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Coronary Artery Disease HELP
Based on 38,710 articles published since 2010
|||| 15 

These are the 38710 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline [Exercise testing: New guidelines]. 2019

Marcadet, Dany Michel. ·Centre cœur et santé Bernoulli, 3, rue Bernoulli, 75008 Paris, France. Electronic address: dmmarcadet@gmail.com. ·Presse Med · Pubmed #31679896.

ABSTRACT: The GERS-P (Exercise Rehabilitation Sports Prevention Group of the French Society of Cardiology) has decided to update current guidelines regarding the practice of EKG stress tests. Since the last update dates from 1997, the GERS judged it necessary to integrate data from new works and advancements made in the last 20 years. Good clinical practices and safety conditions are better defined regarding the structure, location, material, staff competency, as well as convention with hospital structures. The diagnosis of coronary artery disease remains the principal indication for a stress test. Interpretation of the results is crucial - it must be multivariate and provide either a low, intermediate or strong probability of the existence of coronary lesions, taking into account the studied population (risk factors, age, sex and symptoms). We no longer have to talk about a "positive, negative or litigious" test. Several new indications for a stress test have been defined for the assessment of cardiac pathologies. With such indications, the use of gas expiration measurements is highly recommended in order to provide a precise prognosis for all the various cardiac pathologies : congenital, ischemic, valvular, cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, rhythm and conduction disorders, pacemaker fine-tuning, or pulmonary hypertension. Indications for stress tests and contraindications are defined according to different population subgroups, for instance : athletes, women, children, the elderly, asymptomatic patients, diabetics, hypertensive patients, peripheral arteritis disease patients, or in the context of a non-cardiac surgery pre-op visit. The new guidelines are considerably different from those dating from 1997 and further pinpoint the relevance and importance of an EKG stress test within the arsenal of complementary cardiologic exams. With the improvements made in providing diagnostic value in CAD, as well as better prognostic value for any underlying pathology, the indication for an EKG stress test has extended to all cardiovascular disease.

2 Guideline Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in the treatment of coronary and peripheral atherosclerosis. 2019

Witkowski, Adam / Barylski, Marcin / Filipiak, Krzysztof J / Gierlotka, Marek / Legutko, Jacek / Lesiak, Maciej / Stępińska, Janina / Wojakowski, Wojciech. ·Department of Interventional Cardiology and Angiology, Institute of Cardiology in Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland · Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiac Rehabilitation, Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland · 1st Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland · Department of Cardiology, Institute of Medicine, University of Opole, Opole, Poland · Department of Interventional Cardiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, John Paul II Hospital, Kraków, Poland · 1st Department of Cardiology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland · Department of Intensive Cardiac Therapy, Institute of Cardiology in Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland · Department of Cardiology and Structural Heart Diseases, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland ·Kardiol Pol · Pubmed #30799544.

ABSTRACT: Oral anticoagulants (OACs) are widely used for prevention of systemic thromboembolism, including the reduction of the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and prosthetic heart valves. There is also an increasing population of patients who require not only OACs, but also double antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). A typical example is a patient with AF and stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome (ACS), treated by percutaneous coronary intervention. In recent years, with the introduction of NOACs, triple or dual therapy has become safer. Regardless of these indications for the use of NOACs, rivaroxaban at a reduced dose has proved to efficiently reduce the risk of further thrombotic events when added to DAPT in patients who have suffered an ACS. However, such therapy increases the incidence of bleeding complications. Interesting was also the potential impact of the pleiotropic mechanism of action of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) through protease‑activated receptors 1 and 2, present on the platelets and many other cells, and changing the course of arterial atherosclerosis. The COMPASS trial has shown that in the group treated with rivaroxaban combined with aspirin, the primary outcome (cardiovascular death, stroke, and myocardial infarction) occurred significantly less frequently than in the group treated only with aspirin. However, a significantly higher number of bleedings was observed. In the subgroup of patients with peripheral artery disease, a significant reduction of the incidence of amputations was shown. The outcomes of the COMPASS trial might be a breakthrough in the treatment of coronary and peripheral atherosclerosis.

3 Guideline Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Treated With Oral Anticoagulation Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. 2018

Angiolillo, Dominick J / Goodman, Shaun G / Bhatt, Deepak L / Eikelboom, John W / Price, Matthew J / Moliterno, David J / Cannon, Christopher P / Tanguay, Jean-Francois / Granger, Christopher B / Mauri, Laura / Holmes, David R / Gibson, C Michael / Faxon, David P. ·Division of Cardiology, University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville (D.J.A.). · St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, and the Canadian Heart Research Centre, Canada (S.G.G.). · Canadian Virtual Coordinating Centre for Global Collaborative Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Alberta, Canada (S.G.G.). · Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B., C.P.C., L.M., D.P.F.). · Department of Medicine, Population Health Research Institute, Thrombosis & Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada (J.W.E.). · Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA (M.J.P.). · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Gill Heart Institute, University of Kentucky, Lexington (D.J.M.). · Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Canada (J.-F.T.). · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC (C.B.G.). · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (D.R.H.). · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (C.M.G.). ·Circulation · Pubmed #30571525.

ABSTRACT: The optimal antithrombotic treatment regimen for patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation represents a challenge in clinical practice. In 2016, an updated opinion of selected experts from the United States and Canada on the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention was reported. After the 2016 North American consensus statement on the management of antithrombotic therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, results of pivotal clinical trials assessing the type of oral anticoagulant agent and the duration of antiplatelet treatment have been published. On the basis of these results, this focused update on the antithrombotic management of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention recommends that a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant be preferred over a vitamin K antagonist as the oral anticoagulant of choice. Moreover, a double-therapy regimen (oral anticoagulant plus single antiplatelet therapy with a P2Y

4 Guideline Canadian Cardiovascular Society Position Statement on Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Update 2018. 2018

Brunham, Liam R / Ruel, Isabelle / Aljenedil, Sumayah / Rivière, Jean-Baptiste / Baass, Alexis / Tu, Jack V / Mancini, G B John / Raggi, Paolo / Gupta, Milan / Couture, Patrick / Pearson, Glen J / Bergeron, Jean / Francis, Gordon A / McCrindle, Brian W / Morrison, Katherine / St-Pierre, Julie / Henderson, Mélanie / Hegele, Robert A / Genest, Jacques / Goguen, Jeannette / Gaudet, Daniel / Paré, Guillaume / Romney, Jacques / Ransom, Thomas / Bernard, Sophie / Katz, Pamela / Joy, Tisha R / Bewick, David / Brophy, James. ·Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: Liam.brunham@ubc.ca. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Nutrition, Metabolism and Atherosclerosis Clinic, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, and Canadian Collaborative Research Network, Brampton, Ontario, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Laboratory Medicine, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec City, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, McGill University, Clinique 180, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, Université de Montréal, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Biochemistry, Schulich School of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Toronto and Division of Endocrinology, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto Ontario, Canada. · Lipidology Unit, Community Genomic Medicine Centre and ECOGENE-21, Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Saguenay, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Population Health Research Institute and Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Nutrition, Metabolism and Atherosclerosis Clinic, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Université de Montreal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Manitoba, St Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, St John, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #30527143.

ABSTRACT: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is the most common monogenic disorder causing premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. It affects 1 in 250 individuals worldwide, and of the approximately 145,000 Canadians estimated to have FH, most are undiagnosed. Herein, we provide an update of the 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement on FH addressing the need for case identification, prompt recognition, and treatment with statins and ezetimibe, and cascade family screening. We provide a new Canadian definition for FH and tools for clinicians to make a diagnosis. The risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with "definite" FH is 10- to 20-fold that of a normolipidemic individual and initiating treatment in youth or young adulthood can normalize life expectancy. Target levels for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol are proposed and are aligned with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines on dyslipidemia. Recommendation for the use of inhibitors of proprotein convertase kexin/subtilisin type 9 are made in patients who cannot achieve therapeutic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets on maximally tolerated statins and ezetimibe. The writing committee used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology in the preparation of the present document, which offers guidance for practical evaluation and management of patients with FH. This position statement also aims to raise awareness of FH nationally, and to mobilize patient support, promote knowledge translation, and availability of treatment and health care resources for this under-recognized, but important medical condition.

5 Guideline 2018 Focused Update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. 2018

Andrade, Jason G / Verma, Atul / Mitchell, L Brent / Parkash, Ratika / Leblanc, Kori / Atzema, Clare / Healey, Jeff S / Bell, Alan / Cairns, John / Connolly, Stuart / Cox, Jafna / Dorian, Paul / Gladstone, David / McMurtry, M Sean / Nair, Girish M / Pilote, Louise / Sarrazin, Jean-Francois / Sharma, Mike / Skanes, Allan / Talajic, Mario / Tsang, Teresa / Verma, Subodh / Wyse, D George / Nattel, Stanley / Macle, Laurent / Anonymous40968. ·University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada. · Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · QEII Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Alberta, Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Institut universitaire de cardiologie et pneumologie, Quebec, Quebec, Canada. · London Heart Institute, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: lmacle@mac.com. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #30404743.

ABSTRACT: The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Atrial Fibrillation Guidelines Committee provides periodic reviews of new data to produce focused updates that address clinically important advances in atrial fibrillation (AF) management. This 2018 Focused Update addresses: (1) anticoagulation in the context of cardioversion of AF; (2) the management of antithrombotic therapy for patients with AF in the context of coronary artery disease; (3) investigation and management of subclinical AF; (4) the use of antidotes for the reversal of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (5) acute pharmacological cardioversion of AF; (6) catheter ablation for AF, including patients with concomitant AF and heart failure; and (7) an integrated approach to the patient with AF and modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. The recommendations were developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) standards. Individual studies and literature were reviewed for quality and bias; the literature review process and evidence tables are included as Supplementary Material and are available on the CCS Web site. Details of the updated recommendations are presented, along with their background and rationale. This document is linked to an updated summary of all CCS AF guidelines recommendations, from 2010 to the present 2018 Focused Update, which is provided in the Supplementary Material.

6 Guideline Coronary computed tomographic imaging in women: An expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2018

Truong, Quynh A / Rinehart, Sarah / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Berman, Daniel S / Bullock-Palmer, Renee / Carrascosa, Patricia / Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M / Dey, Damini / Ferencik, Maros / Fuechtner, Gudrun / Hecht, Harvey / Jacobs, Jill E / Lee, Sang-Eun / Leipsic, Jonathan / Lin, Fay / Meave, Aloha / Pugliese, Francesca / Sierra-Galán, Lilia M / Williams, Michelle C / Villines, Todd C / Shaw, Leslee J / Anonymous7470967. ·Weill Cornell Medicine, USA. Electronic address: qat9001@med.cornell.edu. · Piedmont Healthcare, USA. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, USA. · University of Erlangan, Germany. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA. · Deborah Heart and Lung Center, USA. · Maipu Diagnosis, Argentina. · William Beaumont Hospital, USA. · Oregon Health & Science University, USA. · Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. · Mount Sinai Health System, USA. · NYU Langone Medical Center, USA. · Severance Hospital, South Korea. · Providence Healthcare, Canada. · Weill Cornell Medicine, USA. · Ignacio Chavez National Institute for Cardiology, Mexico. · William Harvey Research Institute, UK. · American British Cowdray Medical Center, Mexico. · British Heart Foundation, UK. · Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences F Edward Hebert School of Medicine, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #30392926.

ABSTRACT: This expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) provides an evidence synthesis on the use of computed tomography (CT) imaging for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease in women. From large patient and population cohorts of asymptomatic women, detection of any coronary artery calcium that identifies females with a 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk of >7.5% may more effectively triage women who may benefit from pharmacologic therapy. In addition to accurate detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), CT angiography (CTA) identifies nonobstructive atherosclerotic plaque extent and composition which is otherwise not detected by alternative stress testing modalities. Moreover, CTA has superior risk stratification when compared to stress testing in symptomatic women with stable chest pain (or equivalent) symptoms. For the evaluation of symptomatic women both in the emergency department and the outpatient setting, there is abundant evidence from large observational registries and multi-center randomized trials, that CT imaging is an effective procedure. Although radiation doses are far less for CT when compared to nuclear imaging, radiation dose reduction strategies should be applied in all women undergoing CT imaging. Effective and appropriate use of CT imaging can provide the means for improved detection of at-risk women and thereby focus preventive management resulting in long-term risk reduction and improved clinical outcomes.

7 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous7160967 / Shah, Amar B / Kirsch, Jacobo / Bolen, Michael A / Batlle, Juan C / Brown, Richard K J / Eberhardt, Robert T / Hurwitz, Lynne M / Inacio, Joao R / Jin, Jill O / Krishnamurthy, Rajesh / Leipsic, Jonathon A / Rajiah, Prabhakar / Singh, Satinder P / White, Richard D / Zimmerman, Stefan L / Abbara, Suhny. ·Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York. Electronic address: ashah27@northwell.edu. · Panel Chair, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida. · Panel Vice-Chair, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute and Baptist Health of South Florida, Miami, Florida. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts; American College of Cardiology. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; American College of Physicians. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, Maryland. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392597.

ABSTRACT: Chronic chest pain (CCP) of a cardiac etiology is a common clinical problem. The diagnosis and classification of the case of chest pain has rapidly evolved providing the clinician with multiple cardiac imaging strategies. Though scintigraphy and rest echocardiography remain as appropriate imaging tools in the diagnostic evaluation, new technology is available. Current evidence supports the use of alternative imaging tests such as coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), cardiac MRI (CMRI), or Rb-82 PET/CT. Since multiple imaging modalities are available to the clinician, the most appropriate noninvasive imaging strategy will be based upon the patient's clinical presentation and clinical status. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

8 Guideline Risk Assessment for Cardiovascular Disease With Nontraditional Risk Factors: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2018

Anonymous4820954 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #29998297.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death among adults in the United States. Treatment to prevent CVD events by modifying risk factors is currently informed by the Framingham Risk Score, the Pooled Cohort Equations, or similar CVD risk assessment models. If current CVD risk assessment models could be improved by adding more risk factors, treatment might be better targeted, thereby maximizing the benefits and minimizing the harms. Objective: To update the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on using nontraditional risk factors in coronary heart disease risk assessment. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on using nontraditional risk factors in CVD risk assessment, focusing on the ankle-brachial index (ABI), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level, and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score; the health benefits and harms of CVD risk assessment and treatment guided by nontraditional risk factors combined with the Framingham Risk Score or Pooled Cohort Equations compared with using either risk assessment model alone; and whether adding nontraditional risk factors to existing CVD risk assessment models improves measures of calibration, discrimination, and risk reclassification. Findings: The USPSTF found adequate evidence that adding the ABI, hsCRP level, and CAC score to existing CVD risk assessment models results in small improvements in discrimination and risk reclassification; however, the clinical meaning of these changes is largely unknown. Evidence on adding the ABI, hsCRP level, and CAC score to the Pooled Cohort Equations is limited. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence to assess whether treatment decisions guided by the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score, in addition to risk factors in existing CVD risk assessment models, leads to reduced incidence of CVD events or mortality. The USPSTF found adequate evidence to conceptually bound the harms of early detection and interventions as small. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of using the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score in risk assessment for CVD in asymptomatic adults to prevent CVD events. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of adding the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score to traditional risk assessment for CVD in asymptomatic adults to prevent CVD events. (I statement).

9 Guideline Focused update of expert consensus statement: Use of invasive assessments of coronary physiology and structure: A position statement of the society of cardiac angiography and interventions. 2018

Lotfi, Amir / Davies, Justin E / Fearon, William F / Grines, Cindy L / Kern, Morton J / Klein, Lloyd W. ·Baystate Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Springfield, Massachusetts. · Imperial Colleges, London, United Kingdom. · Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California. · Northwell Health, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. · Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California. · Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29968425.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline [ANMCO/ANCE/ARCA/GICR-IACPR intersociety consensus document: long-term antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary artery disease]. 2018

Gulizia, Michele Massimo / Colivicchi, Furio / Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe / Ambrosetti, Marco / Aspromonte, Nadia / Barile, Gabriella / Caporale, Roberto / Casolo, Giancarlo / Chiuini, Emilia / Di Lenarda, Andrea / Faggiano, Pompilio / Gabrielli, Domenico / Geraci, Giovanna / La Manna, Alessio Gaetano / Maggioni, Aldo Pietro / Marchese, Alfredo / Massari, Ferdinando Maria / Mureddu, Gian Francesco / Musumeci, Giuseppe / Nardi, Federico / Panno, Antonio Vittorio / Pedretti, Roberto Franco Enrico / Piredda, Massimo / Pusineri, Enrico / Riccio, Carmine / Rossini, Roberta / Scotto Di Uccio, Fortunato / Urbinati, Stefano / Varbella, Ferdinando / Zito, Giovanni Battista / De Luca, Leonardo. ·U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Garibaldi-Nesima, Azienda di Rilievo Nazionale e Alta Specializzazione "Garibaldi", Catania. · U.O.C. Cardiologia e UTIC, Presidio Ospedaliero San Filippo Neri, Roma. · U.O.C. Cardiologia e UTIC, Ospedale Civile Sant'Antonio Abate, Erice (TP). · Servizio di Cardiologia Riabilitativa, Clinica Le Terrazze, Cunardo (VA). · U.O. Scompenso e Riabilitazione Cardiologica, Polo di Scienze Cardiovascolari e Toraciche, Policlinico Agostino Gemelli, Roma. · Poliambulatorio ASL RM C/D11, Roma. · U.O.C. Cardiologia Interventistica, Ospedale Annunziata, Cosenza. · S.C. Cardiologia, Nuovo Ospedale Versilia, Lido di Camaiore (LU). · Specialista Ambulatoriale Cardiologo, ASL Umbria 1, Perugia. · S.C. Cardiovascolare e Medicina dello Sport, Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Trieste. · U.O. Cardiologia, Spedali Civili, Brescia. · ASUR Marche - Area Vasta 4 Fermo, Ospedale Civile Augusto Murri, Fermo. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Azienda Ospedali Riuniti Villa Sofia-Cervello, Palermo. · Divisione di Cardiologia, A.O.U. Policlinico Vittorio Emanuele, Catania. · Centro Studi ANMCO della Fondazione per il Tuo Cuore, Firenze. · U.O.C. Cardiologia Interventistica, GVM Care & Research Ospedale Santa Maria, Bari. · U.O.C. Malattie Cardiovascolari, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano. · U.O.C. Cardiologia 2, A.O. San Giovanni Addolorata, Roma. · S.C. Cardiologia, A.S.O. Santa Croce e Carle, Cuneo. · S.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Santo Spirito, Casale Monferrato (AL). · Convenzione USL 6, Palermo. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia Riabilitativa, Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri, IRCCS, Pavia. · Divisione di Cardiologia, Centro Cardiotoracico, Istituto Clinico Sant'Ambrogio, Milano. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Civile di Vigevano, ASST, Pavia. · Prevenzione e Riabilitazione Cardiopatico, A.O. Sant'Anna e San Sebastiano, Caserta. · U.O. Cardiologia e UTIC, Ospedale Loreto Mare, ASL NA 1, Napoli. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Bellaria, AUSL di Bologna, Bologna. · S.C. Cardiologia, Ospedali Riuniti di Rivoli, Rivoli (TO). · Ambulatorio di Cardiologia, ASL Napoli 3 Sud, Pompei (NA). · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale San Giovanni Evangelista, Tivoli (RM). ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #29853716.

ABSTRACT: Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor inhibitor is the cornerstone of the pharmacologic management of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and/or receiving coronary stents. Long-term (>1 year) DAPT may further reduce the risk of stent thrombosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and may decrease the occurrence of non-stent-related ischemic events in patients with ACS. Nevertheless, compared with aspirin alone, extended use of aspirin plus a P2Y12 receptor inhibitor may increase the risk of bleeding events that have been strongly linked to adverse outcomes including recurrent ischemia, repeat hospitalization, and death. Over the last years, multiple randomized clinical trials have been published comparing duration of DAPT after PCI and in ACS patients investigating either a shorter or prolonged DAPT regimen.Although current European Society of Cardiology guidelines provide backup to individualize treatment, it seems difficult to identify the ideal patient profile who could safely reduce or prolong DAPT duration in daily clinical practice. The aim of this consensus document is to review the contemporary literature on optimal DAPT duration and to guide clinicians in tailoring antiplatelet strategies in patients undergoing PCI or presenting with ACS.

11 Guideline CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). 2018

Hecht, Harvey S / Blaha, Michael J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Cury, Ricardo C / Budoff, Matt / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: harvey.hecht@mountsinai.org. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Division of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176, United States. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, United States. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29793848.

ABSTRACT: The goal of CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of CAC scanning on all noncontrast CT scans, irrespective of the indication, in order to facilitate clinical decision-making, with recommendations for subsequent patient management. The CAC-DRS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the total calcium score and the number of involved arteries. General recommendations are provided for further management of patients with different degrees of calcified plaque burden based on CAC-DRS classification. In addition, CAC-DRS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit quality assurance and tracking patient outcomes with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

12 Guideline Defining Staged Procedures for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Trials: A Guidance Document. 2018

Spitzer, Ernest / McFadden, Eugène / Vranckx, Pascal / de Vries, Ton / Ren, Ben / Collet, Carlos / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M / Lopes, Renato D / Stone, Gregg W / Cutlip, Donald E / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Cardialysis Core Laboratories and Clinical Trial Management, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Cardiology, Thoraxcenter, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Cardialysis Core Laboratories and Clinical Trial Management, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Cardiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. · Department of Cardiology and Critical Care Medicine, Hartcentrum Hasselt, Jessa Ziekenhuis, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences Hasselt University, Hasselt, Belgium. · Cardialysis Core Laboratories and Clinical Trial Management, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC. · Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center/Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina. · Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation and Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Baim Institute for Clinical Research, Boston, Massachusetts; Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, NHLI, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29747912.

ABSTRACT: Patients in coronary intervention trials may require more than 1 procedure to complete the intended revascularization strategy. However, these staged interventions are not consistently defined. Standardized definitions are needed to allow meaningful comparisons of this outcome among trials. This document provides guidance on relevant parameters involving staged procedures, including minimum data collection and consistent classification of coronary procedures initially identified as staged; the aim is to achieve consistency among clinical trialists, sponsors, health authorities, and regulators. Definitions were developed jointly among representatives of academic institutions and clinical research organizations based on clinical trial experience and published literature. Reasons for staged procedures were identified and include baseline kidney function, contrast load and radiation exposure, lesion complexity, and patient or operator fatigue. Moreover, nonclinical reasons include procedure scheduling and reimbursement. Management of staged procedures should be a standalone section in clinical trial protocols and clinical events committee charters. These documents should clearly define a time window for staged procedures that allows latitude for local policies, while respecting accepted clinical guidelines, and consistency with study objectives. Investigators should document in the case report form the intent to stage a procedure, the lesions to be treated, and the reasons for staging, preferably before randomization. Ideally, all reinterventions, or at least all procedures performed after the recommended time window, those in which data suggest an anticipated procedure due to a worsening condition and those where a revascularization is attempted in the target vessel, should be reviewed by an independent clinical events committee.

13 Guideline A Multidisciplinary Approach on the Perioperative Antithrombotic Management of Patients With Coronary Stents Undergoing Surgery: Surgery After Stenting 2. 2018

Rossini, Roberta / Tarantini, Giuseppe / Musumeci, Giuseppe / Masiero, Giulia / Barbato, Emanuele / Calabrò, Paolo / Capodanno, Davide / Leonardi, Sergio / Lettino, Maddalena / Limbruno, Ugo / Menozzi, Alberto / Marchese, U O Alfredo / Saia, Francesco / Valgimigli, Marco / Ageno, Walter / Falanga, Anna / Corcione, Antonio / Locatelli, Alessandro / Montorsi, Marco / Piazza, Diego / Stella, Andrea / Bozzani, Antonio / Parolari, Alessandro / Carone, Roberto / Angiolillo, Dominick J / Anonymous2080939 / Anonymous2090939 / Anonymous2100939 / Anonymous2110939 / Anonymous2120939 / Anonymous2130939 / Anonymous2140939 / Anonymous2150939 / Anonymous2160939 / Anonymous2170939 / Anonymous2180939 / Anonymous2190939 / Anonymous2200939 / Anonymous2210939 / Anonymous2220939 / Anonymous2230939 / Anonymous2240939 / Anonymous2250939 / Anonymous2260939 / Anonymous2270939 / Anonymous2280939 / Anonymous2290939 / Anonymous2300939. ·Dipartimento Emergenze e Aree Critiche, Ospedale Santa Croce e Carle, Cuneo, Italy. Electronic address: roberta.rossini2@gmail.com. · Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padua Medical School, Padua, Italy. · Dipartimento Emergenze e Aree Critiche, Ospedale Santa Croce e Carle, Cuneo, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Cardio-Thoracic Sciences, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli," Naples, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria "Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania, Italy; Department of General Surgery and Medical-Surgical Specialties, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. · Coronary Care Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · Cardiovascular Department, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Azienda USL Toscana Sudest, Grosseto, Italy. · Unità Operativa di Cardiologia, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Italy. · U.O.C. Cardiologia Interventistica, Anthea Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Bari, Italy. · Cardiology Unit, Cardio-Thoraco-Vascular Department, University Hospital of Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy. · Swiss Cardiovascular Centre Bern, Bern University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland. · Degenza Breve Internistica e Centro Trombosi ed Emostasi, Dipartimento di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università dell'Insubria, Varese, Italy. · Department of Immunohematology and Transfusion Medicine, Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, AORN Dei Colli, Naples, Italy. · Dipartimento di Chirurgia Generale, Humanitas Research Hospital and University, Milano, Italy. · Policlinico Vittorio Emanuele di Catania, Catania, Italy. · Chirurgia Vascolare, Università di Bologna, Ospedale Sant'Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy. · UOC Chirurgia Vascolare, Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Policlinico San Donato IRCCS, University of Milano, Milan, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Città della salute e della scienza, Torino, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, University of Florida, College of Medicine-Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29519377.

ABSTRACT: Perioperative management of antithrombotic therapy in patients treated with coronary stents undergoing surgery remains poorly defined. Importantly, surgery represents a common reason for premature treatment discontinuation, which is associated with an increased risk in mortality and major adverse cardiac events. However, maintaining antithrombotic therapy to minimize the incidence of perioperative ischemic complications may increase the risk of bleeding complications. Although guidelines provide some recommendations with respect to the perioperative management of antithrombotic therapy, these have been largely developed according to the thrombotic risk of the patient and a definition of the hemorrhagic risk specific to each surgical procedure, key to defining the trade-off between ischemia and bleeding, is not provided. These observations underscore the need for a multidisciplinary collaboration among cardiologists, anesthesiologists, hematologists and surgeons to reach this goal. The present document is an update on practical recommendations for standardizing management of antithrombotic therapy management in patients treated with coronary stents (Surgery After Stenting 2) in various types of surgery according to the predicted individual risk of thrombotic complications against the anticipated risk of surgical bleeding complications. Cardiologists defined the thrombotic risk using a "combined ischemic risk" approach, while surgeons classified surgeries according to their inherent hemorrhagic risk. Finally, a multidisciplinary agreement on the most appropriate antithrombotic treatment regimen in the perioperative phase was reached for each surgical procedure.

14 Guideline 2017 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society. 2018

Al-Khatib, Sana M / Stevenson, William G / Ackerman, Michael J / Bryant, William J / Callans, David J / Curtis, Anne B / Deal, Barbara J / Dickfeld, Timm / Field, Michael E / Fonarow, Gregg C / Gillis, Anne M / Granger, Christopher B / Hammill, Stephen C / Hlatky, Mark A / Joglar, José A / Kay, G Neal / Matlock, Daniel D / Myerburg, Robert J / Page, Richard L. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #29097296.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline 2017 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death: Executive Summary: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society. 2018

Al-Khatib, Sana M / Stevenson, William G / Ackerman, Michael J / Bryant, William J / Callans, David J / Curtis, Anne B / Deal, Barbara J / Dickfeld, Timm / Field, Michael E / Fonarow, Gregg C / Gillis, Anne M / Granger, Christopher B / Hammill, Stephen C / Hlatky, Mark A / Joglar, José A / Kay, G Neal / Matlock, Daniel D / Myerburg, Robert J / Page, Richard L. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #29097294.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline Case-based implementation of the 2017 ESC Focused Update on Dual Antiplatelet Therapy in Coronary Artery Disease. 2018

Collet, Jean-Philippe / Roffi, Marco / Byrne, Robert A / Costa, Francesco / Valgimigli, Marco / Anonymous1890925 / Anonymous1900925 / Anonymous1910925. · ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #29088328.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline 2017 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death: Executive Summary. 2018

Al-Khatib, Sana M / Stevenson, William G / Ackerman, Michael J / Bryant, William J / Callans, David J / Curtis, Anne B / Deal, Barbara J / Dickfeld, Timm / Field, Michael E / Fonarow, Gregg C / Gillis, Anne M / Granger, Christopher B / Hammill, Stephen C / Hlatky, Mark A / Joglar, José A / Kay, G Neal / Matlock, Daniel D / Myerburg, Robert J / Page, Richard L. ·Writing committee members are required to recuse themselves from voting on sections to which their specific relationships with industry may apply; see Appendix 1 for detailed information. Section numbers pertain to those in the full-text guideline. †ACC/AHA Representative. ‡HRS Representative. §ACC/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures Liaison/HFSA Representative. ‖ACC/AHA Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines Liaison. ·Circulation · Pubmed #29084733.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline 2017 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death. 2018

Al-Khatib, Sana M / Stevenson, William G / Ackerman, Michael J / Bryant, William J / Callans, David J / Curtis, Anne B / Deal, Barbara J / Dickfeld, Timm / Field, Michael E / Fonarow, Gregg C / Gillis, Anne M / Granger, Christopher B / Hammill, Stephen C / Hlatky, Mark A / Joglar, José A / Kay, G Neal / Matlock, Daniel D / Myerburg, Robert J / Page, Richard L. ·Writing committee members are required to recuse themselves from voting on sections to which their specific relationships with industry may apply; see Appendix 1 for detailed information. †ACC/AHA Representative. ‡HRS Representative. §ACC/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures Liaison/HFSA Representative. ‖ACC/AHA Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines Liaison. ·Circulation · Pubmed #29084731.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline Percutaneous coronary intervention for the left main stem and other bifurcation lesions: 12th consensus document from the European Bifurcation Club. 2018

Lassen, Jens Flensted / Burzotta, Francesco / Banning, Adrian P / Lefèvre, Thierry / Darremont, Olivier / Hildick-Smith, David / Chieffo, Alaide / Pan, Manuel / Holm, Niels Ramsing / Louvard, Yves / Stankovic, Goran. ·Department of Cardiology, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #29061550.

ABSTRACT: The European Bifurcation Club (EBC) was initiated in 2004 to support a continuous overview of the field of coronary artery bifurcation interventions and aims to facilitate a scientific discussion and an exchange of ideas on the management of bifurcation disease. The EBC hosts an annual, two-day compact meeting, dedicated to bifurcations, which brings together physicians, pathologists, engineers, biologists, physicists, mathematicians, epidemiologists and statisticians for detailed discussions. Every meeting is finalised with a consensus statement that reflects the unique opportunity of combining the opinion of interventional cardiologists with the opinion of a large variety of other scientists on bifurcation management. A series of consensus sessions dedicated to specific topics, to strengthen the consensus debates and focus the discussions, was introduced at this year's meeting. The sessions comprise an intensive overview of the present literature, a pro and con debate and a voting system, to guide the consensus-building process. The present document represents the summary of the up-to-date EBC consensus and recommendations from the 12th annual EBC meeting in 2016 in Rotterdam.

20 Guideline 2017 Update of ESC/EAS Task Force on practical clinical guidance for proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibition in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease or in familial hypercholesterolaemia. 2018

Landmesser, Ulf / Chapman, M John / Stock, Jane K / Amarenco, Pierre / Belch, Jill J F / Borén, Jan / Farnier, Michel / Ference, Brian A / Gielen, Stephan / Graham, Ian / Grobbee, Diederick E / Hovingh, G Kees / Lüscher, Thomas F / Piepoli, Massimo F / Ray, Kausik K / Stroes, Erik S / Wiklund, Olov / Windecker, Stephan / Zamorano, Jose Luis / Pinto, Fausto / Tokgözoglu, Lale / Bax, Jeroen J / Catapano, Alberico L. ·Department of Cardiology, Charite Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), German Center of Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin, Germany. · National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM), University of Pierre and Marie Curie, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · European Atherosclerosis Society, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Paris-Diderot-Sorbonne University and Department of Neurology and Stroke Centre, Bichat Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, and Wallenberg Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Lipid Clinic, Point Medical, and Department of Cardiology, CHU Dijon-Bourgogne, Dijon, France. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Division of Translational Research and Clinical Epidemiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Martin-Luther-University Halle/Wittenberg, University Hospital, Halle/Saale, Germany. · Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · University Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Zurich, and Center for Molecular Cardiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Heart Failure Unit, Cardiac Department, G Da Saliceto Hospital, Piacenza, Italy. · Imperial Centre for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK. · Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Swiss Cardiovascular Center Bern, Bern University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Cardiology Department, CCUL, CAML, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal. · Department of Cardiology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Milan and Multimedica IRCSS Milano, Italy. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #29045644.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline 2017 ESC focused update on dual antiplatelet therapy in coronary artery disease developed in collaboration with EACTS. 2018

Valgimigli, Marco / Bueno, Héctor / Byrne, Robert A / Collet, Jean-Philippe / Costa, Francesco / Jeppsson, Anders / Jüni, Peter / Kastrati, Adnan / Kolh, Philippe / Mauri, Laura / Montalescot, Gilles / Neumann, Franz-Josef / Petricevic, Mate / Roffi, Marco / Steg, Philippe Gabriel / Windecker, Stephan / Zamorano, Jose Luis / Levine, Glenn N / Anonymous7100923. · ·Eur J Cardiothorac Surg · Pubmed #29045581.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline Report of an ESC-EAPCI Task Force on the evaluation and use of bioresorbable scaffolds for percutaneous coronary intervention: executive summary. 2018

Byrne, Robert A / Stefanini, Giulio G / Capodanno, Davide / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Baumbach, Andreas / Escaned, Javier / Haude, Michael / James, Stefan / Joner, Michael / Jüni, Peter / Kastrati, Adnan / Oktay, Semih / Wijns, William / Serruys, Patrick W / Windecker, Stephan. ·Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Germany. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #28948934.

ABSTRACT: A previous Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) provided a report on recommendations for the non-clinical and clinical evaluation of coronary stents. Following dialogue with the European Commission, the Task Force was asked to prepare an additional report on the class of devices known as bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS). Five BRS have CE-mark approval for use in Europe. Only one device -the Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold- has published randomized clinical trial data and this data show inferior outcomes to conventional drug-eluting stents (DES) at 2-3 years. For this reason, at present BRS should not be preferred to conventional DES in clinical practice. The Task Force recommends that new BRS devices should undergo systematic non-clinical testing according to standardized criteria prior to evaluation in clinical studies. A clinical evaluation plan should include data from a medium sized, randomized trial against DES powered for a surrogate end point of clinical efficacy. Manufacturers of successful devices receive CE- mark approval for use and must have an approved plan for a large-scale randomized clinical trial with planned long-term follow-up.

23 Guideline 2017 ESC focused update on dual antiplatelet therapy in coronary artery disease developed in collaboration with EACTS: The Task Force for dual antiplatelet therapy in coronary artery disease of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS). 2018

Valgimigli, Marco / Bueno, Héctor / Byrne, Robert A / Collet, Jean-Philippe / Costa, Francesco / Jeppsson, Anders / Jüni, Peter / Kastrati, Adnan / Kolh, Philippe / Mauri, Laura / Montalescot, Gilles / Neumann, Franz-Josef / Petricevic, Mate / Roffi, Marco / Steg, Philippe Gabriel / Windecker, Stephan / Zamorano, Jose Luis / Levine, Glenn N / Anonymous4980918 / Anonymous4990918 / Anonymous5000918. · ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #28886622.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline [2017 ESC focused update on dual antiplatelet therapy in coronary artery disease developed in collaboration with EACTS.] 2017

Valgimigli, Marco / Bueno, Héctor / Byrne, Robert A / Collet, Jean-Philippe / Costa, Francesco / Jeppsson, Anders / Jüni, Peter / Kastrati, Adnan / Kolh, Philippe / Mauri, Laura / Montalescot, Gilles / Neumann, Franz-Josef / Peticevic, Mate / Roffi, Marco / Steg, Philippe Gabriel / Windecker, Stephan / Zamorano, Jose Luis. ·Cardiology, Inselspital, Bern. marco.valgimigli@insel.ch. ·Kardiol Pol · Pubmed #29251754.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline [Acute myocardial infarction in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction : ESC guidelines 2017]. 2017

Thiele, H / Desch, S / de Waha, S. ·Klinik für Innere Medizin/Kardiologie, Herzzentrum Leipzig - Universitätsklinik, Strümpellstr. 39, 04289, Leipzig, Deutschland. holger.thiele@medizin.uni-leipzig.de. · Klinik für Innere Medizin/Kardiologie, Herzzentrum Leipzig - Universitätsklinik, Strümpellstr. 39, 04289, Leipzig, Deutschland. · Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf-Forschung (DZHK), Standort Hamburg/Kiel/Lübeck, Lübeck, Deutschland. · Universitäres Herzzentrum Lübeck, Klinik für Kardiologie, Angiologie und Internistische Intensivmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, Deutschland. ·Herz · Pubmed #29119223.

ABSTRACT: This article gives an update on the management of acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) according to the recently released European Society of Cardiology guidelines 2017 and the modifications are compared to the previous STEMI guidelines from 2012. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remains the preferred reperfusion strategy. New guideline recommendations relate to the access site with a clear preference for the radial artery, use of drug-eluting stents over bare metal stents, complete revascularization during the index hospitalization, and avoidance of routine thrombus aspiration. For periprocedural anticoagulation during PCI, bivalirudin has been downgraded. Oxygen treatment should be administered only if oxygen saturation is <90%. In cardiogenic shock, intra-aortic balloon pumps should no longer be used. New recommendations are in place with respect to the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy for patients without bleeding events during the first 12 months. Newly introduced sections cover myocardial infarction with no relevant stenosis of the coronary arteries (MINOCA), the introduction of new indicators for quality of care for myocardial infarction networks and new definitions for the time to reperfusion.

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