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Coronary Artery Disease HELP
Based on 34,604 articles published since 2009
|||| 13 

These are the 34604 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Worldwide during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Canadian Cardiovascular Society Position Statement on Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Update 2018. 2018

Brunham, Liam R / Ruel, Isabelle / Aljenedil, Sumayah / Rivière, Jean-Baptiste / Baass, Alexis / Tu, Jack V / Mancini, G B John / Raggi, Paolo / Gupta, Milan / Couture, Patrick / Pearson, Glen J / Bergeron, Jean / Francis, Gordon A / McCrindle, Brian W / Morrison, Katherine / St-Pierre, Julie / Henderson, Mélanie / Hegele, Robert A / Genest, Jacques / Goguen, Jeannette / Gaudet, Daniel / Paré, Guillaume / Romney, Jacques / Ransom, Thomas / Bernard, Sophie / Katz, Pamela / Joy, Tisha R / Bewick, David / Brophy, James. ·Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: Liam.brunham@ubc.ca. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Nutrition, Metabolism and Atherosclerosis Clinic, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, and Canadian Collaborative Research Network, Brampton, Ontario, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Laboratory Medicine, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec City, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, McGill University, Clinique 180, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, Université de Montréal, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Biochemistry, Schulich School of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Toronto and Division of Endocrinology, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto Ontario, Canada. · Lipidology Unit, Community Genomic Medicine Centre and ECOGENE-21, Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Saguenay, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Population Health Research Institute and Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Nutrition, Metabolism and Atherosclerosis Clinic, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Université de Montreal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Manitoba, St Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, St John, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #30527143.

ABSTRACT: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is the most common monogenic disorder causing premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. It affects 1 in 250 individuals worldwide, and of the approximately 145,000 Canadians estimated to have FH, most are undiagnosed. Herein, we provide an update of the 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement on FH addressing the need for case identification, prompt recognition, and treatment with statins and ezetimibe, and cascade family screening. We provide a new Canadian definition for FH and tools for clinicians to make a diagnosis. The risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with "definite" FH is 10- to 20-fold that of a normolipidemic individual and initiating treatment in youth or young adulthood can normalize life expectancy. Target levels for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol are proposed and are aligned with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines on dyslipidemia. Recommendation for the use of inhibitors of proprotein convertase kexin/subtilisin type 9 are made in patients who cannot achieve therapeutic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets on maximally tolerated statins and ezetimibe. The writing committee used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology in the preparation of the present document, which offers guidance for practical evaluation and management of patients with FH. This position statement also aims to raise awareness of FH nationally, and to mobilize patient support, promote knowledge translation, and availability of treatment and health care resources for this under-recognized, but important medical condition.

2 Guideline 2018 Focused Update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. 2018

Andrade, Jason G / Verma, Atul / Mitchell, L Brent / Parkash, Ratika / Leblanc, Kori / Atzema, Clare / Healey, Jeff S / Bell, Alan / Cairns, John / Connolly, Stuart / Cox, Jafna / Dorian, Paul / Gladstone, David / McMurtry, M Sean / Nair, Girish M / Pilote, Louise / Sarrazin, Jean-Francois / Sharma, Mike / Skanes, Allan / Talajic, Mario / Tsang, Teresa / Verma, Subodh / Wyse, D George / Nattel, Stanley / Macle, Laurent / Anonymous5291340. ·University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada. · Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · QEII Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Alberta, Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Institut universitaire de cardiologie et pneumologie, Quebec, Quebec, Canada. · London Heart Institute, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: lmacle@mac.com. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #30404743.

ABSTRACT: The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Atrial Fibrillation Guidelines Committee provides periodic reviews of new data to produce focused updates that address clinically important advances in atrial fibrillation (AF) management. This 2018 Focused Update addresses: (1) anticoagulation in the context of cardioversion of AF; (2) the management of antithrombotic therapy for patients with AF in the context of coronary artery disease; (3) investigation and management of subclinical AF; (4) the use of antidotes for the reversal of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (5) acute pharmacological cardioversion of AF; (6) catheter ablation for AF, including patients with concomitant AF and heart failure; and (7) an integrated approach to the patient with AF and modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. The recommendations were developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) standards. Individual studies and literature were reviewed for quality and bias; the literature review process and evidence tables are included as Supplementary Material and are available on the CCS Web site. Details of the updated recommendations are presented, along with their background and rationale. This document is linked to an updated summary of all CCS AF guidelines recommendations, from 2010 to the present 2018 Focused Update, which is provided in the Supplementary Material.

3 Guideline Coronary computed tomographic imaging in women: An expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2018

Truong, Quynh A / Rinehart, Sarah / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Berman, Daniel S / Bullock-Palmer, Renee / Carrascosa, Patricia / Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M / Dey, Damini / Ferencik, Maros / Fuechtner, Gudrun / Hecht, Harvey / Jacobs, Jill E / Lee, Sang-Eun / Leipsic, Jonathan / Lin, Fay / Meave, Aloha / Pugliese, Francesca / Sierra-Galán, Lilia M / Williams, Michelle C / Villines, Todd C / Shaw, Leslee J / Anonymous3891033. ·Weill Cornell Medicine, USA. Electronic address: qat9001@med.cornell.edu. · Piedmont Healthcare, USA. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, USA. · University of Erlangan, Germany. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA. · Deborah Heart and Lung Center, USA. · Maipu Diagnosis, Argentina. · William Beaumont Hospital, USA. · Oregon Health & Science University, USA. · Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. · Mount Sinai Health System, USA. · NYU Langone Medical Center, USA. · Severance Hospital, South Korea. · Providence Healthcare, Canada. · Weill Cornell Medicine, USA. · Ignacio Chavez National Institute for Cardiology, Mexico. · William Harvey Research Institute, UK. · American British Cowdray Medical Center, Mexico. · British Heart Foundation, UK. · Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences F Edward Hebert School of Medicine, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #30392926.

ABSTRACT: This expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) provides an evidence synthesis on the use of computed tomography (CT) imaging for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease in women. From large patient and population cohorts of asymptomatic women, detection of any coronary artery calcium that identifies females with a 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk of >7.5% may more effectively triage women who may benefit from pharmacologic therapy. In addition to accurate detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), CT angiography (CTA) identifies nonobstructive atherosclerotic plaque extent and composition which is otherwise not detected by alternative stress testing modalities. Moreover, CTA has superior risk stratification when compared to stress testing in symptomatic women with stable chest pain (or equivalent) symptoms. For the evaluation of symptomatic women both in the emergency department and the outpatient setting, there is abundant evidence from large observational registries and multi-center randomized trials, that CT imaging is an effective procedure. Although radiation doses are far less for CT when compared to nuclear imaging, radiation dose reduction strategies should be applied in all women undergoing CT imaging. Effective and appropriate use of CT imaging can provide the means for improved detection of at-risk women and thereby focus preventive management resulting in long-term risk reduction and improved clinical outcomes.

4 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous2701124 / Shah, Amar B / Kirsch, Jacobo / Bolen, Michael A / Batlle, Juan C / Brown, Richard K J / Eberhardt, Robert T / Hurwitz, Lynne M / Inacio, Joao R / Jin, Jill O / Krishnamurthy, Rajesh / Leipsic, Jonathon A / Rajiah, Prabhakar / Singh, Satinder P / White, Richard D / Zimmerman, Stefan L / Abbara, Suhny. ·Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York. Electronic address: ashah27@northwell.edu. · Panel Chair, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida. · Panel Vice-Chair, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute and Baptist Health of South Florida, Miami, Florida. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts; American College of Cardiology. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; American College of Physicians. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, Maryland. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392597.

ABSTRACT: Chronic chest pain (CCP) of a cardiac etiology is a common clinical problem. The diagnosis and classification of the case of chest pain has rapidly evolved providing the clinician with multiple cardiac imaging strategies. Though scintigraphy and rest echocardiography remain as appropriate imaging tools in the diagnostic evaluation, new technology is available. Current evidence supports the use of alternative imaging tests such as coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), cardiac MRI (CMRI), or Rb-82 PET/CT. Since multiple imaging modalities are available to the clinician, the most appropriate noninvasive imaging strategy will be based upon the patient's clinical presentation and clinical status. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

5 Guideline Risk Assessment for Cardiovascular Disease With Nontraditional Risk Factors: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2018

Anonymous2681075 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #29998297.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death among adults in the United States. Treatment to prevent CVD events by modifying risk factors is currently informed by the Framingham Risk Score, the Pooled Cohort Equations, or similar CVD risk assessment models. If current CVD risk assessment models could be improved by adding more risk factors, treatment might be better targeted, thereby maximizing the benefits and minimizing the harms. Objective: To update the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on using nontraditional risk factors in coronary heart disease risk assessment. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on using nontraditional risk factors in CVD risk assessment, focusing on the ankle-brachial index (ABI), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level, and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score; the health benefits and harms of CVD risk assessment and treatment guided by nontraditional risk factors combined with the Framingham Risk Score or Pooled Cohort Equations compared with using either risk assessment model alone; and whether adding nontraditional risk factors to existing CVD risk assessment models improves measures of calibration, discrimination, and risk reclassification. Findings: The USPSTF found adequate evidence that adding the ABI, hsCRP level, and CAC score to existing CVD risk assessment models results in small improvements in discrimination and risk reclassification; however, the clinical meaning of these changes is largely unknown. Evidence on adding the ABI, hsCRP level, and CAC score to the Pooled Cohort Equations is limited. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence to assess whether treatment decisions guided by the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score, in addition to risk factors in existing CVD risk assessment models, leads to reduced incidence of CVD events or mortality. The USPSTF found adequate evidence to conceptually bound the harms of early detection and interventions as small. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of using the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score in risk assessment for CVD in asymptomatic adults to prevent CVD events. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of adding the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score to traditional risk assessment for CVD in asymptomatic adults to prevent CVD events. (I statement).

6 Guideline Focused update of expert consensus statement: Use of invasive assessments of coronary physiology and structure: A position statement of the society of cardiac angiography and interventions. 2018

Lotfi, Amir / Davies, Justin E / Fearon, William F / Grines, Cindy L / Kern, Morton J / Klein, Lloyd W. ·Baystate Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Springfield, Massachusetts. · Imperial Colleges, London, United Kingdom. · Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California. · Northwell Health, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. · Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California. · Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29968425.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). 2018

Hecht, Harvey S / Blaha, Michael J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Cury, Ricardo C / Budoff, Matt / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: harvey.hecht@mountsinai.org. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Division of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176, United States. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, United States. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29793848.

ABSTRACT: The goal of CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of CAC scanning on all noncontrast CT scans, irrespective of the indication, in order to facilitate clinical decision-making, with recommendations for subsequent patient management. The CAC-DRS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the total calcium score and the number of involved arteries. General recommendations are provided for further management of patients with different degrees of calcified plaque burden based on CAC-DRS classification. In addition, CAC-DRS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit quality assurance and tracking patient outcomes with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

8 Guideline A Multidisciplinary Approach on the Perioperative Antithrombotic Management of Patients With Coronary Stents Undergoing Surgery: Surgery After Stenting 2. 2018

Rossini, Roberta / Tarantini, Giuseppe / Musumeci, Giuseppe / Masiero, Giulia / Barbato, Emanuele / Calabrò, Paolo / Capodanno, Davide / Leonardi, Sergio / Lettino, Maddalena / Limbruno, Ugo / Menozzi, Alberto / Marchese, U O Alfredo / Saia, Francesco / Valgimigli, Marco / Ageno, Walter / Falanga, Anna / Corcione, Antonio / Locatelli, Alessandro / Montorsi, Marco / Piazza, Diego / Stella, Andrea / Bozzani, Antonio / Parolari, Alessandro / Carone, Roberto / Angiolillo, Dominick J / Anonymous911159 / Anonymous921159 / Anonymous931159 / Anonymous941159 / Anonymous951159 / Anonymous961159 / Anonymous971159 / Anonymous981159 / Anonymous991159 / Anonymous1001159 / Anonymous1011159 / Anonymous1021159 / Anonymous1031159 / Anonymous1041159 / Anonymous1051159 / Anonymous1061159 / Anonymous1071159 / Anonymous1081159 / Anonymous1091159 / Anonymous1101159 / Anonymous1111159 / Anonymous1121159 / Anonymous1131159. ·Dipartimento Emergenze e Aree Critiche, Ospedale Santa Croce e Carle, Cuneo, Italy. Electronic address: roberta.rossini2@gmail.com. · Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padua Medical School, Padua, Italy. · Dipartimento Emergenze e Aree Critiche, Ospedale Santa Croce e Carle, Cuneo, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Cardio-Thoracic Sciences, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli," Naples, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria "Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania, Italy; Department of General Surgery and Medical-Surgical Specialties, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. · Coronary Care Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · Cardiovascular Department, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Azienda USL Toscana Sudest, Grosseto, Italy. · Unità Operativa di Cardiologia, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Italy. · U.O.C. Cardiologia Interventistica, Anthea Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Bari, Italy. · Cardiology Unit, Cardio-Thoraco-Vascular Department, University Hospital of Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy. · Swiss Cardiovascular Centre Bern, Bern University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland. · Degenza Breve Internistica e Centro Trombosi ed Emostasi, Dipartimento di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università dell'Insubria, Varese, Italy. · Department of Immunohematology and Transfusion Medicine, Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, AORN Dei Colli, Naples, Italy. · Dipartimento di Chirurgia Generale, Humanitas Research Hospital and University, Milano, Italy. · Policlinico Vittorio Emanuele di Catania, Catania, Italy. · Chirurgia Vascolare, Università di Bologna, Ospedale Sant'Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy. · UOC Chirurgia Vascolare, Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Policlinico San Donato IRCCS, University of Milano, Milan, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Città della salute e della scienza, Torino, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, University of Florida, College of Medicine-Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29519377.

ABSTRACT: Perioperative management of antithrombotic therapy in patients treated with coronary stents undergoing surgery remains poorly defined. Importantly, surgery represents a common reason for premature treatment discontinuation, which is associated with an increased risk in mortality and major adverse cardiac events. However, maintaining antithrombotic therapy to minimize the incidence of perioperative ischemic complications may increase the risk of bleeding complications. Although guidelines provide some recommendations with respect to the perioperative management of antithrombotic therapy, these have been largely developed according to the thrombotic risk of the patient and a definition of the hemorrhagic risk specific to each surgical procedure, key to defining the trade-off between ischemia and bleeding, is not provided. These observations underscore the need for a multidisciplinary collaboration among cardiologists, anesthesiologists, hematologists and surgeons to reach this goal. The present document is an update on practical recommendations for standardizing management of antithrombotic therapy management in patients treated with coronary stents (Surgery After Stenting 2) in various types of surgery according to the predicted individual risk of thrombotic complications against the anticipated risk of surgical bleeding complications. Cardiologists defined the thrombotic risk using a "combined ischemic risk" approach, while surgeons classified surgeries according to their inherent hemorrhagic risk. Finally, a multidisciplinary agreement on the most appropriate antithrombotic treatment regimen in the perioperative phase was reached for each surgical procedure.

9 Guideline Percutaneous coronary intervention for the left main stem and other bifurcation lesions: 12th consensus document from the European Bifurcation Club. 2018

Lassen, Jens Flensted / Burzotta, Francesco / Banning, Adrian P / Lefèvre, Thierry / Darremont, Olivier / Hildick-Smith, David / Chieffo, Alaide / Pan, Manuel / Holm, Niels Ramsing / Louvard, Yves / Stankovic, Goran. ·Department of Cardiology, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #29061550.

ABSTRACT: The European Bifurcation Club (EBC) was initiated in 2004 to support a continuous overview of the field of coronary artery bifurcation interventions and aims to facilitate a scientific discussion and an exchange of ideas on the management of bifurcation disease. The EBC hosts an annual, two-day compact meeting, dedicated to bifurcations, which brings together physicians, pathologists, engineers, biologists, physicists, mathematicians, epidemiologists and statisticians for detailed discussions. Every meeting is finalised with a consensus statement that reflects the unique opportunity of combining the opinion of interventional cardiologists with the opinion of a large variety of other scientists on bifurcation management. A series of consensus sessions dedicated to specific topics, to strengthen the consensus debates and focus the discussions, was introduced at this year's meeting. The sessions comprise an intensive overview of the present literature, a pro and con debate and a voting system, to guide the consensus-building process. The present document represents the summary of the up-to-date EBC consensus and recommendations from the 12th annual EBC meeting in 2016 in Rotterdam.

10 Guideline 2017 ESC focused update on dual antiplatelet therapy in coronary artery disease developed in collaboration with EACTS. 2018

Valgimigli, Marco / Bueno, Héctor / Byrne, Robert A / Collet, Jean-Philippe / Costa, Francesco / Jeppsson, Anders / Jüni, Peter / Kastrati, Adnan / Kolh, Philippe / Mauri, Laura / Montalescot, Gilles / Neumann, Franz-Josef / Petricevic, Mate / Roffi, Marco / Steg, Philippe Gabriel / Windecker, Stephan / Zamorano, Jose Luis / Levine, Glenn N / Anonymous3740973. · ·Eur J Cardiothorac Surg · Pubmed #29045581.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline Report of an ESC-EAPCI Task Force on the evaluation and use of bioresorbable scaffolds for percutaneous coronary intervention: executive summary. 2018

Byrne, Robert A / Stefanini, Giulio G / Capodanno, Davide / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Baumbach, Andreas / Escaned, Javier / Haude, Michael / James, Stefan / Joner, Michael / Jüni, Peter / Kastrati, Adnan / Oktay, Semih / Wijns, William / Serruys, Patrick W / Windecker, Stephan. ·Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Germany. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #28948934.

ABSTRACT: A previous Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) provided a report on recommendations for the non-clinical and clinical evaluation of coronary stents. Following dialogue with the European Commission, the Task Force was asked to prepare an additional report on the class of devices known as bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS). Five BRS have CE-mark approval for use in Europe. Only one device -the Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold- has published randomized clinical trial data and this data show inferior outcomes to conventional drug-eluting stents (DES) at 2-3 years. For this reason, at present BRS should not be preferred to conventional DES in clinical practice. The Task Force recommends that new BRS devices should undergo systematic non-clinical testing according to standardized criteria prior to evaluation in clinical studies. A clinical evaluation plan should include data from a medium sized, randomized trial against DES powered for a surrogate end point of clinical efficacy. Manufacturers of successful devices receive CE- mark approval for use and must have an approved plan for a large-scale randomized clinical trial with planned long-term follow-up.

12 Guideline [2017 ESC focused update on dual antiplatelet therapy in coronary artery disease developed in collaboration with EACTS.] 2017

Valgimigli, Marco / Bueno, Héctor / Byrne, Robert A / Collet, Jean-Philippe / Costa, Francesco / Jeppsson, Anders / Jüni, Peter / Kastrati, Adnan / Kolh, Philippe / Mauri, Laura / Montalescot, Gilles / Neumann, Franz-Josef / Peticevic, Mate / Roffi, Marco / Steg, Philippe Gabriel / Windecker, Stephan / Zamorano, Jose Luis. ·Cardiology, Inselspital, Bern. marco.valgimigli@insel.ch. ·Kardiol Pol · Pubmed #29251754.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand position statement executive summary: coronary artery calcium scoring. 2017

Hamilton-Craig, Christian R / Chow, Clara K / Younger, John F / Jelinek, V M / Chan, Jonathan / Liew, Gary Yh. ·Heart and Lung Institute, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, QLD c.hamiltoncraig@uq.edu.au. · The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, NSW. · Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD. · St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC. · Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD. · University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #29020908.

ABSTRACT: Introduction This article summarises the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand position statement on coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring. CAC scoring is a non-invasive method for quantifying coronary artery calcification using computed tomography. It is a marker of atherosclerotic plaque burden and the strongest independent predictor of future myocardial infarction and mortality. CAC scoring provides incremental risk information beyond traditional risk calculators such as the Framingham Risk Score. Its use for risk stratification is confined to primary prevention of cardiovascular events, and can be considered as individualised coronary risk scoring for intermediate risk patients, allowing reclassification to low or high risk based on the score. Medical practitioners should carefully counsel patients before CAC testing, which should only be undertaken if an alteration in therapy, including embarking on pharmacotherapy, is being considered based on the test result. Main recommendations CAC scoring should primarily be performed on individuals without coronary disease aged 45-75 years (absolute 5-year cardiovascular risk of 10-15%) who are asymptomatic. CAC scoring is also reasonable in lower risk groups (absolute 5-year cardiovascular risk, < 10%) where risk scores traditionally underestimate risk (eg, family history of premature CVD) and in patients with diabetes aged 40-60 years. We recommend aspirin and a high efficacy statin in high risk patients, defined as those with a CAC score ≥ 400, or a CAC score of 100-399 and above the 75th percentile for age and sex. It is reasonable to treat patients with CAC scores ≥ 100 with aspirin and a statin. It is reasonable not to treat asymptomatic patients with a CAC score of zero. Changes in management as a result of this statement Cardiovascular risk is reclassified according to CAC score. High risk patients are treated with a high efficacy statin and aspirin. Very low risk patients (ie, CAC score of zero) do not benefit from treatment.

14 Guideline Representation of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the AHA / ACC guidelines. 2017

von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian / Pilz, Guenter / Schulz-Menger, Jeanette. ·Department of Cardiology, Clinic Agatharied, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Norbert-Kerkel-Platz, 83734, Hausham, Germany. florian.vonknobelsdorff@khagatharied.de. · Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Berlin, Berlin, Germany. florian.vonknobelsdorff@khagatharied.de. · Working Group Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, a joint cooperation between the Charité Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and HELIOS Klinikum Berlin Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Berlin, Germany. florian.vonknobelsdorff@khagatharied.de. · Department of Cardiology, Clinic Agatharied, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Norbert-Kerkel-Platz, 83734, Hausham, Germany. · Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Working Group Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, a joint cooperation between the Charité Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and HELIOS Klinikum Berlin Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Berlin, Germany. ·J Cardiovasc Magn Reson · Pubmed #28942735.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Whereas evidence supporting the diagnostic value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has increased, there exists significant worldwide variability in the clinical utilization of CMR. A recent study demonstrated that CMR is represented in the majority of European Society for Cardiology (ESC) guidelines, with a large number of specific recommendations in particular regarding coronary artery disease. To further investigate the gap between the evidence and clinical use of CMR, this study analyzed the role of CMR in the guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA). METHODS: Twenty-four AHA/ACC original guidelines, updates and new editions, published between 2006 and 2017, were screened for the terms "magnetic", "MRI", "CMR", "MR" and "imaging". Non-cardiovascular MR examinations were excluded. All CMR-related paragraphs and specific recommendations for CMR including the level of evidence (A, B, C) and the class of recommendation (I, IIa, IIb, III) were extracted. RESULTS: Twelve of the 24 guidelines (50.0%) contain specific recommendations regarding CMR. Four guidelines (16.7%) mention CMR in the text only, and 8 (33.3%) do not mention CMR. The 12 guidelines with recommendations for CMR contain in total 65 specific recommendations (31 class-I, 23 class-IIa, 6 class-IIb, 5 class-III). Most recommendations have evidence level C (44/65; 67.7%), followed by level B (21/65; 32.3%). There are no level A recommendations. 22/65 recommendations refer to vascular imaging, 17 to congenital heart disease, 8 to cardiomyopathies, 8 to myocardial stress testing, 5 to left and right ventricular function, 3 to viability, and 2 to valvular heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: CMR is represented in two thirds of the AHA/ACC guidelines, which contain a number of specific recommendations for the use of CMR. In a simplified comparison with the ESC guidelines, CMR is less represented in the AHA/ACC guidelines in particular in the field of coronary artery disease.

15 Guideline Heart Team: Joint Position of the Swiss Society of Cardiology and the Swiss Society of Cardiac Surgery. 2017

Pedrazzini, Giovanni B / Ferrari, Enrico / Zellweger, Michael / Genoni, Michele. ·Swiss Society of Cardiology (SSC), Ticino, Switzerland. · Swiss Society of Cardiac Surgery (SGHC), Zurich, Switzerland. ·Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #28922674.

ABSTRACT: The Swiss Society of Cardiology (SSC) and the Swiss Society of Cardiac and ThoracicVascular Surgery (SSCTVS) have formulated their mutual intent of a close, patient-oriented, and expertise-based collaboration in the Heart Team Paper. The interdisciplinary dialogue between the SSC and SSCTVS reflects an attitude in decision making, which guarantees the best possible therapy for the individual patient. At the same time, it is a cornerstone of optimized process quality, placing individual interests into the background. Evaluation of the correct indication for a treatment is indeed very challenging and almost impossible to verify retrospectively. Quality in this very important health policy process can therefore only be assured by the use of mutually recognized indications, agreed upon by all involved physicians and medical specialties, whereby the capacity of those involved in the process is not important but rather their competence. These two medical societies recognize their responsibility and have incorporated international guidelines as well as specified regulations for Switzerland. Former competitors now form an integrative consulting team able to deliver a comprehensive evaluation for patients. Naturally, implementation rests with the individual caregiver. The Heart Team Paperof the SGK and SGHC, has defined guide boards within which the involved specialists maintain sufficient room to maneuver, and patients have certainty of receiving the best possible therapy they require.

16 Guideline 2017 Focused Update of the 2016 ACC Expert Consensus Decision Pathway on the Role of Non-Statin Therapies for LDL-Cholesterol Lowering in the Management of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways. 2017

Lloyd-Jones, Donald M / Morris, Pamela B / Ballantyne, Christie M / Birtcher, Kim K / Daly, David D / DePalma, Sondra M / Minissian, Margo B / Orringer, Carl E / Smith, Sidney C. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #28886926.

ABSTRACT: In 2016, the American College of Cardiology published the first expert consensus decision pathway (ECDP) on the role of non-statin therapies for low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol lowering in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. Since the publication of that document, additional evidence and perspectives have emerged from randomized clinical trials and other sources, particularly considering the longer-term efficacy and safety of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors in secondary prevention of ASCVD. Most notably, the FOURIER (Further Cardiovascular Outcomes Research with PCSK9 Inhibition in Subjects with Elevated Risk) trial and SPIRE-1 and -2 (Studies of PCSK9 Inhibition and the Reduction of Vascular Events), assessing evolocumab and bococizumab, respectively, have published final results of cardiovascular outcomes trials in patients with clinical ASCVD and in a smaller number of high-risk primary prevention patients. In addition, further evidence on the types of patients most likely to benefit from the use of ezetimibe in addition to statin therapy after acute coronary syndrome has been published. Based on results from these important analyses, the ECDP writing committee judged that it would be desirable to provide a focused update to help guide clinicians more clearly on decision making regarding the use of ezetimibe and PCSK9 inhibitors in patients with clinical ASCVD with or without comorbidities. In the following summary table, changes from the 2016 ECDP to the 2017 ECDP Focused Update are highlighted, and a brief rationale is provided. The content of the full document has been changed accordingly, with more extensive and detailed guidance regarding decision making provided both in the text and in the updated algorithms. Revised recommendations are provided for patients with clinical ASCVD with or without comorbidities on statin therapy for secondary prevention. The ECDP writing committee judged that these new data did not warrant changes to the decision pathways and algorithms regarding the use of ezetimibe or PCSK9 inhibitors in primary prevention patients with LDL-C <190 mg/dL with or without diabetes mellitus or patients without ASCVD and LDL-C ≥190 mg/dL not due to secondary causes. Based on feedback and further deliberation, the ECDP writing committee down-graded recommendations regarding bile acid sequestrant use, recommending bile acid sequestrants only as optional secondary agents for consideration in patients intolerant to ezetimibe. For clarification, the writing committee has also included new information on diagnostic categories of heterozygous and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, based on clinical criteria with and without genetic testing. Other changes to the original document were kept to a minimum to provide consistent guidance to clinicians, unless there was a compelling reason or new evidence, in which case justification is provided.

17 Guideline 2016 SCCT/STR guidelines for coronary artery calcium scoring of noncontrast noncardiac chest CT scans: A report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and Society of Thoracic Radiology. 2017

Hecht, Harvey S / Cronin, Paul / Blaha, Michael J / Budoff, Matthew J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Narula, Jagat / Yankelevitz, David / Abbara, Suhny. ·aLenox Hill Heart & Vascular Institute, New York, NY, United States bUniversity of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States cJohns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States dHarbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States eIcahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States fThe Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, United States gUTSouthwestern Medical Center, Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blv, Dallas, TX 75390-9316, United States. ·J Thorac Imaging · Pubmed #28832417.

ABSTRACT: The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR) have jointly produced this document. Experts in this subject have been selected from both organizations to examine subject-specific data and write this guideline in partnership. A formal literature review, weighing the strength of evidence has been performed. When available, information from studies on cost was considered. Computed tomography (CT) acquisition, CAC scoring methodologies and clinical outcomes are the primary basis for the recommendations in this guideline. This guideline is intended to assist healthcare providers in clinical decision making. The recommendations reflect a consensus after a thorough review of the best available current scientific evidence and practice patterns of experts in the field and are intended to improve patient care while acknowledging that situations arise where additional information may be needed to better inform patient care.

18 Guideline [Bioresorbable scaffolds in the treatment of coronary artery disease. Expert consensus statement of the Association of Cardiovascular Interventions of the Polish Cardiac Society (ACVI PCS)]. 2017

Reczuch, Krzysztof / Milewski, Krzysztof / Wąsek, Wojciech / Rzeszutko, Łukasz / Wojakowski, Wojciech / Hawranek, Michał / Włodarczak, Adrian / Pawłowski, Tomasz / Kochman, Janusz / Dobrzycki, Sławomir / Grygier, Marek / Ochała, Andrzej / Wójcik, Jarosław / Lesiak, Maciej / Dudek, Dariusz / Legutko, Jacek. ·Przewodniczący AISN PTK; II Klinika Kardiologii, Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Collegium Medicum, Kraków, Polska. jacek.legutko@uj.edu.pl. ·Kardiol Pol · Pubmed #28819961.

ABSTRACT: Bioresorbable scaffold coated with antimitotic drug is the latest development in the coronary stents technology. The concept of temporary scaffolding and natural vessel healing after angioplasty is a very attractive alternative to conventional metal stents. The results of the first observational studies have confirmed their ultimate biodegradation. Newest results of randomised trials and registries in broader clinical and anatomical indications also revealed the limitations of the first generation of scaffolds. The relatively thick polymeric struts and compliance with specific implantation protocol may influence the results. In this document, the group of experts presents the current state of knowledge, with a particular focus on the advantages and limitations of the new technology; it presents practical guidelines for optimal implantation techniques and clarifies documented indications for patients and lesions selection.

19 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous3940905 / Akers, Scott R / Panchal, Vandan / Ho, Vincent B / Beache, Garth M / Brown, Richard K J / Ghoshhajra, Brian B / Greenberg, S Bruce / Hsu, Joe Y / Kicska, Gregory A / Min, James K / Stillman, Arthur E / Stojanovska, Jadranka / Abbara, Suhny / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Principal Author, VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: akerssco@me.com. · Research Author, Internal Medicine Resident, Henry Ford Allegiance Health, Jackson, Michigan. · Panel Vice-Chair, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, California. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; American College of Cardiology. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Panel Chair, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #28473096.

ABSTRACT: In patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), imaging has major and diverse roles. First, imaging is valuable in determining and documenting the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia, hibernation, scarring, and/or the presence, site, and severity of obstructive coronary lesions. Second, imaging findings are important in determining the course of management of patients with suspected chronic myocardial ischemia and better defining those patients best suited for medical therapy, angioplasty/stenting, or surgery. Third, imaging is also necessary to determine the long-term prognosis and likely benefit from various therapeutic options by evaluating ventricular function, diastolic relaxation, and end-systolic volume. Imaging studies are also required to demonstrate other abnormalities, such as congenital/acquired coronary anomalies and severe left ventricular hypertrophy, that can produce angina in the absence of symptomatic coronary obstructive disease due to atherosclerosis. Clinical risk assessment is necessary to determine the pretest probability of CAD. Multiple methods are available to categorize patients as low, medium, or high risk for developing CAD. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

20 Guideline Clinical indications for coronary artery calcium scoring in asymptomatic patients: Expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2017

Hecht, Harvey / Blaha, Michael J / Berman, Daniel S / Nasir, Khurram / Budoff, Matthew / Leipsic, Jonathon / Blankstein, Ron / Narula, Jagat / Rumberger, John / Shaw, Leslee J. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: hhecht@aol.com. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, FL, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division) and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · The Princeton Longevity Center, Princeton, NJ, USA. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28283309.

ABSTRACT: This expert consensus statement summarizes the available data regarding the prognostic value of CAC in the asymptomatic population and its ability to refine individual risk prediction, addresses the limitations identified in the current traditional risk factor-based treatment strategies recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines including use of the Pooled Cohort Equations (PCE), and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Recommendation Statement for Statin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults. It provides CAC based treatment recommendations both within the context of the shared decision making model espoused by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines and independent of these guidelines.

21 Guideline Clinical Pharmacogenetic Testing and Application: Laboratory Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2017

Kim, Sollip / Yun, Yeo Min / Chae, Hyo Jin / Cho, Hyun Jung / Ji, Misuk / Kim, In Suk / Wee, Kyung A / Lee, Woochang / Song, Sang Hoon / Woo, Hye In / Lee, Soo Youn / Chun, Sail. ·Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, College of Medicine, Konyang University, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital and College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Genetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. suddenbz@skku.edu. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. sailchun@amc.seoul.kr. ·Ann Lab Med · Pubmed #28029011.

ABSTRACT: Pharmacogenetic testing for clinical applications is steadily increasing. Correct and adequate use of pharmacogenetic tests is important to reduce unnecessary medical costs and adverse patient outcomes. This document contains recommended pharmacogenetic testing guidelines for clinical application, interpretation, and result reporting through a literature review and evidence-based expert opinions for the clinical pharmacogenetic testing covered by public medical insurance in Korea. This document aims to improve the utility of pharmacogenetic testing in routine clinical settings.

22 Guideline ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. 2017

Patel, Manesh R / Calhoon, John H / Dehmer, Gregory J / Grantham, James Aaron / Maddox, Thomas M / Maron, David J / Smith, Peter K. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #28012615.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate that coronary revascularization may be appropriate for the clinical scenario. Seventeen clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by the rating panel: 10 were identified as appropriate, 6 as may be appropriate, and 1 as rarely appropriate. As seen with the prior coronary revascularization AUC, revascularization in clinical scenarios with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were considered appropriate. Likewise, clinical scenarios with unstable angina and intermediate- or high-risk features were deemed appropriate. Additionally, the management of nonculprit artery disease and the timing of revascularization are now also rated. The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of practice patterns that will hopefully improve physician decision making.

23 Guideline 2016 SCCT/STR guidelines for coronary artery calcium scoring of noncontrast noncardiac chest CT scans: A report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and Society of Thoracic Radiology. 2017

Hecht, Harvey S / Cronin, Paul / Blaha, Michael J / Budoff, Matthew J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Narula, Jagat / Yankelevitz, David / Abbara, Suhny. ·Lenox Hill Heart & Vascular Institute, New York, NY, United States. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. · Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States. · The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. · UTSouthwestern Medical Center, Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blv, Dallas, TX 75390-9316, United States. Electronic address: suhny.abbara@utsouthwestern.edu. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27916431.

ABSTRACT: The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR) have jointly produced this document. Experts in this subject have been selected from both organizations to examine subject-specific data and write this guideline in partnership. A formal literature review, weighing the strength of evidence has been performed. When available, information from studies on cost was considered. Computed tomography (CT) acquisition, CAC scoring methodologies and clinical outcomes are the primary basis for the recommendations in this guideline. This guideline is intended to assist healthcare providers in clinical decision making. The recommendations reflect a consensus after a thorough review of the best available current scientific evidence and practice patterns of experts in the field and are intended to improve patient care while acknowledging that situations arise where additional information may be needed to better inform patient care.

24 Guideline The Rationale for Performance of Coronary Angiography and Stenting Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: From the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Ramee, Stephen / Anwaruddin, Saif / Kumar, Gautam / Piana, Robert N / Babaliaros, Vasilis / Rab, Tanveer / Klein, Lloyd W / Anonymous11460889 / Anonymous11470889. ·Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: lloydklein@comcast.net. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27931592.

ABSTRACT: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective, nonsurgical treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The optimal treatment strategy for treating concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been tested prospectively in a randomized clinical trial. Nevertheless, it is standard practice in the United States to perform coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention for significant CAD at least 1 month before TAVR. All existing clinical trials were designed using this strategy. Therefore, it is wrong to extrapolate current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Appropriate Use Criteria against invasive procedures in asymptomatic patients to the TAVR population when evaluating the quality of care by cardiologists or hospitals. In this statement from the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the ACC, it is recommended that percutaneous coronary intervention should be considered in all patients with significant proximal coronary stenosis in major coronary arteries before TAVR, even though the indication is not covered in current guidelines.

25 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 8 - Hypertension and Associated Clinical Conditions 2016

Malachias, M V B / Amodeo, C / Paula, R B / Cordeiro, A C / Magalhães, L B N C / Bodanese, L C. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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