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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Herbert D. Aronow
Based on 11 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Herbert D. Aronow wrote the following 11 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline SCAI expert consensus statement: 2016 best practices in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: (Endorsed by the cardiological society of india, and sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia intervencionista; Affirmation of value by the Canadian Association of interventional cardiology-Association canadienne de cardiologie d'intervention). 2016

Naidu, Srihari S / Aronow, Herbert D / Box, Lyndon C / Duffy, Peter L / Kolansky, Daniel M / Kupfer, Joel M / Latif, Faisal / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Rao, Sunil V / Swaminathan, Rajesh V / Blankenship, James C. ·Division of Cardiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, New York. ssnaidu@winthrop.org. · Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Cardiovascular Institute, Providence, RI. · West Valley Medical Center, Caldwell, ID. · FirstHealth of the Carolinas, Pinehurst, NC. · Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · University of Illinois School of Medicine-Peoria, Peoria, IL. · University of Oklahoma and VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK. · University of Pittsburgh and VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Greenberg Division of Cardiology, New York, NY. · Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27137680.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial The Future of Endovascular Therapy: A View From the Cockpit. 2016

Aronow, Herbert D / Hyder, Omar N. ·Cardiovascular Institute, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. Electronic address: herbert.aronow@lifespan.org. · Cardiovascular Institute, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27639900.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Long-Term Outcomes of Drug-Eluting Stents Versus Bare-Metal Stents in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Dialysis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2018

Khera, Sahil / Villablanca, Pedro A / Kolte, Dhaval / Gupta, Tanush / Hasan Khan, Mohammed / Velagapudi, Poonam / Kalra, Ankur / Kleiman, Neal / Aronow, Herbert D / Abbott, J Dawn / Rosenfield, Kenneth / Drachman, Douglas E / Bangalore, Sripal / Bhatt, Deepak L / Naidu, Srihari S. ·From the Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Division of Cardiology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. · Division of Cardiology, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI. · Division of Cardiology, New York Medical College and Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY. · Harrington Heart & Vascular Institute at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH. · Department of Cardiology, Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX. · Division of Cardiology, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY. · Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Cardiol Rev · Pubmed #30157064.

ABSTRACT: There are no dedicated data to guide drug-eluting stent (DES) versus bare-metal stent (BMS) selection in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis (ESRD-D). It is unclear whether long-term benefits of a specific stent type outweigh risks in this population at high risk for both bleeding and ischemic events. We performed a meta-analysis of nonrandomized studies extracted from PubMed, Scopus, and EMBASE, assessing the safety and effectiveness of DES versus BMS in ESRD-D patients. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed with the Mantel-Haenszel method. Random-effects model was used for all analyses. A total of 17 nonrandomized studies (N = 63,157; 41,621 DES and 21,536 BMS) met the inclusion criteria and were included for the final quantitative analysis: median follow-up of 1 year (range: 9 months to 6 years). The use of DES in ESRD-D patients was associated with lower all-cause mortality (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.64-0.89, P < 0.001) compared with BMS. The use of DES was also associated with lower rates of cardiovascular mortality (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.60-0.99, P = 0.047) and target lesion/vessel revascularization (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.64-0.94, P = 0.01). However, there were no differences in noncardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, stroke, or major bleeding in DES versus BMS. In this largest meta-analysis of long-term outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention in ESRD-D patients, DES was associated with lower rates of all-cause mortality, target lesion/vessel revascularization, and cardiovascular death.

4 Review Culprit Vessel-Only Versus Multivessel Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Cardiogenic Shock Complicating ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Collaborative Meta-Analysis. 2017

Kolte, Dhaval / Sardar, Partha / Khera, Sahil / Zeymer, Uwe / Thiele, Holger / Hochadel, Matthias / Radovanovic, Dragana / Erne, Paul / Hambraeus, Kristina / James, Stefan / Claessen, Bimmer E / Henriques, Jose P S / Mylotte, Darren / Garot, Philippe / Aronow, Wilbert S / Owan, Theophilus / Jain, Diwakar / Panza, Julio A / Frishman, William H / Fonarow, Gregg C / Bhatt, Deepak L / Aronow, Herbert D / Abbott, J Dawn. ·From the Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Brown University, Providence, RI (D.K., H.D.A., J.D.A.) · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (P.S., T.O.) · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, New York Medical College at Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla (S.K., W.S.A., D.J., J.A.P., W.H.F.) · Department of Cardiology, Institut für Herzinfarktforschung Ludwigshafen, Germany (U.Z., M.H.) · Department of Cardiology, University Heart Center Lübeck, Medical Clinic II, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Germany (H.T.) · German Cardiovascular Research Center (DZHK), Partner Site Hamburg/Kiel/Lübeck, Germany (H.T.) · AMIS Plus Data Center, University of Zurich, Switzerland (D.R., P.E.) · Department of Cardiology, Falun Hospital, Sweden (K.H.) · Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden (K.H., S.J.) · Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands (B.E.C., J.P.S.H.) · Department of Cardiology, Galway University Hospital, SAOLTA Healthcare Group, National University of Ireland (D.M.) · Department of Cardiology, Ramsay Générale de Santé, Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud, Hopital Privé Jacques Cartier, Massy, France (P.G.) · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, David-Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles (G.C.F.) · and Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart and Vascular Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29146672.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The optimal revascularization strategy in patients with multivessel disease presenting with cardiogenic shock complicating ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Databases were searched from 1999 to October 2016. Studies comparing immediate/single-stage multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention (MV-PCI) versus culprit vessel-only PCI (CO-PCI) in patients with multivessel disease, ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, and cardiogenic shock were included. Primary end point was short-term (in-hospital or 30 days) mortality. Secondary end points included long-term mortality, cardiovascular death, reinfarction, and repeat revascularization. Safety end points were in-hospital stroke, renal failure, and major bleeding. The meta-analysis included 11 nonrandomized studies and 5850 patients (1157 MV-PCI and 4693 CO-PCI). There was no significant difference in short-term mortality with MV-PCI versus CO-PCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81-1.43; CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis of nonrandomized studies suggests that in patients with cardiogenic shock complicating ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, there may be no significant benefit with single-stage MV-PCI compared with CO-PCI. Given the limitations of observational data, randomized trials are needed to determine the role of MV-PCI in this setting.

5 Clinical Trial Preprocedural statin use in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. 2014

Kenaan, Mohamad / Seth, Milan / Aronow, Herbert D / Naoum, Joseph / Wunderly, Douglas / Mitchiner, James / Moscucci, Mauro / Gurm, Hitinder S / Anonymous1530798. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI. · Michigan Heart and Vascular Institute, St Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI. · Department of internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Henry Ford Health Systems, Mt Clemens, MI. · Department of Cardiology, Bronson Heart Care, Kalamazoo, MI. · Michigan's Quality improvement Organization, Farmington Hills, MI. · Department of internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Miami Health System, Miami, FL. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI. Electronic address: hgurm@med.umich.edu. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #24952867.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Earlier studies suggest that administering statins prior to percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) is associated with lower risk of periprocedural myocardial infarction and contrast-induced nephropathy. Current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommend routine use of statins prior to PCI. It is unclear how commonly this recommendation is followed in clinical practice and what its effect on outcomes is. METHODS: We evaluated the incidence and in-hospital outcomes associated with statin pretreatment among patients undergoing PCI and enrolled in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium PCI registry at 44 hospitals in Michigan between January 2010 and December 2012. Propensity and exact matching were used to adjust for the nonrandom use of statins prior to PCI. Long-term mortality was assessed in a subset of patients who were linked to Medicare data. RESULTS: Our study population was comprised of 80,493 patients of whom 26,547 (33 %) did not receive statins prior to undergoing PCI. When compared to statin receivers, nonreceivers had lower rates of prior cardiovascular disease. In the matched analysis, absence of statin use prior to PCI was associated with a similar rate of in-hospital mortality (0.43% vs 0.42%, odds ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.70-1.42, P = .98) and periprocedural myocardial infarction (2.34% vs 2.10%, odds ratio 1.13, 95% CI 0.97-1.32, P = .11) compared to statin receivers. Likewise, no difference in the rate of coronary artery bypass grafting, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), or contrast-induced nephropathy was observed. There was no association between pre-PCI use of statins and long-term survival among the subset of included Medicare patients (hazard ratio = 1.0, P = .96). CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of patients undergo PCI without statin pretreatment, but this is not associated with in-hospital major complications or long-term mortality.

6 Clinical Trial Comparison of drug-eluting and bare metal stents for saphenous vein graft lesions (from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry). 2010

Baldwin, Drew E / Abbott, J Dawn / Trost, Jeffrey C / Vlachos, Helen A / Selzer, Faith / Glaser, Ruchira / Wilensky, Robert L / Slater, James N / Doucet, Serge / Naidu, Srihari S / Aronow, Herbert D / Williams, David O. ·Tulane Heart and Vascular Institute, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #20854955.

ABSTRACT: The effectiveness and safety of drug-eluting stents (DES) compared with bare-metal stents (BMS) in saphenous vein graft (SVG) disease remains unclear. In particular, there is a paucity of data on long-term outcomes. In this study, 395 patients enrolled in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry who underwent stenting of SVG lesions with BMS (n = 192) from 1999 to 2006 or DES (n = 203) from 2004 to 2006 were analyzed. Patients were followed prospectively for the occurrence of cardiovascular events and death at 3 years. Patients treated with DES were more likely to have diabetes mellitus and other co-morbidities and previous percutaneous coronary intervention. Treated lesions in DES patients were more complex than those in BMS patients. At 3 years of follow-up, the adjusted risk for target vessel revascularization (hazard ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 1.62, p = 0.91) and death or myocardial infarction (hazard ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 1.04, p = 0.08) was similar in patients treated with DES and those treated with BMS. The combined outcome of death, myocardial infarction, or target vessel revascularization excluding periprocedural myocardial infarction was also similar (adjusted hazard ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.62 to 1.09, p = 0.16). In conclusion, this multicenter nonrandomized study of unselected patients showed no benefit of DES in SVG lesions, including no reduction in target vessel revascularization, compared with BMS at 3 years. An adequately powered randomized controlled trial is needed to determine the optimal stent type for SVG percutaneous coronary intervention.

7 Article The clinical outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention performed without pre-procedural aspirin. 2013

Kenaan, Mohamad / Seth, Milan / Aronow, Herbert D / Wohns, David / Share, David / Gurm, Hitinder S / Anonymous2230770. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #24055844.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence and outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) performed in patients who had not received pre-procedural aspirin. BACKGROUND: Aspirin is an essential component of peri-PCI pharmacotherapy. Previous studies suggest that pre-procedural aspirin is not administered to a clinically significant number of patients undergoing PCI. METHODS: We evaluated the incidence of PCIs performed without pre-procedural aspirin use among patients undergoing PCI from January 2010 through December 2011 at 44 hospitals in Michigan. Propensity-matched multivariate analysis was used to adjust for the nonrandom use of aspirin. RESULTS: Our study population comprised 65,175 patients, of whom 4,640 (7.1%) did not receive aspirin within 24 h before undergoing PCI. Aspirin nonreceivers were more likely to have had previous gastrointestinal bleeding or to present with cardiogenic shock or after cardiac arrest. In the propensity-matched analysis, absence of aspirin before PCI was associated with a higher rate of death (3.9% vs. 2.8%; odds ratio: 1.89 [95% confidence interval: 1.32 to 2.71], p < 0.001) and stroke (0.5% vs. 0.1%; odds ratio: 4.24 [95% confidence interval: 1.49 to 12.11], p = 0.007) with no difference in need for transfusions. This association was consistent across multiple pre-specified subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of patients do not receive aspirin before undergoing PCI. Lack of aspirin before PCI was associated with significantly increased in-hospital mortality and stroke. Our study results support the need for quality efforts focused on optimizing aspirin use before PCI.

8 Article ACP Journal Club. Nonemergency PCI without onsite cardiac surgery was noninferior to PCI with onsite services for MACE. 2013

Wayangankar, Siddharth A / Aronow, Herbert D. ·University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #23856704.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Article The association between patient race, treatment, and outcomes of patients undergoing contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention: insights from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium (BMC2). 2013

Khambatta, Sherezade / Seth, Milan / Rosman, Howard S / Share, David / Aronow, Herbert D / Moscucci, Mauro / Lalonde, Thomas / Dixon, Simon R / Gurm, Hitinder S. ·The Department of Cardiology, St John Hospital and Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #23708159.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine if racial disparities exist in the treatment and outcomes of patients undergoing contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). METHODS: We examined the association between race, process of care, and outcomes of patients undergoing PCI between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2011, and enrolled in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium. We used propensity matching to compare the outcome of black and white patients. RESULTS: The study cohort comprised 65,175 patients, of whom 6,873 (10.5%) were black and 55,789 (85.6%) were white. Black patients were more likely to be younger, be female, have more comorbidities, and be uninsured. Overall, black patients were less likely to receive prasugrel (10.0% vs 14.5%, P < .001) and drug-eluting stents (62.5% vs 67.7%, P < .001), largely related to lower use of these therapies in hospitals treating a higher proportion of black patients. No differences were seen between white and black patients with regard to inhospital mortality (odds ratio 1.34, 95% CI 0.82-2.2, P = .24), contrast-induced nephropathy (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.81-1.40, P = .67), and need for transfusion (OR 1.27, 95% CI 0.98-1.64, P = .06). White race was associated with increased odds of heart failure (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.05-2.08, P = .024) and vascular complications (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03-1.90, P = .032). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with white patients, black patients undergoing PCI have a greater burden of comorbidities but, after adjusting for these differences, have similar inhospital survival and lower odds of vascular complications and heart failure after PCI.

10 Article Current medical management of stable coronary artery disease before and after elective percutaneous coronary intervention. 2013

Ardati, Amer K / Pitt, Bertram / Smith, Dean E / Aronow, Herbert D / Share, David / Moscucci, Mauro / Chetcuti, Stanley / Grossman, P Michael / Gurm, Hitinder S. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #23622915.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable coronary artery disease (CAD) is not superior to optimal medical therapy. It remains unclear if patients who receive PCI for stable CAD are receiving appropriate medical therapy. METHODS: We evaluated the medical management of 60,386 patients who underwent PCI for stable CAD between 2004 and 2009. We excluded patients with contraindications to aspirin, clopidogrel, statins, or β-blockers (BBs). We defined essential medical therapy of stable CAD as treatment with aspirin, statin, and BB before PCI and treatment with aspirin, clopidogrel, and statin after PCI. RESULTS: Essential medical therapy was used in 53.0% of patients before PCI and 82.1% at discharge. Aspirin was used in 94.8% patients before PCI and 98.3% of after PCI. Statins were used in 69.5% of patients before PCI and 84.5% after PCI. β-Blockers were used in 72.8% of patients before PCI. Clopidogrel was used in 97.3% of patients after PCI. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction or revascularization before PCI had better medical therapy compared with patients without such a history (62.8% vs 34.3% [P < .001] before PCI and 83.6% vs 79.1% [P < .001] after PCI). After adjusting for confounders and clustering, women (odds ratio 0.74, 95% CI 0.71-0.78) and patients on dialysis (odds ratio 0.68, 95% CI 0.57-0.80) were less likely to receive a statin at discharge. CONCLUSIONS: Medical therapy remains underused before and after PCI for stable CAD. Women are less likely to receive statin therapy. There are significant opportunities to optimize medical therapy in patients with stable CAD.

11 Article Bleeding risk associated with 1 year of dual antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention: Insights from the Clopidogrel for the Reduction of Events During Observation (CREDO) trial. 2009

Aronow, Herbert D / Steinhubl, Steven R / Brennan, Danielle M / Berger, Peter B / Topol, Eric J / Anonymous340621. ·Clinical Scholars Program, Michigan Heart and Vascular Institute at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, USA. haronow@michiganheart.com ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #19185647.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is unknown. Incremental reductions in the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events may be partially offset by an increased incidence of bleeding in the months after a PCI. METHODS: We examined the incidence, severity, and predictors of bleeding associated with 1 year of dual antiplatelet therapy after PCI among 1,816 patients in the Clopidogrel for the Reduction of Event During Observation (CREDO) trial. We also compared bleeding in patients who received dual antiplatelet therapy for 1 year to those who did so for only 4 weeks. Bleeding was categorized as major or minor using the modified Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) Study Group criteria. RESULTS: Major or minor bleeding occurred in 146 patients during 1 year of follow-up. More than 80% of bleeding events were periprocedural. Multivariable predictors of any bleeding included increasing age and coronary artery bypass. Any (major or minor) bleeding occurred in 71 (8.1%) and 77 (8.9%), major bleeding in 34 (3.9%) and 49 (5.6%), and minor bleeding in 37 (4.2%) and 29 (3.3%) of placebo- and clopidogrel-treated patients, respectively; these differences were not significant. However, major gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in significantly more clopidogrel- than placebo-treated patients (13 [1.4%] vs 3 [0.3%] [P = .011]). CONCLUSIONS: Adding clopidogrel to aspirin beyond 4 weeks post PCI is not associated with a significant increase in the overall rate of major or minor bleeding, although it is associated with an increase in major gastrointestinal bleeding in the year after a PCI.