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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Saif Anwaruddin
Based on 7 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Saif Anwaruddin wrote the following 7 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline The Rationale for Performance of Coronary Angiography and Stenting Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: From the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Ramee, Stephen / Anwaruddin, Saif / Kumar, Gautam / Piana, Robert N / Babaliaros, Vasilis / Rab, Tanveer / Klein, Lloyd W / Anonymous11460889 / Anonymous11470889. ·Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: lloydklein@comcast.net. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27931592.

ABSTRACT: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective, nonsurgical treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The optimal treatment strategy for treating concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been tested prospectively in a randomized clinical trial. Nevertheless, it is standard practice in the United States to perform coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention for significant CAD at least 1 month before TAVR. All existing clinical trials were designed using this strategy. Therefore, it is wrong to extrapolate current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Appropriate Use Criteria against invasive procedures in asymptomatic patients to the TAVR population when evaluating the quality of care by cardiologists or hospitals. In this statement from the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the ACC, it is recommended that percutaneous coronary intervention should be considered in all patients with significant proximal coronary stenosis in major coronary arteries before TAVR, even though the indication is not covered in current guidelines.

2 Editorial Recapturing the magic: revisiting the pleiotropic effects of statins in percutaneous coronary revascularization. 2009

Ellis, Stephen G / Anwaruddin, Saif. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #19643321.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Clinical Trial Effect of transendocardial delivery of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells on functional capacity, left ventricular function, and perfusion in chronic heart failure: the FOCUS-CCTRN trial. 2012

Perin, Emerson C / Willerson, James T / Pepine, Carl J / Henry, Timothy D / Ellis, Stephen G / Zhao, David X M / Silva, Guilherme V / Lai, Dejian / Thomas, James D / Kronenberg, Marvin W / Martin, A Daniel / Anderson, R David / Traverse, Jay H / Penn, Marc S / Anwaruddin, Saif / Hatzopoulos, Antonis K / Gee, Adrian P / Taylor, Doris A / Cogle, Christopher R / Smith, Deirdre / Westbrook, Lynette / Chen, James / Handberg, Eileen / Olson, Rachel E / Geither, Carrie / Bowman, Sherry / Francescon, Judy / Baraniuk, Sarah / Piller, Linda B / Simpson, Lara M / Loghin, Catalin / Aguilar, David / Richman, Sara / Zierold, Claudia / Bettencourt, Judy / Sayre, Shelly L / Vojvodic, Rachel W / Skarlatos, Sonia I / Gordon, David J / Ebert, Ray F / Kwak, Minjung / Moyé, Lemuel A / Simari, Robert D / Anonymous5760721. ·Texas Heart Institute, St Luke's Episcopal Hospital, Houston, USA. ·JAMA · Pubmed #22447880.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Previous studies using autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy have demonstrated safety and suggested efficacy. OBJECTIVE: To determine if administration of BMCs through transendocardial injections improves myocardial perfusion, reduces left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV), or enhances maximal oxygen consumption in patients with coronary artery disease or LV dysfunction, and limiting heart failure or angina. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: A phase 2 randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of symptomatic patients (New York Heart Association classification II-III or Canadian Cardiovascular Society classification II-IV) with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 45% or less, a perfusion defect by single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), and coronary artery disease not amenable to revascularization who were receiving maximal medical therapy at 5 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN) sites between April 29, 2009, and April 18, 2011. INTERVENTION: Bone marrow aspiration (isolation of BMCs using a standardized automated system performed locally) and transendocardial injection of 100 million BMCs or placebo (ratio of 2 for BMC group to 1 for placebo group). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Co-primary end points assessed at 6 months: changes in LVESV assessed by echocardiography, maximal oxygen consumption, and reversibility on SPECT. Phenotypic and functional analyses of the cell product were performed by the CCTRN biorepository core laboratory. RESULTS: Of 153 patients who provided consent, a total of 92 (82 men; average age: 63 years) were randomized (n = 61 in BMC group and n = 31 in placebo group). Changes in LVESV index (-0.9 mL/m(2) [95% CI, -6.1 to 4.3]; P = .73), maximal oxygen consumption (1.0 [95% CI, -0.42 to 2.34]; P = .17), and reversible defect (-1.2 [95% CI, -12.50 to 10.12]; P = .84) were not statistically significant. There were no differences found in any of the secondary outcomes, including percent myocardial defect, total defect size, fixed defect size, regional wall motion, and clinical improvement. CONCLUSION: Among patients with chronic ischemic heart failure, transendocardial injection of autologous BMCs compared with placebo did not improve LVESV, maximal oxygen consumption, or reversibility on SPECT. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00824005.

4 Article Text mining applied to electronic cardiovascular procedure reports to identify patients with trileaflet aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease. 2017

Small, Aeron M / Kiss, Daniel H / Zlatsin, Yevgeny / Birtwell, David L / Williams, Heather / Guerraty, Marie A / Han, Yuchi / Anwaruddin, Saif / Holmes, John H / Chirinos, Julio A / Wilensky, Robert L / Giri, Jay / Rader, Daniel J. ·Department of Medicine and Cardiovascular Institute, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, PA, USA. · Institute for Biomedical Informatics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Medicine and Cardiovascular Institute, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, PA, USA; Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Department of Genetics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, PA, USA. Electronic address: rader@mail.med.upenn.edu. ·J Biomed Inform · Pubmed #28624641.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Interrogation of the electronic health record (EHR) using billing codes as a surrogate for diagnoses of interest has been widely used for clinical research. However, the accuracy of this methodology is variable, as it reflects billing codes rather than severity of disease, and depends on the disease and the accuracy of the coding practitioner. Systematic application of text mining to the EHR has had variable success for the detection of cardiovascular phenotypes. We hypothesize that the application of text mining algorithms to cardiovascular procedure reports may be a superior method to identify patients with cardiovascular conditions of interest. METHODS: We adapted the Oracle product Endeca, which utilizes text mining to identify terms of interest from a NoSQL-like database, for purposes of searching cardiovascular procedure reports and termed the tool "PennSeek". We imported 282,569 echocardiography reports representing 81,164 individuals and 27,205 cardiac catheterization reports representing 14,567 individuals from non-searchable databases into PennSeek. We then applied clinical criteria to these reports in PennSeek to identify patients with trileaflet aortic stenosis (TAS) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Accuracy of patient identification by text mining through PennSeek was compared with ICD-9 billing codes. RESULTS: Text mining identified 7115 patients with TAS and 9247 patients with CAD. ICD-9 codes identified 8272 patients with TAS and 6913 patients with CAD. 4346 patients with AS and 6024 patients with CAD were identified by both approaches. A randomly selected sample of 200-250 patients uniquely identified by text mining was compared with 200-250 patients uniquely identified by billing codes for both diseases. We demonstrate that text mining was superior, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.95 compared to 0.53 by ICD-9 for TAS, and a PPV of 0.97 compared to 0.86 for CAD. CONCLUSION: These results highlight the superiority of text mining algorithms applied to electronic cardiovascular procedure reports in the identification of phenotypes of interest for cardiovascular research.

5 Article Late breaking trials of 2015 in coronary artery disease: Commentary covering ACC, EuroPCR, SCAI, TCT, ESC, and AHA. 2016

Seto, Arnold H / Jordan Safirstein, ? / Anwaruddin, Saif / Dehghani, Payam / Shah, Binita / Tremmel, Jennifer A. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, California. · Department of Cardiology, the Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute at the Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersy. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Prairie Vascular Research Network, University of Saskatchewan, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. · Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Health Care System, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine (Cardiovascular), Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26946364.

ABSTRACT: The SCAI Publications Committee and Emerging Leadership Mentorship (ELM) Fellows concisely summarize and provide context on the most important coronary trials presented at large international meetings in 2015, including the MATRIX, ABSORB, and TOTAL trials. The intent is to allow quick assimilation of trial results into interventional practice, and enable busy interventional cardiologists to stay up to date. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

6 Article Five-year follow-up of patients treated for coronary artery disease in the face of an increasing burden of co-morbidity and disease complexity (from the NHLBI Dynamic Registry). 2014

Bortnick, Anna E / Epps, Kelly C / Selzer, Faith / Anwaruddin, Saif / Marroquin, Oscar C / Srinivas, Vankeepuram / Holper, Elizabeth M / Wilensky, Robert L. ·Division of Cardiology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Epidemiology, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Epidemiology, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Division of Cardiology, Medical City Hospital, Dallas, Texas. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: robert.wilensky@uphs.upenn.edu. ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #24388624.

ABSTRACT: Management of coronary artery disease (CAD) has evolved over the past decade, but there are few prospective studies evaluating long-term outcomes in a real-world setting of evolving technical approaches and secondary prevention. The aim of this study was to determine how the mortality and morbidity of CAD has changed in patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), in the setting of co-morbidities and evolving management. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry was a cohort study of patients undergoing PCI at various time points. Cohorts were enrolled in 1999 (cohort 2, n = 2,105), 2004 (cohort 4, n = 2,112), and 2006 (cohort 5, n = 2,176), and each was followed out to 5 years. Primary outcomes were death, myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass grafting, repeat PCI, and repeat revascularization. Secondary outcomes were PCI for new obstructive lesions at 5 years, 5-year rates of death and MI stratified by the severity of coronary artery and co-morbid disease. Over time, patients were more likely to have multiple co-morbidities and more severe CAD. Despite greater disease severity, there was no significant difference in death (16.5% vs 17.6%, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74 to 1.08), MI (11.0% vs 10.6%, adjusted HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.08), or repeat PCI (20.4% vs 22.2%, adjusted HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.17) at 5-year follow-up, but there was a significant decrease in coronary artery bypass grafting (9.1% vs 4.3%, adjusted HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.59). Patients with 5 co-morbidities had a 40% to 60% death rate at 5 years. There was a modestly high rate of repeat PCI for new lesions, indicating a potential failure of secondary prevention for this population in the face of increasing co-morbidity. Overall 5-year rates of death, MI, repeat PCI, and repeat PCI for new lesions did not change significantly in the context of increased co-morbidities and complex disease.

7 Unspecified Late breaking trials of 2016 in coronary artery disease: Commentary covering SCAI, ACC, TCT, EuroPCR, ESC, and AHA. 2017

Seto, Arnold H / Dehghani, Payam / Shah, Binita / Anwaruddin, Saif / Safirstein, Jordan / Tremmel, Jennifer A. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, California. · Prairie Vascular Research Network, University of Saskatchewan, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. · Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Health Care System, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Cardiology, The Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute at the Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey. · Department of Medicine (Cardiovascular), Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28276150.

ABSTRACT: The SCAI Publications Committee and Emerging Leadership Mentorship (ELM) Fellows concisely summarize and provide context on the most important coronary trials presented at large international meetings in 2016, including SCAI, ACC, TCT, EuroPCR, ESC, and AHA. The intent is to allow quick assimilation of trial results into interventional practice, and enable busy interventional cardiologists to stay up to date. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.