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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Kevin J. Croce
Based on 7 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Kevin Croce wrote the following 7 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Lesion Complexity and Outcomes of Extended Dual Antiplatelet Therapy After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. 2017

Yeh, Robert W / Kereiakes, Dean J / Steg, P Gabriel / Cutlip, Donald E / Croce, Kevin J / Massaro, Joseph M / Mauri, Laura / Anonymous951203. ·Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Baim Institute for Clinical Research, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: ryeh@bidmc.harvard.edu. · Christ Hospital Heart and Vascular Center and the Lindner Center for Research and Education, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Université Paris-Diderot, INSERM U-1148, Paris, France; Hôpital Bichat, Département Hospitalo-Universitaire FIRE, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France; NHLI, Imperial College, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom. · Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Baim Institute for Clinical Research, Boston, Massachusetts. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Baim Institute for Clinical Research, Boston, Massachusetts; Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Baim Institute for Clinical Research, Boston, Massachusetts; Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #29073947.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Subjects undergoing coronary stenting with complex lesion anatomy may experience different risks and benefits with prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy. OBJECTIVES: The authors assessed the effect of 30 months versus 12 months of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) based on the presence or absence of anatomically-complex target lesions. METHODS: In the DAPT Study, combined myocardial infarction (MI) or stent thrombosis and moderate/severe bleeding were assessed in enrolled (n = 25,416) and randomized (n = 11,554) subjects. Complex lesions had any of the following characteristics: unprotected left main, >2 lesions/vessel, length ≥30 mm, bifurcation with side branch ≥2.5 mm, vein bypass graft, or thrombus-containing lesion. Events were evaluated according to increasing number of complexity characteristics and compared according to DAPT score. RESULTS: Enrolled subjects with more complex target lesions had higher rates of MI or stent thrombosis in the first 12 months after PCI (3.9% vs. 2.4%; p < 0.001). Among those who were event-free at 12 months, rates of MI or stent thrombosis between 12 and 30 months were similar between those with versus without complex anatomy (3.5% vs. 2.9%; p = 0.07). Reduction of MI or stent thrombosis with continued thienopyridine beyond 12 months versus placebo was similar for subjects with (2.5% vs. 4.5%; hazard ratio: 0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.38 to 0.79; p = 0.001) and without (2.0% vs. 3.8%; hazard ratio: 0.52; 95% confidence interval: 0.39 to 0.69; p < 0.001) anatomic complexity (p CONCLUSIONS: Complex target-lesion anatomy is associated with increased ischemic events, particularly within the first year after PCI. Among those without events in the first 12 months, the benefits of extending DAPT were similar in subjects with and without complex lesions. A high DAPT score identified those experiencing the most benefit from extended treatment among patients with and without complex anatomy. (The Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Study [DAPT Study]; NCT00977938).

2 Article Usefulness of Intracoronary Brachytherapy for Patients With Resistant Drug-Eluting Stent Restenosis. 2017

Mangione, Fernanda M / Jatene, Tannas / Badr Eslam, Roza / Bergmark, Brian A / Gallagher, Jacob R / Shah, Pinak B / Mauri, Laura / Leopold, Jane A / Sobieszczyk, Piotr S / Faxon, David P / Croce, Kevin J / Bhatt, Deepak L / Devlin, Phillip M. ·Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil. · Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine II, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: dlbhattmd@post.harvard.edu. ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #28583681.

ABSTRACT: In-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a concern even in the drug-eluting stent (DES) era and carries a high risk of recurrence. Brachytherapy is being used as an alternative treatment for resistant ISR, yet the safety and efficacy of this approach has not been well studied. We analyzed the outcomes of 101 patients who underwent coronary brachytherapy for resistant DES ISR. Baseline demographic, clinical, procedural, and outcome data were collected by phone and from electronic records. Comorbidities and overt cardiovascular disease were highly prevalent. Median previous stent layers were 2 with a maximum of 5 layers. Procedural angiographic success rate was 97% and median time to discharge was 1 day after brachytherapy. The primary outcome of target vessel revascularization was 24% at 1 year, 32% at 2 years, and 42% at 3 years. The rate of nonfatal myocardial infarction was 0% at 1 year, 3.5% at 2 years, and 6% at 3 years. The rate of all-cause mortality was 8.5% at 1 year, 12% at 2 years, and 16% at 3 years. We observed only 1 case of late stent thrombosis. After multivariable adjustment, female gender (hazard ratio 2.37, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 5.52, p = 0.04) and diffuse ISR pattern (hazard ratio 2.95, 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 7.17, p = 0.01) were independently associated with the primary outcome. In conclusion, brachytherapy is feasible for the treatment of resistant DES ISR and is associated with high immediate procedural success and reasonable efficacy in a complex patient population. This approach might be used as an alternative for these patients.

3 Article Erosion of Thin-Cap Fibroatheroma in an Area of Low Endothelial Shear Stress: Anatomy and Local Hemodynamic Environment Dictate Outcomes. 2016

Giannopoulos, Andreas A / Antoniadis, Antonios P / Croce, Kevin / Chatzizisis, Yiannis S. ·Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cardiovascular Department, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. · Cardiovascular Division, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska. Electronic address: ychatzizisis@icloud.com. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27017369.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Recurrent myocardial infarctions and premature coronary atherosclerosis in a 23-year-old man with antiphospholipid syndrome. 2016

Vergallo, Rocco / Aguirre, Aaron D / Abtahian, Farhad / Minami, Yoshiyasu / Soeda, Tsunenari / Chatzizisis, Yiannis S / Croce, Kevin / Jang, Ik-Kyung. ·Ik-Kyung Jang, MD, PhD, Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, GRB 800, Boston, MA 02114, USA, Tel.: +1 617 726 9226, Fax: +1 617 726 7419, E-mail: ijang@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Thromb Haemost · Pubmed #26423215.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Article Advanced anatomical and functional imaging guides management of coronary artery ulcerated plaque. 2015

Giannopoulos, Andreas A / Antoniadis, Antonios P / Croce, Kevin J / Chatzizisis, Yiannis S. ·Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA, USA. · Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA, USA ychatzizisis@icloud.com. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25944048.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Article Prevalence of high platelet reactivity in aspirin-treated patients referred for coronary angiography. 2013

Manica, André / Sarmento-Leite, Rogério / Manfroi, Clara / Rodrigues, La Hore / Gottschall, Carlos / Marchini, Julio F / Croce, Kevin. ·Instituto de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. andrelmanica@yahoo.com.br ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #23295251.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Aspirin (ASA) reduces adverse events in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients by inhibiting platelets. Some CAD patients have high platelet reactivity (HPR) despite ASA therapy and these individuals have increased risk of adverse events. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPR in ASA-treated patients referred for coronary angiography and to assess whether the HPR correlates with the severity of CAD. METHODS: This single center investigation enrolled 115 consecutive ASA-treated patients with stable CAD. ADP- and collagen-induced platelet reactivity were evaluated by light transmittance aggregometry (LTA). Patients with greater than 70% ADP- and collagen-induced aggregation were determined to have HPR and, in this group, ASA compliance was assessed by examining blood salicylate levels. Mean age was 60.9 years and average ASA dose was 164.2 mg. RESULTS: Smoking and DM were present in 28.7% and 31.5% respectively. HPR was found in 14 patients (13%) however 7 of the 14 patients (50%) with HPR had low serum salicylate levels (< 2.0 µg/mL) suggesting medication noncompliance. Of the entire cohort, 6.5% of patients had HPR and detectable serum salicylate levels suggesting reduced ASA efficacy. HPR correlated with number and severity of coronary stenosis (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: In a general population of ASA-treated patients referred for coronary angiography, elevated platelet reactivity is prevalent (13%) with 50% related to noncompliance and 50% related to reduced aspirin efficacy.

7 Minor Cangrelor Use Since FDA Approval: A Single-Center, Real-World Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital. 2017

Vaduganathan, Muthiah / Qamar, Arman / Singh, Abhayjit / Venkateswaran, Ramkumar V / Szumita, Paul M / Croce, Kevin J / Mauri, Laura / Leopold, Jane A / Shah, Pinak B / Sobieszczyk, Piotr / Faxon, David P / Bhatt, Deepak L. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27914699.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --