Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Charles E. Chambers
Based on 7 articles published since 2008
||||

Between 2008 and 2019, Charles E. Chambers wrote the following 7 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline 2011 ACCF/AHA/SCAI guideline for percutaneous coronary intervention: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. 2013

Levine, Glenn N / Bates, Eric R / Blankenship, James C / Bailey, Steven R / Bittl, John A / Cercek, Bojan / Chambers, Charles E / Ellis, Stephen G / Guyton, Robert A / Hollenberg, Steven M / Khot, Umesh N / Lange, Richard A / Mauri, Laura / Mehran, Roxana / Moussa, Issam D / Mukherjee, Debabrata / Nallamothu, Brahmajee K / Ting, Henry H / Anonymous5470709 / Anonymous5480709 / Anonymous5490709. · ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #22065485.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions American Association for Thoracic Surgery American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Heart Failure Society of America Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Society of Thoracic Surgeons. 2012

Patel, Manesh R / Bailey, Steven R / Bonow, Robert O / Chambers, Charles E / Chan, Paul S / Dehmer, Gregory J / Kirtane, Ajay J / Wann, L Samuel / Ward, R Parker / Douglas, Pamela S / Patel, Manesh R / Bailey, Steven R / Altus, Philip / Barnard, Denise D / Blankenship, James C / Casey, Donald E / Dean, Larry S / Fazel, Reza / Gilchrist, Ian C / Kavinsky, Clifford J / Lakoski, Susan G / Le, D Elizabeth / Lesser, John R / Levine, Glenn N / Mehran, Roxana / Russo, Andrea M / Sorrentino, Matthew J / Williams, Mathew R / Wong, John B / Wolk, Michael J / Bailey, Steven R / Douglas, Pamela S / Hendel, Robert C / Kramer, Christopher M / Min, James K / Patel, Manesh R / Shaw, Leslee / Stainback, Raymond F / Allen, Joseph M. ·Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Representative. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #22678595.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

3 Guideline ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2012

Anonymous780721 / Patel, Manesh R / Dehmer, Gregory J / Hirshfeld, John W / Smith, Peter K / Spertus, John A / Anonymous790721 / Masoudi, Frederick A / Dehmer, Gregory J / Patel, Manesh R / Smith, Peter K / Chambers, Charles E / Ferguson, T Bruce / Garcia, Mario J / Grover, Frederick L / Holmes, David R / Klein, Lloyd W / Limacher, Marian C / Mack, Michael J / Malenka, David J / Park, Myung H / Ragosta, Michael / Ritchie, James L / Rose, Geoffrey A / Rosenberg, Alan B / Russo, Andrea M / Shemin, Richard J / Weintraub, William S / Anonymous800721 / Wolk, Michael J / Bailey, Steven R / Douglas, Pamela S / Hendel, Robert C / Kramer, Christopher M / Min, James K / Patel, Manesh R / Shaw, Leslee / Stainback, Raymond F / Allen, Joseph M / Anonymous810721 / Anonymous820721 / Anonymous830721 / Anonymous840721 / Anonymous850721 / Anonymous860721 / Anonymous870721 / Anonymous880721. · ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #22424518.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD). Additionally, percutaneous coronary intervention may have a role in revascularization of patients with high burden of CAD. The primary objective of the appropriate use criteria is to improve physician decision making and patient education regarding expected benefits from revascularization and to guide future research.

4 Guideline 2011 ACCF/AHA/SCAI Guideline for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. 2012

Levine, Glenn N / Bates, Eric R / Blankenship, James C / Bailey, Steven R / Bittl, John A / Cercek, Bojan / Chambers, Charles E / Ellis, Stephen G / Guyton, Robert A / Hollenberg, Steven M / Khot, Umesh N / Lange, Richard A / Mauri, Laura / Mehran, Roxana / Moussa, Issam D / Mukherjee, Debabrata / Nallamothu, Brahmajee K / Ting, Henry H / Anonymous640718 / Anonymous650718 / Anonymous660718. · ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #22328235.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial SCAI position statement concerning coverage policies for percutaneous coronary interventions based on the appropriate use criteria. 2016

Klein, Lloyd W / Blankenship, James C / Kolansky, Daniel M / Dean, Larry S / Naidu, Srihari S / Chambers, Charles E / Duffy, Peter L / Anonymous2810861. ·Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL. · Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA. · University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA. · University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY. · Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA. · FirstHealth of the Carolinas, Reid Heart Center, Pinehurst, NC. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26968441.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Article Fluoroscopy pulse rate reduction during diagnostic and therapeutic imaging in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: An evaluation of radiation dose, procedure complications and outcomes. 2017

Hansen, James W / Foy, Andrew / Schmidt, Torrey / Ghahramani, Mehrdad / Chambers, Charles E. ·Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, 17033. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27121130.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate radiation reduction by reducing fluoroscopy pulse rate in diagnostic cardiac catheterizations and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) as well as outcomes at 30 days and six months. BACKGROUND: Radiation exposure to the public at large has increased dramatically over the past three decades, and the cardiac catheterization laboratory is a large contributor. Fluoroscopy pulse rate is one way to decrease radiation exposure. METHODS: Fluoroscopy pulse rate was reduced from 10 pulses/sec (p/s) to 7.5 p/s as part of an internal quality improvement project. A retrospective analysis of all cardiac catheterizations was performed, evaluating Air KERMA at the interventional reference point (K RESULTS: In diagnostic catheterization median P CONCLUSIONS: Reducing fluoroscopy pulse rates to 7.5 from 10 is an effective way to reduce patient radiation exposure across meaningful dose indices. A pulse rate of 7.5 p/s is safe, with no difference in complications or outcomes. A fluoroscopy pulse rate of 7.5 p/s should be given strong consideration for a new standard. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

7 Article Intracoronary stent infection ... Beware the bugs. 2009

Chambers, Charles E. ·Penn State College of Medicine, PA, USA. cchambers@psu.edu ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #19089965.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --