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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: HELP
Articles from Alabama
Based on 6 articles published since 2010
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These are the 6 published articles about Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic that originated from Alabama during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Evidence of widespread metabolite abnormalities in Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: assessment with whole-brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 2020

Mueller, Christina / Lin, Joanne C / Sheriff, Sulaiman / Maudsley, Andrew A / Younger, Jarred W. ·Department of Psychology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave S, Birmingham, AL, 35294, USA. · Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1600 NW 10th Ave #1140, Miami, FL, 33136, USA. · Department of Psychology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave S, Birmingham, AL, 35294, USA. younger@uab.edu. ·Brain Imaging Behav · Pubmed #30617782.

ABSTRACT: Previous neuroimaging studies have detected markers of neuroinflammation in patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS). Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is suitable for measuring brain metabolites linked to inflammation, but has only been applied to discrete regions of interest in ME/CFS. We extended the MRS analysis of ME/CFS by capturing multi-voxel information across the entire brain. Additionally, we tested whether MRS-derived brain temperature is elevated in ME/CFS patients. Fifteen women with ME/CFS and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls completed fatigue and mood symptom questionnaires and whole-brain echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI). Choline (CHO), myo-inositol (MI), lactate (LAC), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) were quantified in 47 regions, expressed as ratios over creatine (CR), and compared between ME/CFS patients and controls using independent-samples t-tests. Brain temperature was similarly tested between groups. Significant between-group differences were detected in several regions, most notably elevated CHO/CR in the left anterior cingulate (p < 0.001). Metabolite ratios in seven regions were correlated with fatigue (p < 0.05). ME/CFS patients had increased temperature in the right insula, putamen, frontal cortex, thalamus, and the cerebellum (all p < 0.05), which was not attributable to increased body temperature or differences in cerebral perfusion. Brain temperature increases converged with elevated LAC/CR in the right insula, right thalamus, and cerebellum (all p < 0.05). We report metabolite and temperature abnormalities in ME/CFS patients in widely distributed regions. Our findings may indicate that ME/CFS involves neuroinflammation.

2 Article Two-Year Follow-Up of Impaired Range of Motion in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 2018

Rowe, Peter C / Marden, Colleen L / Flaherty, Marissa A K / Jasion, Samantha E / Cranston, Erica M / Fontaine, Kevin R / Violand, Richard L. ·Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: prowe@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Health Behavior, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, Birmingham, AL. · Rick Violand PT, LLC, Ellicott City, MD. ·J Pediatr · Pubmed #29866593.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To measure changes in range of motion (ROM) over time in a cohort of 55 adolescents and young adults with chronic fatigue syndrome and to determine whether changes in ROM correlated with changes in health-related quality of life. STUDY DESIGN: Participants underwent a standardized examination of 11 areas of limb and spine ROM at baseline and at 3- to 6-month intervals for 2 years, resulting in a ROM score that ranged from 0 (normal throughout) to 11 (abnormal ROM in all areas tested). We measured the time until the ROM score was ≤2 (the score in healthy age-matched controls). Change in ROM was measured by subtracting the 24-month from the baseline ROM score and by summing the degrees of change in the 10 tests with continuous outcomes. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 (PedsQL). RESULTS: The mean age at enrollment was 16.5 years (range 10-23). Two-year follow-up was available for 53 (96%). The proportion with a ROM score of >2 fell gradually over 2 years, from 78% at entry to 20% at 24 months (P < .001). ROM scores improved from a median of 5 at entry to 2 at 24 months (P < .001). The change in the summed degrees of improvement in ROM correlated positively with improvement in the PedsQL physical function subscale (r = 0.30; P < .03). CONCLUSIONS: In association with multimodal therapy, young people with chronic fatigue syndrome experienced progressively less impairment in ROM over 2 years, correlating with improvements in the physical function subscale of the PedsQL.

3 Article Fibromyalgia in 300 adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency. 2017

Barton, James C / Bertoli, Luigi F / Barton, Jackson C / Acton, Ronald T. ·Department of Medicine, Brookwood Medical Center, Birmingham, AL; Southern Iron Disorders Center, Birmingham, AL; and Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA. ironmd@isp.com. · Department of Medicine, Brookwood Medical Center, Birmingham, AL; Southern Iron Disorders Center, Birmingham, AL; and Brookwood Biomedical, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Southern Iron Disorders Center, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Southern Iron Disorders Center, Birmingham, AL; and Department of Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #28422000.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine the prevalence and clinical and laboratory associations of fibromyalgia in adults with primary immunodeficiency (immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSD) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of these observations in 300 non-Hispanic white adult index patients with recurrent/severe respiratory tract infections and IgGSD or CVID: age; sex; IgGSD; fibromyalgia; chronic fatigue; autoimmune conditions (ACs); interstitial cystitis (IC); diabetes; body mass index; serum Ig isotypes; blood lymphocytes and subsets; and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and -B types and haplotypes. We performed univariate comparisons, logistic multivariable regressions, and an analysis of covariance. RESULTS: Mean age was 49 ± 12 (standard deviation) y. There were 246 women (82.0%). IgGSD was diagnosed in 276 patients (92.0%). Fifty-six patients had fibromyalgia (18.7%; female:male 13:1). Other characteristics included: chronic fatigue, 63.0%; aggregate ACs, 35.3%; Sjögren's syndrome, 8.0%; IC, 3.0%; diabetes, 10.3%; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity, 9.7%. Prevalences of female sex; chronic fatigue; IC; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity were greater in patients with fibromyalgia. Logistic regression on fibromyalgia revealed three positive associations: chronic fatigue (p=0.0149; odds ratio 2.6 [95% confidence interval 1.2, 5.6]); Sjögren's syndrome (p=0.0004; 5.2 [2.1, 13.2]); and IC (p=0.0232; 5.7 [1.3, 25.7]). In an analysis of covariance, there were significant interactions of chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and interstitial cystitis on fibromyalgia. CONCLUSIONS: Fibromyalgia is common in non-Hispanic white adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency, especially women. Chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and IC are significantly associated with fibromyalgia after adjustment for other independent variables.

4 Article Neuromuscular Strain Increases Symptom Intensity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 2016

Rowe, Peter C / Fontaine, Kevin R / Lauver, Megan / Jasion, Samantha E / Marden, Colleen L / Moni, Malini / Thompson, Carol B / Violand, Richard L. ·Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · Department of Health Behavior, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, Birmingham, Alabama, United States of America. · Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · Rick Violand, PT LLC, Ellicott City, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #27428358.

ABSTRACT: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex, multisystem disorder that can be disabling. CFS symptoms can be provoked by increased physical or cognitive activity, and by orthostatic stress. In preliminary work, we noted that CFS symptoms also could be provoked by application of longitudinal neural and soft tissue strain to the limbs and spine of affected individuals. In this study we measured the responses to a straight leg raise neuromuscular strain maneuver in individuals with CFS and healthy controls. We randomly assigned 60 individuals with CFS and 20 healthy controls to either a 15 minute period of passive supine straight leg raise (true neuromuscular strain) or a sham straight leg raise. The primary outcome measure was the symptom intensity difference between the scores during and 24 hours after the study maneuver compared to baseline. Fatigue, body pain, lightheadedness, concentration difficulties, and headache scores were measured individually on a 0-10 scale, and summed to create a composite symptom score. Compared to individuals with CFS in the sham strain group, those with CFS in the true strain group reported significantly increased body pain (P = 0.04) and concentration difficulties (P = 0.02) as well as increased composite symptom scores (all P = 0.03) during the maneuver. After 24 hours, the symptom intensity differences were significantly greater for the CFS true strain group for the individual symptom of lightheadedness (P = 0.001) and for the composite symptom score (P = 0.005). During and 24 hours after the exposure to the true strain maneuver, those with CFS had significantly higher individual and composite symptom intensity changes compared to the healthy controls. We conclude that a longitudinal strain applied to the nerves and soft tissues of the lower limb is capable of increasing symptom intensity in individuals with CFS for up to 24 hours. These findings support our preliminary observations that increased mechanical sensitivity may be a contributor to the provocation of symptoms in this disorder.

5 Article Functional somatic syndromes as risk factors for hysterectomy in early bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. 2014

Warren, John W / Clauw, Daniel J / Wesselmann, Ursula / Howard, Fred M / Gallicchio, Lisa / Morozov, Vadim. ·Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, United States; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, United States. Electronic address: jwarren@medicine.umaryland.edu. · Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, United States; Department of Medicine, University of Michigan School of Medicine, United States. · Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, United States; Department of Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, United States. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, United States. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, United States. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, United States. ·J Psychosom Res · Pubmed #25258358.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that functional somatic syndromes (FSSs) are risk factors for hysterectomy in early bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). METHODS: In 312 women with incident BPS/IC, we diagnosed seven pre-BPS/IC syndromes: chronic pelvic pain (CPP), fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), sicca syndrome, migraine, and panic disorder. Each was defined as present before 12 months (existing syndrome) or onset within 12 months (new syndrome) prior to BPS/IC onset. Retrospectively, we sought associations between prior hysterectomy and existing FSSs. Prospectively, we studied associations of existing and new syndromes with subsequent hysterectomy. Logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, race, menopause and education. RESULTS: The retrospective study showed prior hysterectomy (N=63) to be associated with existing CPP and the presence of multiple existing FSSs. The prospective study revealed that 30/249 women with a uterus at baseline (12%) underwent hysterectomy in early BPS/IC. This procedure was associated with new CPP (OR 6.0; CI 2.0, 18.2), new IBS (OR 5.4; CI 1.3, 22.3), and ≥3 existing FSSs (OR 3.9; CI 1.1, 13.9). CONCLUSION: Accounting for CPP and IBS, the presence of multiple FSSs (most without pelvic pain) was a separate, independent risk factor for hysterectomy in early BPS/IC. This suggests that patient features in addition to abdominopelvic abnormalities led to this procedure. Until other populations are assessed, a prudent approach to patients who are contemplating hysterectomy (and possibly other surgeries) for pain and who have IBS or numerous FSSs is first to try alternative therapies including treatment of the FSSs.

6 Article Impaired range of motion of limbs and spine in chronic fatigue syndrome. 2014

Rowe, Peter C / Marden, Colleen L / Flaherty, Marissa A K / Jasion, Samantha E / Cranston, Erica M / Johns, Allison S / Fan, John / Fontaine, Kevin R / Violand, Richard L. ·Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: prowe@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Health Behavior, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, Birmingham, AL. · Violand and McNerney, PA, Ellicott City, MD. ·J Pediatr · Pubmed #24929332.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine whether adolescents and young adults with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have a greater prevalence of impaired range of motion (ROM) of the limbs and spine than healthy control patients. STUDY DESIGN: Case-control study comparing rates of abnormal ROM in 48 consecutive adolescents and young adults with CFS and 48 healthy control patients matched by sex and joint hypermobility. We examined range of ankle dorsiflexion, passive straight-leg raise, seated slump, upper-limb neurodynamic test, prone knee bend, and prone press-up. Abnormal ROM was defined before the study began. The number of abnormal responses ranged from 0 (normal ROM throughout) to 11 (impaired ROM in all areas tested). RESULTS: The median number of areas with impaired ROM was greater in patients with CFS at the onset of stretch in the involved limb (5 vs 2, P<.001) and at end-range (2 vs 0, P<.001). Patients with CFS were more likely to have greater than 3 areas of impaired ROM (OR 6.0, 95% CI 2.1-17.3; P<.001) and were more likely to develop abnormal symptomatic responses to the individual tests and to the overall assessment (40% vs 4%; P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Impaired ROM is more common in subjects with CFS than in healthy adolescents and young adults matched by sex and joint hypermobility. Adding a longitudinal strain to the nerves and soft tissues provoked symptoms in some subjects with CFS. The causes, functional impact, and optimal treatment of these abnormalities warrant further study.