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Bronchogenic Carcinoma HELP
Based on 33,328 articles published since 2008
|||| 34 

These are the 33328 published articles about Carcinoma, Bronchogenic that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline SEOM-SERAM-SEMNIM guidelines on the use of functional and molecular imaging techniques in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. 2018

Fernández Pérez, G / Sánchez Escribano, R / García Vicente, A M / Luna Alcalá, A / Ceballos Viro, J / Delgado Bolton, R C / Vilanova Busquets, J C / Sánchez Rovira, P / Fierro Alanis, M P / García Figueiras, R / Alés Martínez, J E. ·Departamento de Radiología, Hospital Universitario Río Hortega, Valladolid, España. · Departamento de Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario de Burgos, Burgos, España. · Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital General Universitario, Ciudad Real, España. · Clínica Las Nieves, Health Time, Jaén, España; Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, Estados Unidos. Electronic address: aluna70@htime.org. · Unidad de Oncología Médica, Hospital Nuestra Señora de Sonsoles, Complejo Asistencial de Ávila, Ávila, España. · Departamento de Diagnóstico por Imagen (Radiología) y Medicina Nuclear, Hospital de San Pedro y (CIBIR), Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, España. · Servicio de Radiología, Institut Català de la Salut (IDI), Girona, Clínica Girona, Girona, España. · Departamento de Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario de Jaén, Jaén, España. · Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España. · Departamento de Radiología, Complexo Hospitalario Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España. ·Radiologia · Pubmed #29807678.

ABSTRACT: Imaging in oncology is an essential tool for patient management but its potential is being profoundly underutilized. Each of the techniques used in the diagnostic process also conveys functional information that can be relevant in treatment decision making. New imaging algorithms and techniques enhance our knowledge about the phenotype of the tumor and its potential response to different therapies. Functional imaging can be defined as the one that provides information beyond the purely morphological data, and include all the techniques that make it possible to measure specific physiological functions of the tumor, whereas molecular imaging would include techniques that allow us to measure metabolic changes. Functional and molecular techniques included in this document are based on multi-detector computed tomography (CT), 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and hybrid equipments, integrating PET with CT (PET/CT) or MRI (PET-MRI). Lung cancer is one of the most frequent and deadly tumors although survival is increasing thanks to advances in diagnostic methods and new treatments. This increased survival poises challenges in terms of proper follow-up and definitions of response and progression, as exemplified by immune therapy-related pseudoprogression. In this consensus document, the use of functional and molecular imaging techniques will be addressed to exploit their current potential and explore future applications in the diagnosis, evaluation of response and detection of recurrence of advanced NSCLC.

2 Guideline ESTRO ACROP guidelines for target volume definition in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. 2018

Nestle, Ursula / De Ruysscher, Dirk / Ricardi, Umberto / Geets, Xavier / Belderbos, Jose / Pöttgen, Christoph / Dziadiuszko, Rafal / Peeters, Stephanie / Lievens, Yolande / Hurkmans, Coen / Slotman, Ben / Ramella, Sara / Faivre-Finn, Corinne / McDonald, Fiona / Manapov, Farkhad / Putora, Paul Martin / LePéchoux, Cécile / Van Houtte, Paul. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Kliniken Maria Hilf, Moenchengladbach, Germany; Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg, Germany. Electronic address: ursula.nestle@mariahilf.de. · Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (Maastro clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, The Netherlands; KU Leuven, Radiation Oncology, Belgium. · Department of Oncology, University of Turin, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc, MIRO - IREC Lab, UCL, Belgium. · Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, West German Tumor Centre, University of Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Germany. · Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdańsk, Poland. · Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (Maastro clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Belgium. · Catharina Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome, Italy. · University of Manchester & The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Department of Radiotherapy, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Germany. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Switzerland; Medical Faculty, University of Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France. · Department Radiation Oncology, Institut Bordet, Université Libre Bruxelles, Belgium. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #29605476.

ABSTRACT: Radiotherapy (RT) plays a major role in the curative treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, the ACROP committee was asked by the ESTRO to provide recommendations on target volume delineation for standard clinical scenarios in definitive (chemo)radiotherapy (RT) and adjuvant RT for locally advanced NSCLC. The guidelines given here are a result of the evaluation of a structured questionnaire followed by a consensus discussion, voting and writing procedure within the committee. Hence, we provide advice for methods and time-points of diagnostics and imaging before the start of treatment planning and for the mandatory and optional imaging to be used for planning itself. Concerning target volumes, recommendations are given for GTV delineation of primary tumour and lymph nodes followed by issues related to the delineation of CTVs for definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy. In the context of PTV delineation, recommendations about the management of geometric uncertainties and target motion are given. We further provide our opinions on normal tissue delineation and organisational and responsibility questions in the process of target volume delineation. This guideline intends to contribute to the standardisation and optimisation of the process of RT treatment planning for clinical practice and prospective studies.

3 Guideline [PD-L1 testing in non-small cell lung carcinoma: Guidelines from the PATTERN group of thoracic pathologists]. 2018

Lantuejoul, Sylvie / Adam, Julien / Girard, Nicolas / Duruisseaux, Mickael / Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey / Cazes, Aurélie / Rouquette, Isabelle / Gibault, Laure / Garcia, Stéphane / Antoine, Martine / Vignaud, Jean Michael / Galateau-Sallé, Françoise / Sagan, Christine / Badoual, Cécile / Penault-Llorca, Frédérique / Damotte, Diane / Anonymous5301006. ·Département de biopathologie et département de recherche translationnelle et d'innovations, centre Léon-Bérard UNICANCER, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France; Inserm U1209/CNRS 5309, Grenoble-Alpes université, Institute for Advanced Biosciences, 38700 La Tronche, France. Electronic address: sylvie.lantuejoul@lyon.unicancer.fr. · Département de biologie et pathologie médicales, Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif, France; Inserm U981, Gustave-Roussy, 94805 Villejuif, France. · Institut du thorax Curie-Montsouris, institut Curie, 75005 Paris, France; Université Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne, France. · Inserm 1052, CNRS 5286, centre de recherche en cancérologie de Lyon, institut de cancérologie des Hospices Civiles de Lyon (IC-HCL), service de pneumologie, hôpital Louis-Pradel, 69008 Lyon, France. · Département de pathologie, hôpital Cochin, université Paris Descartes, Assistance publique-hôpitaux de Paris, 74014 Paris, France. · Inserm UMR1152, département de pathologie, hôpital Bichat, université Paris Diderot, 75018 Paris, France. · Département de pathologie, IUCT Oncopôle, CHU de Toulouse, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Département de pathologie, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance publique-hôpitaux de Paris, 75015 Paris, France; Inserm UMR-S970, Paris centre de recherche cardiovasculaire, Georges-Pompidou European Hospital, 75015 Paris, France. · Département de Pathologie, hôpital Nord, Assistance publique-hôpitaux de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Université, CRCM, 13015 Marseille, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, hôpital Tenon AP-HP, 75020 Paris, France; UPMC université Paris 06, GRC n(o) 04, Theranoscan, 75252 Paris, France. · Département de pathologie, CHRU de Nancy, 54035 Nancy, France; Inserm 1256, université de Lorraine, 54505 Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · Centre National Référent MESOPATH, Base Clinicobiologique nationale MESOBANK, Registre multicentrique MESONAT centre Leon-Bérard, département de biopathologie, 69008 Lyon, France. · Inserm U1087, institut du Thorax, service d'anatomie et cytologique pathologiques, hôpital Hotel-Dieu, CHU de Nantes, 44093 Nantes, France. · UMR Inserm 1240 IMoST, Centre Jean-Perrin, département de pathologie, université Clermont-Auvergne, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand, France. ·Ann Pathol · Pubmed #29571563.

ABSTRACT: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in France with low response rates to conventional chemotherapy. Nevertheless, new therapies have emerged recently, among which PD1 immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI), such as nivolumab (OPDIVO

4 Guideline Appendix 8: Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (2): eUpdate published online 28 June 2017 (www.esmo.org/Guidelines/Lung-and-Chest-Tumours). 2017

Anonymous5000918. · ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28881929.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline Appendix 7: Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (1): MCBS eUpdate published online 28 June 2017 (www.esmo.org/Guidelines/Lung-and-Chest-Tumours). 2017

Anonymous4990918. · ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28881928.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. 2017

Postmus, P E / Kerr, K M / Oudkerk, M / Senan, S / Waller, D A / Vansteenkiste, J / Escriu, C / Peters, S / Anonymous4880918. ·The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre and Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Liverpool. · University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK. · Center for Medical Imaging, University of Groningen, Groningen. · Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK. · University Hospitals KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Oncology Department, Service d'Oncologie Médicale, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28881918.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline ESTRO ACROP consensus guideline on implementation and practice of stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripherally located early stage non-small cell lung cancer. 2017

Guckenberger, Matthias / Andratschke, Nicolaus / Dieckmann, Karin / Hoogeman, Mischa S / Hoyer, Morten / Hurkmans, Coen / Tanadini-Lang, Stephanie / Lartigau, Eric / Méndez Romero, Alejandra / Senan, Suresh / Verellen, Dirk. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address: matthias.guckenberger@usz.ch. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zürich, Switzerland. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille, France. · Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, UZ Brussel (VUB), Belgium. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #28687397.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become the standard of care for medically inoperable patients with peripherally located, early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and for those refusing surgical resection. Despite the availability of national and international guidelines, there exists substantial variability in many aspects of SBRT practice. METHODS: The ESTRO ACROP guideline is based on a questionnaire covering all aspects of SBRT implementation and practice (n=114 items). The questionnaire was answered by the 11 faculty members of the ESTRO course "Clinical practice and implementation of image-guided SBRT" and their 8 institutions. RESULTS: Agreement by >50% of the institutions was achieved in 72% of all items. Only 8/57 technologies and techniques were identified as mandatory for SBRT while 32/57 were considered as optional. In contrast, quality-assurance related elements were considered as mandatory in 12/24 items. A consensus of risk-adapted SBRT fractionation was achieved with 3×15Gy for peripherally located lesions and 4×12Gy (PTV D95-D99; D CONCLUSIONS: This ACROP guideline achieved detailed recommendations in all aspects of SBRT implementation and practice, which will contribute to further standardization of SBRT for peripherally located early stage NSCLC.

8 Guideline Adjuvant Systemic Therapy and Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Stages I to IIIA Resectable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancers: American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline Update Summary. 2017

Kris, Mark G / Gaspar, Laurie E / Chaft, Jamie E / Kennedy, Erin B. ·University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz, CO; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, NY; and American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #28441082.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline Adjuvant Systemic Therapy and Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Stage I to IIIA Completely Resected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancers: American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline Update. 2017

Kris, Mark G / Gaspar, Laurie E / Chaft, Jamie E / Kennedy, Erin B / Azzoli, Christopher G / Ellis, Peter M / Lin, Steven H / Pass, Harvey I / Seth, Rahul / Shepherd, Frances A / Spigel, David R / Strawn, John R / Ung, Yee C / Weyant, Michael. ·Mark G. Kris and Jamie E. Chaft, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center · Harvey I. Pass, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York · Rahul Seth, Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY · Laurie E. Gaspar and Michael Weyant, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO · Erin B. Kennedy, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Christopher G. Azzoli, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA · Steven H. Lin, MD Anderson Cancer Center · John R. Strawn, Patient Representative, Houston, TX · David R. Spigel, Sarah Cannon Cancer Center, Nashville, TN · Peter M. Ellis, Juravinski Cancer Center, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton · Frances A. Shepherd, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network · and Yee C. Ung, Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28437162.

ABSTRACT: Purpose The panel updated the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) adjuvant therapy guideline for resected non-small-cell lung cancers. Methods ASCO convened an update panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature, investigating adjuvant therapy in resected non-small-cell lung cancers. Results The updated evidence base covered questions related to adjuvant systemic therapy and included a systematic review conducted by Cancer Care Ontario current to January 2016. A recent American Society for Radiation Oncology guideline and systematic review, previously endorsed by ASCO, was used as the basis for recommendations for adjuvant radiation therapy. An update of these systematic reviews and a search for studies related to radiation therapy found no additional randomized controlled trials. Recommendations Adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy is recommended for routine use in patients with stage IIA, IIB, or IIIA disease who have undergone complete surgical resections. For individuals with stage IB, adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy is not recommended for routine use. However, a postoperative multimodality evaluation, including a consultation with a medical oncologist, is recommended to assess benefits and risks of adjuvant chemotherapy for each patient. The guideline provides information on factors other than stage to consider when making a recommendation for adjuvant chemotherapy, including tumor size, histopathologic features, and genetic alterations. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not recommended for patients with stage IA disease. Adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for patients with resected stage I or II disease. In patients with stage IIIA N2 disease, adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for routine use. However, a postoperative multimodality evaluation, including a consultation with a radiation oncologist, is recommended to assess benefits and risks of adjuvant radiation therapy for each patient with N2 disease. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/lung-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

10 Guideline Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Version 5.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2017

Ettinger, David S / Wood, Douglas E / Aisner, Dara L / Akerley, Wallace / Bauman, Jessica / Chirieac, Lucian R / D'Amico, Thomas A / DeCamp, Malcolm M / Dilling, Thomas J / Dobelbower, Michael / Doebele, Robert C / Govindan, Ramaswamy / Gubens, Matthew A / Hennon, Mark / Horn, Leora / Komaki, Ritsuko / Lackner, Rudy P / Lanuti, Michael / Leal, Ticiana A / Leisch, Leah J / Lilenbaum, Rogerio / Lin, Jules / Loo, Billy W / Martins, Renato / Otterson, Gregory A / Reckamp, Karen / Riely, Gregory J / Schild, Steven E / Shapiro, Theresa A / Stevenson, James / Swanson, Scott J / Tauer, Kurt / Yang, Stephen C / Gregory, Kristina / Hughes, Miranda. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #28404761.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Guidelines for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) focuses on targeted therapies and immunotherapies for metastatic NSCLC, because therapeutic recommendations are rapidly changing for metastatic disease. For example, new recommendations were added for atezolizumab, ceritinib, osimertinib, and pembrolizumab for the 2017 updates.

11 Guideline Recommendations for the Diagnosis and Management of Asbestos-Related Pleural and Pulmonary Disease. 2017

Diego Roza, Carmen / Cruz Carmona, M Jesús / Fernández Álvarez, Ramón / Ferrer Sancho, Jaume / Marín Martínez, Belén / Martínez González, Cristina / Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio / Romero Valero, Fernando / Villena Garrido, Victoria. ·Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Ferrol, La Coruña, España. Electronic address: Carmen.diego.roza@sergas.es. · Hospital Val d'Hebrón, Barcelona, España. · Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, España. · Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, España. · Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, España. · Hospital Universitario Puerta del Mar, Cádiz, España. · Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. ·Arch Bronconeumol · Pubmed #28279517.

ABSTRACT: Asbestos is the term used for a set of mineral silicates that tend to break up into fibers. Its use has been associated with numerous diseases affecting the lung and pleura in particular, all of which are characterized by their long period of latency. Asbestos, moreover, has been recognized by the WHO as a Group IA carcinogen since 1987 and its use was banned in Spain in 2002. The publication in 2013 of the 3rd edition of the specific asbestos health monitoring protocol, together with the development of new diagnostic techniques, prompted the SEPAR EROM group to sponsor publication of guidelines, which review the clinical, radiological and functional aspects of the different asbestos-related diseases. Recommendations have also been made for the diagnosis and follow-up of exposed patients. These recommendations were drawn up in accordance with the GRADE classification system.

12 Guideline Recommendations of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery on the diagnosis and treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer. 2016

Álvarez, Felipe Villar / Trueba, Ignacio Muguruza / Sanchis, José Belda / López-Rodó, Laureano Molins / Rodríguez Suárez, Pedro Miguel / de Cos Escuín, Julio Sánchez / Barreiro, Esther / Henar Borrego Pintado, M / Vicente, Carlos Disdier / Aldeyturriaga, Javier Flandes / Gámez García, Pablo / Garrido López, Pilar / León Atance, Pablo / Izquierdo Elena, José Miguel / Novoa Valentín, Nuria M / Rivas de Andrés, Juan José / Crespo, Íñigo Royo / Velázquez, Ángel Salvatierra / Seijo Maceiras, Luis M / Reina, Segismundo Solano / Bujanda, David Aguiar / Ávila Martínez, Régulo J / de Granda Orive, José Ignacio / Martínez, Eva de Higes / Gude, Vicente Díaz-Hellín / Flor, Raúl Embún / Freixinet Gilart, Jorge L / García Jiménez, María Dolores / Alarza, Fátima Hermoso / Sarmiento, Samuel Hernández / Honguero Martínez, Antonio Francisco / Jiménez Ruiz, Carlos A / Sanz, Iker López / Mariscal de Alba, Andrea / Martínez Vallina, Primitivo / Menal Muñoz, Patricia / Pérez, Laura Mezquita / Olmedo García, María Eugenia / Rombolá, Carlos A / Arregui, Íñigo San Miguel / Somiedo Gutiérrez, María Del Valle / Triviño Ramírez, Ana Isabel / Trujillo Reyes, Joan Carles / Vallejo, Carmen / Lozano, Paz Vaquero / Simó, Gonzalo Varela / Zulueta, Javier J. ·Servicio de Neumología, IIS Fundación Jiménez Díaz, UAM, CIBERES, Madrid, España. Electronic address: fvillarleon@yahoo.es. · Departamento de Cirugía Torácica, Hospitales Idcsalud, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Hospital Universitari Mútua Terrassa, Terrassa, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Instituto Clínic Respiratori, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria «Dr. Negrín», Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, España. · Sección de Neumología, Hospital San Pedro de Alcántara, Cáceres, España. · Grupo de Investigación en Desgaste Muscular y Caquexia en Enfermedades Crónicas Respiratorias y Cáncer de Pulmón, Instituto de Investigación del Hospital del Mar (IMIM)-Hospital del Mar, Departamento de Ciencias Experimentales y de la Salud (CEXS), Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Parc de Recerca Biomèdica de Barcelona (PRBB), Barcelona y Centro de Investigación en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Anatomía Patológica, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valladolid, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valladolid, España. · Unidad de Broncoscopias y Neumología Intervencionista, Servicio de Neumología, IIS Fundación Jiménez Díaz, UAM, CIBERES, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete, Albacete, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Hospital Universitario Donostia, San Sebastián, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa e IIS Aragón, Zaragoza, España. · Unidad de Cirugía Torácica y Trasplante Pulmonar, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, España. · Servicio de Neumología, IIS-Fundación Jiménez Díaz-CIBERES, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Tabaquismo, Servicio de Neumología, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria «Dr. Negrín», Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Fundación Hospital Alcorcón, Alcorcón, Madrid, España. · Unidad Especializada de Tabaquismo, Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid, España. · Servicio de Radiología, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, España. · Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria «Dr. Negrín», Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, España. · Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, España. ·Arch Bronconeumol · Pubmed #27389767.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline Executive summary of the SEPAR recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. 2016

Villar Álvarez, Felipe / Muguruza Trueba, Ignacio / Belda Sanchis, José / Molins López-Rodó, Laureano / Rodríguez Suárez, Pedro Miguel / Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio / Barreiro, Esther / Borrego Pintado, M Henar / Disdier Vicente, Carlos / Flandes Aldeyturriaga, Javier / Gámez García, Pablo / Garrido López, Pilar / León Atance, Pablo / Izquierdo Elena, José Miguel / Novoa Valentín, Nuria M / Rivas de Andrés, Juan José / Royo Crespo, Íñigo / Salvatierra Velázquez, Ángel / Seijo Maceiras, Luís M / Solano Reina, Segismundo / Aguiar Bujanda, David / Avila Martínez, Régulo J / de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio / de Higes Martinez, Eva / Diaz-Hellín Gude, Vicente / Embún Flor, Raúl / Freixinet Gilart, Jorge L / García Jiménez, María Dolores / Hermoso Alarza, Fátima / Hernández Sarmiento, Samuel / Honguero Martínez, Antonio Francisco / Jimenez Ruiz, Carlos A / López Sanz, Iker / Mariscal de Alba, Andrea / Martínez Vallina, Primitivo / Menal Muñoz, Patricia / Mezquita Pérez, Laura / Olmedo García, María Eugenia / Rombolá, Carlos A / San Miguel Arregui, Iñigo / de Valle Somiedo Gutiérrez, María / Triviño Ramírez, Ana Isabel / Trujillo Reyes, Joan Carles / Vallejo, Carmen / Vaquero Lozano, Paz / Varela Simó, Gonzalo / Zulueta, Javier J. ·Servicio de Neumología, IIS Fundación Jiménez Díaz, UAM, CIBERES, Madrid, España. Electronic address: fvillarleon@yahoo.es. · Departamento de Cirugía Torácica, Hospitales Idcsalud, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Hospital Universitari Mútua Terrassa, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Instituto Clínic Respiratori, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria «Dr. Negrín», España. · Sección de Neumología, Hospital San Pedro de Alcántara, Cáceres, España. · Grupo de Investigación en Desgaste Muscular y Caquexia en Enfermedades Crónicas Respiratorias y Cáncer de Pulmón, Instituto de Investigación del Hospital del Mar (IMIM)-Hospital del Mar, Departamento de Ciencias Experimentales y de la Salud (CEXS), Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Parc de Recerca Biomèdica de Barcelona (PRBB); Centro de Investigación en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Barcelona. España. · Servicio de Anatomía Patológica, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valladolid, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valladolid, España. · Unidad de Broncoscopias y Neumología Intervencionista, Servicio de Neumología, ISS Fundación Jiménez Díaz, UAM, CIBERES, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Hospital Universitario Donostia, España. · Servicio de Cirugía Torácica, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca, España. · Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa e IIS Aragón, Zaragoza, España. · Unidad de Cirugía Torácica y Trasplante Pulmonar, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, España. · Servicio de Neumología, IIS-Fundación Jiménez Díaz-CIBERES, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Tabaquismo, Servicio de Neumología H.G.U. Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria «Dr. Negrín», España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Fundación Hospital Alcorcón, Alcorcón, Madrid, España. · Unidad Especializada de Tabaquismo, Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid, España. · Servicio de Radiología, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, España. · Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria «Dr. Negrín», España. · Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, España. ·Arch Bronconeumol · Pubmed #27237592.

ABSTRACT: The Thoracic Surgery and Thoracic Oncology groups of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) have backed the publication of a handbook on recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Due to the high incidence and mortality of this disease, the best scientific evidence must be constantly updated and made available for consultation by healthcare professionals. To draw up these recommendations, we called on a wide-ranging group of experts from the different specialties, who have prepared a comprehensive review, divided into 4 main sections. The first addresses disease prevention and screening, including risk factors, the role of smoking cessation, and screening programs for early diagnosis. The second section analyzes clinical presentation, imaging studies, and surgical risk, including cardiological risk and the evaluation of respiratory function. The third section addresses cytohistological confirmation and staging studies, and scrutinizes the TNM and histological classifications, non-invasive and minimally invasive sampling methods, and surgical techniques for diagnosis and staging. The fourth and final section looks at different therapeutic aspects, such as the role of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, a multidisciplinary approach according to disease stage, and other specifically targeted treatments, concluding with recommendations on the follow-up of lung cancer patients and surgical and endoscopic palliative interventions in advanced stages.

14 Guideline Technical Aspects of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report. 2016

Wahidi, Momen M / Herth, Felix / Yasufuku, Kazuhiro / Shepherd, Ray Wesley / Yarmus, Lonny / Chawla, Mohit / Lamb, Carla / Casey, Kenneth R / Patel, Sheena / Silvestri, Gerard A / Feller-Kopman, David J. ·Duke University Medical Center, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Durham, NC. Electronic address: momen.wahidi@duke.edu. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Thoracic Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, VA. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Lahey Clinic Hospital, Burlington, MA. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. · CHEST, Glenview, IL. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. ·Chest · Pubmed #26402427.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) was introduced in the last decade, enabling real-time guidance of transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) of mediastinal and hilar structures and parabronchial lung masses. The many publications produced about EBUS-TBNA have led to a better understanding of the performance characteristics of this procedure. The goal of this document was to examine the current literature on the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA as they relate to patient, technology, and proceduralist factors to provide evidence-based and expert guidance to clinicians. METHODS: Rigorous methodology has been applied to provide a trustworthy evidence-based guideline and expert panel report. A group of approved panelists developed key clinical questions by using the PICO (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome) format that addressed specific topics on the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA. MEDLINE (via PubMed) and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched for relevant literature, which was supplemented by manual searches. References were screened for inclusion, and well-recognized document evaluation tools were used to assess the quality of included studies, to extract meaningful data, and to grade the level of evidence to support each recommendation or suggestion. RESULTS: Our systematic review and critical analysis of the literature on 15 PICO questions related to the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA resulted in 12 statements: 7 evidence-based graded recommendations and 5 ungraded consensus-based statements. Three questions did not have sufficient evidence to generate a statement. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence on the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA varies in strength but is satisfactory in certain areas to guide clinicians on the best conditions to perform EBUS-guided tissue sampling. Additional research is needed to enhance our knowledge regarding the optimal performance of this effective procedure.

15 Guideline [The Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Chinese Patients with sensitizing EGFR Mutation or ALK Fusion Gene-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (2015 Version)]. 2015

Anonymous2840856 / Anonymous2850856. · ·Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi · Pubmed #26813604.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) Guidelines for the Use of Systemic Therapy in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. 2015

Anonymous6760854. · ·Ann Acad Med Singapore · Pubmed #26763063.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The SCAN lung cancer workgroup aimed to develop Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) clinical practice guidelines for the use of systemic therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Singapore. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The workgroup utilised a modified ADAPTE process to calibrate high quality international evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to our local setting. RESULTS: Five international guidelines were evaluated- those developed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (2014), the European Society of Medical Oncology (2014), the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (2012), the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (2014) and Cancer Care Council Australia (2012). Recommendations on systemic treatment for advanced NSCLC were produced. CONCLUSION: These adapted guidelines form the SCAN guidelines 2015 for systemic therapy of advanced or metastatic NSCLC.

17 Guideline Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) Guidelines for Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. 2015

Anonymous6750854. · ·Ann Acad Med Singapore · Pubmed #26763062.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The SCAN lung cancer workgroup aimed to develop Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) clinical practice guidelines for the use of adjuvant systemic therapy for non-small cell lung cancer in Singapore. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The workgroup utilised a modified ADAPTE process to calibrate high quality international evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to our local setting. RESULTS: Five international guidelines were evaluated- those developed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (2014), European Society of Medical Oncology (2014), National Institute of Clinical Excellence (2012), Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (2014), and the Cancer Care Council Australia (2012). Recommendations on the selection of patients, chemotherapy regimen, treatment for stage I disease, treatment for positive margins and treatment options for pN2 disease with negative margins were produced. CONCLUSION: These adapted guidelines form the SCAN Guidelines 2015 for adjuvant systemic therapy of non-small cell lung cancer.

18 Guideline Systemic Therapy for Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update. 2015

Masters, Gregory A / Temin, Sarah / Azzoli, Christopher G / Giaccone, Giuseppe / Baker, Sherman / Brahmer, Julie R / Ellis, Peter M / Gajra, Ajeet / Rackear, Nancy / Schiller, Joan H / Smith, Thomas J / Strawn, John R / Trent, David / Johnson, David H / Anonymous1370841. ·Gregory A. Masters, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Newark, DE · Sarah Temin, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria · Sherman Baker Jr, Virginia Commonwealth University · David Trent, Virginia Cancer Center, Richmond, VA · Christopher G. Azzoli, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA · Giuseppe Giaccone, Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC · Julie R. Brahmer and Thomas J. Smith, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD · Peter M. Ellis, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada · Ajeet Gajra, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY · Nancy Rackear, Uniting Against Lung Cancer, Fort Lauderdale, FL · Joan H. Schiller, University of Texas Southwestern · David H. Johnson, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas · and John R. Strawn, patient representative, Houston, TX. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26324367.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To provide evidence-based recommendations to update the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline on systemic therapy for stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: An Update Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology NSCLC Expert Panel based recommendations on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials from January 2007 to February 2014. RESULTS: This guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is no cure for patients with stage IV NSCLC. For patients with performance status (PS) 0 to 1 (and appropriate patient cases with PS 2) and without an EGFR-sensitizing mutation or ALK gene rearrangement, combination cytotoxic chemotherapy is recommended, guided by histology, with early concurrent palliative care. Recommendations for patients in the first-line setting include platinum-doublet therapy for those with PS 0 to 1 (bevacizumab may be added to carboplatin plus paclitaxel if no contraindications); combination or single-agent chemotherapy or palliative care alone for those with PS 2; afatinib, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with sensitizing EGFR mutations; crizotinib for those with ALK or ROS1 gene rearrangement; and following first-line recommendations or using platinum plus etoposide for those with large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Maintenance therapy includes pemetrexed continuation for patients with stable disease or response to first-line pemetrexed-containing regimens, alternative chemotherapy, or a chemotherapy break. In the second-line setting, recommendations include docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed for patients with nonsquamous cell carcinoma; docetaxel, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with squamous cell carcinoma; and chemotherapy or ceritinib for those with ALK rearrangement who experience progression after crizotinib. In the third-line setting, for patients who have not received erlotinib or gefitinib, treatment with erlotinib is recommended. There are insufficient data to recommend routine third-line cytotoxic therapy. Decisions regarding systemic therapy should not be made based on age alone. Additional information can be found at http://www.asco.org/guidelines/nsclc and http://www.asco.org/guidelineswiki.

19 Guideline Expert Consensus on the Management of Adverse Events from EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in the UK. 2015

Califano, R / Tariq, N / Compton, S / Fitzgerald, D A / Harwood, C A / Lal, R / Lester, J / McPhelim, J / Mulatero, C / Subramanian, S / Thomas, A / Thatcher, N / Nicolson, M. ·Cancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK, raffaele.califano@christie.nhs.uk. ·Drugs · Pubmed #26187773.

ABSTRACT: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are standard-of-care for first-line treatment of EGFR-mutant advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These drugs have a proven benefit in terms of higher response rate, delaying progression and improvement of quality of life over palliative platinum-based chemotherapy. The most common adverse events (AEs) are gastrointestinal (GI) (diarrhoea and stomatitis/mucositis) and cutaneous (rash, dry skin and paronychia). These are usually mild, but if they become moderate or severe, they can have a negative impact on the patient's quality of life (QOL) and lead to dose modifications or drug discontinuation. Appropriate management of AEs, including prophylactic measures, supportive medications, treatment delays and dose reductions, is essential. A consensus meeting of a UK-based multidisciplinary panel composed of medical and clinical oncologists with a special interest in lung cancer, dermatologists, gastroenterologists, lung cancer nurse specialists and oncology pharmacists was held to develop guidelines on prevention and management of cutaneous (rash, dry skin and paronychia) and GI (diarrhoea, stomatitis and mucositis) AEs associated with the administration of EGFR-TKIs. These guidelines detail supportive measures, treatment delays and dose reductions for EGFR-TKIs. Although the focus of the guidelines is to support healthcare professionals in UK clinical practice, it is anticipated that the management strategies proposed will also be applicable in non-UK settings.

20 Guideline Combined endobronchial and oesophageal endosonography for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline, in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). 2015

Vilmann, Peter / Clementsen, Paul Frost / Colella, Sara / Siemsen, Mette / De Leyn, Paul / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Herth, Felix J / Larghi, Alberto / Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique / Hassan, Cesare / Crombag, Laurence / Korevaar, Daniël A / Konge, Lars / Annema, Jouke T. ·Dept of Surgical Gastroenterology, Endoscopy Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Copenhagen, Denmark Peter.Vilmann@regionh.dk. · Dept of Pulmonary Medicine, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark Centre for Clinical Education, University of Copenhagen and the Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Dept of Pulmonary Medicine, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark. · Dept of Thoracic Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Hospital Union, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Dept of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium. · Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Dept of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Dept of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Universidad de Alcala, Madrid, Spain. · Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Dept of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Centre for Clinical Education, University of Copenhagen and the Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Eur Respir J · Pubmed #26034128.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline Combined endobronchial and esophageal endosonography for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline, in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). 2015

Vilmann, Peter / Clementsen, Paul Frost / Colella, Sara / Siemsen, Mette / De Leyn, Paul / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Herth, Felix J / Larghi, Alberto / Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique / Hassan, Cesare / Crombag, Laurence / Korevaar, Daniël A / Konge, Lars / Annema, Jouke T. ·Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Endoscopy Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark. · Department of Thoracic Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Hospital Union, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium. · Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Respiratory Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Centre for Clinical Education, University of Copenhagen and the Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #26030890.

ABSTRACT: This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), produced in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). It addresses the benefit and burden associated with combined endobronchial and esophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) approach was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence.The article has been co-published with permission in the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and the European Respiratory Journal. Recommendations 1 For mediastinal nodal staging in patients with suspected or proven non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with abnormal mediastinal and/or hilar nodes at computed tomography (CT) and/or positron emission tomography (PET), endosonography is recommended over surgical staging as the initial procedure (Recommendation grade A). The combination of endobronchial ultrasound with real-time guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and endoscopic (esophageal) ultrasound with fine needle aspiration, with use of a gastrointestinal (EUS-FNA) or EBUS (EUS-B-FNA) scope, is preferred over either test alone (Recommendation grade C). If the combination of EBUS and EUS-(B) is not available, we suggest that EBUS alone is acceptable (Recommendation grade C).Subsequent surgical staging is recommended, when endosonography does not show malignant nodal involvement (Recommendation grade B). 2 For mediastinal nodal staging in patients with suspected or proven non-small-cell peripheral lung cancer without mediastinal involvement at CT or CT-PET, we suggest that EBUS-TBNA and/or EUS-(B)-FNA should be performed before therapy, provided that one or more of the following conditions is present: (i) enlarged or fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET-avid ipsilateral hilar nodes; (ii) primary tumor without FDG uptake; (iii) tumor size ≥ 3 cm (Fig. 3a - c) (Recommendation grade C). If endosonography does not show malignant nodal involvement, we suggest that mediastinoscopy is considered, especially in suspected N1 disease (Recommendation grade C).If PET is not available and CT does not reveal enlarged hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes, we suggest performance of EBUS-TBNA and/or EUS-(B)-FNA and/or surgical staging (Recommendation grade C). 3 In patients with suspected or proven < 3 cm peripheral NSCLC with normal mediastinal and hilar nodes at CT and/or PET, we suggest initiation of therapy without further mediastinal staging (Recommendation grade C). 4 For mediastinal staging in patients with centrally located suspected or proven NSCLC without mediastinal or hilar involvement at CT and/or CT-PET, we suggest performance of EBUS-TBNA, with or without EUS-(B)-FNA, in preference to surgical staging (Fig. 4) (Recommendation grade D). If endosonography does not show malignant nodal involvement, mediastinoscopy may be considered (Recommendation grade D). 5 For mediastinal nodal restaging following neoadjuvant therapy, EBUS-TBNA and/or EUS-(B)-FNA is suggested for detection of persistent nodal disease, but, if this is negative, subsequent surgical staging is indicated (Recommendation grade C). 6 A complete assessment of mediastinal and hilar nodal stations, and sampling of at least three different mediastinal nodal stations (4 R, 4 L, 7) (Fig. 1, Fig. 5) is suggested in patients with NSCLC and an abnormal mediastinum by CT or CT-PET (Recommendation grade D). 7 For diagnostic purposes, in patients with a centrally located lung tumor that is not visible at conventional bronchoscopy, endosonography is suggested, provided the tumor is located immediately adjacent to the larger airways (EBUS) or esophagus (EUS-(B)) (Recommendation grade D). 8 In patients with a left adrenal gland suspected for distant metastasis we suggest performance of endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) (Recommendation grade C), while the use of EUS-B with a transgastric approach is at present experimental (Recommendation grade D). 9 For optimal endosonographic staging of lung cancer, we suggest that individual endoscopists should be trained in both EBUS and EUS-B in order to perform complete endoscopic staging in one session (Recommendation grade D). 10 We suggest that new trainees in endosonography should follow a structured training curriculum consisting of simulation-based training followed by supervised practice on patients (Recommendation grade D). 11 We suggest that competency in EBUS-TBNA and EUS-(B)-FNA for staging lung cancer be assessed using available validated assessment tools (Recommendation Grade D).

22 Guideline Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Version 6.2015. 2015

Ettinger, David S / Wood, Douglas E / Akerley, Wallace / Bazhenova, Lyudmila A / Borghaei, Hossein / Camidge, David Ross / Cheney, Richard T / Chirieac, Lucian R / D'Amico, Thomas A / Demmy, Todd L / Dilling, Thomas J / Dobelbower, M Chris / Govindan, Ramaswamy / Grannis, Frederic W / Horn, Leora / Jahan, Thierry M / Komaki, Ritsuko / Krug, Lee M / Lackner, Rudy P / Lanuti, Michael / Lilenbaum, Rogerio / Lin, Jules / Loo, Billy W / Martins, Renato / Otterson, Gregory A / Patel, Jyoti D / Pisters, Katherine M / Reckamp, Karen / Riely, Gregory J / Rohren, Eric / Schild, Steven E / Shapiro, Theresa A / Swanson, Scott J / Tauer, Kurt / Yang, Stephen C / Gregory, Kristina / Hughes, Miranda / Anonymous6640829. ·The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; University of Washington/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fox Chase Cancer Center; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Moffitt Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; Stanford Cancer Institute; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #25964637.

ABSTRACT: These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates to the 2015 NCCN Guidelines for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Appropriate targeted therapy is very effective in patients with advanced NSCLC who have specific genetic alterations. Therefore, it is important to test tumor tissue from patients with advanced NSCLC to determine whether they have genetic alterations that make them candidates for specific targeted therapies. These NCCN Guidelines Insights describe the different testing methods currently available for determining whether patients have genetic alterations in the 2 most commonly actionable genetic alterations, notably anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements and sensitizing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations.

23 Guideline Adjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Executive summary of an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) evidence-based clinical practice guideline. 2015

Rodrigues, George / Choy, Hak / Bradley, Jeffrey / Rosenzweig, Kenneth E / Bogart, Jeffrey / Curran, Walter J / Gore, Elizabeth / Langer, Corey / Louie, Alexander V / Lutz, Stephen / Machtay, Mitchell / Puri, Varun / Werner-Wasik, Maria / Videtic, Gregory M M. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Radiation Oncology, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Radiation Oncology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Medical Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Blanchard Valley Health System, Findlay, Ohio. · Department of Radiation Oncology, UH Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. ·Pract Radiat Oncol · Pubmed #25957185.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To provide guidance to physicians and patients with regard to the use of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (RT) in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) based on available medical evidence complemented by consensus-based expert opinion. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A panel authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Board of Directors and Guidelines Subcommittee conducted 2 systematic reviews on the following topics: (1) indications for postoperative adjuvant RT and (2) indications for preoperative neoadjuvant RT. Practice guideline recommendations were approved using an a priori-defined consensus-building methodology supported by ASTRO and approved tools for the grading of evidence quality and the strength of guideline recommendations. RESULTS: For patients who have undergone surgical resection, high-level evidence suggests that use of postoperative RT does not influence survival, but optimizes local control for patients with N2 involvement, and its use in the setting of positive margins or gross primary/nodal residual disease is recommended. No high-level evidence exists for the routine use of preoperative induction chemoradiation therapy; however, modern surgical series and a post-hoc Intergroup 0139 clinical trial analysis suggest that a survival benefit may exist if patients are properly selected and surgical techniques/postoperative care is optimized. CONCLUSIONS: A consensus and evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the adjuvant radiotherapeutic management of LA NSCLC has been created addressing 2 important questions.

24 Guideline Definitive radiation therapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Executive summary of an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) evidence-based clinical practice guideline. 2015

Rodrigues, George / Choy, Hak / Bradley, Jeffrey / Rosenzweig, Kenneth E / Bogart, Jeffrey / Curran, Walter J / Gore, Elizabeth / Langer, Corey / Louie, Alexander V / Lutz, Stephen / Machtay, Mitchell / Puri, Varun / Werner-Wasik, Maria / Videtic, Gregory M M. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Radiation Oncology, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Radiation Oncology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Medical Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Blanchard Valley Health System, Findlay, Ohio. · Department of Radiation Oncology, UH Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. ·Pract Radiat Oncol · Pubmed #25957184.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To provide guidance to physicians and patients with regard to the use of definitive external beam radiation therapy (RT) in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) based on available medical evidence complemented by consensus-based expert opinion. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A panel authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Board of Directors and Guidelines Subcommittee conducted 3 systematic reviews on the following topics: (1) ideal radical RT dose fractionation for RT alone; (2) ideal radical RT dose fractionation for chemoradiation; and (3) ideal timing of radical radiation therapy with systemic chemotherapy. Practice guideline recommendations were approved using an a priori-defined consensus-building methodology supported by ASTRO and approved tools for the grading of evidence quality and the strength of guideline recommendations. RESULTS: For patients managed by RT alone, a minimum dose of 60 Gy of RT is recommended. Dose escalation beyond 60 Gy in the context of combined modality concurrent chemoradiation has not been found to be associated with any clinical benefits. In the context of combined modality therapy, chemotherapy and radiation should ideally be given concurrently to maximize survival, local control, and disease response rate. CONCLUSIONS: A consensus and evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the definitive radiotherapeutic management of LA NSCLC has been created that addresses 3 important questions.

25 Guideline 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer: locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. 2015

Eberhardt, W E E / De Ruysscher, D / Weder, W / Le Péchoux, C / De Leyn, P / Hoffmann, H / Westeel, V / Stahel, R / Felip, E / Peters, S / Anonymous5570827. ·Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Centre, University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Ruhrlandklinik, Essen, Germany. · Department of Radiation Oncology, KU Leuven-University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Division of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Gustave Roussy Cancer Institute, Villejuif, France. · Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospitals, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Thoracic Surgery, Thoraxklinik, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Chest Disease, University Hospital, Besançon, France. · Clinic of Oncology, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · Département d'Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #25897013.

ABSTRACT: To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organises consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. The 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference on Lung Cancer was held on 11-12 May 2013 in Lugano. A total of 35 experts met to address several questions on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in each of four areas: pathology and molecular biomarkers, first-line/second and further lines of treatment in advanced disease, early-stage disease and locally advanced disease. For each question, recommendations were made including reference to the grade of recommendation and level of evidence. This consensus paper focuses on locally advanced disease.

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