · University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI, USA. · University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Acibadem Maslak Hospital Breast Health, Istanbul, Turkey. · Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy, International Atomic Energy Agency, Lisbon, Portugal. · Champalimaud Cancer Center, Lisbon, Portugal. · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Uganda Cancer Institute, Kampala, Uganda. · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; University of Washington, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA, USA. · University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; University of Washington, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: banderso@fredhutch.org. · ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #25752564.

ABSTRACT: Supportive care and palliative care are now recognised as critical components of global cancer control programmes. Many aspects of supportive and palliative care services are already available in some low-income and middle-income countries. Full integration of supportive and palliative care into breast cancer programmes requires a systematic, resource-stratified approach. The Breast Health Global Initiative convened three expert panels to develop resource allocation recommendations for supportive and palliative care programmes in low-income and middle-income countries. Each panel focused on a specific phase of breast cancer care: during treatment, after treatment with curative intent (survivorship), and after diagnosis with metastatic disease. The panel consensus statements were published in October, 2013. This Executive Summary combines the three panels' recommendations into a single comprehensive document covering breast cancer care from diagnosis through curative treatment into survivorship, and metastatic disease and end-of-life care. The recommendations cover physical symptom management, pain management, monitoring and documentation, psychosocial and spiritual aspects of care, health professional education, and patient, family, and caregiver education.

13 Guideline [ANOCEF guidelines for the management of brain metastases]. 2015

Le Rhun, É / Dhermain, F / Noël, G / Reyns, N / Carpentier, A / Mandonnet, E / Taillibert, S / Metellus, P / Anonymous3440805. ·Neuro-oncologie, département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Roger-Salengro, CHRU de Lille, rue Émile-Laine, 59037 Lille cedex, France; Oncologie médicale, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille cedex, France; Laboratoire Prism, université Lille 1, Inserm U1192, bâtiment SN3 1(er) étage, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq cedex, France; Groupe de réflexion sur la prise en charge des métastases cérébrales (GRPCMaC) , 13273 Marseille cedex 09, France. Electronic address: emilie.lerhun@chru-lille.fr. · Groupe de réflexion sur la prise en charge des métastases cérébrales (GRPCMaC) , 13273 Marseille cedex 09, France; Département de radiothérapie, institut de cancérologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex, France; Réunion de concertation pluridisciplinaire de neuro-oncologie, institut de cancérologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex, France. · Département universitaire de radiothérapie, centre de lutte contre le cancer Paul-Strauss, 3, rue de la Porte-de-l'Hôpital, BP 42, 67065 Strasbourg cedex, France; Laboratoire EA 3430, fédération de médecine translationnelle de Strasbourg (FMTS), université de Strasbourg, 4, rue Kirschleger, 67085 Strasbourg cedex, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Roger-Salengro, CHRU de Lille, rue Émile-Laine, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Service de neurologie, hôpital Avicenne, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), 125, rue de Stalingrad, 93009 Bobigny cedex, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Lariboisière, 2, rue Ambroise-Paré, 75010 Paris, France. · Département de neurologie 2, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Département de radiothérapie, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris VI, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France. · Groupe de réflexion sur la prise en charge des métastases cérébrales (GRPCMaC) , 13273 Marseille cedex 09, France; Département de neurochirurgie, centre hospitalo-universitaire La Timone, AP-HM, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France; Centre de recherche en oncologie et oncopharmacologie (CRO2), faculté de médecine Timone, université Aix-Marseille, 27, boulevard Jean-Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France; Inserm U911, faculté de médecine Timone, 27, boulevard Jean-Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France. · ·Cancer Radiother · Pubmed #25666314.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of brain metastases is increasing because of the use of new therapeutic agents, which allow an improvement of overall survival, but with only a poor penetration into the central nervous system brain barriers. The management of brain metastases has changed due to a better knowledge of immunohistochemical data and molecular biological data, the development of new surgical, radiotherapeutic approaches and improvement of systemic treatments. Most of the time, the prognosis is still limited to several months, nevertheless, prolonged survival may be now observed in some sub-groups of patients. The main prognostic factors include the type and subtype of the primitive, age, general status of the patient, number and location of brain metastases, extracerebral disease. The multidisciplinary discussion should take into account all of these parameters. We should notice also that treatments including surgery or radiotherapy may be proposed in a symptomatic goal in advanced phases of the disease underlying the multidisciplinary approach until late in the evolution of the disease. This article reports on the ANOCEF (French neuro-oncology association) guidelines. The management of brain metastases of breast cancers and lung cancers are discussed in the same chapter, while the management of melanoma brain metastases is reported in a separate chapter due to different responses to the brain radiotherapy.

14 Guideline ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer. 2015

Offersen, Birgitte V / Boersma, Liesbeth J / Kirkove, Carine / Hol, Sandra / Aznar, Marianne C / Biete Sola, Albert / Kirova, Youlia M / Pignol, Jean-Philippe / Remouchamps, Vincent / Verhoeven, Karolien / Weltens, Caroline / Arenas, Meritxell / Gabrys, Dorota / Kopek, Neil / Krause, Mechthild / Lundstedt, Dan / Marinko, Tanja / Montero, Angel / Yarnold, John / Poortmans, Philip. ·Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: birgoffe@rm.dk. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Centre - GROW (MAASTRO), The Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg, The Netherlands. · Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Clinic i Provincial, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris, France. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinique Sainte Elisabeth (AMPR), Namur, Belgium. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, KU Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitari Sant Joan, Reus, Spain. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Canada. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) Dresden and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology and OncoRay, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Gothenborg, Sweden. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal, Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, Madrid, Spain. · Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, UK. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud university medical centre, The Netherlands. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #25630428.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. The aim was to develop a delineation guideline obtained by consensus between a broad European group of radiation oncologists. MATERIAL AND METHODS: During ESTRO teaching courses on breast cancer, teachers sought consensus on delineation of CTV through dialogue based on cases. One teacher delineated CTV on CT scans of 2 patients, followed by discussion and adaptation of the delineation. The consensus established between teachers was sent to other teams working in the same field, both locally and on a national level, for their input. This was followed by developing a broad consensus based on discussions. RESULTS: Borders of the CTV encompassing a 5mm margin around the large veins, running through the regional lymph node levels were agreed, and for the breast/thoracic wall other vessels were pointed out to guide delineation, with comments on margins for patients with advanced breast cancer. CONCLUSION: The ESTRO consensus on CTV for elective RT of breast cancer, endorsed by a broad base of the radiation oncology community, is presented to improve consistency.

15 Guideline Updated UK Recommendations for HER2 assessment in breast cancer. 2015

Rakha, Emad A / Pinder, Sarah E / Bartlett, John M S / Ibrahim, Merdol / Starczynski, Jane / Carder, Pauline J / Provenzano, Elena / Hanby, Andrew / Hales, Sally / Lee, Andrew H S / Ellis, Ian O / Anonymous330803. ·Department of Pathology, University of Nottingham and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · Division of Cancer Studies, Department of Research Oncology, King's College London, London, UK. · Department of Transformative Pathology, Ontario Institute of Cancer Research, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Histopathology, UK NEQAS for Immunocytochemistry, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Cellular Pathology, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Histopathology, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford, UK. · Department of Histopathology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Histopathology, Academic Unit of Pathology, St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Department of Histopathology, Countess of Chester Hospital, Chester, UK. · ·J Clin Pathol · Pubmed #25488926.

ABSTRACT: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression is present in approximately 15% of early invasive breast cancers, and is an important predictive and prognostic marker. The substantial benefits achieved with anti-HER2 targeted therapies in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer have emphasised the need for accurate assessment of HER2 status. Current data indicate that HER2 test accuracy improved following previous publication of guidelines and the implementation of an external quality assessment scheme with a decline in false-positive and false-negative rates. This paper provides an update of the guidelines for HER2 testing in the UK. The aim is to further improve the analytical validity and clinical utility of HER2 testing by providing guidelines of test performance parameters, and recommendations on the postanalytical interpretation of test results. HER2 status should be determined in all newly diagnosed and recurrent breast cancers. Testing involves immunohistochemistry with >10% complete strong membrane staining defining a positive status. In situ hybridisation, either fluorescent or bright field chromogenic, is used either upfront or in immunohistochemistry borderline cases to detect the presence of HER2 gene amplification. Situations where repeat HER2 testing is advised are outlined and the impact of genetic heterogeneity is discussed. Strict quality control and external quality assurance of validated assays are essential. Testing laboratories should perform ongoing competency assessment and proficiency tests and ensure the reliability and accuracy of the assay. Pathologists, oncologists and surgeons involved in test interpretation and clinical use should adhere to published guidelines and maintain accurate performance and consistent interpretation of test results.

16 Guideline Vessel based delineation guidelines for the elective lymph node regions in breast cancer radiation therapy - PROCAB guidelines. 2015

Verhoeven, Karolien / Weltens, Caroline / Remouchamps, Vincent / Mahjoubi, Khalil / Veldeman, Liv / Lengele, Benoit / Hortobagyi, Eszter / Kirkove, Carine. ·University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: karolien.verhoeven@uzleuven.be. · University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven, Belgium. · Clinique Sainte Elisabeth (AMPR), Namur, Belgium. · Ghent University Hospital, Belgium. · Catholic University of Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #25466373.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A national project to improve the quality of breast radiation therapy was started, named PROCAB (PROject on CAncer of the Breast). One of the objectives was to reach a national consensus guideline for the delineation of the regional lymph node areas in breast radiation therapy. METHODS: The realization of the new guidelines was a step by step process that started with multiple expert meetings where the existing guidelines were analyzed and the delineations of the lymph node regions were performed together with a surgeon, specialized in the anatomy of the drainage of the breast. RESULTS: The delineation guidelines are vessel-based. Since the occurrence of pathological lymph nodes is typically around the veins, the cranial and caudal borders of all different nodal regions are based on a 5mm margin around the veins, except for the parasternal lymph node area. Compared to the existing guidelines there are some major changes. CONCLUSION: With this project a national as well as a European (ESTRO) consensus guideline for the delineation of the regional lymph node areas in breast RT is reached. The new delineation atlas is vessel-based and no longer field-based.

17 Guideline The evaluation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in breast cancer: recommendations by an International TILs Working Group 2014. 2015

Salgado, R / Denkert, C / Demaria, S / Sirtaine, N / Klauschen, F / Pruneri, G / Wienert, S / Van den Eynden, G / Baehner, F L / Penault-Llorca, F / Perez, E A / Thompson, E A / Symmans, W F / Richardson, A L / Brock, J / Criscitiello, C / Bailey, H / Ignatiadis, M / Floris, G / Sparano, J / Kos, Z / Nielsen, T / Rimm, D L / Allison, K H / Reis-Filho, J S / Loibl, S / Sotiriou, C / Viale, G / Badve, S / Adams, S / Willard-Gallo, K / Loi, S / Anonymous1020959. ·Breast Cancer Translational Research Laboratory/Breast International Group, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels Department of Pathology and TCRU, GZA, Antwerp, Belgium. · Institute of Pathology, Charité -University Hospital, Berlin, Germany. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University Medical School, New York, USA. · Department of Pathology, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · European Institute of Oncology (IEO) and University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology GZA, TCRU Hospitals and CORE Antwerp University, Antwerp, Belgium. · Genomic Health, Inc., Redwood City, USA University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. · Clermont-Ferrand Biopathology, University of Auvergne, Jean Perrin Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Division of Haematology/Medical Oncology and. · Department of Cancer Biology, Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville. · Department of Pathology, The UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Boston. · Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston Department of Cancer Biology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. · Department of Cancer Biology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Department of Cancer Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. · Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan, Italy. · Genomic Health, Inc., Redwood City, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels. · Department of Pathology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Women's Health, Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, USA. · Laboratory Medicine Program, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Genetic Pathology Evaluation Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven. · Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Centre, Stanford. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · German Breast Group, Neu-Isenburg, Germany. · Department of Pathology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, USA. · Molecular Immunology Unit, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Division of Research and Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia sherene.loi@petermac.org. · ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #25214542.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The morphological evaluation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in breast cancer (BC) is gaining momentum as evidence strengthens for the clinical relevance of this immunological biomarker. Accumulating evidence suggests that the extent of lymphocytic infiltration in tumor tissue can be assessed as a major parameter by evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained tumor sections. TILs have been shown to provide prognostic and potentially predictive value, particularly in triple-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing BC. DESIGN: A standardized methodology for evaluating TILs is now needed as a prerequisite for integrating this parameter in standard histopathological practice, in a research setting as well as in clinical trials. This article reviews current data on the clinical validity and utility of TILs in BC in an effort to foster better knowledge and insight in this rapidly evolving field, and to develop a standardized methodology for visual assessment on H&E sections, acknowledging the future potential of molecular/multiplexed approaches. CONCLUSIONS: The methodology provided is sufficiently detailed to offer a uniformly applied, pragmatic starting point and improve consistency and reproducibility in the measurement of TILs for future studies.

18 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society Clinical Practice Guideline for systemic treatment of breast cancer. 2015

Mukai, Hirofumi / Aihara, Tomohiko / Yamamoto, Yutaka / Takahashi, Masato / Toyama, Tatsuya / Sagara, Yasuaki / Yamaguchi, Hiroshi / Akabane, Hiromitsu / Tsurutani, Junji / Hara, Fumikata / Fujisawa, Tomomi / Yamamoto, Naohito / Ohsumi, Shozo / Anonymous550802. ·Division of Breast and Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, 6-5-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan, hrmukai@east.ncc.go.jp. · ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #25200171.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline Japan Breast Cancer Society clinical practice guideline for surgical treatment of breast cancer. 2015

Komoike, Yoshifumi / Inokuchi, Masafumi / Itoh, Toshikazu / Kitamura, Kaoru / Kutomi, Goro / Sakai, Takehiko / Jinno, Hiromitsu / Wada, Noriaki / Ohsumi, Shozo / Mukai, Hirofumi / Anonymous540802. ·Section of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Onohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka, 589-8511, Japan, komoike@surg.med.kindai.ac.jp. · ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #25091115.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society Clinical Practice Guideline for screening and imaging diagnosis of breast cancer. 2015

Tozaki, Mitsuhiro / Isomoto, Ichiro / Kojima, Yasuyuki / Kubota, Kazunori / Kuroki, Yoshifumi / Ohnuki, Koji / Ohsumi, Shozo / Mukai, Hirofumi / Anonymous530802. ·Diagnostic Imaging Center, Kameda Kyobashi Clinic, 3-1-1 Kyobashi Chuo-ku, Tokyo Square Garden 4F, Tokyo, Japan. · ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #25085808.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society clinical practice guideline for epidemiology and prevention of breast cancer. 2015

Taira, Naruto / Arai, Masami / Ikeda, Masahiko / Iwasaki, Motoki / Okamura, Hitoshi / Takamatsu, Kiyoshi / Yamamoto, Seiichiro / Ohsumi, Shozo / Mukai, Hirofumi / Anonymous520802. ·Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Okayama University Hospital, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama, 700-8558, Japan, ntaira@md.okayama-u.ac.jp. · ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #25085807.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society Clinical Practice Guideline for pathological diagnosis of breast cancer. 2015

Horii, Rie / Honma, Naoko / Ogiya, Akiko / Kozuka, Yuji / Fukuda, Takayo / Yoshida, Masayuki / Ohsumi, Shozo / Mukai, Hirofumi / Anonymous510802. ·Department of Pathology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo, 135-8550, Japan, rhorii-pathology@jfcr.or.jp. · ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #25022266.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline The Japanese Breast Cancer Society clinical practice guideline for radiotherapy of breast cancer. 2015

Sekiguchi, Kenji / Ogawa, Yasuhiro / Sanuki, Naoko / Arahira, Satoko / Ogo, Etsuyo / Yoshimura, Michio / Yamauchi, Chikako / Oguchi, Masahiko / Ohsumi, Shozo / Mukai, Hirofumi / Anonymous500802. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, 9-1 Akashi-cho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-8560, Japan, kenjisek@luke.or.jp. · ·Breast Cancer · Pubmed #25022265.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. 2014

Greenlee, Heather / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha / Deng, Gary / Hershman, Dawn / Mumber, Matthew / Perlmutter, Jane / Seely, Dugald / Sen, Ananda / Zick, Suzanna M / Tripathy, Debu / Anonymous2270800. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health (HG, DH), Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, (HG, DH), and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons (DH), Columbia University, New York, NY (HG, DH); School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (LGB); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada (LEC); Institute for Health and Aging, University of California San Francisco, CA (MC); Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA (MC); Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (GD); Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA (MM); Gemini Group, Ann Arbor, MI (JP); Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada (DS); Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada (DS); Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System (AS, SMZ), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (SMZ), and Department of Biostatistics (AS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (AS, SMZ); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (DT). hg2120@columbia.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health (HG, DH), Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, (HG, DH), and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons (DH), Columbia University, New York, NY (HG, DH); School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (LGB); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada (LEC); Institute for Health and Aging, University of California San Francisco, CA (MC); Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA (MC); Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (GD); Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA (MM); Gemini Group, Ann Arbor, MI (JP); Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada (DS); Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada (DS); Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System (AS, SMZ), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (SMZ), and Department of Biostatistics (AS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (AS, SMZ); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (DT). · ·J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr · Pubmed #25749602.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. RESULTS: The search (January 1, 1990-December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). CONCLUSIONS: Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well-designed controlled trials with meaningful outcomes.

25 Guideline Treatment with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancer. 2014

Anonymous6790799 / Marta, G N / Hanna, S A / Gadia, R. · ·Rev Assoc Med Bras · Pubmed #25650847.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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