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Breast Neoplasms: HELP
Articles from Munich
Based on 771 articles published since 2009
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These are the 771 published articles about Breast Neoplasms that originated from Munich during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline First international consensus conference on standardization of oncoplastic breast conserving surgery. 2017

Weber, Walter P / Soysal, Savas D / El-Tamer, Mahmoud / Sacchini, Virgilio / Knauer, Michael / Tausch, Christoph / Hauser, Nik / Günthert, Andreas / Harder, Yves / Kappos, Elisabeth A / Schwab, Fabienne / Fitzal, Florian / Dubsky, Peter / Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna / Reitsamer, Roland / Koller, Rupert / Heil, Jörg / Hahn, Markus / Blohmer, Jens-Uwe / Hoffmann, Jürgen / Solbach, Christine / Heitmann, Christoph / Gerber, Bernd / Haug, Martin / Kurzeder, Christian. ·Breast Center, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. walter.weber@usb.ch. · Breast Center, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Breast Center St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland. · Breast-Center Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Breast Center Hirslanden Clinics Aarau Cham Zug and frauenarztzentrum aargau ag, Baden, Switzerland. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cantonal Hospital of Lucerne, Lucerne, Switzerland. · Division of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Ospedale Regionale di Lugano (ORL), Breast Centre of Switzerland (CSSI), Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale (EOC), Lugano, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery and Comprehensive Cancer Center Vienna, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Breast Center, Hirslanden Klinik St. Anna, Lucerne, Switzerland. · Department of Gynecology, Medical Univerisity Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 14, 8036, Graz, Austria. · Breast Center Salzburg, University Clinic Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria. · Plastische, Ästhetische und Rekonstruktive Chirurgie, Wilhelminenspital der Stadt, Vienna, Austria. · Universitäts-Brustzentrum, Universitäts-Frauenklinik, Im Neuenheimer Feld 440, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Women's Health, University Breast Center Tubingen, Tübingen, Germany. · Gynecology with Breast Center, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Breast Center, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225, Düsseldorf, Germany. · Breast Center, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany. · Breast Center at the English Garden, Munich, Germany. · Breast Surgery Unit at the Department of Ob/Gyn, University Hospital Rostock, Suedring 81, 18059, Rostock, Germany. ·Breast Cancer Res Treat · Pubmed #28578506.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To obtain consensus recommendations for the standardization of oncoplastic breast conserving surgery (OPS) from an international panel of experts in breast surgery including delegates from the German, Austrian and Swiss societies of senology. METHODS: A total of 52 questions were addressed by electronic voting. The panel's recommendations were put into context with current evidence and the report was circled in an iterative open email process until consensus was obtained. RESULTS: The panelists considered OPS safe and effective for improving aesthetic outcomes and broadening the indication for breast conserving surgery (BCS) towards larger tumors. A slim majority believed that OPS reduces the rate of positive margins; however, there was consensus that OPS is associated with an increased risk of complications compared to conventional BCS. The panel strongly endorsed patient-reported outcomes measurement, and recommended selected scales of the Breast-Q™-Breast Conserving Therapy Module for that purpose. The Clough bi-level classification was recommended for standard use in clinical practice for indicating, planning and performing OPS, and the Hoffmann classification for surgical reports and billing purposes. Mastopexy and reduction mammoplasty were the only two recognized OPS procedure categories supported by a majority of the panel. Finally, the experts unanimously supported the statement that every OPS procedure should be tailored to each individual patient. CONCLUSIONS: When implemented into clinical practice, the panel recommendations may improve safety and effectiveness of OPS. The attendees agreed that there is a need for prospective multicenter studies to optimize patient selection and for standardized criteria to qualify and accredit OPS training centers.

2 Guideline 3rd ESO-ESMO International Consensus Guidelines for Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC 3). 2017

Cardoso, F / Costa, A / Senkus, E / Aapro, M / André, F / Barrios, C H / Bergh, J / Bhattacharyya, G / Biganzoli, L / Cardoso, M J / Carey, L / Corneliussen-James, D / Curigliano, G / Dieras, V / El Saghir, N / Eniu, A / Fallowfield, L / Fenech, D / Francis, P / Gelmon, K / Gennari, A / Harbeck, N / Hudis, C / Kaufman, B / Krop, I / Mayer, M / Meijer, H / Mertz, S / Ohno, S / Pagani, O / Papadopoulos, E / Peccatori, F / Penault-Llorca, F / Piccart, M J / Pierga, J Y / Rugo, H / Shockney, L / Sledge, G / Swain, S / Thomssen, C / Tutt, A / Vorobiof, D / Xu, B / Norton, L / Winer, E. ·European School of Oncology & Breast Unit, Champalimaud Clinical Center, Lisbon, Portugal. · European School of Oncology, Milan, Italy and European School of Oncology, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland. · Breast Center, Genolier Cancer Center, Genolier, Switzerland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France. · Department of Medicine, PUCRS School of Medicine, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Department of Oncology/Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Institutet & Cancer Center Karolinska and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fortis Hospital, Kolkata, India. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital of Prato, Prato, Italy. · Breast Unit, Champalimaud Clinical Center, Lisbon, Portugal. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. · METAvivor Research and Support, Annapolis, USA. · Division of Experimental Therapeutics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris, France. · NK Basile Cancer Institute Breast Center of Excellence, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. · Department of Breast Tumors, Cancer Institute 'I. Chiricuta', Cluj-Napoca, Romania. · Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, UK. · Breast Care Support Group, Europa Donna Malta, Mtarfa, Malta. · Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. · BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medical Oncology, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy. · Brustzentrum der Universitat München, Munich, Germany. · Breast Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, USA. · Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. · Advanced Breast Cancer.org, New York, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Radvoud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Metastatic Breast Cancer Network US, Inversness, USA. · Breast Oncology Centre, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and Breast Unit of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Europa Donna, Nicosia, Cyprus. · European School of Oncology, Milan, Italy and Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Jean Perrin Centre, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Clermont Ferrand, France. · Department of Medicine, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Department of Medicine, Breast Oncology Program, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Johns Hopkins Breast Center, Baltimore. · Indiana University Medical CTR, Indianapolis. · Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, USA. · Department of Gynaecology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle an der Saale, Germany. · Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Unit, King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas's NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Sandton Oncology Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa. · Department of Medical Oncology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Breast Cancer Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28177437.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline 3rd ESO-ESMO international consensus guidelines for Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC 3). 2017

Cardoso, F / Costa, A / Senkus, E / Aapro, M / André, F / Barrios, C H / Bergh, J / Bhattacharyya, G / Biganzoli, L / Cardoso, M J / Carey, L / Corneliussen-James, D / Curigliano, G / Dieras, V / El Saghir, N / Eniu, A / Fallowfield, L / Fenech, D / Francis, P / Gelmon, K / Gennari, A / Harbeck, N / Hudis, C / Kaufman, B / Krop, I / Mayer, M / Meijer, H / Mertz, S / Ohno, S / Pagani, O / Papadopoulos, E / Peccatori, F / Penault-Llorca, F / Piccart, M J / Pierga, J Y / Rugo, H / Shockney, L / Sledge, G / Swain, S / Thomssen, C / Tutt, A / Vorobiof, D / Xu, B / Norton, L / Winer, E. ·European School of Oncology & Breast Unit, Champalimaud Clinical Center, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: fatimacardoso@fundacaochampalimaud.pt. · European School of Oncology, Milan, Italy; European School of Oncology, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland. · Breast Center, Genolier Cancer Center, Genolier, Switzerland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France. · Department of Medicine, PUCRS School of Medicine, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Department of Oncology/Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Institutet & Cancer Center Karolinska and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fortis Hospital, Kolkata, India. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital of Prato, Prato, Italy. · Breast Unit, Champalimaud Clinical Center, Lisbon, Portugal. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, USA. · METAvivor Research and Support, Annapolis, USA. · Division of Experimental Therapeutics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris, France. · NK Basile Cancer Institute Breast Center of Excellence, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. · Department of Breast Tumors, Cancer Institute 'I. Chiricuta', Cluj-Napoca, Romania. · Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, UK. · Breast Care Support Group, Europa Donna Malta, Mtarfa, Malta. · Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. · BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medical Oncology, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy. · Brustzentrum der Universitat München, Munich, Germany. · Breast Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, USA. · Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA. · Advanced BC.org, New York, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Radvoud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Metastatic Breast Cancer Network US, Inversness, USA. · Breast Oncology Centre, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and Breast Unit of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Europa Donna, Nicosia, Cyprus. · Jean Perrin Centre, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Clermont Ferrand, France. · Department of Medicine, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Department of Medicine, Breast Oncology Program, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, USA. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Johns Hopkins Breast Center, Baltimore, USA. · Indiana University Medical CTR, Indianapolis, USA. · Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, USA. · Department of Gynaecology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle an der Saale, DE, Germany. · Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Unit, King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas's NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Sandton Oncology Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa. · Department of Medical Oncology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Breast Cancer Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, USA. ·Breast · Pubmed #27927580.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline Second international consensus guidelines for breast cancer in young women (BCY2). 2016

Paluch-Shimon, Shani / Pagani, Olivia / Partridge, Ann H / Bar-Meir, Eran / Fallowfield, Lesley / Fenlon, Deborah / Friedman, Eitan / Gelmon, Karen / Gentilini, Oreste / Geraghty, James / Harbeck, Nadia / Higgins, Stephen / Loibl, Sibylle / Moser, Elizabeth / Peccatori, Fedro / Raanani, Hila / Kaufman, Bella / Cardoso, Fatima. ·Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel. · Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and Breast Unit of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Faculty of Medicine, Bar-Ilan University, Israel. · SHORE-C, Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, UK. · University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada. · Breast Surgery Unit, San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy. · St Vincent Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Breast Center, Dept. OB&GYN, University of Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany. · Tallaght Hospital & Our Lady's Hospice, Dublin, Ireland. · German Breast Group, Neu-Isenburg, & Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Germany. · Breast Unit, Champalimaud Cancer Center, Lisbon, Portugal. · European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Breast Unit, Champalimaud Cancer Center, Lisbon, Portugal; European School of Oncology, Italy. Electronic address: fatimacardoso@fundacaochampalimaud.pt. ·Breast · Pubmed #27017247.

ABSTRACT: The 2nd International Consensus Conference for Breast Cancer in Young Women (BCY2) took place in November 2014, in Dublin, Ireland organized by the European School of Oncology (ESO). Consensus recommendations for the management of breast cancer in young women (BCYW) were updated from BCY1 with incorporation of new evidence to inform the guidelines, and areas of research priorities were identified. This manuscript summarizes these international consensus recommendations, which are also endorsed by the European Society of Breast Specialists (EUSOMA).

5 Guideline ESO-ESMO 2nd international consensus guidelines for advanced breast cancer (ABC2). 2014

Cardoso, F / Costa, A / Norton, L / Senkus, E / Aapro, M / André, F / Barrios, C H / Bergh, J / Biganzoli, L / Blackwell, K L / Cardoso, M J / Cufer, T / El Saghir, N / Fallowfield, L / Fenech, D / Francis, P / Gelmon, K / Giordano, S H / Gligorov, J / Goldhirsch, A / Harbeck, N / Houssami, N / Hudis, C / Kaufman, B / Krop, I / Kyriakides, S / Lin, U N / Mayer, M / Merjaver, S D / Nordström, E B / Pagani, O / Partridge, A / Penault-Llorca, F / Piccart, M J / Rugo, H / Sledge, G / Thomssen, C / Van't Veer, L / Vorobiof, D / Vrieling, C / West, N / Xu, B / Winer, E / Anonymous1680807 / Anonymous1690807. ·European School of Oncology & Breast Unit, Champalimaud Cancer Center, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: fatimacardoso@fundacaochampalimaud.pt. · European School of Oncology, Milan, Italy; European School of Oncology, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Breast Cancer Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, USA. · Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland. · Division of Oncology, Institut Multidisciplinaire d'Oncologie, Genolier, Switzerland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave-Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France. · Department of Medicine, PUCRS School of Medicine, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Department of Oncology/Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Institutet & Cancer Center Karolinska and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Medical Oncology, Sandro Pitigliani Oncology Centre, Prato, Italy. · Breast Cancer Clinical Program, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, USA. · Breast Unit, Champalimaud Cancer Center, Lisbon, Portugal. · University Clinic Golnik, Medical Faculty Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · NK Basile Cancer Institute Breast Center of Excellence, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon. · Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, UK. · Breast Care Support Group, Europa Donna Malta, Mtarfa, Malta. · Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. · BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada. · Departments of Health Services Research and Breast Medical Oncology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · APHP Tenon, IUC-UPMC, Francilian Breast Intergroup, Arome, Paris, France. · Program of Breast Health, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Brustzentrum der Universität München, Munich, DE, USA. · Screening and Test Evaluation Program, School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Breast Cancer Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA. · Europa Donna Cyprus, Nicosa, Cyprus. · Advanced BC.org, New York, USA. · University of Michigan Medical School and School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, USA. · Europa Donna Sweden & Bröstcancerföreningarnas Riksorganisation, BRO, Sundbyberg, Sweden. · Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and Breast Unit of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Department Medical Oncology, Division of Women's Cancers, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA. · Jean Perrin Centre, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Clermont Ferrand, France. · Department of Medicine, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medicine, Breast Oncology Program, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, USA. · Indiana University Medical CTR, Indianapolis, USA. · Department of Gynaecology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle an der Saale, DE, Germany. · Breast Oncology Program, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, USA. · Sandton Oncology Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa. · Department of Radiotherapy, Clinique des Grangettes, Geneva, Switzerland. · Nursing Division, Health Board, Cardiff and Vale University, Cardiff, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. ·Breast · Pubmed #25244983.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Pride, Prejudice, or Science: Attitudes Towards the Results of the TARGIT-A Trial of Targeted Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer. 2015

Vaidya, Jayant S / Bulsara, Max / Wenz, Frederik / Joseph, David / Saunders, Christobel / Massarut, Samuele / Flyger, Henrik / Eiermann, Wolfgang / Alvarado, Michael / Esserman, Laura / Falzon, Mary / Brew-Graves, Chris / Potyka, Ingrid / Tobias, Jeffrey S / Baum, Michael / Anonymous660833. ·Clinical Trials Group, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK; Department of Surgery, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK; Department of Surgery, Whittington Health, London, UK. Electronic address: jayant.vaidya@ucl.ac.uk. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, WA, Australia. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia; School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologia, Aviano, Italy. · Department of Breast Surgery, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Red Cross Hospital, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Department of Pathology, University College London Hospitals, London, UK. · Clinical Trials Group, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Clinical Oncology, University College London Hospitals, London, UK. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #26068479.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial From heart to heart for breast cancer patients - cardiovascular toxicities in breast cancer radiotherapy. 2014

Duma, M N / Molls, M / Trott, K R. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 , München, Germany, Marciana.Duma@lrz.tu-muenchen.de. ·Strahlenther Onkol · Pubmed #24253182.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Review [Breast cancer in young women]. 2019

Burgmann, D-Maximiliane / Dobler, Franziska / Zeder-Göss, Christine / Mahner, Sven / Harbeck, Nadia / Würstlein, Rachel. ·Brustzentrum, Klinik und Poliklinik für Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Klinikum der Univ. München, Marchioninistr. 15, D-81377, München, Deutschland. burgmann@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Klinikum der Universität München, München, Deutschland. ·MMW Fortschr Med · Pubmed #31414431.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Review [Breast cancer - a modern approach in oncoplastic surgery]. 2019

Hagemann, Friederike / Geiger, Pamina / Luczak, Carolin / Perabò, Marta / Degenhardt, Tom / Schenck, Thilo / Mahner, Sven / Harbeck, Nadia / Ditsch, Nina. ·Klinik und Poliklinik für Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Campus Innenstadt, Maistrasse 11, D-80337, München, Deutschland. Hagemann@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Campus Innenstadt, Maistrasse 11, D-80337, München, Deutschland. ·MMW Fortschr Med · Pubmed #31414430.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma (i-SMILE) of the uterine cervix: report of a case series and review of the literature indicating poor prognostic subtype of cervical adenocarcinoma. 2019

Horn, Lars-Christian / Handzel, Romy / Borte, Gudrun / Siebolts, Udo / Haak, Anja / Brambs, Christine E. ·Division of Gynecologic, Breast and Perinatal Pathology, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 26, 04103, Leipzig, Germany. hornl@medizin.uni-leipzig.de. · Division of Gynecologic Oncologic Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Institute of Trier), University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Division of Molecular Pathology, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Halle/Saale, Halle/saale, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany. ·J Cancer Res Clin Oncol · Pubmed #31385027.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma (i-SMILE) represents a recently recognized subtype of cervical adenocarcinoma (AC) developing in a background of a stratified mucin-producing intraepithelial lesion (SMILE). Clinical and prognostic data on i-SMILE are limited. METHODS: We report a series of five cases with histopathological, immunohistochemical (p16) and PCR analyses. The cases as well as the patients previously published in the literature were reviewed for follow-up information. RESULTS: Thirteen cases were identified. The mean age of 47.1 years (range 34-66) was not different from the usual type of cervical AC. 10/13 cases presented with tumors > 2 cm and a polypoid-exophytic appearance. Regardless of tumor size and stage of the disease, 7 out of 11 patients developed recurrent disease after a mean of 7.8 months (range 6 weeks-36 months). Five patients developed distant metastases (three of them in the lungs). Five out of the 11 informative cases died of the disease. All reported cases were positive for high-risk HPV (mainly HPV type 18) and associated with p16-overexpression. CONCLUSION: i-SMILE represent a distinct subtype of invasive endocervical AC, associated high-risk HPV infection and strong p16-overexpression. Clinically, i-SMILE may represent an aggressive tumor with early recurrent disease and substantial risk of distant metastatic disease, especially to the lungs.

11 Review Endocervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) with ovarian and pulmonary involvement: report of a case and review of the literature suggesting a "seed and soil hypothesis". 2019

Horn, Lars-Christian / Höhn, Anne Kathrin / Stark, Sylvia / Einenkel, Jens / Borte, Gudrun / Haak, Anja / Siebolts, Udo / Brambs, Christine E. ·Division of Breast, Gynecologic and Perinatal Pathology, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital of Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 26, 04103, Leipzig, Germany. hornl@medizin.uni-leipzig.de. · Division of Breast, Gynecologic and Perinatal Pathology, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital of Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 26, 04103, Leipzig, Germany. · Division of Oncologic Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Institute of Trier), University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Division Molecular Pathology, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital of Halle/Saale, Halle (Saale), Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany. ·J Cancer Res Clin Oncol · Pubmed #31309301.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Cervical cancer metastases to the ovary may occur with advanced tumor stage, deep cervical stromal involvement and corpus involvement. Endocervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) with ovarian involvement is exceptionally rare with about twelve reported cases. METHODS: Here we present a case of endocervical AIS with ovarian and pulmonary involvement 39 months after the initial diagnosis. The characteristics of that case were compared and summarized with the eleven previously published cases. RESULTS: The patients' age ranged between 30 and 40 years (median 37.4 years). The time interval between the diagnosis of AIS and ovarian involvement was 26.7 months (range 2-84 months). Majority of the patients are alive without evidence of disease after a median time of 63.4 months (range 9-156 months). All reported cases were positive for high-risk HPV which was associated with strong p16 expression on immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSIONS: The ovarian involvement by endocervical AIS suggests the concept of a transtubal spread of the neoplastic cervical cells with or without previous colonization within the endometrium without evidence of invasive growth, suggesting a seed and soil spread of the disease. In cases with ovarian involvement by the AIS and without additional extragenital spread, the prognosis may be favorable.

12 Review Preoperative radiotherapy: A paradigm shift in the treatment of breast cancer? A review of literature. 2019

Corradini, Stefanie / Krug, David / Meattini, Icro / Matuschek, Christiane / Bölke, Edwin / Francolini, Giulio / Baumann, René / Figlia, Vanessa / Pazos, Montserrat / Tonetto, Fabrizio / Trovò, Marco / Mazzola, Rosario / Alongi, Filippo. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: stefanie.corradini@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Department of Biomedical, Experimental, and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; Radiation Oncology Unit, Oncology Department, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy. · Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Heinrich Heine University, Medical faculty, Düsseldorf, Germany. · Department of Biomedical, Experimental, and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany; Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Marien Hospital Siegen, Siegen, Germany. · Department of Advanced Radiation Oncology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria, Negrar di Valpolicella, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata UD, Udine, Italy. · Department of Advanced Radiation Oncology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria, Negrar di Valpolicella, Verona, Italy; University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #31272045.

ABSTRACT: The standard of care for early-stage breast cancer (BC) consists of breast-conserving surgery followed by postoperative irradiation. Recently, the concept of changing the usual sequence of treatment components in BC RT has been investigated. Potential advantages of preoperative RT in BC include a possible tumor downstaging with improved surgical cosmetic outcomes, accurate tumor site identification and better target volume delineation. Furthermore, preoperative RT could serve as a tool for treatment stratification for de-escalation of treatments in the event of pathological complete response. The present literature review analyzed the available clinical data regarding the potential impact of preoperative RT. Overall, available clinical evidence of preoperative RT in BC remains limited, deriving mostly from retrospective case series. Nevertheless, the experiences prove the feasibility of the preoperative RT approach and confirm the efficacy in almost all analyzed studies, including experiences using higher prescription RT doses or RT in combination with systemic therapy.

13 Review Pathological chemotherapy response score is prognostic in tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data. 2019

Cohen, Paul A / Powell, Aime / Böhm, Steffen / Gilks, C Blake / Stewart, Colin J R / Meniawy, Tarek M / Bulsara, Max / Avril, Stefanie / Brockbank, Eleanor C / Bosse, Tjalling / de Azevedo Focchi, Gustavo Rubino / Ganesan, Raji / Glasspool, Rosalind M / Howitt, Brooke E / Kim, Hyun-Soo / Lee, Jung-Yun / Le, Nhu D / Lockley, Michelle / Manchanda, Ranjit / Mandalia, Trupti / McCluggage, W Glenn / McNeish, Iain / Midha, Divya / Srinivasan, Radhika / Tan, Yun Yi / van der Griend, Rachael / Yunokawa, Mayu / Zannoni, Gian F / Anonymous1431522 / Singh, Naveena. ·Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Bendat Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia; Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia; Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia, 32 Mouat Street Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. Electronic address: Paul.Cohen@uwa.edu.au. · Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Bendat Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia; Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia, 32 Mouat Street Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Barts Health NHS Trust, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7BE, United Kingdom. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, Vancouver General Hospital, 899 W 12th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada. · Department of Histopathology, King Edward Memorial Hospital, 374 Bagot Road, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia; Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Gairdner Drive Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia. · Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia, 32 Mouat Street Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. · Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wolstein Research Building, Room 6524, 2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland, OH 44106, United States of America; Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, Munich 81675, Germany. · Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Barts Health NHS Trust, Whitechapel Rd, London E1 1BB, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, 2333 ZA, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Federal University de São Paulo (UNIFESP), R Botucatu, 740, São Paulo, SP CEP 04023-062, Brazil. · Department of Cellular Pathology, Birmingham Women's NHS Foundation Trust, Mindelsohn Way, Birmingham B15 2TG, United Kingdom. · Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Glasgow, The Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, University of Glasgow, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, H2128E, Stanford, CA 94305, United States of America. · Department of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1, Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Women's Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1, Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea. · Cancer Control Research, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z1L3, Canada. · Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, United Kingdom; University College London Hospital, 235 Euston Rd, Fitzrovia, London NW1 2BU, United Kingdom. · Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Barts Health NHS Trust, Royal London Hospital, 10th Floor, South Block, Whitechapel Road, London E1 1BB, United Kingdom. · Department of Histopathology, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (Wonford), Old Pathology Building, Church Lane, Exeter, Devon EX2 5AD, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Grosvenor Road Belfast, BT12 6BA, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, IRDB Building, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 0NN, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Tata Medical Center, 14 MAR, Rajarhat, Kolkata 700160, India. · Department of Cytology and Gynecological Pathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector 12, Chandigarh 160012, India. · Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, United Kingdom. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Canterbury Health Laboratories, 2 Riccarton Ave, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand. · Department of Breast and Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Women and Child Health, Fondazione Policlinico Gemelli, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo F Vito 1, 00168 Roma, Italy. · Department of Cellular Pathology, Barts Health NHS Trust, Whitechapel Rd, London E1 1BB, United Kingdom. ·Gynecol Oncol · Pubmed #31118141.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: There is a need to develop and validate biomarkers for treatment response and survival in tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC). The chemotherapy response score (CRS) stratifies patients into complete/near-complete (CRS3), partial (CRS2), and no/minimal (CRS1) response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Our aim was to review current evidence to determine whether the CRS is prognostic in women with tubo-ovarian HGSC treated with NACT. METHODS: We established an international collaboration to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis, pooling individual patient data from 16 sites in 11 countries. Patients had stage IIIC/IV HGSC, 3-4 NACT cycles and >6-months follow-up. Random effects models were used to derive combined odds ratios in the pooled population to investigate associations between CRS and progression free and overall survival (PFS and OS). RESULTS: 877 patients were included from published and unpublished studies. Median PFS and OS were 15 months (IQR 5-65) and 28 months (IQR 7-92) respectively. CRS3 was seen in 249 patients (28%). The pooled hazard ratios (HR) for PFS and OS for CRS3 versus CRS1/CRS2 were 0·55 (95% CI, 0·45-0·66; P < 0·001) and 0·65 (95% CI 0·50-0·85, P = 0·002) respectively; no heterogeneity was identified (PFS: Q = 6·42, P = 0·698, I2 = 0·0%; OS: Q = 6·89, P = 0·648, I2 = 0·0%). CRS was significantly associated with PFS and OS in multivariate models adjusting for age and stage. Of 306 patients with known germline BRCA1/2 status, those with BRCA1/2 mutations (n = 80) were more likely to achieve CRS3 (P = 0·027). CONCLUSIONS: CRS3 was significantly associated with improved PFS and OS compared to CRS1/2. This validation of CRS in a real-world setting demonstrates it to be a robust and reproducible biomarker with potential to be incorporated into therapeutic decision-making and clinical trial design.

14 Review Surrogate threshold effect based on a meta-analysis for the predictive value of progression-free survival for overall survival in hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. 2019

Lux, Michael Patrick / Böhme, Sarah / Hücherig, Stephanie / Jeratsch, Ulli / Kürschner, Niclas / Lüftner, Diana. ·Kooperatives Brustzentrum Paderborn, Paderborn, Germany. m.lux@vincenz.de. · Frauenklinik St. Louise, Paderborn, Germany. m.lux@vincenz.de. · St. Josefs-Krankenhaus, Salzkotten, Germany. m.lux@vincenz.de. · Frauen- und Kinderklinik St. Louise, Husener Str. 81, 33098, Paderborn, Germany. m.lux@vincenz.de. · Pfizer Deutschland GmbH, Linkstraße 10, 10785, Berlin, Germany. · AMS Advanced Medical Services GmbH, Rosa-Bavarese-Str. 5, 80639, Munich, Germany. · Klinik für Hämatologie, Onkologie und Tumorimmunologie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200, Berlin, Germany. ·Breast Cancer Res Treat · Pubmed #31065873.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Clinical trials investigating therapies for metastatic breast cancer (mBC) generally use progression-free survival (PFS) as primary endpoint, which is not accepted as patient-relevant outcome within the German benefit assessment. Hence a validation of PFS as surrogate endpoint for overall survival (OS) is needed, e.g., in the indication of HR+, HER2-negative mBC. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted. RCT were included if at least one study arm investigated fulvestrant, letrozole, tamoxifen, exemestane, or anastrozole. Additionally, hazard ratios reported for OS/PFS including confidence interval or standard error were mandatory. Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to estimate the relation of surrogate endpoint PFS and patient-relevant outcome OS as well as the surrogate threshold effect (STE) which is used to determine thresholds for the estimate of the surrogate endpoint. RESULTS: 16 studies with 5324 patients in total were included in the analyses. The correlation between hazard ratios of PFS and OS was statistically significant (r = 0.72, 95% CI 0.35-0.90) representing a positive linear relationship. STE analysis was applied. The meta-regression model revealed a STE for HR CONCLUSIONS: Based on the derived STE, it is possible to draw conclusions on a significant effect in OS for a hypothetical trial demonstrating an upper confidence limit of HR

15 Review Modern radiotherapy in cancer treatment during pregnancy. 2019

Mazzola, Rosario / Corradini, Stefanie / Eidemüeller, Markus / Figlia, Vanessa / Fiorentino, Alba / Giaj-Levra, Niccolò / Nicosia, Luca / Ricchetti, Francesco / Rigo, Michele / Musola, Mariella / Ceccaroni, Marcello / Gori, Stefania / Magrini, Stefano Maria / Alongi, Filippo. ·Radiation Oncology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar-Verona, Italy. Electronic address: rosariomazzola@hotmail.it. · Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany. · Institute of Radiation Protection, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany. · Radiation Oncology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar-Verona, Italy. · Radiation Oncology, General Regional Hospital "F. Miulli", Acquaviva delle Fonti-Bari, Italy. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar-Verona, Italy. · Medical Oncology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar-Verona, Italy. · Radiation Oncology, University and Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, Italy. · Radiation Oncology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar-Verona, Italy; University of Brescia, Italy. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #30878124.

ABSTRACT: Breast cancer, gynecological malignancies and lymphomas are the most frequently diagnosed tumors in pregnant women. The feasibility of radiotherapy during pregnancy remains a subject of debate and clinicians continue to hesitate on this approach, trying to avoid radiotherapy in most cases. Since the 1990s, several technological advances, including intensity modulated and image guided radiation delivery, have been implemented in radiation oncology to improve the radiation treatment in terms of effectiveness and tolerability. It remains uncertain which short- and long-term health effects the radiation exposure of the fetus may have through advanced radiotherapy techniques. The present systematic literature review aims to summarize the limited current evidences of the feasibility and clinical results of "modern" radiotherapy procedures for the treatment of the most frequently diagnosed tumors in pregnant women.

16 Review CDK4/6 Inhibitors Expand the Therapeutic Options in Breast Cancer: Palbociclib, Ribociclib and Abemaciclib. 2019

Eggersmann, Tanja K / Degenhardt, Tom / Gluz, Oleg / Wuerstlein, Rachel / Harbeck, Nadia. ·Department of OB&GYN, Breast Center, University of Munich (LMU), Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377, Munich, Germany. Tanja.Eggersmann@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Department of OB&GYN, Breast Center, University of Munich (LMU), Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377, Munich, Germany. · Westdeutsche Studiengruppe, Moenchengladbach, Germany. ·BioDrugs · Pubmed #30847853.

ABSTRACT: The majority of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) have hormone receptor-positive HER2-negative disease. For this subgroup, endocrine therapy is the key therapeutic option. Recently, therapeutic options have been expanded by introduction of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6i). Three compounds, palbociclib, ribociclib, and abemaciclib, have already been approved by the FDA for use together with endocrine therapy such as aromatase inhibitors (AIs) or fulvestrant; abemaciclib is also approved as a single agent. In the first-line setting, all three agents-together with an AI-substantially prolonged progression-free survival with a consistent hazard ratio of around 0.5 in all phase III trials. The data for second-line settings and beyond is also quite consistent, with again a substantial prolongation of progression-free survival demonstrated for fulvestrant together with palbociclib, ribociclib, or abemaciclib. Treatment with CDK4/6i is well tolerated and side effects are manageable. With palbociclib and ribociclib, hematological toxicities are most frequent. Abemaciclib has a lower incidence of neutropenia and a much greater incidence of all grades of diarrhea compared with other CDK4/6i, making diarrhea the key toxicity for abemaciclib. Patient quality of life is maintained under therapy and, particularly in later line settings, deterioration of quality of life is slowed down and symptoms such as pain are better controlled by CDK4/6i. Their consistent and clinically relevant efficacy makes these drugs an important improvement in our armamentarium against MBC and, potentially, ideal candidates in early breast cancer (EBC). This review summarizes the available clinical data for CDK4/6i and current research activities, particularly in EBC.

17 Review Translational highlights in breast cancer research and treatment: recent developments with clinical impact. 2019

Fasching, Peter A / Schneeweiss, Andreas / Kolberg, Hans-Christian / Ettl, Johannes / Fehm, Tanja N / Overkamp, Friedrich / Lüftner, Diana. ·Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen University Hospital, Comprehensive Cancer Center Erlangen-EMN, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen. · Nationales Centrum für Tumorerkrankungen, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Marienhospital Bottrop, Bottrop. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf. · OncoConsult Hamburg GmbH, Hamburg. · Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumour Immunology, Charité University Hospital Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany. ·Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30520757.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Over the last decades the time which is needed to translate a preclinical finding or idea in the clinic has reduced continuously. Especially but not only for breast cancer the number of tested drugs and targeted pathways have increased immensely. In addition, the introduction of immune-oncological treatments has further advanced the possibilities for future treatments. This review focuses on recent developments in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer including results from major clinical trials and recent conferences. RECENT FINDINGS: Many pathways involved in the progression or treatment of breast cancer have been also identified in the cause and pathogenesis of breast cancer. Therefore, breast cancer risk can be described in much more detail, possibly leading to new prevention strategies. In breast cancer treatment the introduction of PARP inhibitors has begun. Recent trials will lead to a better understanding whether PI3K inhibitors can be developed for application in the clinic and first large randomized trials show the superiority of anti PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. SUMMARY: Treatment strategies which were developed over the last decade are moving rapidly into the clinical use. The understanding of treatment targets and involved side effects will be important for the safe implementation of these treatments into routine practice.

18 Review Second International Consensus Conference on lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3 lesions). 2019

Rageth, Christoph J / O'Flynn, Elizabeth A M / Pinker, Katja / Kubik-Huch, Rahel A / Mundinger, Alexander / Decker, Thomas / Tausch, Christoph / Dammann, Florian / Baltzer, Pascal A / Fallenberg, Eva Maria / Foschini, Maria P / Dellas, Sophie / Knauer, Michael / Malhaire, Caroline / Sonnenschein, Martin / Boos, Andreas / Morris, Elisabeth / Varga, Zsuzsanna. ·Département de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique, Centre du sein, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève, Bd de la Cluse 30, 1211, Geneva 14, Switzerland. jcr@2cr.ch. · , Ringlikerstrasse 53, 8142, Uitikon Waldegg, Switzerland. jcr@2cr.ch. · The Rose Centre, St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Perimeter Road, London, SW17 0QT, UK. · Breast Imaging Service, Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 300 E 66th St, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Medical Services, Institute of Radiology, Kantonsspital Baden, im Ergel, 5404, Baden, Switzerland. · Zentrum Radiologie der Niels-Stensen-Kliniken; Marienhospital Osnabrück, Bischofsstraße 1, 49074, Osnabrück, Germany. · Institut für Pathologie am Dietrich-Bonhoeffer-Klinikum, Salvador-Allende-Straße 30, 17036, Neubrandenburg, Germany. · Brust-Zentrum Zürich, Seefeldstr. 214, 8008, Zurich, Switzerland. · Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Department of Diagnostic, Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich, Germany. · Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, Unit of Anatomic Pathology at Bellaria Hospital, University of Bologna, Via Altura 3, 40139, Bologna, Italy. · Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Basel, University of Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031, Basel, Switzerland. · Breast Center St. Gallen, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Rorschacher Str. 95, 9007, St. Gallen, Switzerland. · Imaging Department, Institut Curie, PSL Research University, Paris, France. · Division of Radiology, Breast Center Bern (Brustzentrum Bern), Klinik Engeried, Lindenhofgruppe AG, Riedweg 15, 3012, Bern, Switzerland. · Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Rämistr. 100, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland. · Institute of Pathology and Molecular Pathology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland Schmelzbergstrasse 12., 8091, Zurich, Switzerland. ·Breast Cancer Res Treat · Pubmed #30506111.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The second International Consensus Conference on B3 lesions was held in Zurich, Switzerland, in March 2018, organized by the International Breast Ultrasound School to re-evaluate the consensus recommendations. METHODS: This study (1) evaluated how management recommendations of the first Zurich Consensus Conference of 2016 on B3 lesions had influenced daily practice and (2) reviewed current literature towards recommendations to biopsy. RESULTS: In 2018, the consensus recommendations for management of B3 lesions remained almost unchanged: For flat epithelial atypia (FEA), classical lobular neoplasia (LN), papillary lesions (PL) and radial scars (RS) diagnosed on core-needle biopsy (CNB) or vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB), excision by VAB in preference to open surgery, and for atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and phyllodes tumors (PT) diagnosed at VAB or CNB, first-line open surgical excision (OE) with follow-up surveillance imaging for 5 years. Analyzing the Database of the Swiss Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsies (MIBB) with more than 30,000 procedures recorded, there was a significant increase in recommending more frequent surveillance of LN [65% in 2018 vs. 51% in 2016 (p = 0.004)], FEA (72% in 2018 vs. 62% in 2016 (p = 0.005)), and PL [(76% in 2018 vs. 70% in 2016 (p = 0.04)] diagnosed on VAB. A trend to more frequent surveillance was also noted also for RS [77% in 2018 vs. 67% in 2016 (p = 0.07)]. CONCLUSIONS: Minimally invasive management of B3 lesions (except ADH and PT) with VAB continues to be appropriate as an alternative to first-line OE in most cases, but with more frequent surveillance, especially for LN.

19 Review [Personalized cancer medicine : Biomarkers for molecular therapy stratification in pancreatic carcinoma]. 2018

Ormanns, S. ·Pathologisches Institut, Medizinische Fakultät, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Thalkirchner Straße 36, 80337, München, Deutschland. steffen.ormanns@med.uni-muenchen.de. ·Pathologe · Pubmed #30361776.

ABSTRACT: Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas has a very poor prognosis and a rising incidence. Even after curative intent resection, which is possible in a minority of patients, most patients relapse, whereas the majority is diagnosed with inoperable or metastatic disease. That's why palliative systemic chemotherapy is the current therapeutic mainstay. Biomarker-based tumor characterization could identify potential therapy targets and enable a personalized cancer medicine. Although potentially targetable alterations occur at very low frequencies, the possible impact on patient outcome can be significant. This article summarizes some of the contributions to these aspects and gives an outlook on their clinical meaning.

20 Review Evaluation of the methodological quality of articles on autologous breast reconstruction. 2018

Schülein, Stefanie / Taylor, Katherine J / Braun, Bettina / Heyl, Volker / Zoche, Hermann / Peek, Alberto / Solbach, Christine / Schott, Sarah / Blettner, Maria / Klug, Stefanie J. ·Epidemiology, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Technical University of Munich, Georg-Brauchle-Ring 56, 80992 Munich, Germany. · Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg University, Obere Zahlbacher Strasse 69, 55131 Mainz, Germany. · Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building D3, 48149 Münster, Germany. · Mic.ma.mainz, Center of Medicine for Minimally Invasive Surgery, Senology and Oncology, Rheinstrasse 4, 55116 Mainz, Germany. · Gynecology Clinic, Regiomed-Clinic, Ketschendorfer Strasse 33, 96450 Coburg, Germany. · Group Practice for Plastic Surgery, Oeder Weg 2-4, 60318 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. · Senology and Breast Center, Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Frankfurt, Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. · University Women's Clinic, Im Neuenheimer Feld 440, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), NCT Heidelberg and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. · Epidemiology, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Technical University of Munich, Georg-Brauchle-Ring 56, 80992 Munich, Germany. Electronic address: sekretariat.klug@tum.de. ·J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg · Pubmed #30173715.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Breast cancer remains the most common cancer among women worldwide. Autologous breast reconstruction may contribute toward restoring body image and improving quality of life after mastectomy. This systematic literature review describes differences in the quality and type of studies investigating autologous breast reconstruction techniques over time. METHODS: MEDLINE was searched for articles related to the surgical techniques, namely, TRAM, LADO, DIEP, and SGAP/IGAP, for the periods 1970 to 2007 and 2008 to 2010. The quality and type of studies were compared across the two time periods. Full-texts were evaluated according to prespecified quality criteria. RESULTS: The MEDLINE searches yielded 1,057 articles for review; of them, 517 articles were excluded, and 314 had a completed quality criteria checklist and hence were included; of these 314 articles, 206 articles investigated TRAM flaps, 85 investigated LADO flaps, 74 investigated DIEP flaps, and 6 investigated SGAP/IGAP flaps. A total of 218 articles were published between 1970 and 2007 compared to 96 articles published between 2008 and 2010. The comparison of quality scores between the two time periods showed a shift toward higher scores in the period 2008 to 2010. The DIEP technique was investigated more frequently between 2008 and 2010 than between 1970 and 2007, whereas the percentage of articles focusing on the TRAM flap decreased. The percentage of articles investigating the LADO and SGAP/IGAP techniques remained constant across the time periods. CONCLUSIONS: Results relating to the methodological quality of articles on breast reconstruction with autologous tissue show that the quality of publications has improved with time, whereas research interests concerning the type of surgical technique investigated have changed in focus.

21 Review Biophysical and photobiological basics of water-filtered infrared-A hyperthermia of superficial tumors. 2018

Vaupel, Peter / Piazena, Helmut / Müller, Werner / Notter, Markus. ·a Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy , Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München (TUM) , München , Germany. · b Medical Photobiology Group, Department of Internal Medicine , Charité University Medicine , Berlin , Germany. · c Physical Optics Consultant Office , Wetzlar , Germany. · d Department of Radiation Oncology , Lindenhofspital , Bern , Switzerland. ·Int J Hyperthermia · Pubmed #29745269.

ABSTRACT: Thermography-controlled, water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) is a novel, effective and approved heating technique listed in the ESHO quality assurance guidelines for superficial hyperthermia clinical trials (2017). In order to assess the special features and the potential of wIRA-hyperthermia (wIRA-HT), detailed and updated information about its physical and photobiological background is presented. wIRA allows for (a) application of high irradiances without skin pain and acute grade 2-4 skin toxicities, (b) prolonged, therapeutically relevant exposure times using high irradiances (150-200 mW/cm

22 Review Updated standard operating procedures for electrochemotherapy of cutaneous tumours and skin metastases. 2018

Gehl, Julie / Sersa, Gregor / Matthiessen, Louise Wichmann / Muir, Tobian / Soden, Declan / Occhini, Antonio / Quaglino, Pietro / Curatolo, Pietro / Campana, Luca G / Kunte, Christian / Clover, A James P / Bertino, Giulia / Farricha, Victor / Odili, Joy / Dahlstrom, Karin / Benazzo, Marco / Mir, Lluis M. ·a Center for Experimental Drug and Gene Electrotransfer (C*EDGE), Department of Clinical Oncology and Palliative Care , Zealand University Hospital , Roskilde , Denmark. · b Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences , University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark. · c Department of Oncology Herlev and Gentofte Hospital , University of Copenhagen , Herlev , Denmark. · d Department of Experimental Oncology , Institute of Oncology Ljubljana , Ljubljana , Slovenia. · e South Tees NHS Foundation Trust , James Cook University Hospital , Middlesbrough , UK. · f Cork Cancer Research Centre , Western Gateway Building University College Cork , Cork , Ireland. · g Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery , University of Pavia - IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation , Pavia , Italy. · h Department of Medical Sciences , Dermatologic Clinic, University of Turin , Turin , Italy. · i Department of Dermatology and Plastic Surgery , La Sapienza University , Roma , Italy. · j Department of Surgery Oncology and Gastroenterology (DISCOG) , University of Padova , Padova , Italy. · k Surgical Oncology Unit , Veneto Institute of Oncology IRCCS , Padova , Italy. · l Department of Dermatologic Surgery and Dermatology , Artemed Fachklinik München , Munich , Germany. · m Department of Dermatology and Allergology , Ludwig-Maximillian University , Munich , Germany. · n Department of Plastic Surgery , Cork University Hospital , Cork , Ireland. · o Melanoma and Sarcoma Unit Department of Surgery , Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Rua Professor Lima Basto, Faculty of Medicine of Lisbon , Lisbon , Portugal. · p Department of Plastic Surgery , St. George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust , London , UK. · q Department of Plastic Surgery , Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark. · r Vectorology and Anticancer Therapies , UMR 8203, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Gustave Roussy, Université Paris-Saclay , Villejuif , France. ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #29577784.

ABSTRACT: Electrochemotherapy is now in routine clinical use to treat cutaneous metastases of any histology, and is listed in national and international guidelines for cutaneous metastases and primary skin cancer. Electrochemotherapy is used by dermatologists, surgeons, and oncologists, and for different degrees and manifestations of metastases to skin and primary skin tumours not amenable to surgery. This treatment utilises electric pulses to permeabilize cell membranes in tumours, thus allowing a dramatic increase of the cytotoxicity of anti-cancer agents. Response rates, often after only one treatment, are very high across all tumour types. The most frequent indications are cutaneous metastases from malignant melanoma and breast cancer. In 2006, standard operating procedures (SOPs) were written for this novel technology, greatly facilitating introduction and dissemination of the therapy. Since then considerable experience has been obtained treating a wider range of tumour histologies and increasing size of tumours which was not originally thought possible. A pan-European expert panel drawn from a range of disciplines from dermatology, general surgery, head and neck surgery, plastic surgery, and oncology met to form a consensus opinion to update the SOPs based on the experience obtained. This paper contains these updated recommendations for indications for electrochemotherapy, pre-treatment information and evaluation, treatment choices, as well as follow-up.

23 Review Epigenome-based cancer risk prediction: rationale, opportunities and challenges. 2018

Widschwendter, Martin / Jones, Allison / Evans, Iona / Reisel, Daniel / Dillner, Joakim / Sundström, Karin / Steyerberg, Ewout W / Vergouwe, Yvonne / Wegwarth, Odette / Rebitschek, Felix G / Siebert, Uwe / Sroczynski, Gaby / de Beaufort, Inez D / Bolt, Ineke / Cibula, David / Zikan, Michal / Bjørge, Line / Colombo, Nicoletta / Harbeck, Nadia / Dudbridge, Frank / Tasse, Anne-Marie / Knoppers, Bartha M / Joly, Yann / Teschendorff, Andrew E / Pashayan, Nora / Anonymous1571201. ·Department of Women's Cancer, Institute for Women's Health, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Karolinska University Laboratory, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Center for Medical Decision Sciences, Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, LUMC, Leiden, Netherlands. · Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Harding Center for Risk Literacy, Berlin, Germany. · Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Center for Adaptive Rationality, Berlin, Germany. · Institute of Public Health, Medical Decision Making and Health Technology Assessment, Department of Public Health, Health Services Research, and HTA, UMIT-University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall in Tirol, Austria. · Harvard T. C. Chan School of Public Health, Center for Health Decision Science, Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston, MA, USA. · Oncotyrol: Center for Personalized Medicine, Innsbruck, Austria. · Department of Medical Ethics and Philosophy of Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, First Medical Faculty of the Charles University and General Faculty Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, and Centre for Cancer Biomarkers, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · European Institute of Oncology and University Milan-Bicocca, Milan, Italy. · Breast Center, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, University of Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany. · Department of Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. · Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK. · Public Population Project in Genomics and Society, McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Canada. · Centre of Genomics and Policy, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. · Department of Applied Health Research, Institute of Epidemiology and Healthcare, University College London, UK. ·Nat Rev Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29485132.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of cancer is continuing to rise and risk-tailored early diagnostic and/or primary prevention strategies are urgently required. The ideal risk-predictive test should: integrate the effects of both genetic and nongenetic factors and aim to capture these effects using an approach that is both biologically stable and technically reproducible; derive a score from easily accessible biological samples that acts as a surrogate for the organ in question; and enable the effectiveness of risk-reducing measures to be monitored. Substantial evidence has accumulated suggesting that the epigenome and, in particular, DNA methylation-based tests meet all of these requirements. However, the development and implementation of DNA methylation-based risk-prediction tests poses considerable challenges. In particular, the cell type specificity of DNA methylation and the extensive cellular heterogeneity of the easily accessible surrogate cells that might contain information relevant to less accessible tissues necessitates the use of novel methods in order to account for these confounding issues. Furthermore, the engagement of the scientific community with health-care professionals, policymakers and the public is required in order to identify and address the organizational, ethical, legal, social and economic challenges associated with the routine use of epigenetic testing.

24 Review [Endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes]. 2018

Reisch, N / Reincke, M. ·Medizinische Klinik IV, Klinikum der Universität München, Ziemssenstr. 1, 80336, München, Deutschland. nicole.reisch@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Medizinische Klinik IV, Klinikum der Universität München, Ziemssenstr. 1, 80336, München, Deutschland. ·Internist (Berl) · Pubmed #29387897.

ABSTRACT: Endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes result from the production of bioactive substances from neoplastic cells, of endocrine or neuroendocrine origin. Typically these are located in the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, thyroid gland, adrenal medulla, skin, prostate or breast. In endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes the secretion of peptides, amines or other bioactive substances is always ectopic and not related to the anatomical source. The clinical presentation, however, is indistinguishable from a suspected eutopic endocrine tumor posing a diagnostic challenge. The most common endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes are based on the secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) resulting in hyponatremia, secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or rarely corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) resulting in Cushing syndrome as well as secretion of growth hormone-releasing hormone resulting in acromegaly. Paraneoplastic endocrine syndromes mainly occur in highly malignant tumors; however, the development of these tumors does not necessarily correlate with tumor stage, malignant potential or prognosis. As endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes are a rare complication, there are hardly any evidence-based therapeutic recommendations. Treatment of the underlying tumor is the first choice and in a palliative setting symptomatic therapy is possible.

25 Review The Role of micro RNAs in Breast Cancer Metastasis: Preclinical Validation and Potential Therapeutic Targets. 2018

Weidle, Ulrich H / Dickopf, Steffen / Hintermair, Corinna / Kollmorgen, Gwendlyn / Birzele, Fabian / Brinkmann, Ulrich. ·Roche Pharma Research and Early Development, Roche Innovation Center Munich, Penzberg, Germany ulrich.brinkmann@roche.com weidle49@t-online.de. · Roche Pharma Research and Early Development, Large Molecule Research, Roche Innovation Center Munich, Penzberg, Germany. · Helmholtz Zentrum, Molecular Epigenetics, Munich, Germany. · Roche Pharma Research and Early Development, Roche Innovation Center Munich, Penzberg, Germany. · Roche Pharma Research and Early Development, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Roche Innovation Center Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Roche Pharma Research and Early Development, Large Molecule Research, Roche Innovation Center Munich, Penzberg, Germany ulrich.brinkmann@roche.com weidle49@t-online.de. ·Cancer Genomics Proteomics · Pubmed #29275360.

ABSTRACT: Despite the approval of several molecular therapies in the last years, breast cancer-associated death ranks as the second highest in women. This is due to metastatic disease, which represents a challenge for treatment. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of metastasis is, therefore, of paramount importance. In this review we summarize the role of micro RNAs (miRs) involved in metastasis of breast cancer. We present an overview on metastasis-promoting, -suppressing and context-dependent miRs with both activities. We have categorized the corresponding miRs according to their target classes, interaction with stromal cells or exosomes. The pathways affected by individual miRs are outlined in regard to in vitro properties, activity in metastasis-related in vivo models and clinical significance. Current approaches that may be suitable for therapeutic inhibition or restauration of miR activity are outlined. Finally, we discuss the delivery bottlenecks which present as a major challenge in nucleic acid (miR)-based therapies.

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