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Bronchiolitis Obliterans HELP
Based on 1,530 articles published since 2008
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These are the 1530 published articles about Bronchiolitis Obliterans that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline An international ISHLT/ATS/ERS clinical practice guideline: diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. 2014

Meyer, Keith C / Raghu, Ganesh / Verleden, Geert M / Corris, Paul A / Aurora, Paul / Wilson, Kevin C / Brozek, Jan / Glanville, Allan R / Anonymous4900810 / Anonymous4910810. ·School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA kcm@medicine.wisc.edu. · School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, UK. · Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. · McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · The Lung Transplant Unit, St Vincents Hospital, Sydney, Australia. ·Eur Respir J · Pubmed #25359357.

ABSTRACT: Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is a major complication of lung transplantation that is associated with poor survival. The International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society convened a committee of international experts to describe and/or provide recommendations for 1) the definition of BOS, 2) the risk factors for developing BOS, 3) the diagnosis of BOS, and 4) the management and prevention of BOS. A pragmatic evidence synthesis was performed to identify all unique citations related to BOS published from 1980 through to March, 2013. The expert committee discussed the available research evidence upon which the updated definition of BOS, identified risk factors and recommendations are based. The committee followed the GRADE (Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach to develop specific clinical recommendations. The term BOS should be used to describe a delayed allograft dysfunction with persistent decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s that is not caused by other known and potentially reversible causes of post-transplant loss of lung function. The committee formulated specific recommendations about the use of systemic corticosteroids, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, azithromycin and about re-transplantation in patients with suspected and confirmed BOS. The diagnosis of BOS requires the careful exclusion of other post-transplant complications that can cause delayed lung allograft dysfunction, and several risk factors have been identified that have a significant association with the onset of BOS. Currently available therapies have not been proven to result in significant benefit in the prevention or treatment of BOS. Adequately designed and executed randomised controlled trials that properly measure and report all patient-important outcomes are needed to identify optimal therapies for established BOS and effective strategies for its prevention.

2 Editorial Lung transplantation and esophageal dysfunction. 2018

Ruiz de León San Juan, Antonio. ·Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Cínico San Carlos, España. ·Rev Esp Enferm Dig · Pubmed #29807435.

ABSTRACT: Lung transplants belong in the group of organ transplants with poorer outcomes, with acute rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans being cited as major causes of this. Poor allograft evolution has been associated with multiple factors, including those related to esophagogastric disease. In patients with end-stage pulmonary conditions eligible for a lung transplant gastroesophageal reflux (GER), esophageal dysmotily, and gastroparesis are highly prevalent and worsen upon transplantation, which may compromise transplant viability. High-resolution impedance manometry and long-term impedance pH-metry studies provide a new perspective where reflux and dysmotility share the limelight with changes in the diagnostic approach and in potential therapies.

3 Editorial Physiology of chronic lung allograft dysfunction: back to the future? 2017

Glanville, Allan R. ·The Lung Transplant Unit, St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia allan.glanville@svha.org.au. ·Eur Respir J · Pubmed #28404654.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Spirometry States the Obvious: Recognizing Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome Early after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. 2016

Belloli, Elizabeth A / Lama, Vibha N. ·Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. ·Ann Am Thorac Soc · Pubmed #27831809.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Phenotypes of Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction: Getting Closer Step by Step? 2016

Verleden, S E / Vanaudenaerde, B M / Vos, R / Verleden, G M. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Laboratory for Respiratory Diseases, Lung Transplantation Unit, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (University of Leuven), Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Respiratory Diseases, Lung Transplantation Unit, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (University of Leuven), University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Respiratory Diseases, Lung Transplantation Unit, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (University of Leuven), University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. geert.verleden@uzleuven.be. ·Am J Transplant · Pubmed #27305458.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Novel effect of rapamycin on experimental obliterative bronchiolitis. 2016

Walters, Dustin M / Mulligan, Michael S. ·Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, the University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Wash. · Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, the University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Wash. Electronic address: msmmd@u.washington.edu. ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #26806507.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Harnessing regulatory B cells to prevent experimental obliterative bronchiolitis. 2016

Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang / Brüstle, Karina / Weder, Walter. ·Division of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address: wolfgang.jungraithmayr@usz.ch. · Division of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #26520010.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Is bronchiolitis obliterans after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation reversible? 2015

Peters, Steve G. ·1 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Mayo Clinic Rochester, Minnesota. ·Am J Respir Crit Care Med · Pubmed #26029830.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Are the antimicrobial properties of macrolides required for their therapeutic efficacy in chronic neutrophilic airway diseases? 2015

Brusselle, Guy G. ·Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium Department of Epidemiology and Respiratory Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. ·Thorax · Pubmed #25870311.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Intragraft regulatory T cells and lung transplant outcomes--we are still at square one. 2015

Neujahr, David C. ·Emory University Lung Transplant Program, Atlanta, GA, 303022, USA. dneujah@emory.edu. ·Clin Transplant · Pubmed #25757045.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial What we expected all along: Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome is not specific for bronchiolitis obliterans in pediatric lung transplantation! 2015

Benden, Christian. ·Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address: christian_benden@yahoo.de. ·J Heart Lung Transplant · Pubmed #25727772.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Dangerous liaisons? Gastroesophageal reflux disease and organizing pneumonia. 2015

Drakopanagiotakis, Fotios. · ·Respiration · Pubmed #25720852.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial New humanized mouse model of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. 2015

Anegon, Ignacio. ·1 INSERM UMR 1064-Center for Research in Transplantation and Immunology-ITUN Nantes, France. (ianegon@nantes.inserm.fr). ·Transplantation · Pubmed #25695785.

ABSTRACT: Humanized animals are transplanted with human tissues and cells to study their behavior as they do in the human body. This commentary briefly summarizes the recent developments and discusses the limitations of these humanized animal models.

14 Editorial Matrix metalloproteinases and bronchiolitis obliterans: Wrapping the enigma in a riddle. 2015

Denlinger, Chadrick E. ·Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. Electronic address: denlinge@musc.edu. ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #25618413.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Restrictive chronic lung allograft dysfunction: Where are we now? 2015

Verleden, Stijn E / Ruttens, David / Vandermeulen, Elly / Bellon, Hannelore / Van Raemdonck, Dirk E / Dupont, Lieven J / Vanaudenaerde, Bart M / Verleden, Geert / Vos, Robin. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Laboratory of Pneumology, Lung Transplant Unit, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and University Hospitals, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: stijn.verleden@med.kuleuven.be. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Laboratory of Pneumology, Lung Transplant Unit, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and University Hospitals, Leuven, Belgium. ·J Heart Lung Transplant · Pubmed #25577564.

ABSTRACT: Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) remains a frequent and troublesome complication after lung transplantation. Apart from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), a restrictive phenotype of CLAD (rCLAD) has recently been recognized, which occurs in approximately 30% of CLAD patients. The main characteristics of rCLAD include a restrictive pulmonary function pattern with a persistent decline in lung function (FEV1, FVC and TLC), persistent parenchymal infiltrates and (sub)pleural thickening on chest CT scan, as well as pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis and obliterative bronchiolitis on histopathologic examination. Once diagnosed, median survival is only 6 to 18 months compared with 3 to 5 years with BOS. In this perspective we review the historic evidence for rCLAD and describe the different diagnostic criteria and prognosis. Furthermore, we elaborate on the typical radiologic and histopathologic presentations of rCLAD and highlight risk factors and mechanisms. Last, we summarize some opportunities for further research including the urgent need for adequate therapy. In this perspective we not only assess the current knowledge, but also clarify the existing gaps in understanding this increasingly recognized complication after lung transplantation.

16 Editorial Growing old(er) with postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans. 2015

Cullinan, Paul / Bush, Andrew. ·Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK. · Department of Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton Hospital and Imperial College, London, UK. ·Thorax · Pubmed #25414199.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Are we near to an effective drug treatment for bronchiolitis obliterans? 2014

Verleden, Geert M / Vos, Robin / Dupont, Lieven / Van Raemdonck, Dirk E / Vanaudenaerde, Bart M / Verleden, Stijn E. ·KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Lab of Pneumology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , B-3000 Leuven , Belgium. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #25154562.

ABSTRACT: Lung transplantation remains the only effective therapeutic option for well-selected patients with end-stage (cardio) pulmonary diseases such as emphysema, cystic fibrosis, lung fibrosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Although the results have improved lately, the long-term survival is still far behind other organ transplantations. This is mainly due to the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), with bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) being the most frequent manifestation and restrictive CLAD or restrictive allograft syndrome (RAS) being a rather novel distinct entity, with a worse survival. Although the pathology of BO has been well described, this is not an obvious diagnosis after lung transplantation, because of the low sensitivity of transbronchial biopsies to detect BO. As a consequence, BO syndrome (BOS), the clinical correlate of BO, characterized by a progressive and obstructive decline in FEV1, has been introduced and is used worldwide to describe patients affected by this condition. BOS is the major long-term problem after lung transplantation, occurring in some 50% of patients within 5 years after the transplant procedure and causing up to 30% of late mortality between 3 and 5 years after transplantation. Its treatment remains very difficult, although recent advances have certainly improved the survival after diagnosis of BOS. We will here review the current therapeutic options to try to prevent BOS on the one hand and to treat BOS on the other hand.

18 Editorial Time to reconsider transplant criteria for candidacy? Lung transplantation feasibility in HIV-infected patients. 2014

George, M Patricia. ·Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ·Ann Am Thorac Soc · Pubmed #25032871.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Diagnosing organizing pneumonia: Limitations of radiology and pathology. 2014

Bilawich, A M / Churg, A. ·Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital & University of British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Vancouver General Hospital & University of British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: achurg@interchange.ubc.ca. ·Rev Clin Esp (Barc) · Pubmed #24726193.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Prediction of chronic lung allograft dysfunction: a systems medicine challenge. 2014

Pison, Christophe / Magnan, Antoine / Botturi, Karine / Sève, Michel / Brouard, Sophie / Marsland, Benjamin J / Ernst, Florian / Paprotka, Tobias / Deplanche, Kevin / Fritz, Andreas / Siroux, Valérie / Boissel, Jean-Pierre / Corris, Paul A / Auffray, Charles / Nicod, Laurent P / Anonymous4930786. ·Pôle de Cancérologie, Médecine Aiguë et Communautaire, CHU Grenoble. ·Eur Respir J · Pubmed #24585866.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Assessing the cells in the lung lavage: an untapped resource in lung transplant monitoring. 2014

Neujahr, D C. ·Emory University Transplant Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ·Am J Transplant · Pubmed #24447821.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial A new classification system for chronic lung allograft dysfunction. 2014

Verleden, Geert M / Raghu, Ganesh / Meyer, Keith C / Glanville, Allan R / Corris, Paul. ·University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Lung Transplantation Unit, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: geert.verleden@uzleuven.be. · University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin. · The Lung Transplant Unit, St Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Australia. · Department of Respiratory Medicine, Institute of Transplantation and Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University and The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. ·J Heart Lung Transplant · Pubmed #24374027.

ABSTRACT: Although survival after lung transplantation has improved significantly during the last decade, chronic rejection is thought to be the major cause of late mortality. The physiologic hallmark of chronic rejection has been a persistent fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second associated with an obstructive ventilatory defect, for which the term bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) was defined to allow a uniformity of description and grading of severity throughout the world. Although BOS was generally thought to be irreversible, recent evidence suggests that some patients with BOS may respond to azithromycin with > 10% improvement in their forced expiratory volume in 1 second. In addition, a restrictive form of chronic rejection has recently been described that does not fit the strict definition of BOS as an obstructive defect. Hence, the term chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) has been introduced to cover all forms of graft dysfunction, but CLAD has yet to be defined. We propose a definition of CLAD and a flow chart that may facilitate recognition of the different phenotypes of CLAD that can complicate the clinical course of lung transplant recipients.

23 Editorial Extended recipients but not extended donors are associated with poor outcomes following lung transplantation. 2014

Moreno, Paula / Alvarez, Antonio / Santos, Francisco / Vaquero, José Manuel / Baamonde, Carlos / Redel, Javier / Cerezo, Francisco / Algar, Francisco Javier / Salvatierra, Angel. ·Thoracic Surgery and Lung Transplantation Unit, University Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba, Spain Group for the Study of Thoracic Neoplasms and Lung Transplantation, IMIBIC (Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba), University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain pmoreno39@gmail.com. · Thoracic Surgery and Lung Transplantation Unit, University Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba, Spain Group for the Study of Thoracic Neoplasms and Lung Transplantation, IMIBIC (Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba), University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain. · Thoracic Surgery and Lung Transplantation Unit, University Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba, Spain. ·Eur J Cardiothorac Surg · Pubmed #24163362.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Extended donors (EDs) are safely used to increase the donor pool in lung transplantation (LT), but their influence in critically ill patients (extended recipients [ERs]) remains controversial. We compared LT outcomes matching optimal donors (ODs) or EDs with optimal recipients (ORs) or ERs. METHODS: Three hundred and sixty-five LTs were reviewed. ED criteria: age >55, PaO2/FiO2 < 350 mmHg, pulmonary infiltrates/purulent secretions and ischaemic times >6 h (single LT [SLT]) and >9 h (double LT [DLT]). ER criteria: pulmonary fibrosis or pulmonary hypertension, pretransplant intubation, age >60 years and bypass >2 h. Four groups were created: Group 1 (OD/OR), Group 2 (OD/ER), Group 3 (ED/OR) and Group 4 (ED/ER). Thirty-day mortality, primary graft dysfunction (PGD), onset of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), long-term survival and other transplant outcomes were compared between OD and ED, OR and ER and among the four groups of study. RESULTS: There were 151 SLTs and 214 DLTs. Donors: OD (n = 229) vs ED (n = 136); PGD 8 vs 10% (P = 0.43); 30-day mortality 19 vs 20% (P = 0.53) and survival (1, 5, 10 and 15 years) 67, 47, 34, 26 vs 69, 53, 46 and 29% (P = 0.33). Recipients: OR (n = 182) vs ER (n = 183); PGD 7 vs 10% (P = 0.10); 30-day mortality 15 vs 23% (P = 0.04) and survival (1, 5, 10 and 15 years): 73, 57, 46, 30 vs 61, 42, 29 and 23% (P = 0.002). Four donor/recipient (D/R) groups: Group 1 (n = 122), Group 2 (n = 106), Group 3 (n = 61), Group 4 (n = 76); PGD 10, 6, 3 and 16% (P = 0.05); 30-day mortality 13, 26, 19 and 20%, respectively (P = 0.13); survival (1, 5, 10 and 15 years) 74, 55, 44 and 35% (Group 1), 55, 39, 22 and 16% (Group 2), 70, 59, 48 and 26% (Group 3) and 68, 47, 37 and 22% (Group 4) (P = 0.004). No differences in the onset of BOS were observed among the four study groups. CONCLUSIONS: LT in critically ill recipients is associated with poor early and long-term outcomes, irrespective of the quality of the donor and length of ischaemic times.

24 Editorial Gastroesophageal reflux disease and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome: where are we today? 2013

Garrity, Edward R. · ·J Heart Lung Transplant · Pubmed #23701850.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Eosinophilic bronchiolitis: is it a new syndrome? 2013

Poletti, Venerino. · ·Eur Respir J · Pubmed #23633610.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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