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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Adel H. A. Allam
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Adel H. Allam wrote the following 4 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial More risk factors, less ischemia, and the relevance of MPI testing. 2015

Thompson, Randall C / Allam, Adel H. ·St. Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, USA, rthompson@saint-lukes.org. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #25698478.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Is atherosclerosis fundamental to human aging? Lessons from ancient mummies. 2014

Clarke, Emily M / Thompson, Randall C / Allam, Adel H / Wann, L Samuel / Lombardi, Guido P / Sutherland, M Linda / Sutherland, James D / Cox, Samantha L / Soliman, Muhammad Al-Tohamy / Abd el-Maksoud, Gomaa / Badr, Ibrahem / Miyamoto, Michael I / Frohlich, Bruno / Nur el-din, Abdel-Halim / Stewart, Alexandre F R / Narula, Jagat / Zink, Albert R / Finch, Caleb E / Michalik, David E / Thomas, Gregory S. ·University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, USA; University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USA. · Al Azhar Medical School, Cairo, Egypt. · Columbia St Mary's Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA. · Laboratorio de Paleopatologia, Catedra Pedro Weiss, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru. · Newport Diagnostic Center, Newport Beach, CA, USA. · Saddleback Memorial, Laguna Hills, CA, USA. · University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · National Research Center, Giza, Egypt. · Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. · Institute of Restoration, Alexandria, Egypt. · Mission Internal Medical Group, Mission Viejo, CA, USA. · Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC, USA. · University for Science and Technology, 6th of October City, Egypt. · University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontairo, Canada. · Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Institute for Mummies and the Iceman, European Academy, Bolzano, Italy. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Miller Children's Hospital, Long Beach, CA, USA; University of California, Irvine, CA, USA. · MemorialCare Heart & Vascular Institute, Long Beach Memorial, Long Beach, CA, USA; University of California, Irvine, CA, USA. Electronic address: gthomas1@memorialcare.org. ·J Cardiol · Pubmed #24582386.

ABSTRACT: Case reports from Johan Czermak, Marc Ruffer, and others a century or more ago demonstrated ancient Egyptians had atherosclerosis three millennia ago. The Horus study team extended their findings, demonstrating that atherosclerosis was prevalent among 76 ancient Egyptian mummies and among 61 mummies from each of the ancient cultures of Peru, the American Southwest, and the Aleutian Islands. These findings challenge the assumption that atherosclerosis is a modern disease caused by present day risk factors. An extensive autopsy of an ancient Egyptian teenage male weaver named Nakht found that he was infected with four parasites: Schistosoma haematobium, Taenia species, Trichinella spiralis, and Plasmodium falciparum. Modern day patients with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and human immunodeficiency virus experience premature atherosclerosis. Could the burden of chronic inflammatory disease have been a risk factor for atherosclerosis in these ancient cultures? The prevalence of atherosclerosis in four diverse ancient cultures is consistent with atherosclerosis being fundamental to aging. The impact of risk factors in modern times, and potentially in ancient times, suggests a strong gene-environmental interplay: human genes provide a vulnerability to atherosclerosis, the environment determines when and if atherosclerosis becomes manifest clinically.

3 Article Is coronary calcium scoring too late? Total body arterial calcium burden in patients without known CAD and normal MPI. 2018

Allam, Adel H A / Thompson, Randall C / Eskander, Michael A / Mandour Ali, Mohamed A / Sadek, Ayman / Rowan, Chris J / Sutherland, M Linda / Sutherland, James D / Frohlich, Bruno / Michalik, David E / Anonymous211017 / Finch, Caleb E / Narula, Jagat / Thomas, Gregory S / Samuel Wann, L. ·Al Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt. · Alpha Scan, 45 Anas Ibn Malik Street, Mohandseen, Giza, Egypt. · Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, USA. · University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USA. · University of California, Irvine Health, Orange, CA, USA. eskandem@uci.edu. · Renown Institute for Heart and Vascular Health, Reno, NV, USA. · Newport Diagnostic Center, Newport, CA, USA. · South Coast Radiological Medical Group, Laguna Hills, CA, USA. · National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, DC, USA. · University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA. · Miller Women's and Children's Hospital, Long Beach, CA, USA. · Leonard Davis School of Gerontology and Dornsife College, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Long Beach Memorial, Long Beach, CA, USA. · University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA, USA. · Ascension Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #28547671.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with normal myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) have a good prognosis. However, pre-clinical coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis may exist in the absence of myocardial ischemia. METHODS: 154 Egyptian patients (mean age 53 years) underwent whole-body non-contrast CT following normal MPI. RESULTS: Atherosclerosis in the form of calcification was observed in ≥1 vascular bed in 115 of 154 (75%) patients. This included the iliofemoral (62%), abdominal aorta (53%), thoracic aorta (47%), coronary (47%), and carotid (25%) vascular beds. Mean total body calcium score was 3172 ± 530 AU. Extracoronary atherosclerosis in patients with a zero coronary artery calcium (CAC) score was common, occurring in the above-listed beds 42%, 36%, 29%, and 7% of the time, respectively. CAC was rarely present without iliofemoral or abdominal aortic calcification. CONCLUSION: Quantitative assessment of calcification in different vascular beds demonstrates that extracoronary atherosclerosis is common in patients who have normal MPI. Atherosclerotic calcifications are most common in the iliofemoral arteries and abdominal aorta, which typically predate coronary calcifications. An imaging strategy to detect extracoronary atherosclerosis could lead to greater understanding of the natural history of atherosclerosis in its long pre-clinical phase and possibly to earlier preventive strategies.

4 Article Coronary atherosclerosis in indigenous South American Tsimane: a cross-sectional cohort study. 2017

Kaplan, Hillard / Thompson, Randall C / Trumble, Benjamin C / Wann, L Samuel / Allam, Adel H / Beheim, Bret / Frohlich, Bruno / Sutherland, M Linda / Sutherland, James D / Stieglitz, Jonathan / Rodriguez, Daniel Eid / Michalik, David E / Rowan, Chris J / Lombardi, Guido P / Bedi, Ram / Garcia, Angela R / Min, James K / Narula, Jagat / Finch, Caleb E / Gurven, Michael / Thomas, Gregory S. ·Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA. Electronic address: hkaplan@unm.edu. · Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA. · School of Human Evolution and Social Change, and Center for Evolution and Medicine, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. · Ascension Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA. · Al Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt. · Department of Human Behavior, Ecology and Culture, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany. · National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA; Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, USA. · Newport Diagnostic Center, Newport Beach, CA, USA. · South Coast Radiological Medical Group, Laguna Hills, CA, USA. · Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse, Toulouse, France; Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA. · Department of Medicine, Universidad de San Simón, Cochabamba, Bolivia. · University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA; Miller Women's and Children's Hospital Long Beach, CA, USA. · Renown Institute for Heart and Vascular Health, Reno, NV, USA; University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA. · Laboratorio de Paleopatologia, Catedra Pedro Weiss, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru. · Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA, USA. · Department of Anthropology University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA. · Weill Cornell Medical College and the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, NY, USA. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · University of Southern California Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Dornsife College, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Anthropology University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA; Long Beach Memorial, Long Beach, CA, USA. · University of California Irvine, Orange, CA, USA. ·Lancet · Pubmed #28320601.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Conventional coronary artery disease risk factors might potentially explain at least 90% of the attributable risk of coronary artery disease. To better understand the association between the pre-industrial lifestyle and low prevalence of coronary artery disease risk factors, we examined the Tsimane, a Bolivian population living a subsistence lifestyle of hunting, gathering, fishing, and farming with few cardiovascular risk factors, but high infectious inflammatory burden. METHODS: We did a cross-sectional cohort study including all individuals who self-identified as Tsimane and who were aged 40 years or older. Coronary atherosclerosis was assessed by coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring done with non-contrast CT in Tsimane adults. We assessed the difference between the Tsimane and 6814 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). CAC scores higher than 100 were considered representative of significant atherosclerotic disease. Tsimane blood lipid and inflammatory biomarkers were obtained at the time of scanning, and in some patients, longitudinally. FINDINGS: Between July 2, 2014, and Sept 10, 2015, 705 individuals, who had data available for analysis, were included in this study. 596 (85%) of 705 Tsimane had no CAC, 89 (13%) had CAC scores of 1-100, and 20 (3%) had CAC scores higher than 100. For individuals older than age 75 years, 31 (65%) Tsimane presented with a CAC score of 0, and only four (8%) had CAC scores of 100 or more, a five-fold lower prevalence than industrialised populations (p≤0·0001 for all age categories of MESA). Mean LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations were 2·35 mmol/L (91 mg/dL) and 1·0 mmol/L (39·5 mg/dL), respectively; obesity, hypertension, high blood sugar, and regular cigarette smoking were rare. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was elevated beyond the clinical cutoff of 3·0 mg/dL in 360 (51%) Tsimane participants. INTERPRETATION: Despite a high infectious inflammatory burden, the Tsimane, a forager-horticulturalist population of the Bolivian Amazon with few coronary artery disease risk factors, have the lowest reported levels of coronary artery disease of any population recorded to date. These findings suggest that coronary atherosclerosis can be avoided in most people by achieving a lifetime with very low LDL, low blood pressure, low glucose, normal body-mass index, no smoking, and plenty of physical activity. The relative contributions of each are still to be determined. FUNDING: National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health; St Luke's Hospital of Kansas City; and Paleocardiology Foundation.