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Breast Neoplasms: HELP
Articles from Peking University
Based on 507 articles published since 2010
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These are the 507 published articles about Breast Neoplasms that originated from Peking University during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Review Prognostic value of receptor status conversion following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2019

Li, Chao / Fan, Hongwei / Xiang, Qian / Xu, Ling / Zhang, Zhuo / Liu, Qianxin / Zhang, Tongtong / Ling, Jinjie / Zhou, Ying / Zhao, Xia / Cui, Yimin. ·Department of Pharmacy, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China. · National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital & Shenzhen Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Breast Disease Center, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China. · Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · Department of Pharmacy, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China. cui.pharm@pkufh.com. ·Breast Cancer Res Treat · Pubmed #31471838.

ABSTRACT: Biomarkers of breast cancer such as hormone receptors (HR) and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) can be altered after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). However, whether the conversion of these receptors affects the prognosis of patients remains to be determined. We sought to evaluate the prognostic value of HR and HER2 receptors before and after NAC and to analyze their clinical implications. Relevant studies were used to calculate the pooled hazard ratios, 95% confidence interval (95% CI). This meta-analysis included eight studies with 2847 patients. Compared to patients with HR+ → +, patients with HR+ → - have shorter disease free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio = 2.64, 95% CI 1.86-3.75) and overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio = 2.99, 95% CI 1.97-4.54). Furthermore, patients with HR- → + tend to achieve better DFS (hazard ratio = 0.83, 95% CI 0.60-1.17) compared to patients with HR- → -. Patients with HR- → + gain better OS (hazard ratio = 0.67, 95% CI 0.46-0.99) compared to patients exhibiting HR- → -. When comparing patients with HER2+ → - to patients with HER2+ → +, patients with HER2+ → - tended to achieve better DFS (hazard ratio = 1.65, 95% CI 1.08-2.53) though results for OS (hazard ratio = 1.16, 95% CI 0.54-2.49) were not statistically significant. Our data strongly support the need for redetection of HR and HER2 receptor status of surgical sample following neoadjuvant therapy. Changes in HR status induced by NAC can be used as a prognostic factor in breast cancer patients for predicting both OS and DFS. HER2 change may also be valuable for predicting prognosis. Further research should explore therapeutic strategies for those presenting receptor status conversion.

2 Review Prognostic and clinicopathological value of PD-L1 expression in primary breast cancer: a meta-analysis. 2019

Huang, Wenfa / Ran, Ran / Shao, Bin / Li, Huiping. ·Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Department of Breast Oncology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52, Fucheng Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100142, China. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Department of Breast Oncology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52, Fucheng Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100142, China. huipingli2012@hotmail.com. ·Breast Cancer Res Treat · Pubmed #31359214.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the association between PD-L1 expression (PD-L1+) and clinicopathological characteristics and effect on prognosis in primary breast cancer (PBC). METHODS: A systematic search of the PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase databases was conducted in November 2018. Studies detecting PD-L1 using immunohistochemistry, and concerning its prognostic or clinicopathological significance in PBC were included. The HR with 95% CI for survival, and the events for clinicopathological features were pooled. RESULTS: Forty-seven studies were included, with a total of 14,367 PBC patients. PD-L1+ tumor cells (TCs) were associated with ductal carcinomas, large tumor size, histological Grade 3 tumors, high Ki-67, ER and PR negative, and triple-negative breast cancer; and also, related to high tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and PD-1 expression. PD-L1+ TCs were significantly associated with shorter disease-free survival (DFS, HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.21-1.70, P < 0.0001) and overall survival (OS, HR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.14-2.20, P = 0.006). And the HRs of PD-L1+ TCs on DFS and OS were higher (1.48 and 1.70, respectively) and homogeneous when using whole tissue section, compared with tumor microarrays. However, PD-L1+ TILs related to better DFS (HR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.28-0.73, P = 0.001) and OS (HR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.27-0.63, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: PD-L1 expression on TCs associates with high-risk clinicopathological parameters and poor prognosis in PBC patients, while PD-L1+ TILs may relate to a better survival. Comprehensive assessment of TCs and TILs is required when evaluating the clinical relevance of PD-L1 expression in future studies.

3 Review Treating HR+/HER2- breast cancer in premenopausal Asian women: Asian Breast Cancer Cooperative Group 2019 Consensus and position on ovarian suppression. 2019

Yeo, Winnie / Ueno, Takayuki / Lin, Ching-Hung / Liu, Qiang / Lee, Kyung-Hun / Leung, Roland / Naito, Yoichi / Park, Yeon Hee / Im, Seock-Ah / Li, Huiping / Yap, Yoon Sim / Lu, Yen-Shen / Anonymous4950996. ·State Key Laboratory of Translational Oncology, Department of Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong Cancer Institute, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 30-32 Ngan Shing St., Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Breast Surgical Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake Koto-ku, Tokyo, 135-8550, Japan. · Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, 7 Chung-Shan South Rd., Taipei, 10016, Taiwan. · Breast Tumor Center, Sun-Yat Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun-Yat Sen University, 107 Yanjiang West Rd., Guangzhou, 510120, China. · Department of Internal Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 03080, Republic of Korea. · Division of Haematology, Medical Oncology and BMT, Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, 102 Pokfulam Rd., Hong Kong SAR, China. · Department of Breast and Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, 6-5-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8577, Japan. · Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, 81 Irwon-ro, Seoul, 06351, Republic of Korea. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Department of Breast Oncology, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, 52 Fucheng Rd., Beijing, 100142, China. · Division of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore, 11 Hospital Drive, Singapore, 169610, Singapore. · Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, 7 Chung-Shan South Rd., Taipei, 10016, Taiwan. yslu@ntu.edu.tw. ·Breast Cancer Res Treat · Pubmed #31270763.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Breast cancer in young Asian women has distinctive clinicopathological characteristics; hence, we question the universal generalizability of treatment recommendations based on data from predominantly non-Asian postmenopausal women. METHODS: The Asian Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (ABCCG) reviewed current ESO-ESMO and St. Gallen recommendations for treating hormone receptor positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HR+/HER2-) breast cancer in premenopausal women. Points disputed by ≥ 3/12 members were discussed, and statements on contentious issues formulated for anonymous voting; consensus required a ≥ 75% majority. RESULTS: The ABCCG contends that: (1) Trials in premenopausal women are not only necessary, but also worthwhile if performed separately from others that also enroll postmenopausal participants. (2) Not all premenopausal women with HR+ early breast cancer need adjuvant ovarian function suppression (OFS). (3) Certain clinical factors might influence decision-making about prescribing OFS. (4) For early HR+/HER2- breast cancer in premenopausal patients with OFS, tamoxifen is preferred for intermediate-risk cases; for high risk, near-consensus supported aromatase inhibitor, despite no clear overall survival benefit versus tamoxifen. (5) Oncotype DX Breast Recurrence Score CONCLUSION: Premenopausal Asian women with breast cancer have unique disease characteristics and may benefit from treatment that differs somewhat from international guidelines. Given the great diversity of patients and clinical settings worldwide, the ABCCG advocates evidence-based yet flexible and individualized use of all potential options to improve breast cancer outcomes.

4 Review Osteopontin as a multifaceted driver of bone metastasis and drug resistance. 2019

Pang, Xiaocong / Gong, Kan / Zhang, Xiaodan / Wu, Shiliang / Cui, Yimin / Qian, Bin-Zhi. ·Department of Pharmacy, Peking University First Hospital, Xicheng District, 10034, Beijing, China. · Department of Urology, Peking University First Hospital, Xicheng District, 10034, Beijing, China. · Department of Pharmacy, Peking University First Hospital, Xicheng District, 10034, Beijing, China. Electronic address: cui.pharm@pkufh.com. · Translational Medicine Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University.University of Edinburgh and MRC Centre for Reproductive Health, 2 Edinburgh Cancer Research UK Centre Queen's Medical Research Institute, EH16 4TJ, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Translational Medicine Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Haizhu District, 510260, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: Binzhi.qian@ed.ac.uk. ·Pharmacol Res · Pubmed #31028902.

ABSTRACT: Metastasis to bone frequently occurs in majority of patients with advanced breast cancer and prostate cancer, leading to devastating skeletal-related events and substantially reducing the survival of patients. Currently, the crosstalk between tumor cells and the bone stromal compartment was widely investigated for bone metastasis and the resistance to many conventional therapeutic methods. Osteopontin (OPN), also known as SPP1 (secreted phosphoprotein 1), a secreted and chemokine-like glyco-phosphoprotein is involved in tumor progression such as cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The expression of OPN in tumor tissue and plasma has been clinically proved to be correlated to poor prognosis and shortened survival in patients with breast cancer and prostate cancer. This review summarizes the multifaceted roles that OPN plays in bone microenvironment and drug resistance, with emphasis on breast and prostate cancers, via binding to αvβ3 integrin and CD44 receptor and inducing signaling cascades. We further discuss the promising therapeutic strategy for OPN targeting, mainly inhibiting OPN at transcriptional or protein level or blocking it binding to receptor or its downstream signaling pathways. The comprehending of the function of OPN in bone microenvironment is crucial for the development of novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target for the diagnosis and treatment of bone metastasis and against the emergence of drug resistance in advanced cancers.

5 Review Chemoresistance mechanisms of breast cancer and their countermeasures. 2019

Ji, Xiwei / Lu, Yuan / Tian, Huifang / Meng, Xiangrui / Wei, Minji / Cho, William C. ·Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China. Electronic address: jjxxeezz@163.com. · Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Central Laboratory, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing, China. · Xiyuan Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. · Department of Clinical Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China. Electronic address: chocs@ha.org.hk. ·Biomed Pharmacother · Pubmed #30921705.

ABSTRACT: Chemoresistance is one of the major challenges for the breast cancer treatment. Owing to its heterogeneous nature, the chemoresistance mechanisms of breast cancer are complicated, and not been fully elucidated. The existing treatments fall short of offering adequate solution to drug resistance, so more effective approaches are desperately needed to improve existing therapeutic regimens. To overcome this hurdle, a number of strategies are being investigated, such as novel agents or drug carriers and combination treatment. In addition, some new therapeutics including gene therapy and immunotherapy may be promising for dealing with the resistance. In this article, we review the mechanisms of chemoresistance in breast cancer. Furthermore, the potential therapeutic methods to overcome the resistance were discussed.

6 Review Chinese association of ultrasound in medicine and engineering, superficial organs and peripheral vessels committee expert consensus on clinical frequently asked questions in breast ultrasonography, June 2018. 2018

Jiang, Tian'an / Jiang, Yuxin / Chen, Wen / Luo, Baoming / Peng, Yulan / Wang, Zhili / Xu, Jinfeng / Zhou, Jianqiao / Zhou, Qi / Bao, Lingyun / Chen, Li / Chen, Lin / Chen, Qin / Cong, Shuzhen / Cui, Kefei / Cui, Xinwu / Fang, Qinmao / Li, Fengsheng / Li, Huiwen / Li, Jing / Li, Jianchu / Li, Junlai / Li, Quanshui / Li, Tianliang / Li, Tao / Li, Yanjiang / Li, Zhengyi / Liu, Jia / Liu, Yong / Luo, Jun / Ma, Buyun / Ma, Zhe / Nie, Fang / Peng, Chengzhong / Sui, Xiufang / Sun, Hongguang / Wang, Hongqiao / Wang, Jing / Wang, Yan / Wu, Changjun / Xiao, Ying / Xiong, Huahua / Xu, Dong / Xue, Ensheng / Xue, Lifang / Yan, Songli / Yang, Lichun / Yong, Qiang / Zhan, Weiwei / Zhang, Sheng / Zhang, Xuezhen / Zhang, Jianxing / Zhou, Xianli / Lin, Xi / Yin, Shanyu / Zhao, Qiyu. ·Department of Ultrasound, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, Haidian District, Beijing, China. · Department of Ultrasound, SunYat-Sen Memorial Hospital, SunYat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China. · Department of Ultrasound, West China Hospital, Chengdu, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China. · Department of Ultrasonography, Second Clinical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen People's Hospital, Shenzhen, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Shanghai Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicineas, Shanghai, China. · Department of Ultrasound, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China. · Department of Ultrasonography, The Affiliated Hanghzou First People's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China. · Department of Ultrasound, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences and Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences and Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, China. · Department of Ultrasound, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China. · Department of Medical Ultrasound, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. · Department of Ultrasound, 3rd Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · Departments of Ultrasound and Medical Oncology, Affiliated Shaanxi Cancer Hospital of the School of Medicine, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Ordos Central Hospital, Ordos, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Tianjin Union Medical Center, Nankai University, Affiliated Hospital, Tianjin, China. · Luohu Hospital, Shenzhen, China. · Department of Medical Ultrasound, Shanxi Cardiovascular Hospital, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China. · Department of Ultrasound, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Shenzhen Second People's Hospital, Shenzhen, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Dalian Municipul Central Hospital, Dalian, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China. · Department of Ultrasonography, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital, Hangzhou, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Anhui, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Affiliated Hospital of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou Universit, Yangzhou, China. · Department Abdominal Ultrasound, Qingdao University, Affiliated Hospital, Qingdao, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. · Department of Ultrasound in Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China. · Department of Ultrasound, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China. · Department of Ultrasonography, Xiang Ya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Peking University, International Hospital, Beijing, China. · Department of Ultrasonography, The First Hospital of Putian, Putian, China. · Department of Ultrasound Medicine, Yunnan Cancer Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Yunnan Cancer Center, Kunming, China. · Department of The General Ultrasound, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing, China. · Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Ultrasounography, Tianjin Cancer Hospital and Institution, Tianjin, China. · Department of Ultrasound, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical College, Bengbu, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Guangdong Pronvicial Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. · Department of Ultrasound In-Patient, Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China. · Department of Ultrasound, Sun Yat-Sen University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, China. ·J Cancer Res Ther · Pubmed #30589024.

ABSTRACT: Ultrasonography, the preferred imaging modality for breast diseases, has merits such as absence of radiation, high diagnostic accuracy, and convenience for follow-up, thus playing an important role in clinical diagnosis and management. The American College of Radiology (ACR) proposed Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS ) and has updated for several times. Gradually, the BI-RADS has been accepted and adopted by ultrasound physicians at all levels of hospitals in China, and it has played a certain role in improving the diagnostic level of breast ultrasound in China. In order to standardize breast ultrasound application and raise the status of ultrasound in clinical decision-making of breast diseases, based on the latest edition of ACR BI-RADS Atlas 2013, the committee has reached the "Expert Consensus on Clinical Frequently Asked Questions in Breast Ultrasonography"on a number of controversial Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) in clinical practice (hereafter referred to as "Consensus"), and will be dedicated to updating the contents of the "Consensus", through further experience in clinical practice and the advent of new information from further studies. This consensus is only for reference purposes for medical personnel, and the processes outlined are not mandatory by law.

7 Review PIK3CA mutations and their response to neoadjuvant treatment in early breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2018

Fan, Hongwei / Li, Chao / Xiang, Qian / Xu, Ling / Zhang, Zhuo / Liu, Qianxin / Zhang, Tonttong / Zhou, Ying / Zhao, Xia / Cui, Yimin. ·Department of Pharmacy, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China. · National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital & Shenzhen Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. · Breast Disease Center, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China. ·Thorac Cancer · Pubmed #29575819.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: PIK3CA mutations frequently occur in breast cancer patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between PIK3CA mutations and neoadjuvant treatment response and to analyze the clinical implications. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane database were searched for relevant studies in September 2017. The pooled risk ratio (RR) was estimated using fixed effects or random effects models according to heterogeneity among studies. RESULTS: This meta-analysis included 20 studies with 4392 patients. The pooled RR showed that PIK3CA mutation is correlated to lower pathological complete response (pCR) in unselected HER2+ patients (RR = 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.81), thus the predictive value of PIK3CA status may be stronger in HER2+/HR+ patients (RR = 0.50; 95% CI 0.27-0.93) and those administered dual-targeting treatment (RR = 0.55; 95% CI 0.39-0.78). In contrast with wild type, either exon 9 (RR = 0.55; 95% CI 0.39-0.78) or exon 20 (RR = 0.71; 95% CI 0.58-0.89) mutations were significantly associated with lower pCR. The predictive value of exon 9 mutations was not significantly greater than exon 20 mutations (RR = 0.76; 95% CI 0.51-1.13). CONCLUSION: In early breast cancer, PIK3CA mutations seem to identify HER2+ patients who are less likely to reach pCR. The clinical implications of PIK3CA mutations tend to vary between exon 9 and exon 20. This mechanism should be explored in further studies.

8 Review Strategies and Progress of Endocrine Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer. 2017

Rugo, Hope S / Li, Huiping / Gui, Xinyu. ·University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA, USA. Hope.Rugo@ucsf.edu. · Key laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Breast Oncology, Peking University, Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing, 100142, China. ·Adv Exp Med Biol · Pubmed #29282695.

ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers and the leading causes of cancer mortality in women worldwide and in China. For hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer, accounting for approximately 60-80% of breast cancer, endocrine therapy (ET) is the primary treatment strategy. For patients with HR+ metastatic breast cancer (MBC), there are many endocrine-based treatment options that can improve long-term outcomes and optimize quality of life. With the emergence and availability of new and effective agents, the options for ET have expanded in the last two decades. Although hormone therapy has been a standard of care for many decades, treatment must be individualized based on tumor biology and extent of disease. For example, the patients with impending organ failure may be treated with induction chemotherapy to improve organ function, followed by ET. For the patients who develop metastatic disease while on adjuvant ET, particularly when associated with organ failure, or for those with low expression of hormone receptors or expression of HER2, chemotherapy again may be a preferred initial treatment. ET blocks estrogen-driven tumor growth through different mechanisms; however, HR+ MBC can be intrinsically resistant or may acquire resistance to the treatment. Several targeted agents have been approved to use in combination with ET to improve response and delay development of resistance.

9 Review Targeted Therapies Against Growth Factor Signaling in Breast Cancer. 2017

Du, Juan / Yu, Yu / Zhan, Jun / Zhang, Hongquan. ·Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology and Tumor Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China. · Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology and Tumor Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China. Hongquan.Zhang@bjmu.edu.cn. ·Adv Exp Med Biol · Pubmed #29282682.

ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the most prevalent female malignancy throughout the world. Conventional treatment strategies for breast cancer consist of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, chemoradiation, hormone therapy, and targeted therapies. Among them, targeted therapies show advantages to reduce cost and toxicity for being possible for individualized treatments based on the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer. With deeper understanding of key signaling pathways concerning tumor growth and survival, growth factor-controlled signaling pathways are frequently dysregulated in the development and progression of breast cancer. Thus, targeted therapies against growth factor-mediated signaling pathways have been shown to have promising efficacy in both preclinical animal models and human clinical trials. In this chapter, we will briefly introduce inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies that target the main growth factor-modulated scenarios including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling pathways in breast cancer therapy.

10 Review The Era of Multigene Panels Comes? The Clinical Utility of Oncotype DX and MammaPrint. 2017

Xin, Ling / Liu, Yin-Hua / Martin, Tracey A / Jiang, Wen G. ·Department of Breast Disease, Peking University First Hospital, Xishiku Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100034, China. · Cardiff China Medical Research Collaborative (CCMRC), School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Ground Floor, Henry Welcome Building, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK. ·World J Oncol · Pubmed #29147432.

ABSTRACT: The AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, eighth edition published in late 2016, will become the new global guideline for cancer diagnosis and treatment from January 1, 2018. The new edition for the tumor staging system has numerous updates, including building up the prognostic stage group of tumors for the first time and adding a large number of non-anatomical factors into the prognostic evaluation. Oncotype DX and MammaPrint are two of the genomic predictors that will be part of routine clinical practice in the future. Numerous studies have proved the clinical utility of multigene panels in predicting clinical outcome and treatment response. Here we present our review of the studies on these multigene panels and their application to breast cancer.

11 Review [Overdiagnosis in mammography screening for breast cancer]. 2017

Huang, Y B / Yang, L / Song, F J / Chen, K X. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy of Tianjin, Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy of Ministry of Education, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060, China. · Beijing Office for Cancer Prevention and Control, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing 100142, China. ·Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi · Pubmed #29141352.

ABSTRACT: Screening has been always considered as a double-edged sword. Cancer screening could save lives in some cases, however, in other cases, it might also turn people into overdiagnosis. Overdiagnosis is the diagnosis of cancer that will never cause symptoms or death during a patient's lifetime. Therefore, overdiagnosis might lead to unnecessary treatments and lifetime surveillance, and then increase economic burden and psychological burden. In this review, we focus on how to correctly evaluate the overdiagnosis rate, and how to avoid or reduce the harms caused by overdiagnosis in the future according to the reasons associated with overdiagnosis. After systematically reviewing the previous studies, we will try to identify the potential reasons associated with overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening with mammography, address how to correctly evaluate the overdiagnosis rate, and finally provide some suggestions to reduce the overdiagnosis.

12 Review [PROGRESS OF TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF BREAST CANCER RELATED LYMPHEDEMA]. 2016

Zang, Huiran / Bi, Ye / Mu, Lan. ·Department of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, 100044, P. R. China. ·Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #29786353.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review the progress of treatment and prevention of breast cancer related lymphedema. METHODS: The recent literature concerning treatment and prevention of breast cancer related lymphedema was extensively consulted and reviewed. RESULTS: The treatment of lymphedema is now based on complete decongestive therapy, supplemented with medicine and surgery. Those procedures have been proved to be safe and effective. Sentinel lymph node biopsy, axillary reverse mapping, and lymphaticovenous anastomoses have been used to decrease the incidence of lymphedema. They show promising effectiveness in short term, but the long-term effectiveness needs further tests. CONCLUSIONS: In clinical practice, many treatment methods are used to decrease lymphedema, and lymphedema prevention is playing an increasingly important role. Lymphaticovenous anastomoses shows a promising effectiveness in reducing lymphedema.

13 Review Recent advances in the research for the homolog of breast cancer associated gene AtROW1 in higher plants. 2016

Jiao, Yue / Zhang, Yuzhou / Zhu, Yu-Xian. ·State Key Laboratory of Protein and Plant Gene Research, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China. · Center for Science and Technology Development, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100176, China. · State Key Laboratory of Protein and Plant Gene Research, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China. zhuyx2@pku.edu.cn. ·Sci China Life Sci · Pubmed #27502904.

ABSTRACT: BARD1 (BRCA1 associated RING domain protein 1), as an important animal tumor suppressor gene associated with many kinds of cancers, has been intensively studied for decades. Surprisingly, homolog of BARD1 was found in plants and it was renamed AtROW1 (repressor of Wuschel-1) according to its extremely important function with regard to plant stem cell homeostasis. Although great advances have been made in human BARD1, the function of this animal tumor-suppressor like gene in plant is not well studied and need to be further elucidated. Here, we review and summarize past and present work regarding this protein. Apart from its previously proposed role in DNA repair, recently it is found essential for shoot and root stem cell development and differentiation in plants. The study of AtROW1 in plant may provide an ideal model for further elucidating the functional mechanism of BARD1 in mammals.

14 Review "Secretory" Carcinoma of the Skin Mimicking Secretory Carcinoma of the Breast: Case Report and Literature Review. 2016

Huang, Sixia / Liu, Yan / Su, Jing / Liu, Jianying / Guo, Xiaoning / Mei, Fang / Zheng, Jie / Liao, Songlin. ·*Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China; †Department of Pathology, The Third Hospital, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China; and ‡Department of Pathology, Hospital of Beijing Renhe, Beijing, China. ·Am J Dermatopathol · Pubmed #26981741.

ABSTRACT: Secretory carcinoma is a unique kind of adenocarcinoma. It has distinct histological features and a special genetic change, that is, t (12; 15) (p13; q25) translocation which leads to the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. Secretory carcinoma has been found to occur both in the breast and salivary gland. Here the authors present a case of 22-year-old woman with a unique cutaneous neoplasm located at the axilla. The tumor was characterized histologically with the formation of round to ovoid microcysts and papillary structure, which was similar to the secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary gland. Furthermore, the gene sequence analysis of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction products demonstrated the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of secretory carcinoma from the skin which has the same genetic change as those from the breast and salivary gland. Local excision was performed on this patient. She had been followed up for nearly 1 year. No recurrence or metastasis was found yet.

15 Review Angiosarcoma (Stewart-Treves syndrome) in postmastectomy patients: report of 10 cases and review of literature. 2015

Cui, Lifang / Zhang, Jixin / Zhang, Xinmin / Chang, Hong / Qu, Congling / Zhang, Jiangying / Zhong, Dingrong. ·Department of Pathology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University China. · Department of Pathology, Peking University First Hospital Beijing, China. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Temple University Hospital Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College Beijing 100730, China. ·Int J Clin Exp Pathol · Pubmed #26617830.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: To study the clinicopathologic features of Stewart-Treves syndrome (STS) in postmastectomy patients including the epidemiology, presentation, morphology, differentiation, pathogenesis and therapeutic options. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten cases of STS in postmastectomy patients were retrospectively identified in our archives, and immunohistochemistry for CD34, CD31, D2-40, HHV-8, CK, EMA and Ki-67 was performed. All ten patients presented with lymphedema after mastectomy as the first sign. Physical examination revealed multiple raised, pinkish-red papulo-vesicular lesions or ulceration as the early evidence of tumor in the field where radiation therapy was introduced. Microscopic examination revealed infiltrative proliferation of vessels and the heteromorphic tumor cells expressed CD34, CD31 and D2-40. Despite the various treatment modalities, 5 patients died in an average of 19 months, 4 patients survived to the last follow-up (9-31 months), and 1 patient got lost. CONCLUSIONS: STS is a fatal complication of postmastectomy lymphedema. Patients with STS have very poor prognosis. The key to improve patient's survival is the early diagnosis through a high alert of this disease by primary care physicians and comprehensive physical examination of patients with pertinent history and suspicious clinical presentations followed by prompt biopsy for definitive diagnosis.

16 Review National consensus in China on diagnosis and treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer. 2015

Xu, Binghe / Hu, Xichun / Jiang, Zefei / Li, Huiping / Chen, Jiayi / Cui, Shude / Li, Qing / Liao, Ning / Liu, Donggeng / Liu, Jian / Lu, Jinsong / Shen, Kunwei / Sun, Tao / Teng, Yuee / Tong, Zhongsheng / Wang, Shulian / Wang, Xiang / Wang, Xiaojia / Wang, Yongsheng / Wu, Jiong / Yuan, Peng / Zhang, Pin / Zhang, Qingyuan / Zheng, Hong / Pang, Da / Ren, Guosheng / Shao, Zhimin / Shen, Zhenzhou / Song, Erwei / Song, Santai. ·1 Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China ; 2 Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China ; 3 Beijing 307 Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100101, China ; 4 Cancer Hospital of Peking University, Beijing 100142, China ; 5 Ruijin Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200020, China ; 6 Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou 450008, China ; 7 Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou 510080, China ; 8 Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China ; 9 Fujian Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou 350000, China ; 10 Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200032, China ; 11 Liaoning Cancer Hospital, Shenyang 110042, China ; 12 First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, China ; 13 Cancer Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300060, China ; 14 Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou 310022, China ; 15 Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250031, China ; 16 Cancer Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150000, China ; 17 West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chendu 610041, China ; 18 First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014, China ; 19 Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510175, China. ·Ann Transl Med · Pubmed #26605288.

ABSTRACT: The recently available guidelines on the management of advanced breast cancer (ABC) organized by Chinese Anti-Cancer Association, Committee of Breast Cancer Society (CACA-CBCS) do not elucidate ABC in details. To instruct clinicians in treatment of ABC, a Chinese expert consensus meeting on diagnosis and treatment of ABC was held in June 2014 and a consensus is developed. The following consensus provides the level of evidence and supporting documents for each recommendation, and introduces research topics to be urgently addressed. Notably, the consensus on diagnosis and treatment of ABC in China is developed to be applied nationwide. In different areas, multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) tailored to the each patient and the disease itself should be applied based on the basic principles of modern oncology.

17 Review Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer: how the latest results are improving therapeutic options. 2015

Jiang, Hanfang / Rugo, Hope S. ·Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Breast Oncology, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing, China. · University of California San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero St, Box 1710 San Francisco CA 94115, USA. ·Ther Adv Med Oncol · Pubmed #26557900.

ABSTRACT: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains an incurable disease, and approximately 25% of patients with HER2+ early breast cancer still relapse after adjuvant trastuzumab-based treatment. HER2 is a validated therapeutic target that remains relevant throughout the disease process. Recently, a number of novel HER2 targeted agents have become available, including lapatinib (a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both HER2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor), pertuzumab (a new anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody) and ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1, a novel antibody-drug conjugate), which provide additional treatment options for patients with HER2+ MBC. The latest clinical trials have demonstrated improved outcome with treatment including pertuzumab or T-DM1 compared with standard HER2 targeted therapy. Here we review the clinical development of approved and investigational targeted agents for the treatment of HER2+ MBC, summarize the latest results of important clinical trials supporting use of these agents in the treatment of HER2+ MBC, and discuss how these results impact therapeutic options in clinical practice.

18 Review Breast cancer treatment and sulfotransferase. 2015

Ji, Xi-Wei / Zhou, Tian-Yan / Lu, Yuan / Wei, Min-Ji / Lu, Wei / Cho, William C. ·Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Peking University First Hospital, Peking University , Beijing , China jjxxeezz@163.com. ·Expert Opin Ther Targets · Pubmed #25677121.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Sustained exposure to excessive estrogen is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Sulfotransferase (SULT)-mediated sulfonation represents an effective approach for estrogen deprivation as estrogen sulfates do not bind and activate estrogen receptors (ERs). The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily functions as a sensor for xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules, which can regulate the expression of SULT. AREAS COVERED: In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of SULT regulation by NRs and inactivation of estrogen by SULT. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of clinical therapy targeting SULT in breast cancer treatment. Gaps in current knowledge that require further study are also highlighted. EXPERT OPINION: The prevention of estrogen binding to ER by antiestrogen and inhibition of estrogen synthesis by aromatase or sulfatase inhibitor have been used in clinical therapy for breast cancer. Although the induction of SULT has been proven effective to estrogen inactivation, reports on this method applied to breast cancer treatment are rare. Targeted activation of SULT may open up a new means of treating hormone-dependent breast cancer.

19 Review [Application of bevacizumab on metastatic breast cancer]. 2012

Guo, Yan tong / Ding, Lei / Li, Tian hong. ·Department of Surgery, Fourth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Beijing, China. ·Beijing Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban · Pubmed #23073579.

ABSTRACT: Tumor angiogenesis defines tumor growth as it is dependent on generation of new blood vessels. Over forty years ago, Folkman hypothesized that inhibiting tumor angiogenesis could inhibit the growth of solid tumors and thus could be exploited as a therapeutic strategy. Among the numerous factors have been implicated in the angiogenesis activation process, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the best studied angiogenesis target in cancer, using many different approaches in a wide variety of human cancers. Bevacizumab is the first anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody and proof-of-concept angiogenesis inhibitor that has been approved by the United States FDA for several tumor types. Drugs inhibiting VEGF work through several mechanisms, including inhibition of tumor blood vessel growth, vascular renormalization, potentiating of other antitumor agents, and inhibiting tumor metastasis. Unlike colorectal, kidney, lung, and brain tumors, the use of bevacizumab in breast cancer has been, as it were, on a rollercoaster in the United States, from accelerated approval for early drug access by patients in February 2008, to modest efficacy that fell short of high expectations, and increasing concern for serious toxicity in July 2010, and on to FDA revocation of accelerated approval for metastatic breast cancer patients in November 2011. Through a concise review of the FDA process, we have summarized its lessons, the challenges in developing new cancer drugs, and perspectives on further development of bevacizumab and other angiogenesis inhibitors in treatment of breast cancer. Despite all the challenges, antiangiogenesis remains a promising strategy to conquer breast cancer.

20 Clinical Trial Efficacy of pegfilgrastim to support neoadjuvant dose-dense epirubicin and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy in breast cancer. 2019

Wang, Xinguang / He, Yingjian / Wang, Tianfeng / Xie, Yuntao / Li, Jinfeng / Ouyang, Tao / Fan, Zhaoqing. ·Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Breast Center, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing, 100142, China. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Breast Center, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing, 100142, China. zhqfan@yahoo.com. ·Support Care Cancer · Pubmed #30607682.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The role of long-acting hematopoietic growth factor in supporting dose-dense chemotherapy and minimizing hematologic toxicity has not been established. We investigated the efficacy and safety of once-per-cycle pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant dose-dense epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (ddEC). METHODS: Newly diagnosed stage I to III breast cancer patients received four cycles of ddEC (E, 100 mg/m RESULTS: A total of 240 patients were enrolled and 913 ddEC cycles were administered in the study. Chemotherapy delay occurred in 15 patients (6.3% of patients, 95% CI 3.2-9.4%) for 17 cycles (1.9% of cycles, 95% CI 1.0-2.8%). The most frequent cause of chemotherapy delay was transaminase elevation (10 patients, 12 cycles). A total of 12 patients (5.0%, 95% CI 2.2-7.8%) developed 13 episodes of FN. Of the 221 patients that completed four ddEC cycles with pegfilgrastim support, 209 patients (94.6%, 95% CI 91.6-97.6%) had a 100% relative dose intensity (RDI). A RDI ≥ 85% was achieved in 217 of 221 patients (98.2%, 95% CI 96.5-99.9%). Bone pain of any grade was recorded in 85 of 220 evaluable patients (38.6%, 95% CI 32.2-45.0%). CONCLUSIONS: Pegfilgrastim is effective and safe in facilitating four cycles of neoadjuvant ddEC, with low incidences of chemotherapy delay and febrile neutropenia.

21 Clinical Trial Combination versus sequential paclitaxel plus gemcitabine as first-line chemotherapy for women with metastatic breast cancer: a prospective randomized phase II study. 2018

Shao, Bin / Song, Guohong / Li, Huiping / Dil, Lijun / Jiang, Hanfang / Liang, Xu / Yan, Ying / Zhang, Ruyan / Ran, Ran / Wang, Jing / Liu, Xiaoran / You, Miaoning. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Key laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Breast Oncology, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Haidian District, Beijing 100142, China. ·J BUON · Pubmed #30610781.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Paclitaxel (T) plus gemcitabine (G) is an active concomitant combination for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). However, the efficacy of sequential administration of these two drugs is unclear. This randomized phase II study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of T and G administered either as a concomitant or as a sequential regimen in patients with MBC. METHODS: Patients with MBC (n=66) were randomized to either receive 6 cycles of concomitant T and G or 4 cycles of T followed by 4 cycles of G, as first line chemotherapy. With no progression, the arms would switch to maintenance with paclitaxel. Progression free survival (PFS) was defined as the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints were the overall response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. In total, 33 patients were randomized to the concomitant or sequential arms. Patient characteristics were well balanced. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was 6 for the concomitant arm and 8 for the sequential arm. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed in terms of PFS, ORR, and OS. Only 13 (39.4%) patients progressed in the sequential arm. Although there was no significant difference between the two arms (p=0.056),the sequential arm had a remarkable trend of longer PFS than the concomitant arm. Toxicities were manageable and similar in both arms.The incidence of neutropenia was significantly higher in the concomitant arm (90.9%) than in the sequential arm (60.6%). Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was not significantly different between the two arms. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant and sequential treatment with paclitaxel and gemcitabine had no significant difference in terms of PFS.

22 Clinical Trial Comparison of sentinel lymph node biopsy guided by indocyanine green, blue dye, and their combination in breast cancer patients: a prospective cohort study. 2017

Guo, Jiajia / Yang, Houpu / Wang, Shu / Cao, Yingming / Liu, Miao / Xie, Fei / Liu, Peng / Zhou, Bo / Tong, Fuzhong / Cheng, Lin / Liu, Hongjun / Wang, Siyuan. ·Peking University People's Hospital Breast Center, NO 11, Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing, 10044, People's Republic of China. · Peking University People's Hospital Breast Center, NO 11, Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing, 10044, People's Republic of China. shuwang@pkuph.edu.cn. ·World J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29096643.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent studies show that near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green (ICG) has the potential to improve the performance of sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping. The current cohort study was designed to assess the value of the combination of ICG and methylene blue (MB) dye in patients undergoing SLN biopsy. METHODS: A prospective self-controlled trial was designed to detect the difference in the detection efficacies of ICG, MB, and combined ICG and MB (ICG + MB) navigation methods. Between 2010 and 2013, 198 consecutive early breast cancer patients eligible for sentinel lymph node biopsy were enrolled and 200 biopsy procedures were performed by injection of both ICG and MB. SLNs were searched and removed under the guidance of fluorescence and/or blue dye. The mapping characteristics, the detection rate of SLNs and positive SLNs, and the number of SLNs of ICG, MB, and ICG + MB were compared. Injection safety of ICG and MB was evaluated. RESULTS: Fluorescence imaging of lymphatic flow, which is helpful to locate the incision site, could be seen in 184 of 200 procedures. The nodal detection rate of ICG, MB, and ICG + MB samples was 97, 89, and 99.5% (χ CONCLUSIONS: The lymphatic navigation by ICG fluorescence detects SLNs at a high detection rate and improves the mapping performance when added to the MB method. The novel ICG + MB dual tracing modality, without involvement of radioactive isotopes, exhibits great potential as an alternative to traditional standard mapping methods. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTRN12612000109808 . Retrospectively registered on 23 January 2012.

23 Clinical Trial Kinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer Treated with Paclitaxel, Nab-Paclitaxel, or Ixabepilone: CALGB 40502 (Alliance). 2017

Mehrotra, Shailly / Sharma, Manish R / Gray, Elizabeth / Wu, Kehua / Barry, William T / Hudis, Clifford / Winer, Eric P / Lyss, Alan P / Toppmeyer, Deborah L / Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro / Lad, Thomas E / Valasco, Mario / Overmoyer, Beth / Rugo, Hope / Ratain, Mark J / Gobburu, Jogarao V. ·Center for Translational Medicine, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, Illinois, USA. · State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs (Peking University), Beijing, China. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Dana-Farber/Partners CancerCare/ Harvard Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Heartland Cancer Research NCORP, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · John H. Stroger Jr Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Decatur Memorial Hospital/Cancer Care Specialists of Illinois/ Heartland Cancer Research NCORP, Decatur, Illinois, USA. · University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Center for Translational Medicine, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. jgobburu@rx.umaryland.edu. · Center for Translational Medicine, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 20 N Pine Street, Room 513, Baltimore, Maryland, 21201, USA. jgobburu@rx.umaryland.edu. ·AAPS J · Pubmed #28620884.

ABSTRACT: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting toxicity caused by several chemotherapeutic agents. Currently, CIPN is managed by empirical dose modifications at the discretion of the treating physician. The goal of this research is to quantitate the dose-CIPN relationship to inform the optimal strategies for dose modification. Data were obtained from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 40502 trial, a randomized phase III trial of paclitaxel vs. nab-paclitaxel vs. ixabepilone as first-line chemotherapy for locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. CIPN was measured using a subset of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Gynecologic Oncology Group Neurotoxicity (FACT-GOG-NTX) scale. A kinetic-pharmacodynamic (K-PD) model was utilized to quantitate the dose-CIPN relationship simultaneously for the three drugs. Indirect response models with linear and S

24 Clinical Trial Utidelone plus capecitabine versus capecitabine alone for heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancer refractory to anthracyclines and taxanes: a multicentre, open-label, superiority, phase 3, randomised controlled trial. 2017

Zhang, Pin / Sun, Tao / Zhang, Qingyuan / Yuan, Zhongyu / Jiang, Zefei / Wang, Xiao Jia / Cui, Shude / Teng, Yuee / Hu, Xi-Chun / Yang, Junlan / Pan, Hongming / Tong, Zhongsheng / Li, Huiping / Yao, Qiang / Wang, Yongsheng / Yin, Yongmei / Sun, Ping / Zheng, Hong / Cheng, Jing / Lu, Jinsong / Zhang, Baochun / Geng, Cuizhi / Liu, Jian / Peng, Roujun / Yan, Min / Zhang, Shaohua / Huang, Jian / Tang, Li / Qiu, Rongguo / Xu, Binghe / Anonymous8680896. ·Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Liaoning Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shenyang, China. · Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, China. · Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China. · The 307th Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing, China. · Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, China. · Breast Cancer Center, Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou, China. · Department of Medical Oncology, the First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China. · Fudan University Cancer Center, Shanghai, China. · The 301st Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing, China. · Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China. · Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin, China. · Peking University Cancer Hospital, Beijing, China. · Nankai University Tianjin People's Hospital, Tianjin, China. · Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, China. · The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. · Qingdao University Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital, Yantai, China. · Sichuan University West China Hospital, Chengdu, China. · Tongji Medical College Wuhan Union Hospital, Wuhan, China. · Shanghai Jiaotong University Renji Hospital, Shanghai, China. · Nantong Tumor Hospital, Nantong, China. · Hebei Medical University Tumor Hospital, Shijiazhuang, China. · Fujian Medical University Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou, China. · Beijing Biostar Technologies, Beijing, China. · Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Electronic address: bhxu@hotmail.com. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #28209298.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Utidelone, a genetically engineered epothilone analogue, has shown promise as a potential treatment for breast cancer in phase 1 and 2 trials. The aim of this phase 3 trial was to compare the efficacy and safety of utidelone plus capecitabine versus capecitabine alone in patients with metastatic breast cancer. METHODS: We did a multicentre, open-label, superiority, phase 3, randomised controlled trial in 26 hospitals in China. Eligible participants were female patients with metastatic breast cancer refractory to anthracycline and taxane chemotherapy regimens. We randomly assigned participants (2:1) using computer based randomisation and block sizes of 6 to a 21-day cycle of either utidelone (30 mg/m FINDINGS: Between Aug 8, 2014, and Dec 14, 2015, we enrolled and randomly assigned 270 patients to treatment with utidelone plus capecitabine, and 135 to capecitabine alone. Median follow-up for progression-free survival was 6·77 months (IQR 3·81-10·32) for the utidelone plus capecitabine group and 4·55 months (2·55-9·39) for the capecitabine alone group. Median progression-free survival by central review in the utidelone plus capecitabine group was 8·44 months (95% CI 7·95-9·92) compared with 4·27 months (3·22-5·68) in the capecitabine alone group; hazard ratio 0·46, 95% CI 0·36-0·59; p<0·0001. Peripheral neuropathy was the most common grade 3 adverse event in the utidelone plus capecitabine group (58 [22%] of 267 patients vs 1 [<1%] of 130 patients in the capecitabine alone group). Palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia was the most prominent grade 3 adverse event in the capacitabine alone group (in 10 [8%] of 130 patients) and was the next most frequent grade 3 event in the utidelone plus capecitabine group (in 18 [7%] of 267 patients). 16 serious adverse events were reported in the combination therapy group (diarrhoea was the most common, in three [1%] patients) and 14 serious adverse events were reported in the monotherapy group (the most common were diarrhoea, increased blood bilirubin, and anaemia, in two [2%] patients for each event). 155 patients died (99 in the combination therapy arm, 56 in the monotherapy arm). All deaths were related to disease progression except for one in each group (attributed to pericardial effusion in the combination therapy group and dyspnoea in the monotherapy group) that were considered possibly or probably treatment-related. INTERPRETATION: Despite disease progression with previous chemotherapies, utidelone plus capecitabine was more efficacious compared with capecitabine alone for the outcome of progression-free survival, with mild toxicity except for peripheral sensory neuropathy, which was manageable. The findings from this study support the use of utidelone plus capecitabine as an effective option for patients with metastatic breast cancer. FUNDING: Beijing Biostar Technologies, Beijing, China.

25 Clinical Trial Phase II trial of utidelone as monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine in heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancer patients. 2016

Zhang, Pin / Tong, Zhongsheng / Tian, Fuguo / Wang, Yongsheng / Yang, Junlan / Li, Weilian / Di, Lijun / Liu, Wei / Tang, Li / Qiu, Rongguo / Xu, Binghe. ·National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 17# Panjiayuan Nanli, Beijing, 100021, China. · Cancer Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China. · Shanxi Cancer Hospital, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China. · Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong, China. · PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China. · Tianjin People's Hospital, Tianjin, China. · Cancer Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, China. · Hebei Cancer Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China. · Beijing Biostar Technologies, Ltd., Beijing, China. · National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 17# Panjiayuan Nanli, Beijing, 100021, China. xubh2014@126.com. ·J Hematol Oncol · Pubmed #27516093.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains a great clinical challenge as drug resistance frequently develops. Alternative agents that can overcome drug resistance would offer new therapeutic options. The primary aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of utidelone as a monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine in metastatic breast cancer patients previously treated with and resistant to anthracyclines and taxanes. METHODS: In two open-label, noncomparative clinical studies, patients with metastatic breast cancer who previously received anthracycline- and/or taxane-containing regimens were given (1) 25 to 35 mg/m(2)/day intravenously infused utidelone, once daily for 5 days, in combination with 14 days of 2000 mg/m(2) capecitabine, divided in two equal daily oral doses or (2) 40 mg/m(2)/day intravenously infused utidelone, once daily for 5 days. These regimens were administered per each 21-day treatment cycle, and the maximum of treatment cycles allowed per protocol is 6. Objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and tolerability were evaluated. RESULTS: In the combination study, 33 patients completed a median of 6 cycles of therapy, which was the highest cycles a trial patient could receive under the criteria of the study protocol. Efficacy was evaluated (n = 32) with an ORR of 42.4 % (FAS, 95 % CI, 26.6, 60.9) and a median PFS of 7.9 (FAS, 95 % CI, 6.1, 9.8) months. The monotherapy study (n = 63) resulted in an ORR of 28.57 % (FAS, 95 % CI, 18.4, 40.6) and a median PFS of 5.4 (FAS, 95 % CI, 2.9, 9.8) months. In both studies, common toxicities associated with utidelone administration included peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, myalgia, and arthralgia, but the toxicities were limited and manageable. Notably, very mild myelosuppression, low liver and renal toxicities, and very limited gastrointestinal toxic effect were observed, in contrast to other agents in the same class. CONCLUSIONS: Utidelone showed promising efficacy, tolerability, and advantageous safety profiles in the treatment of patients with advanced anthracycline/taxane-refractory metastatic breast cancer and may offer new treatment options to overcome drug resistance. TRIAL REGISTRATION: CHiCTR-TRC-13004205 , registered on August 15, 2013.

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