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Coronary Artery Disease HELP
Based on 33,646 articles published since 2008
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These are the 33646 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2018.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Risk Assessment for Cardiovascular Disease With Nontraditional Risk Factors: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2018

Anonymous1771221 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #29998297.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death among adults in the United States. Treatment to prevent CVD events by modifying risk factors is currently informed by the Framingham Risk Score, the Pooled Cohort Equations, or similar CVD risk assessment models. If current CVD risk assessment models could be improved by adding more risk factors, treatment might be better targeted, thereby maximizing the benefits and minimizing the harms. Objective: To update the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on using nontraditional risk factors in coronary heart disease risk assessment. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on using nontraditional risk factors in CVD risk assessment, focusing on the ankle-brachial index (ABI), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level, and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score; the health benefits and harms of CVD risk assessment and treatment guided by nontraditional risk factors combined with the Framingham Risk Score or Pooled Cohort Equations compared with using either risk assessment model alone; and whether adding nontraditional risk factors to existing CVD risk assessment models improves measures of calibration, discrimination, and risk reclassification. Findings: The USPSTF found adequate evidence that adding the ABI, hsCRP level, and CAC score to existing CVD risk assessment models results in small improvements in discrimination and risk reclassification; however, the clinical meaning of these changes is largely unknown. Evidence on adding the ABI, hsCRP level, and CAC score to the Pooled Cohort Equations is limited. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence to assess whether treatment decisions guided by the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score, in addition to risk factors in existing CVD risk assessment models, leads to reduced incidence of CVD events or mortality. The USPSTF found adequate evidence to conceptually bound the harms of early detection and interventions as small. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of using the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score in risk assessment for CVD in asymptomatic adults to prevent CVD events. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of adding the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score to traditional risk assessment for CVD in asymptomatic adults to prevent CVD events. (I statement).

2 Guideline CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). 2018

Hecht, Harvey S / Blaha, Michael J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Cury, Ricardo C / Budoff, Matt / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: harvey.hecht@mountsinai.org. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Division of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176, United States. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, United States. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29793848.

ABSTRACT: The goal of CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of CAC scanning on all noncontrast CT scans, irrespective of the indication, in order to facilitate clinical decision-making, with recommendations for subsequent patient management. The CAC-DRS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the total calcium score and the number of involved arteries. General recommendations are provided for further management of patients with different degrees of calcified plaque burden based on CAC-DRS classification. In addition, CAC-DRS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit quality assurance and tracking patient outcomes with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

3 Guideline Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand position statement executive summary: coronary artery calcium scoring. 2017

Hamilton-Craig, Christian R / Chow, Clara K / Younger, John F / Jelinek, V M / Chan, Jonathan / Liew, Gary Yh. ·Heart and Lung Institute, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, QLD c.hamiltoncraig@uq.edu.au. · The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, NSW. · Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD. · St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC. · Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD. · University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #29020908.

ABSTRACT: Introduction This article summarises the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand position statement on coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring. CAC scoring is a non-invasive method for quantifying coronary artery calcification using computed tomography. It is a marker of atherosclerotic plaque burden and the strongest independent predictor of future myocardial infarction and mortality. CAC scoring provides incremental risk information beyond traditional risk calculators such as the Framingham Risk Score. Its use for risk stratification is confined to primary prevention of cardiovascular events, and can be considered as individualised coronary risk scoring for intermediate risk patients, allowing reclassification to low or high risk based on the score. Medical practitioners should carefully counsel patients before CAC testing, which should only be undertaken if an alteration in therapy, including embarking on pharmacotherapy, is being considered based on the test result. Main recommendations CAC scoring should primarily be performed on individuals without coronary disease aged 45-75 years (absolute 5-year cardiovascular risk of 10-15%) who are asymptomatic. CAC scoring is also reasonable in lower risk groups (absolute 5-year cardiovascular risk, < 10%) where risk scores traditionally underestimate risk (eg, family history of premature CVD) and in patients with diabetes aged 40-60 years. We recommend aspirin and a high efficacy statin in high risk patients, defined as those with a CAC score ≥ 400, or a CAC score of 100-399 and above the 75th percentile for age and sex. It is reasonable to treat patients with CAC scores ≥ 100 with aspirin and a statin. It is reasonable not to treat asymptomatic patients with a CAC score of zero. Changes in management as a result of this statement Cardiovascular risk is reclassified according to CAC score. High risk patients are treated with a high efficacy statin and aspirin. Very low risk patients (ie, CAC score of zero) do not benefit from treatment.

4 Guideline Representation of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the AHA / ACC guidelines. 2017

von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian / Pilz, Guenter / Schulz-Menger, Jeanette. ·Department of Cardiology, Clinic Agatharied, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Norbert-Kerkel-Platz, 83734, Hausham, Germany. florian.vonknobelsdorff@khagatharied.de. · Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Berlin, Berlin, Germany. florian.vonknobelsdorff@khagatharied.de. · Working Group Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, a joint cooperation between the Charité Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and HELIOS Klinikum Berlin Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Berlin, Germany. florian.vonknobelsdorff@khagatharied.de. · Department of Cardiology, Clinic Agatharied, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Norbert-Kerkel-Platz, 83734, Hausham, Germany. · Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Working Group Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, a joint cooperation between the Charité Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and HELIOS Klinikum Berlin Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Berlin, Germany. ·J Cardiovasc Magn Reson · Pubmed #28942735.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Whereas evidence supporting the diagnostic value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has increased, there exists significant worldwide variability in the clinical utilization of CMR. A recent study demonstrated that CMR is represented in the majority of European Society for Cardiology (ESC) guidelines, with a large number of specific recommendations in particular regarding coronary artery disease. To further investigate the gap between the evidence and clinical use of CMR, this study analyzed the role of CMR in the guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA). METHODS: Twenty-four AHA/ACC original guidelines, updates and new editions, published between 2006 and 2017, were screened for the terms "magnetic", "MRI", "CMR", "MR" and "imaging". Non-cardiovascular MR examinations were excluded. All CMR-related paragraphs and specific recommendations for CMR including the level of evidence (A, B, C) and the class of recommendation (I, IIa, IIb, III) were extracted. RESULTS: Twelve of the 24 guidelines (50.0%) contain specific recommendations regarding CMR. Four guidelines (16.7%) mention CMR in the text only, and 8 (33.3%) do not mention CMR. The 12 guidelines with recommendations for CMR contain in total 65 specific recommendations (31 class-I, 23 class-IIa, 6 class-IIb, 5 class-III). Most recommendations have evidence level C (44/65; 67.7%), followed by level B (21/65; 32.3%). There are no level A recommendations. 22/65 recommendations refer to vascular imaging, 17 to congenital heart disease, 8 to cardiomyopathies, 8 to myocardial stress testing, 5 to left and right ventricular function, 3 to viability, and 2 to valvular heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: CMR is represented in two thirds of the AHA/ACC guidelines, which contain a number of specific recommendations for the use of CMR. In a simplified comparison with the ESC guidelines, CMR is less represented in the AHA/ACC guidelines in particular in the field of coronary artery disease.

5 Guideline Heart Team: Joint Position of the Swiss Society of Cardiology and the Swiss Society of Cardiac Surgery. 2017

Pedrazzini, Giovanni B / Ferrari, Enrico / Zellweger, Michael / Genoni, Michele. ·Swiss Society of Cardiology (SSC), Ticino, Switzerland. · Swiss Society of Cardiac Surgery (SGHC), Zurich, Switzerland. ·Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #28922674.

ABSTRACT: The Swiss Society of Cardiology (SSC) and the Swiss Society of Cardiac and ThoracicVascular Surgery (SSCTVS) have formulated their mutual intent of a close, patient-oriented, and expertise-based collaboration in the Heart Team Paper. The interdisciplinary dialogue between the SSC and SSCTVS reflects an attitude in decision making, which guarantees the best possible therapy for the individual patient. At the same time, it is a cornerstone of optimized process quality, placing individual interests into the background. Evaluation of the correct indication for a treatment is indeed very challenging and almost impossible to verify retrospectively. Quality in this very important health policy process can therefore only be assured by the use of mutually recognized indications, agreed upon by all involved physicians and medical specialties, whereby the capacity of those involved in the process is not important but rather their competence. These two medical societies recognize their responsibility and have incorporated international guidelines as well as specified regulations for Switzerland. Former competitors now form an integrative consulting team able to deliver a comprehensive evaluation for patients. Naturally, implementation rests with the individual caregiver. The Heart Team Paperof the SGK and SGHC, has defined guide boards within which the involved specialists maintain sufficient room to maneuver, and patients have certainty of receiving the best possible therapy they require.

6 Guideline 2017 Focused Update of the 2016 ACC Expert Consensus Decision Pathway on the Role of Non-Statin Therapies for LDL-Cholesterol Lowering in the Management of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways. 2017

Lloyd-Jones, Donald M / Morris, Pamela B / Ballantyne, Christie M / Birtcher, Kim K / Daly, David D / DePalma, Sondra M / Minissian, Margo B / Orringer, Carl E / Smith, Sidney C. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #28886926.

ABSTRACT: In 2016, the American College of Cardiology published the first expert consensus decision pathway (ECDP) on the role of non-statin therapies for low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol lowering in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. Since the publication of that document, additional evidence and perspectives have emerged from randomized clinical trials and other sources, particularly considering the longer-term efficacy and safety of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors in secondary prevention of ASCVD. Most notably, the FOURIER (Further Cardiovascular Outcomes Research with PCSK9 Inhibition in Subjects with Elevated Risk) trial and SPIRE-1 and -2 (Studies of PCSK9 Inhibition and the Reduction of Vascular Events), assessing evolocumab and bococizumab, respectively, have published final results of cardiovascular outcomes trials in patients with clinical ASCVD and in a smaller number of high-risk primary prevention patients. In addition, further evidence on the types of patients most likely to benefit from the use of ezetimibe in addition to statin therapy after acute coronary syndrome has been published. Based on results from these important analyses, the ECDP writing committee judged that it would be desirable to provide a focused update to help guide clinicians more clearly on decision making regarding the use of ezetimibe and PCSK9 inhibitors in patients with clinical ASCVD with or without comorbidities. In the following summary table, changes from the 2016 ECDP to the 2017 ECDP Focused Update are highlighted, and a brief rationale is provided. The content of the full document has been changed accordingly, with more extensive and detailed guidance regarding decision making provided both in the text and in the updated algorithms. Revised recommendations are provided for patients with clinical ASCVD with or without comorbidities on statin therapy for secondary prevention. The ECDP writing committee judged that these new data did not warrant changes to the decision pathways and algorithms regarding the use of ezetimibe or PCSK9 inhibitors in primary prevention patients with LDL-C <190 mg/dL with or without diabetes mellitus or patients without ASCVD and LDL-C ≥190 mg/dL not due to secondary causes. Based on feedback and further deliberation, the ECDP writing committee down-graded recommendations regarding bile acid sequestrant use, recommending bile acid sequestrants only as optional secondary agents for consideration in patients intolerant to ezetimibe. For clarification, the writing committee has also included new information on diagnostic categories of heterozygous and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, based on clinical criteria with and without genetic testing. Other changes to the original document were kept to a minimum to provide consistent guidance to clinicians, unless there was a compelling reason or new evidence, in which case justification is provided.

7 Guideline 2016 SCCT/STR guidelines for coronary artery calcium scoring of noncontrast noncardiac chest CT scans: A report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and Society of Thoracic Radiology. 2017

Hecht, Harvey S / Cronin, Paul / Blaha, Michael J / Budoff, Matthew J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Narula, Jagat / Yankelevitz, David / Abbara, Suhny. ·aLenox Hill Heart & Vascular Institute, New York, NY, United States bUniversity of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States cJohns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States dHarbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States eIcahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States fThe Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, United States gUTSouthwestern Medical Center, Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blv, Dallas, TX 75390-9316, United States. ·J Thorac Imaging · Pubmed #28832417.

ABSTRACT: The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR) have jointly produced this document. Experts in this subject have been selected from both organizations to examine subject-specific data and write this guideline in partnership. A formal literature review, weighing the strength of evidence has been performed. When available, information from studies on cost was considered. Computed tomography (CT) acquisition, CAC scoring methodologies and clinical outcomes are the primary basis for the recommendations in this guideline. This guideline is intended to assist healthcare providers in clinical decision making. The recommendations reflect a consensus after a thorough review of the best available current scientific evidence and practice patterns of experts in the field and are intended to improve patient care while acknowledging that situations arise where additional information may be needed to better inform patient care.

8 Guideline [Bioresorbable scaffolds in the treatment of coronary artery disease. Expert consensus statement of the Association of Cardiovascular Interventions of the Polish Cardiac Society (ACVI PCS)]. 2017

Reczuch, Krzysztof / Milewski, Krzysztof / Wąsek, Wojciech / Rzeszutko, Łukasz / Wojakowski, Wojciech / Hawranek, Michał / Włodarczak, Adrian / Pawłowski, Tomasz / Kochman, Janusz / Dobrzycki, Sławomir / Grygier, Marek / Ochała, Andrzej / Wójcik, Jarosław / Lesiak, Maciej / Dudek, Dariusz / Legutko, Jacek. ·Przewodniczący AISN PTK; II Klinika Kardiologii, Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Collegium Medicum, Kraków, Polska. jacek.legutko@uj.edu.pl. ·Kardiol Pol · Pubmed #28819961.

ABSTRACT: Bioresorbable scaffold coated with antimitotic drug is the latest development in the coronary stents technology. The concept of temporary scaffolding and natural vessel healing after angioplasty is a very attractive alternative to conventional metal stents. The results of the first observational studies have confirmed their ultimate biodegradation. Newest results of randomised trials and registries in broader clinical and anatomical indications also revealed the limitations of the first generation of scaffolds. The relatively thick polymeric struts and compliance with specific implantation protocol may influence the results. In this document, the group of experts presents the current state of knowledge, with a particular focus on the advantages and limitations of the new technology; it presents practical guidelines for optimal implantation techniques and clarifies documented indications for patients and lesions selection.

9 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous3281079 / Akers, Scott R / Panchal, Vandan / Ho, Vincent B / Beache, Garth M / Brown, Richard K J / Ghoshhajra, Brian B / Greenberg, S Bruce / Hsu, Joe Y / Kicska, Gregory A / Min, James K / Stillman, Arthur E / Stojanovska, Jadranka / Abbara, Suhny / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Principal Author, VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: akerssco@me.com. · Research Author, Internal Medicine Resident, Henry Ford Allegiance Health, Jackson, Michigan. · Panel Vice-Chair, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, California. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; American College of Cardiology. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Panel Chair, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #28473096.

ABSTRACT: In patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), imaging has major and diverse roles. First, imaging is valuable in determining and documenting the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia, hibernation, scarring, and/or the presence, site, and severity of obstructive coronary lesions. Second, imaging findings are important in determining the course of management of patients with suspected chronic myocardial ischemia and better defining those patients best suited for medical therapy, angioplasty/stenting, or surgery. Third, imaging is also necessary to determine the long-term prognosis and likely benefit from various therapeutic options by evaluating ventricular function, diastolic relaxation, and end-systolic volume. Imaging studies are also required to demonstrate other abnormalities, such as congenital/acquired coronary anomalies and severe left ventricular hypertrophy, that can produce angina in the absence of symptomatic coronary obstructive disease due to atherosclerosis. Clinical risk assessment is necessary to determine the pretest probability of CAD. Multiple methods are available to categorize patients as low, medium, or high risk for developing CAD. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

10 Guideline Clinical indications for coronary artery calcium scoring in asymptomatic patients: Expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2017

Hecht, Harvey / Blaha, Michael J / Berman, Daniel S / Nasir, Khurram / Budoff, Matthew / Leipsic, Jonathon / Blankstein, Ron / Narula, Jagat / Rumberger, John / Shaw, Leslee J. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: hhecht@aol.com. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, FL, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division) and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · The Princeton Longevity Center, Princeton, NJ, USA. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28283309.

ABSTRACT: This expert consensus statement summarizes the available data regarding the prognostic value of CAC in the asymptomatic population and its ability to refine individual risk prediction, addresses the limitations identified in the current traditional risk factor-based treatment strategies recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines including use of the Pooled Cohort Equations (PCE), and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Recommendation Statement for Statin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults. It provides CAC based treatment recommendations both within the context of the shared decision making model espoused by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines and independent of these guidelines.

11 Guideline Clinical Pharmacogenetic Testing and Application: Laboratory Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2017

Kim, Sollip / Yun, Yeo Min / Chae, Hyo Jin / Cho, Hyun Jung / Ji, Misuk / Kim, In Suk / Wee, Kyung A / Lee, Woochang / Song, Sang Hoon / Woo, Hye In / Lee, Soo Youn / Chun, Sail. ·Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, College of Medicine, Konyang University, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital and College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Genetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. suddenbz@skku.edu. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. sailchun@amc.seoul.kr. ·Ann Lab Med · Pubmed #28029011.

ABSTRACT: Pharmacogenetic testing for clinical applications is steadily increasing. Correct and adequate use of pharmacogenetic tests is important to reduce unnecessary medical costs and adverse patient outcomes. This document contains recommended pharmacogenetic testing guidelines for clinical application, interpretation, and result reporting through a literature review and evidence-based expert opinions for the clinical pharmacogenetic testing covered by public medical insurance in Korea. This document aims to improve the utility of pharmacogenetic testing in routine clinical settings.

12 Guideline 2016 SCCT/STR guidelines for coronary artery calcium scoring of noncontrast noncardiac chest CT scans: A report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and Society of Thoracic Radiology. 2017

Hecht, Harvey S / Cronin, Paul / Blaha, Michael J / Budoff, Matthew J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Narula, Jagat / Yankelevitz, David / Abbara, Suhny. ·Lenox Hill Heart & Vascular Institute, New York, NY, United States. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. · Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States. · The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. · UTSouthwestern Medical Center, Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blv, Dallas, TX 75390-9316, United States. Electronic address: suhny.abbara@utsouthwestern.edu. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27916431.

ABSTRACT: The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR) have jointly produced this document. Experts in this subject have been selected from both organizations to examine subject-specific data and write this guideline in partnership. A formal literature review, weighing the strength of evidence has been performed. When available, information from studies on cost was considered. Computed tomography (CT) acquisition, CAC scoring methodologies and clinical outcomes are the primary basis for the recommendations in this guideline. This guideline is intended to assist healthcare providers in clinical decision making. The recommendations reflect a consensus after a thorough review of the best available current scientific evidence and practice patterns of experts in the field and are intended to improve patient care while acknowledging that situations arise where additional information may be needed to better inform patient care.

13 Guideline The Rationale for Performance of Coronary Angiography and Stenting Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: From the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Ramee, Stephen / Anwaruddin, Saif / Kumar, Gautam / Piana, Robert N / Babaliaros, Vasilis / Rab, Tanveer / Klein, Lloyd W / Anonymous5770890 / Anonymous5780890. ·Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: lloydklein@comcast.net. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27931592.

ABSTRACT: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective, nonsurgical treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The optimal treatment strategy for treating concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been tested prospectively in a randomized clinical trial. Nevertheless, it is standard practice in the United States to perform coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention for significant CAD at least 1 month before TAVR. All existing clinical trials were designed using this strategy. Therefore, it is wrong to extrapolate current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Appropriate Use Criteria against invasive procedures in asymptomatic patients to the TAVR population when evaluating the quality of care by cardiologists or hospitals. In this statement from the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the ACC, it is recommended that percutaneous coronary intervention should be considered in all patients with significant proximal coronary stenosis in major coronary arteries before TAVR, even though the indication is not covered in current guidelines.

14 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 8 - Hypertension and Associated Clinical Conditions 2016

Malachias, M V B / Amodeo, C / Paula, R B / Cordeiro, A C / Magalhães, L B N C / Bodanese, L C. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A North American Perspective-2016 Update. 2016

Angiolillo, Dominick J / Goodman, Shaun G / Bhatt, Deepak L / Eikelboom, John W / Price, Matthew J / Moliterno, David J / Cannon, Christopher P / Tanguay, Jean-Francois / Granger, Christopher B / Mauri, Laura / Holmes, David R / Gibson, C Michael / Faxon, David P. ·From the Division of Cardiology, University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville (D.J.A.); St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, and the Canadian Heart Research Centre; Canadian VIGOUR Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton (S.G.G.); Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B., D.P.F.); Department of Medicine, Population Health Research Institute, Thrombosis & Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, ON, Canada (J.W.E.); Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla CA (M.J.P.); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Gill Heart Institute, University of Kentucky, Lexington (D.J.M.); Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Clinical Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (C.P.C., L.M.); Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, QC, Canada (J.-F.T.); Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC (C.B.G.); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (D.R.H.); and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (C.M.G.). dominick.angiolillo@jax.ufl.edu. · From the Division of Cardiology, University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville (D.J.A.); St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, and the Canadian Heart Research Centre; Canadian VIGOUR Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton (S.G.G.); Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B., D.P.F.); Department of Medicine, Population Health Research Institute, Thrombosis & Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, ON, Canada (J.W.E.); Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla CA (M.J.P.); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Gill Heart Institute, University of Kentucky, Lexington (D.J.M.); Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Clinical Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (C.P.C., L.M.); Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, QC, Canada (J.-F.T.); Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC (C.B.G.); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (D.R.H.); and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (C.M.G.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27803042.

ABSTRACT: The optimal antithrombotic treatment regimen for patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation is an emerging clinical problem. Currently, there is limited evidenced-based data on the optimal antithrombotic treatment regimen, including antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies, for these high-risk patients with practice guidelines, thus, providing limited recommendations. Over the past years, expert consensus documents have provided guidance to clinicians on how to manage patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Given the recent advancements in the field, the current document provides an updated opinion of selected North American experts from the United States and Canada on the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. In particular, this document provides the current views on (1) embolic/stroke risk, (2) ischemic/thrombotic cardiac risk, and (3) bleeding risk, which are pivotal for discerning the choice of antithrombotic therapy. In addition, we describe the recent advances in pharmacology, stent designs, and clinical trials relevant to the field. Ultimately, we provide expert consensus-derived recommendations, using a pragmatic approach, on the management of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

16 Guideline SCCT guidelines for the performance and acquisition of coronary computed tomographic angiography: A report of the society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee: Endorsed by the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). 2016

Abbara, Suhny / Blanke, Philipp / Maroules, Christopher D / Cheezum, Michael / Choi, Andrew D / Han, B Kelly / Marwan, Mohamed / Naoum, Chris / Norgaard, Bjarne L / Rubinshtein, Ronen / Schoenhagen, Paul / Villines, Todd / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. · Cardiology Service Ft. Belvoir Community Hospital, Ft. Belvoir, VA, United States. · Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington DC, United States. · Minneapolis Heart Institute and Children's Heart Clinic, Minneapolis, MN, United States. · Cardiology Department, University Hospital, Erlangen, Germany. · Concord Hospital, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus University Hospital-Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark. · Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center & Rappaport School of Medicine- Technion- IIT, Haifa, Israel. · Cardiovascular Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, United States. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27780758.

ABSTRACT: In response to recent technological advancements in acquisition techniques as well as a growing body of evidence regarding the optimal performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA), the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee has produced this update to its previously established 2009 "Guidelines for the Performance of Coronary CTA" (1). The purpose of this document is to provide standards meant to ensure reliable practice methods and quality outcomes based on the best available data in order to improve the diagnostic care of patients. Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines for the Interpretation is published separately (2). The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee ensures compliance with all existing standards for the declaration of conflict of interest by all authors and reviewers for the purpose ofclarity and transparency.

17 Guideline 2016 ACC/AHA guideline focused update on duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary artery disease: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2016

Levine, Glenn N / Bates, Eric R / Bittl, John A / Brindis, Ralph G / Fihn, Stephan D / Fleisher, Lee A / Granger, Christopher B / Lange, Richard A / Mack, Michael J / Mauri, Laura / Mehran, Roxana / Mukherjee, Debabrata / Newby, L Kristin / O'Gara, Patrick T / Sabatine, Marc S / Smith, Peter K / Smith, Sidney C / Halperin, Jonathan L / Levine, Glenn N / Al-Khatib, Sana M / Birtcher, Kim K / Bozkurt, Biykem / Brindis, Ralph G / Cigarroa, Joaquin E / Curtis, Lesley H / Fleisher, Lee A / Gentile, Federico / Gidding, Samuel / Hlatky, Mark A / Ikonomidis, John S / Joglar, José A / Pressler, Susan J / Wijeysundera, Duminda N. · ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #27751237.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline [SICI-GISE Position paper: Use of Absorb BVS in clinical practice]. 2016

Tarantini, Giuseppe / Saia, Francesco / Capranzano, Piera / Cortese, Bernardo / Mojoli, Marco / Boccuzzi, Giacomo / Cuculo, Andrea / Geraci, Salvatore / Mattesini, Alessio / Oreglia, Jacopo / Summaria, Francesco / Testa, Luca / Berti, Sergio / Esposito, Giovanni / La Manna, Alessio / Limbruno, Ugo / Marchese, Alfredo / Mauro, Ciro / Tarantino, Fabio / Salvi, Alessandro / Santoro, Gennaro / Varbella, Ferdinando / Violini, Roberto / Musumeci, Giuseppe. ·Dipartimento di Scienze Cardiologiche, Toraciche e Vascolari, Policlinico Universitario, Padova. · Dipartimento Cardio-Toraco-Vascolare, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna. · Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, Ospedale Ferrarotto, Università degli Studi, Catania. · Cardiologia Interventistica, A.O. Fatebenefratelli, Milano. · Cardiologia Interventistica, Azienda Sanitaria Locale Torino 2, Torino. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, A.O. Ospedali Riuniti, Foggia. · Cardiologia Interventistica, Ospedale S. Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento. · Cardiologia Interventistica, Ospedale Moriggia Pelascini, Gravedona (CO). · Emodinamica, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milano. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, Policlinico Casilino, Roma. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, IRCCS Policlinico S. Donato, S. Donato Milanese (MI). · U.O. Cardiologia Diagnostica ed Interventistica, Fondazione Toscana "Gabriele Monasterio", Ospedale del Cuore, Massa. · Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Università degli Studi "Federico II", Napoli. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Azienda USL Toscana Sudest, Grosseto. · U.O.C. Cardiologia Interventistica, Anthea Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Bari. · Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, Ospedale Cardarelli, Napoli. · Laboratorio di Emodinamica, U.O. Cardiologia, Ospedale G.B. Morgagni-L. Pierantoni, Forlì. · Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, Ospedali Riuniti, Università degli Studi, Trieste. · Cardiologia Interventistica, AOU Careggi, Firenze. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, Ospedale degli Infermi, Rivoli (TO). · Cardiologia Interventistica, Ospedale S. Camillo-Forlanini, Roma. · Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo. ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #27729667.

ABSTRACT: Drug-eluting stents (DES) are the current gold standard for percutaneous treatment of coronary artery disease. However, DES are associated with a non-negligible risk of long-term adverse events related to persistence of foreign material in the coronary artery wall. In addition, DES implantation causes permanent caging of the native vessel, thus impairing normal vasomotricity and the possibility of using non-invasive coronary imaging or preforming subsequent bypass surgery. On the contrary, coronary bioresorbable stents (BRS) may provide temporary mechanical support to coronary wall without compromising the subsequent recovery of normal vascular physiology, and have the potential to prevent late adverse events related to permanent elements. Several types of BRS have been introduced into clinical practice in Europe or are being tested. However, most of available clinical data relate to a single BRS, the Absorb bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (Absorb BVS) (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA). Despite encouraging clinical results, no societal guidelines are available on the use of BRS in clinical practice.A panel of Italian expert cardiologists assembled under the auspices of the Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology (SICI-GISE) for comprehensive discussion and consensus development, with the aim to provide recommendations on the use of bioresorbable stents in terms of clinical indications, procedural aspects, post-percutaneous coronary angioplasty pharmacologic treatment and follow-up. Based on current evidence and BRS availability in Italian cath-labs, the panel decided unanimously to provide specific recommendations for the Absorb BVS device. These recommendations do not necessarily extend to other BRS, unless specified, although significant overlap may exist with Absorb BVS, particularly in terms of clinical rationale.

19 Guideline 2016 Focused Update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. 2016

Macle, Laurent / Cairns, John / Leblanc, Kori / Tsang, Teresa / Skanes, Allan / Cox, Jafna L / Healey, Jeff S / Bell, Alan / Pilote, Louise / Andrade, Jason G / Mitchell, L Brent / Atzema, Clare / Gladstone, David / Sharma, Mike / Verma, Subodh / Connolly, Stuart / Dorian, Paul / Parkash, Ratika / Talajic, Mario / Nattel, Stanley / Verma, Atul / Anonymous1151150. ·Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: lmacle@mac.com. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · London Heart Institute, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · QEII Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · McMaster University and Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McMaster University and Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; The Canadian Stroke Network, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #27609430.

ABSTRACT: The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Guidelines Committee provides periodic reviews of new data to produce focused updates that address clinically important advances in AF management. This 2016 Focused Update deals with: (1) the management of antithrombotic therapy for AF patients in the context of the various clinical presentations of coronary artery disease; (2) real-life data with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (3) the use of antidotes for the reversal of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (4) digoxin as a rate control agent; (5) perioperative anticoagulation management; and (6) AF surgical therapy including the prevention and treatment of AF after cardiac surgery. The recommendations were developed with the same methodology used for the initial 2010 guidelines and the 2012 and 2014 Focused Updates. Using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) standards, individual studies and literature were reviewed for quality and bias; the literature review process and evidence tables are included in the Supplementary Material, and on the CCS Web site. The section on concomitant AF and coronary artery disease was developed in collaboration with the CCS Antiplatelet Guidelines Committee. Details of the updated recommendations are presented, along with their background and rationale. This document is linked to an updated summary of all CCS AF Guidelines recommendations, from 2010 to the present 2016 Focused Update.

20 Guideline Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS): An Expert Consensus Document of SCCT, ACR and NASCI: Endorsed by the ACC. 2016

Cury, Ricardo C / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Agatston, Arthur / Berman, Daniel S / Budoff, Matthew J / Dill, Karin E / Jacobs, Jill E / Maroules, Christopher D / Rubin, Geoffrey D / Rybicki, Frank J / Schoepf, U Joseph / Shaw, Leslee J / Stillman, Arthur E / White, Charles S / Woodard, Pamela K / Leipsic, Jonathon A. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27609151.

ABSTRACT: The intent of CAD-RADS - Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) in order to facilitate decision-making regarding further patient management. The suggested CAD-RADS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the highest-grade coronary artery lesion documented by coronary CTA. It ranges from CAD-RADS 0 (Zero) for the complete absence of stenosis and plaque to CAD-RADS 5 for the presence of at least one totally occluded coronary artery and should always be interpreted in conjunction with the impression found in the report. Specific recommendations are provided for further management of patients with stable or acute chest pain based on the CAD-RADS classification. The main goal of CAD-RADS is to standardize reporting of coronary CTA results and to facilitate communication of test results to referring physicians along with suggestions for subsequent patient management. In addition, CAD-RADS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit education, research, peer-review and quality assurance with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

21 Guideline [The heart team in planning and performance of revascularization : ESC guidelines versus clinical routine]. 2016

Sinning, J-M / Welz, A / Nickenig, G. ·Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II, Herzzentrum der Universität Bonn, Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105, Bonn, Deutschland. jan-malte.sinning@ukb.uni-bonn.de. · Klinik für Herzchirurgie, Herzzentrum der Universität Bonn, Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Bonn, Deutschland. · Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II, Herzzentrum der Universität Bonn, Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105, Bonn, Deutschland. ·Herz · Pubmed #27596003.

ABSTRACT: The heart team, consisting of conservative cardiologists, cardiac surgeons and interventional cardiologists, is important for a balanced, multidisciplinary decision-making process for patients suffering from coronary artery disease (CAD). Standard evidence-based, interdisciplinary, institutional protocols can be used for commonly encountered case scenarios to avoid the need for a systematic case by case review. Complex cases with a SYNTAX score of more than 32, diabetes mellitus and lesions of the left main stem or three-vessel disease should in general not be treated by an ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) but first discussed in the heart team. Culprit lesion PCI is usually the first choice in most patients with acute coronary syndrome. If complete percutaneous revascularization is not possible, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) should be considered by the heart team. In patients assigned for CABG, timing of the procedure should be decided on an individual basis, depending on the symptoms, hemodynamic stability, coronary anatomy and signs of ischemia. In stabilized patients with acute coronary syndrome, the choice of revascularization modality can be made in analogy to patients with stable CAD.

22 Guideline CAD-RADS(TM) Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Cury, Ricardo C / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Agatston, Arthur / Berman, Daniel S / Budoff, Matthew J / Dill, Karin E / Jacobs, Jill E / Maroules, Christopher D / Rubin, Geoffrey D / Rybicki, Frank J / Schoepf, U Joseph / Shaw, Leslee J / Stillman, Arthur E / White, Charles S / Woodard, Pamela K / Leipsic, Jonathon A. ·Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL, 33176, United States. Electronic address: rcury@baptisthealth.net. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen-Nürnberg, Department of Cardiology, Ulmenweg 18, 90154, Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: Stephan.Achenbach@uk-erlangen.de. · Baptist Health Medical Grp, 1691 Michigan Avenue, Miami, FL, 33139, United States. Electronic address: ArthurSAg@baptisthealth.net. · Cedars-Sinai Med Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Taper Building, Rm 1258, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, United States. Electronic address: bermand@cshs.org. · 1124 W. Carson Street, Torrance, CA, 90502, United States. Electronic address: mbudoff@labiomed.org. · 5841 South Maryland Ave, MC2026, Chicago, IL, 60637, United States. Electronic address: kdill@radiology.bsd.uchicago.edu. · 550 First Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, United States. Electronic address: jill.jacobs@nyumc.org. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: christopher.maroules@gmail.com. · 2400 Pratt Street, Room 8020, DCRI Box 17969, Durham, NC, 27715, United States. Electronic address: grubin@duke.edu. · The Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON, CA K1H 8L6, Canada. Electronic address: frybicki@toh.on.ca. · 25 Courtenay Dr., Charleston, SC, 29425, United States. Electronic address: schoepf@musc.edu. · 1256 Briarcliff Rd. NE, Rm 529, Atlanta, GA, 30324, United States. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. · 1364 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, United States. Electronic address: aestill@emory.edu. · University of Maryland, 22 S. Greene St., Baltimore, MD, 21201, United States. Electronic address: cwhite@umm.edu. · Mallinckrodt Instit of Radiology, 510 S Kingshighway Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63110, United States. Electronic address: woodardp@mir.wustl.edu. · Department of Radiology|St. Paul's Hospital, 2nd Floor, Providence Building, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, United States. Electronic address: jleipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27318587.

ABSTRACT: The intent of CAD-RADS - Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) in order to facilitate decision-making regarding further patient management. The suggested CAD-RADS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the highest-grade coronary artery lesion documented by coronary CTA. It ranges from CAD-RADS 0 (Zero) for the complete absence of stenosis and plaque to CAD-RADS 5 for the presence of at least one totally occluded coronary artery and should always be interpreted in conjunction with the impression found in the report. Specific recommendations are provided for further management of patients with stable or acute chest pain based on the CAD-RADS classification. The main goal of CAD-RADS is to standardize reporting of coronary CTA results and to facilitate communication of test results to referring physicians along with suggestions for subsequent patient management. In addition, CAD-RADS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit education, research, peer-review and quality assurance with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

23 Guideline SCAI expert consensus statement: 2016 best practices in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: (Endorsed by the cardiological society of india, and sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia intervencionista; Affirmation of value by the Canadian Association of interventional cardiology-Association canadienne de cardiologie d'intervention). 2016

Naidu, Srihari S / Aronow, Herbert D / Box, Lyndon C / Duffy, Peter L / Kolansky, Daniel M / Kupfer, Joel M / Latif, Faisal / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Rao, Sunil V / Swaminathan, Rajesh V / Blankenship, James C. ·Division of Cardiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, New York. ssnaidu@winthrop.org. · Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Cardiovascular Institute, Providence, RI. · West Valley Medical Center, Caldwell, ID. · FirstHealth of the Carolinas, Pinehurst, NC. · Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · University of Illinois School of Medicine-Peoria, Peoria, IL. · University of Oklahoma and VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK. · University of Pittsburgh and VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Greenberg Division of Cardiology, New York, NY. · Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27137680.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline 2016 ACC/AHA Guideline Focused Update on Duration of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2016

Levine, Glenn N / Bates, Eric R / Bittl, John A / Brindis, Ralph G / Fihn, Stephan D / Fleisher, Lee A / Granger, Christopher B / Lange, Richard A / Mack, Michael J / Mauri, Laura / Mehran, Roxana / Mukherjee, Debabrata / Newby, L Kristin / O'Gara, Patrick T / Sabatine, Marc S / Smith, Peter K / Smith, Sidney C. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27036918.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline [SICI-GISE position paper on standards and guidelines for diagnostic and catheterization laboratories]. 2015

Piccaluga, Emanuela / Marchese, Alfredo / Varbella, Ferdinando / Sardella, Gennaro / Danzi, Gian Battista / Salvi, Alessandro / Cremonesi, Alberto / Merelli, Antonella / Ciarma, Lorenzo / Magro, Beatrice / Bedogni, Francesco / Anonymous920845. ·Cardiologia 1-Emodinamica, A.O. Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milano. · U.O. Cardiologia Interventistica, Anthea Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Bari. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, Ospedale degli Infermi, Rivoli (TO). · Dipartimento di Scienze Cardiovascolari, Respiratorie, Nefrologiche, Anestesiologiche e Geriatriche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma. · U.O. Cardiologia, Ospedale Santa Corona, Pietra Ligure (SV). · Emodinamica Diagnostica e Interventistica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria "Ospedali Riuniti", Trieste. · Laboratorio di Cardio-Angiologia Diagnostica ed Interventistica, Maria Cecilia Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Cotignola (RA). · U.O. Cardiologia 2, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa. · U.O. Emodinamica, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna. · UOSD Diagnostica ed Interventistica Cardiovascolare Endoluminale, Ospedale Civile "S. Maria della Misericordia", ULSS 18, Rovigo. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese (MI). ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #26444219.

ABSTRACT: In the last few years, the activity of cath labs has undergone some notable changes, at present largely focusing on diagnosis and invasive therapy of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. Technological and pharmacological advances have allowed for procedures to be performed in patients who are increasingly complex, and cath labs have become the preferred venue for endovascular treatment of coronary artery disease, in particular acute coronary syndrome, as well as the treatment of structural heart disease and peripheral vascular disease. This position paper is an update of the 1996 and 2008 versions, given the present level of experience and the situation in Italy. It aims to provide the quality standards required to maintain adequate conditions of know-how and safety, as well as the structural and organizational requirements that are fundamental to obtain the best possible use of human and technological resources. Position papers should be a stimulus and guide for operators in the field as well as for those who govern health policies. This should allow for an improved and more rational allocation of cath labs in Italy, based on the real need for procedures and an optimal distribution and organization of the cardiovascular emergency networks while respecting the minimum standards of care.

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