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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Ziad A. Ali
Based on 41 articles published since 2010
(Why 41 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Ziad Ali wrote the following 41 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Editorial Macro-Confusion About the Coronary Microcirculation. 2020

Jeremias, Allen / Ali, Ziad A. ·St. Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY (A.J., Z.A.A.). · Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY (A.J., Z.A.A.). · Columbia University, New York, NY (Z.A.A.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #32408820.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial The "Oculo-Appositional Reflex": Should Optical Coherence Tomography-Detected Stent Malapposition Be Corrected? 2019

Ali, Ziad A / Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan / Shlofmitz, Richard A / Mintz, Gary S. ·1 Division of Cardiology Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University New York NY. · 2 Cardiovascular Research Foundation New York NY. · 3 Department of Cardiovascular Medicine University of Sydney Australia. · 4 St Francis Hospital Roslyn NY. ·J Am Heart Assoc · Pubmed #30907208.

ABSTRACT: See Article by Im et al.

3 Editorial Shining light on calcified lesions, plaque stabilisation and physiologic significance: new insights from intracoronary OCT. 2018

Ali, Ziad A / Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi. ·Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #29624174.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial The science of stents: angioplasty turns 40. 2017

Ali, Ziad A. ·Division of Cardiology, Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, 177 Fort Washington Ave, Herbert Irving Pavilion, 6th Floor, New York Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. · Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA. ·Cardiovasc Res · Pubmed #28899003.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Assessment and management of coronary artery disease in kidney and pancreas transplant candidates. 2019

Knapper, Joseph T / Raval, Zankhana / Harinstein, Matthew E / Friedewald, John J / Skaro, Anton I / Abecassis, Michael I / Ali, Ziad A / Gheorghiade, Mihai / Flaherty, James D. ·Department of Medicine, Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · Division of Cardiology, Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Department of Surgery, Division of Transplantation, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Department of Surgery, Division of General Surgery and Multi-Organ Transplantation, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. ·J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) · Pubmed #30540647.

ABSTRACT: : Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing evaluation for kidney and/or pancreas transplantation represent a population with unique cardiovascular (CV) profiles and unique therapeutic needs. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is common in patients with ESRD, mediated by both the overrepresentation and higher prognostic value of traditional CV risk factors amongst this population, as well as altered cardiovascular responses to failing renal function, likely mediated by dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and abnormal calcium and phosphate metabolism. Within the ESRD population, obstructive CAD correlates highly with adverse coronary events, including during the peri-transplant period, and successful revascularization may attenuate some of that increased risk. Accordingly, peri-transplant coronary risk assessment is critical to ensuring optimal outcomes for these patients. The following provides a review of CAD in patients being evaluated for kidney and/or pancreas transplantation, as well as evidence-based recommendations for appropriate peri-transplant evaluation and management.

6 Review Cardiac allograft vasculopathy: A review. 2018

Lee, Michael S / Tadwalkar, Rigved V / Fearon, William F / Kirtane, Ajay J / Patel, Amisha J / Patel, Chetan B / Ali, Ziad / Rao, Sunil V. ·Division of Cardiology, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. · Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #30265435.

ABSTRACT: Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a complex disease that remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Originating as a result of inflammatory response, the development and progression of CAV is attributed to endothelial dysfunction, cellular infiltration, and a wide-range of genetic and patient factors. The detection of CAV remains a diagnostic challenge, as symptoms can be variable or absent. While coronary angiography remains the initial test of choice for the diagnosis and surveillance of CAV, intravascular imaging (either by ultrasound or optical coherence tomography) and physiologic assessments are useful adjuncts in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Positron emission tomography, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging may have a role increasing the time interval between invasive screening tests for prognosis. Medical management should include a statin, vasodilator, and tailored immunosuppressive regimen that maximally decrease allograft rejection and CAV progression while causing minimal side effects. Patients that are less responsive to pharmacotherapy should be considered for invasive management with percutaneous coronary intervention. Although surgical revascularization is a poor option, repeat OHT is the only definitive treatment option but given its morbidity should be reserved for a highly selected patient population.

7 Review Algorithmic Approach for Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Stent Implantation During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. 2018

Shlofmitz, Evan / Shlofmitz, Richard A / Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi / Rahim, Hussein M / Virmani, Renu / Hill, Jonathan M / Matsumura, Mitsuaki / Mintz, Gary S / Maehara, Akiko / Landmesser, Ulf / Stone, Gregg W / Ali, Ziad A. ·Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Cardiology, St. Francis Hospital, 100 Port Washington Boulevard, Suite 105, Roslyn, NY 11576, USA; Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway 9th Floor, New York, NY 10019, USA. · Department of Cardiology, St. Francis Hospital, 100 Port Washington Boulevard, Suite 105, Roslyn, NY 11576, USA. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. · CVPath Institute, 19 Firstfield Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA. · London Bridge Hospital, 2nd Floor, St Olaf House, London SE1 2PR, UK; Department of Cardiology, King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, SE5 9RS, UK. · Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway 9th Floor, New York, NY 10019, USA. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA; Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway 9th Floor, New York, NY 10019, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, Berlin 12200, Germany. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Cardiology, St. Francis Hospital, 100 Port Washington Boulevard, Suite 105, Roslyn, NY 11576, USA; Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway 9th Floor, New York, NY 10019, USA. Electronic address: zaa2112@columbia.edu. ·Interv Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #29983145.

ABSTRACT: Intravascular imaging plays a key role in optimizing outcomes for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) utilizes a user-friendly interface and provides high-resolution images. OCT can be used as part of daily practice in all stages of a coronary intervention: baseline lesion assessment, stent selection, and stent optimization. Incorporating a standardized, algorithmic approach when using OCT allows for precision PCI.

8 Review Imaging-guided pre-dilatation, stenting, post-dilatation: a protocolized approach highlighting the importance of intravascular imaging for implantation of bioresorbable scaffolds. 2018

Ali, Ziad A / Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan / Shlofmitz, Richard / Maehara, Akiko / Mintz, Gary S / Abizaid, Alexandre / Chamié, Daniel / Hill, Jonathan / Serruys, Patrick W / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Stone, Gregg W. ·a Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation , New York , NY , USA. · b Department of Cardiology , NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center , New York , NY , USA. · c Department of Cardiology , St Francis Hospital , Roslyn , NY , USA. · d Department of Cardiology , Instituto Dante Pazzanese of Cardiology , São Paulo , Brazil. · e Department of Cardiology , Cardiovascular Research Center , São Paulo , Brazil. · f Department of Cardiology , King's College , London , UK. · g Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine , London , UK. · h Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center , Rotterdam , The Netherlands. ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #29732926.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The advent of the fully bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) is the latest step in a series of advancements in the design of intracoronary stents over the past few decades. The novelty of this technology is in providing temporary vessel scaffolding and local antiproliferative therapy to prevent neointimal hyperplasia after percutaneous coronary intervention followed by gradual resorption of the scaffold to restore the native vessel anatomy and physiology - a process termed vascular reparative therapy. Areas covered: The first generation of BVS has not been able to fully match the high benchmark in safety and efficacy set by contemporary metallic drug-eluting stents. These shortcomings of BVS may be due to factors related to the device itself, the complexity of the underlying lesion, or the implantation technique. Expert commentary: Here, how intravascular imaging may be used to minimize these shortcomings is described and moreover, an imaging-guided step-by-step approach for BVS implantation that integrates the recently described pre-dilatation, stenting, post-dilatation (PSP) strategy is explained.

9 Review Utility of intracoronary imaging in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: comprehensive evaluation with intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography. 2018

Parviz, Yasir / Shlofmitz, Evan / Fall, Khady N / Konigstein, Maayan / Maehara, Akiko / Jeremias, Allen / Shlofmitz, Richard A / Mintz, Gary S / Ali, Ziad A. ·Division of Cardiology, Columbia UniversityMedical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA. · St. Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY, USA. ·Br Med Bull · Pubmed #29360941.

ABSTRACT: Background: Intracoronary imaging is an important tool for guiding decision making in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Sources of data: We have reviewed the latest available evidence in the field to highlight the various potential benefits of intravascular imaging. Areas of agreement: Coronary angiography has been considered the gold standard test to appropriately diagnose and manage patients with coronary artery disease, but it has the inherent limitation of being a 2-dimensional x-ray lumenogram of a complex 3-dimensional vascular structure. Areas of controversy: There is well-established inter- and intra-observer variability in reporting coronary angiograms leading to potential variability in various management strategies. Intracoronary imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy while optimizing the results of an intervention. Utilization of intracoronary imaging modalities in routine practice however remains low worldwide. Increased costs, resources, time and expertise have been cited as explanations for low incorporation of these techniques. Growing points: Intracoronary imaging supplements and enhances an operator's decision-making ability based on detailed and objective lesion assessment rather than a subjective visual estimation. The benefits of intravascular imaging are becoming more profound as the complexity of cases suitable for revascularization increases. Areas timely for developing research: While the clinical benefits of intravascular ultrasound have been well validated, optical coherence tomography in comparison is a newer technology, with robust clinical trials assessing its clinical benefit are underway.

10 Review Intracoronary Optical Coherence Tomography 2018: Current Status and Future Directions. 2017

Ali, Ziad A / Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan / Maehara, Akiko / Shlofmitz, Richard A / Ben-Yehuda, Ori / Mintz, Gary S / Stone, Gregg W. ·Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, New York, New York; Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. Electronic address: zaa2112@columbia.edu. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, New York, New York. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, New York, New York; Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. · Department of Cardiology, St. Francis Hospital, Roslyn, New York. · Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29268880.

ABSTRACT: The advent of intravascular imaging has been a significant advancement in visualization of coronary arteries, particularly with optical coherence tomography (OCT) that allows for high-resolution imaging of intraluminal and transmural coronary structures. Accumulating data support a clinical role for OCT in a multitude of clinical scenarios, including assessing the natural history of atherosclerosis and modulating effects of therapies, mechanisms of acute coronary syndromes, mechanistic insights into the effects of novel interventional devices, and optimization of percutaneous coronary intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we provide an overview of the published data on the clinical utility of OCT, highlighting the areas that need further investigation and the current barriers for further adoption of OCT in interventional cardiology practice.

11 Review IVUS-Guided Versus OCT-Guided Coronary Stent Implantation: A Critical Appraisal. 2017

Maehara, Akiko / Matsumura, Mitsuaki / Ali, Ziad A / Mintz, Gary S / Stone, Gregg W. ·Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. Electronic address: amaehara@crf.org. · Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #29216976.

ABSTRACT: Procedural guidance with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging improves the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) by: 1) informing the necessity for lesion preparation; 2) directing appropriate stent sizing to maximize the final stent area and minimize geographic miss; 3) selecting the optimal stent length to cover residual disease adjacent to the lesion, thus minimizing geographic miss; 4) guiding optimal stent expansion; 5) identifying acute complications (edge dissection, stent malapposition, tissue protrusion); and 6) clarifying the mechanism of late stent failure (stent thrombosis, neointimal hyperplasia, stent underexpansion or fracture, or neoatherosclerosis). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides similar information to IVUS (with some important differences), also potentially improving acute and long-term patient outcomes compared to angiography-guided PCI. The purpose of this review is to describe the similarities and differences between IVUS and OCT technologies, and to highlight the evidence supporting their utility to improve PCI outcomes.

12 Review Imaging and Physiology to Guide Venous Graft Interventions Without Contrast Administration in Advanced Renal Failure. 2017

Parviz, Yasir / Fall, Khady / Stone, Gregg W / Maehara, Akiko / Ben-Yehuda, Ori / Mintz, Gary S / Ali, Ziad A. ·Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, 161 Fort Washington Ave, New York, NY 10032 USA. zaa2112@columbia.edu. ·J Invasive Cardiol · Pubmed #29086735.

ABSTRACT: We describe step-by-step "zero-contrast" saphenous vein bypass graft intervention using a modified technique.

13 Review 2-year outcomes with the Absorb bioresorbable scaffold for treatment of coronary artery disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of seven randomised trials with an individual patient data substudy. 2017

Ali, Ziad A / Serruys, Patrick W / Kimura, Takeshi / Gao, Runlin / Ellis, Stephen G / Kereiakes, Dean J / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Simonton, Charles / Zhang, Zhen / Stone, Gregg W. ·New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA. · International Centre for Cardiovascular Health, Imperial College, London, London, UK. · Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan. · Fu Wai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · The Christ Hospital, Heart and Vascular Center, Lindner Research Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA, USA. · New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: gs2184@columbia.edu. ·Lancet · Pubmed #28732815.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) offer the potential to improve long-term outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention after their complete bioresorption. Randomised trials have shown non-inferiority between BVS and metallic drug-eluting stents at 1 year in composite safety and effectiveness outcomes, although some increases in rates of target vessel-related myocardial infarction and device thrombosis were identified. Outcomes of BVS following the first year after implantation are unknown. We sought to ascertain whether BVS are as safe and effective as drug-eluting stents within 2 years after implantation and between 1 and 2 years. METHODS: We did a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials in which patients were randomly assigned to everolimus-eluting Absorb BVS or metallic everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and followed up for at least 2 years. We searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane database, TCTMD, ClinicalTrials.gov, Clinical Trial Results, CardioSource, and abstracts and presentations from major cardiovascular meetings up to April 1, 2017, to identify relevant studies. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the device-oriented composite endpoint (cardiac mortality, target vessel-related myocardial infarction, or ischaemia-driven target lesion revascularisation) and the primary safety outcome measure was definite or probable device thrombosis. Individual patient data from the four ABSORB trials were used for landmark and subgroup analysis and multivariable modelling. FINDINGS: We identified seven randomised trials in which 5583 patients were randomly assigned to Absorb BVS (n=3261) or metallic EES (n=2322) and followed up for 2 years. BVS had higher 2-year relative risks of the device-oriented composite endpoint than did EES (9·4% [304 of 3217] vs 7·4% [169 of 2299]; relative risk [RR] 1·29 [95% CI 1·08-1·56], p=0·0059). These differences were driven by increased rates of target vessel-related myocardial infarction (5·8% [187 of 3218] vs 3·2% [74 of 2299]; RR 1·68 [95% CI 1·29-2·19], p=0·0003) and ischaemia-driven target lesion revascularisation (5·3% [169 of 3217] vs 3·9% [90 of 2300]; 1·40 [1·09-1·80], p=0·0090) with BVS, with non-significant differences in cardiac mortality. The cumulative 2-year incidence of device thrombosis was higher with BVS than with EES (2·3% [73 of 3187] vs 0·7% [16 of 2281]; RR 3·35 [95% CI 1·96-5·72], p<0·0001). Landmark analysis between 1 and 2 years also showed higher rates of the device-oriented composite endpoint (3·3% [69 of 2100] vs 1·9% [23 of 1193]; RR 1·64 [95% CI 1·03-2·61], p=0·0376) and device thrombosis (0·5% [11 of 2085] vs none [0 of 1183], p<0·0001) in BVS-treated patients than in EES-treated patients. INTERPRETATION: BVS was associated with increased rates of composite device-oriented adverse events and device thrombosis cumulatively at 2 years and between 1 and 2 years of follow-up compared with EES. FUNDING: Abbott Vascular.

14 Clinical Trial Identification of patients and plaques vulnerable to future coronary events with near-infrared spectroscopy intravascular ultrasound imaging: a prospective, cohort study. 2019

Waksman, Ron / Di Mario, Carlo / Torguson, Rebecca / Ali, Ziad A / Singh, Varinder / Skinner, William H / Artis, Andre K / Cate, Tim Ten / Powers, Eric / Kim, Christopher / Regar, Evelyn / Wong, S Chiu / Lewis, Stephen / Wykrzykowska, Joanna / Dube, Sandeep / Kazziha, Samer / van der Ent, Martin / Shah, Priti / Craig, Paige E / Zou, Quan / Kolm, Paul / Brewer, H Bryan / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M / Anonymous661050. ·MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address: ron.waksman@medstar.net. · University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, USA. · New York Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY & Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA. · Long Island Jewish, New York, NY, USA. · Central Baptist Hospital, Lexington, KY, USA. · Methodist Hospital, Merrillville, IN, USA. · Radboud University Medical Centre, Netherlands. · Medical University of South Carolina Hospital, Charleston, SC, USA. · Davis Hospital and Medical Center, Ogden, UT, USA. · Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Charleston Area Medical Center, Charleston, WV, USA. · Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Community Heart and Vascular, Indianapolis, IN, USA. · Crittenton Shelton Heart Center, Rochester, MI, USA. · Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Infraredx, Burlington, MA, USA. ·Lancet · Pubmed #31570255.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) intravascular ultrasound imaging can detect lipid-rich plaques (LRPs). LRPs are associated with acute coronary syndromes or myocardial infarction, which can result in revascularisation or cardiac death. In this study, we aimed to establish the relationship between LRPs detected by NIRS-intravascular ultrasound imaging at unstented sites and subsequent coronary events from new culprit lesions. METHODS: In this prospective, cohort study (LRP), patients from 44 medical centres were enrolled in Italy, Latvia, Netherlands, Slovakia, UK, and the USA. Patients with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent cardiac catheterisation with possible ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention were eligible to be enrolled. Enrolled patients underwent scanning of non-culprit segments using NIRS-intravascular ultrasound imaging. The study had two hierarchal primary hypotheses, patient and plaque, each testing the association between maximum 4 mm Lipid Core Burden Index (maxLCBI FINDINGS: Between Feb 21, 2014, and March 30, 2016, 1563 patients were enrolled. NIRS-intravascular ultrasound device-related events were seen in six (0·4%) patients. 1271 patients (mean age 64 years, SD 10, 883 [69%] men, 388 [31%]women) with analysable maxLCBI INTERPRETATION: NIRS imaging of non-obstructive territories in patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation and possible percutaneous coronary intervention was safe and can aid in identifying patients and segments at higher risk for subsequent NC-MACE. NIRS-intravascular ultrasound imaging adds to the armamentarium as the first diagnostic tool able to detect vulnerable patients and plaques in clinical practice. FUNDING: Infraredx.

15 Clinical Trial Optical Coherence Tomography of De Novo Lesions and In-Stent Restenosis in Coronary Saphenous Vein Grafts (OCTOPUS Study). 2016

Roleder, Tomasz / Pociask, Elżbieta / Wańha, Wojciech / Dobrolińska, Magdalena / Gąsior, Paweł / Smolka, Grzegorz / Walkowicz, Wojciech / Jadczyk, Tomasz / Bochenek, Tomasz / Dudek, Dariusz / Ochała, Andrzej / Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna / Gąsior, Zbigniew / Tendera, Michał / Ali, Ziad A / Wojakowski, Wojciech. ·Third Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia. ·Circ J · Pubmed #27334029.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The OCTOPUS registry prospectively evaluates the procedural and long-term outcomes of saphenous vein graft (SVG) PCI. The current study assessed the morphology of de novo lesions and in-stent restenosis (ISR) in patients undergoing PCI of SVG. METHODS AND RESULTS: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of SVG lesions in consecutive patients presenting with stable CAD and ACS was carried out. Thirty-nine patients (32 de novo and 10 ISR lesions) were included in the registry. ISR occurred in 5 BMS and 5 DES. There were no differences in the presence of plaque rupture and thrombus between de novo lesions and ISR. Lipid-rich tissue was identified in both de novo lesions and in ISR (75% vs. 50%, P=0.071) with a higher prevalence in BMS than in DES (23% vs. 7.5%; P=0.048). Calcific de novo lesions were detected in older grafts as compared with non-calcific atheromas (159±57 vs. 90±62 months after CABG, P=0.001). Heterogeneous neointima was found only in ISR (70% vs. 0, P<0.001) and was observed with similar frequency in both BMS and DES (24% vs. 30%, P=0.657). ISR was detected earlier in DES than BMS (median, 50 months; IQR, 18-96 months vs. 27 months; IQR, 13-29 months, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: OCT-based characteristics of de novo and ISR lesions in SVG were similar except for heterogeneous tissue, which was observed only in ISR. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1804-1811).

16 Article Improvement in left ventricular function following higher-risk percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. 2019

Russo, Juan J / Prasad, Megha / Doshi, Darshan / Karmpaliotis, Dimitrios / Parikh, Manish A / Ali, Ziad A / Popma, Jeffrey J / Pershad, Ashish / Ohman, E Magnus / Douglas, Pamela S / O'Neill, William W / Leon, Martin B / Moses, Jeffrey W / Kirtane, Ajay J. ·Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Banner - University Medical Center Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #31693292.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Surgical revascularization is associated with improved ventricular function and clinical outcomes among patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. There are less extensive data on changes in ventricular function among patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Accordingly, we sought to assess the extent and predictors of change in left ventricular ejection fraction (ΔLVEF) among patients undergoing hemodynamically-supported PCI. METHODS: We assessed ΔLVEF following hemodynamically-supported PCI (with Impella or intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation) among patients enrolled in the PROTECT II trial and cVAD registry. The ΔLVEF was compared among patients with paired echocardiography at baseline and at least 30 days of follow-up. Independent correlates of ΔLVEF (modeled continuously and with an absolute ΔLVEF≥5%) were assessed using multivariable models. RESULTS: Among the 689 patients with paired echocardiographic data included in the analysis, the mean LVEF improved from 24.8 ± 9.9% to 31.4 ± 13.3% after PCI, for a net increase of 6.5 ± 10.8% (p < .001). A total of 395 (57%) patients had ΔLVEF ≥ 5% following hemodynamically-supported PCI. The number of vessels treated was associated with ΔLVEF (ΔLVEF 5.5% with 1 vessel, 6.6% with 2 vessels, and 8.3% with 3 vessels, p for trend = .046). A lower baseline LVEF, absence of a history of congestive heart failure or aldosterone receptor antagonist use, and a greater number of vessels treated were independent correlates of LVEF improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction and paired echocardiographic assessments, an improvement in LVEF was observed following hemodynamically-supported PCI.

17 Article In-Hospital Outcomes of Chronic Total Occlusion Percutaneous Coronary Interventions in Patients With Prior Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery. 2019

Tajti, Peter / Karmpaliotis, Dimitri / Alaswad, Khaldoon / Jaffer, Farouc A / Yeh, Robert W / Patel, Mitul / Mahmud, Ehtisham / Choi, James W / Burke, M Nicholas / Doing, Anthony H / Dattilo, Phil / Toma, Catalin / Smith, A J Conrad / Uretsky, Barry / Holper, Elizabeth / Potluri, Srinivas / Wyman, R Michael / Kandzari, David E / Garcia, Santiago / Krestyaninov, Oleg / Khelimskii, Dmitrii / Koutouzis, Michalis / Tsiafoutis, Ioannis / Jaber, Wissam / Samady, Habib / Moses, Jeffrey W / Lembo, Nicholas J / Parikh, Manish / Kirtane, Ajay J / Ali, Ziad A / Doshi, Darshan / Xenogiannis, Iosif / Stanberry, Larissa I / Rangan, Bavana V / Ungi, Imre / Banerjee, Subhash / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·Minneapolis Heart Institute and Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, MN (P.T., M.N.B., I.X., L.I.S., B.V.R., E.S.B.). · Division of Invasive Cardiology, Second Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology Center, University of Szeged, Hungary (P.T., I.U.). · Columbia University, New York, NY (D.K., J.W.M., N.J.L., M.P., A.J.K., Z.A.A., D.D.). · Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (K.A.). · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (F.A.J.). · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (R.W.Y.). · VA San Diego Healthcare System and University of California San Diego, La Jolla (M.P., E.M.). · Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital, Dallas, TX (J.W.C.). · Medical Center of the Rockies, Loveland, CO (A.H.D., P.D.). · University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (C.T., A.J.C.S.). · VA Central Arkansas Healthcare System, Little Rock (B.U.). · The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano, TX (E.H., S.P.). · Torrance Memorial Medical Center, CA (R.M.W.). · Piedmont Heart Institute, Atlanta, GA (D.E.K.). · VA Minneapolis Healthcare System and University of Minnesota (S.G.). · Meshalkin Siberian Federal Biomedical Research Center, Ministry of Health of Russian Federation, Novosibirsk (O.K., D.K.). · Korgialeneio-Benakeio Hellenic Red Cross General Hospital of Athens, Greece (M.K., I.T.). · Emory University, Atlanta, GA (W.J., H.S.). · VA North Texas Health Care System and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (S.B., E.S.B.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #30871357.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We examined the procedural outcomes of chronic total occlusions (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions in patients with prior coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). METHODS AND RESULTS: We compared the clinical, angiographic characteristics and outcomes of 3486 CTO interventions performed in patients with (n=1101) and without (n=2317) prior CABG at 21 centers. Prior CABG patients (32% of total cohort) were older (67±9 versus 63±10 years; P<0.001) and had more comorbidities and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (50% [40-58] versus 55% [45-60]; P<0.001). The CTO target vessel in prior CABG patients was the right coronary artery (56%), circumflex (26%), and left anterior descending artery (17%). The mean J-CTO (2.9±1.2 versus 2.2±1.3; P<0.001) and PROGRESS-CTO (Prospective Global Registry for the Study of Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention; 1.5±1.1 versus 1.2±1.0; P<0.001) score was higher in prior CABG patients. Retrograde (53% versus 30%, P<0.001) and antegrade dissection reentry (35% versus 28%; P<0.001) techniques were used more frequently in prior CABG patients. Prior CABG patients had lower technical (84% versus 89%; P<0.001) and procedural (82% versus 87%, P<0.001) success, but similar incidence of in-hospital major complications (3.1% versus 2.5%; P=0.287). In-hospital mortality (1% versus 0.4%; P=0.016) and coronary perforation (7.1% versus 3.1%; P<0.001) occurred more frequently in prior CABG patients, however, CABG patients had a lower incidence of pericardial tamponade (0.1% versus 1.0%; P=0.002) and pericardiocentesis (0% versus 1.3%; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In a large multicenter CTO percutaneous coronary interventions registry, prior CABG patients had lower success rate but similar overall risk for complications, although mortality was higher and the incidence of tamponade was lower. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT02061436.

18 Article A prospective, single-center, randomized study to assess whether automated coregistration of optical coherence tomography with angiography can reduce geographic miss. 2019

Koyama, Kohei / Fujino, Akiko / Maehara, Akiko / Yamamoto, Myong Hwa / Alexandru, Dragos / Jennings, Joan / Krug, Patricia / Santiago, Lyn M / Murray, Meghan / Bongiovanni, Linda / Lee, Tetsumin / Kim, Song-Yi / Wang, Xiao / Lin, Yongqing / Matsumura, Mitsuaki / Ali, Ziad A / Sosa, Fernando / Haag, Elizabeth / Mintz, Gary S / Shlofmitz, Richard A. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. · Department of Cardiology, St. Francis Hospital, Roslyn, New York. · Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Department of Cardiology, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. · Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #30345635.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate whether automated coregistration of optical coherence tomography (OCT) with angiography reduces geographic miss (GM) during coronary stenting. BACKGROUND: Previous intravascular ultrasound or OCT studies have showed that residual disease at the stent edge or stent edge dissection was associated with stent thrombosis or edge restenosis. This has been termed GM. METHODS: Two hundred de novo coronary lesions were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to OCT-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with versus without automated coregistration of OCT with angiography. GM, the primary endpoint, was defined as angiographic ≥type B dissection or diameter stenosis >50% or OCT minimum lumen area <4.0 mm RESULTS: The prevalence of GM was not different comparing OCT-guided PCI with versus without automated coregistration (27.6% vs 34.0%, P = 0.33). However, there was a trend toward a reduced prevalence of significant distal stent edge dissection in lesions with automated coregistration (11.1% vs 20.8%, P = 0.07). The discrepancy in the distance between planned versus actual implanted stent location with automated coregistration was significantly shorter than without coregistration (1.9 ± 1.6 mm vs 2.6 ± 2.7 mm, P = 0.03), especially the prevalence of ≥5 mm discrepancy that was less frequent with automated coregistration. CONCLUSIONS: Automated coregistration of OCT with angiography did not reduce the primary endpoint of GM after stent implantation.

19 Article Apolipoprotein A-I Reduces In-Stent Restenosis and Platelet Activation and Alters Neointimal Cellular Phenotype. 2018

Vanags, Laura Z / Tan, Joanne T M / Galougahi, Keyvan K / Schaefer, Andreas / Wise, Steven G / Murphy, Andrew / Ali, Ziad A / Bursill, Christina A. ·Immunobiology Group, The Heart Research Institute, Sydney, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Columbia University, New York, New York. · Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. · Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · Haematopoiesis and Leukocyte Biology Group, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Immunology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. ·JACC Basic Transl Sci · Pubmed #30062205.

ABSTRACT: Even the most advanced drug-eluting stents evoke unresolved issues, including chronic inflammation, late thrombosis, and neoatherosclerosis. This highlights the need for novel strategies that improve stent biocompatibility. Our studies show that apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) reduces in-stent restenosis and platelet activation, and enhances endothelialization. These findings have therapeutic implications for improving stent biocompatibility.

20 Article Predictors of Calcium Fracture Derived From Balloon Angioplasty and its Effect on Stent Expansion Assessed by Optical Coherence Tomography. 2018

Fujino, Akiko / Mintz, Gary S / Lee, Tetsumin / Hoshino, Masahiro / Usui, Eisuke / Kanaji, Yoshihisa / Murai, Tadashi / Yonetsu, Taishi / Matsumura, Mitsuaki / Ali, Ziad A / Jeremias, Allen / Moses, Jeffery W / Shlofmitz, Richard A / Kakuta, Tsunekazu / Maehara, Akiko. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29798768.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Article Three-Year Outcomes With the Absorb Bioresorbable Scaffold: Individual-Patient-Data Meta-Analysis From the ABSORB Randomized Trials. 2018

Ali, Ziad A / Gao, Runlin / Kimura, Takeshi / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Kereiakes, Dean J / Ellis, Stephen G / Chevalier, Bernard / Vu, Minh-Thien / Zhang, Zhen / Simonton, Charles A / Serruys, Patrick W / Stone, Gregg W. ·New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York (Z.A.A., G.W.S.). · Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY (Z.A.A., G.W.S.). · Fu Wai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China (R.G.). · Kyoto University Hospital, Japan (T.K.). · Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Y.O.). · The Christ Hospital, Heart and Vascular Center, Lindner Research Center, Cincinnati, OH (D.J.K.). · Cleveland Clinic, OH (S.G.E.). · Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud, Massy, France (B.C.). · Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA (M.-t.V., Z.Z., C.A.S.). · International Centre for Cardiovascular Health, Imperial College, London, UK (P.W.S.). · New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York (Z.A.A., G.W.S.) gs2184@columbia.edu. ·Circulation · Pubmed #29089314.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) completely resorbs within 3 years after coronary artery implantation. The safety and effectiveness of BVS through this critical 3-year period have not been characterized. METHODS: We performed an individual-patient-data pooled meta-analysis of the 4 randomized ABSORB trials in which 3389 patients with coronary artery disease were randomly assigned to everolimus-eluting Absorb BVS (n=2164) or cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stents (n=1225). The primary efficacy outcome measure was target lesion failure (cardiac mortality, target vessel myocardial infarction, or ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization), and the primary safety outcome measure was device thrombosis. RESULTS: BVS compared with cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stents resulted in higher 3-year rates of target lesion failure (11.7% versus 8.1%; risk ratio [RR], 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.73; CONCLUSIONS: In the present individual-patient-data pooled meta-analysis of the ABSORB trials, BVS was associated with increased rates of target lesion failure and device thrombosis between 1 and 3 years and cumulatively through 3 years of follow-up compared with everolimus-eluting stents. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT01751906, NCT01844284, NCT01923740, and NCT01425281.

22 Article Mechanisms of Orbital Versus Rotational Atherectomy Plaque Modification in Severely Calcified Lesions Assessed by Optical Coherence Tomography. 2017

Yamamoto, Myong Hwa / Maehara, Akiko / Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan / Mintz, Gary S / Parviz, Yasir / Kim, Sung Sik / Koyama, Kohei / Amemiya, Kisaki / Kim, Song-Yi / Ishida, Masaru / Losquadro, Monica / Kirtane, Ajay J / Haag, Elizabeth / Sosa, Fernando A / Stone, Gregg W / Moses, Jeffery W / Ochiai, Masahiko / Shlofmitz, Richard A / Ali, Ziad A. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29268891.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Article Relation of Coronary Flow Reserve to Other Findings on Positron Emission Tomography Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Left Heart Catheterization in Patients With End-stage Renal Disease Being Evaluated for Kidney Transplant. 2017

Paz, Yehuda / Morgenstern, Rachelle / Weinberg, Richard / Chiles, Mariana / Bhatti, Navdeep / Ali, Ziad / Mohan, Sumit / Bokhari, Sabahat. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: yep2103@cumc.columbia.edu. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; The Columbia University Renal Epidemiology (CURE) Group, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; The Columbia University Renal Epidemiology (CURE) Group, New York, New York; Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, New York. ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #28942939.

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and often goes undetected. Abnormal coronary flow reserve (CFR), which predicts increased risk of cardiac death, may be present in patients with ESRD without other evidence of coronary artery disease (CAD). We prospectively studied 131 patients who had rest and dipyridamole pharmacologic stress N

24 Article Optical Coherence Tomography Characterization of Coronary Lithoplasty for Treatment of Calcified Lesions: First Description. 2017

Ali, Ziad A / Brinton, Todd J / Hill, Jonathan M / Maehara, Akiko / Matsumura, Mitsuaki / Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan / Illindala, Uday / Götberg, Matthias / Whitbourn, Robert / Van Mieghem, Nicolas / Meredith, Ian T / Di Mario, Carlo / Fajadet, Jean. ·Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, New York, New York; Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. Electronic address: zaa2112@columbia.edu. · Stanford University Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, California. · King's College Hospital NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, New York, New York; Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, New York, New York. · Shockwave Medical, Fremont, California. · Institute of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Fitzroy, Australia. · VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Cardiovascular Research Centre, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Australia. · Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom. · Clinique Pasteur, Toulouse, France. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28797412.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine the mechanistic effects of a novel balloon-based lithoplasty system on heavily calcified coronary lesions and subsequent stent placement using optical coherence tomography (OCT). BACKGROUND: The Shockwave Coronary Rx Lithoplasty System (Shockwave Medical, Fremont, California) delivers localized, lithotripsy-enhanced disruption of calcium within the target lesion (i.e., lithoplasty) for vessel preparation before stent implantation. METHODS: We analyzed OCT findings in 31 patients in whom lithoplasty was used to treat severely calcified stenotic coronary lesions. RESULTS: After lithoplasty, intraplaque calcium fracture was identified in 43% of lesions, with circumferential multiple fractures noted in >25%. The frequency of calcium fractures per lesion increased in the most severely calcified plaques (highest tertile vs. lowest tertile; p = 0.009), with a trend toward greater incidence of calcium fracture (77.8% vs. 22.2%; p = 0.057). Post-lithoplasty, mean acute area gain was 2.1 mm CONCLUSIONS: High-resolution imaging by OCT delineated calcium modification with fracture as a major mechanism of action of lithoplasty in vivo and demonstrated efficacy in the achievement of significant acute area gain and favorable stent expansion.

25 Article Neoatherosclerosis assessed with optical coherence tomography in restenotic bare metal and first- and second-generation drug-eluting stents. 2017

Song, Lei / Mintz, Gary S / Yin, Dong / Yamamoto, Myong Hwa / Chin, Chee Yang / Matsumura, Mitsuaki / Fall, Khady / Kirtane, Ajay J / Parikh, Manish A / Moses, Jeffrey W / Ali, Ziad A / Shlofmitz, Richard A / Maehara, Akiko. ·Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway, 9th Floor, New York, NY, 10019, USA. · New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Nation Center for Cardiovascular Disease, China Peking Union Medical College, Fuwai Hospital, Beijing, China. · National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. · St. Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY, USA. · Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway, 9th Floor, New York, NY, 10019, USA. amaehara@crf.org. · New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. amaehara@crf.org. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28281026.

ABSTRACT: Although reported in bare metal stents (BMS) and first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES), little is known about neoatherosclerosis in second-generation DES. We used optical coherence tomography to evaluate neoatherosclerosis among different stent generations. Overall, 274 in-stent restenosis (ISR) lesions (duration from implantation 56.9 ± 47.2 months) in 274 patients were assessed for the presence of neoatherosclerosis. Neoatherosclerosis was identified in 38.7% of lesions (106/274): 23.0% second-generation DES (38/165), 65.1% first-generation DES (54/83), and 53.8% BMS (14/26). In the neoatherosclerosis cohort (n = 106), more stent underexpansion or fracture/deformation was observed in second-generation DES, whereas thrombus, without plaque rupture, or evagination was more common in first-generation DES. In multivariable analyses, duration from implantation >1 year (OR: 2.44, 95% CI 1.12-5.31; p = 0.03), absence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.10-3.44; p = 0.02) or statins at the time of ISR (OR 3.12, 95% CI 1.42-6.84; p = 0.01), and first-generation vs first-generation DES (OR 5.32, 95% CI 2.82-10.10; p < 0.001) correlated with a higher prevalence of neoatherosclerosis. Duration from implantation <1 year (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.03-4.55; p = 0.04) and thin fibrous cap, thrombus, or rupture (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.15-6.39; p = 0.02) were independent predictors for acute coronary syndromes presentation. Neoatherosclerosis is an important ISR mechanism, especially in first generation DES.

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