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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Vasken Dilsizian
Based on 22 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Vasken Dilsizian wrote the following 22 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Quantitative PET Myocardial Blood Flow: "Trust, But Verify". 2017

Dilsizian, Vasken / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28473105.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Display of 3D Multimodality Cardiac Images With 2D Polar Maps: Simplicity Can Be a Virtue. 2016

Smith, Mark F / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: msmith7@umm.edu. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27209100.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Highlights from the Updated Joint ASNC/SNMMI PET Myocardial Perfusion and Metabolism Clinical Imaging Guidelines. 2016

Dilsizian, Vasken. ·University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland vdilsizian@umm.edu. ·J Nucl Med · Pubmed #27199358.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial PET-determined hyperemic myocardial blood flow: further progress to clinical application. 2014

Schindler, Thomas H / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: tschind3@jhmi.edu. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #25277619.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Qualitative and quantitative scrutiny by regulatory process: is the truth subjective or objective? 2009

Dilsizian, Vasken / Narula, Jagat. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #19679295.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review Science to Practice: Does FDG Differentiate Morphologically Unstable from Stable Atherosclerotic Plaque? 2017

Dilsizian, Vasken / Jadvar, Hossein. ·Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine University of Maryland School of Medicine Baltimore, Md. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California 2250 Alcazar St, CSC/IGM 102 Los Angeles, CA 90033. ·Radiology · Pubmed #28318446.

ABSTRACT: It has been reported that fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) may detect the inflammatory state and macrophage burden of atherosclerotic plaques and potentially identify vulnerable plaques. However, published reports have been inconsistent in this area. Tavakoli et al ( 1 ) hypothesized that differential regulation of macrophage glucose metabolism by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF; inflammation resolving) and granulocyte-M-CSF (GM-CSF; proinflammatory) may contribute to the inconsistency of FDG vessel wall inflammation. After the induction of inflammatory and metabolic profiles, both M-CSF and GM-CSF generated comparable levels of glucose uptake in cultured macrophages and murine atherosclerotic plaques. These findings suggest that although FDG uptake is an indicator of vascular macrophage burden (total number of macrophages), it may not necessarily differentiate morphologically unstable (inflammatory) from stable (noninflammatory) atherosclerotic plaque. Moreover, although atherosclerosis is characterized by macrophage-predominated inflammation, there is a wide range of other vascular diseases in which macrophages and inflammation play an important role in the absence of atherosclerosis. FDG uptake will be indistinguishable in atherosclerosis from large-artery inflammatory vascular disease, such as Takayasu arteritis, chemotherapy- or radiation-induced vascular inflammation, or foreign-body reaction, such as synthetic arterial graft. Because of the nonspecific nature of FDG uptake by any cell (upregulated under hypoxic conditions or other microenvironmental factors), this work calls for a more cautious approach to interpreting vascular FDG uptake as indicative of inflammatory atherosclerosis in the clinical setting.

7 Review Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease. 2016

Gewirtz, Henry / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·From Department of Medicine (Cardiology Division), Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (H.G.) · and Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore (V.D.). ·Circulation · Pubmed #27245647.

ABSTRACT: In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted.

8 Review Quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow--clinical and research applications. 2014

Schindler, Thomas H / Quercioli, Alessandra / Valenta, Ines / Ambrosio, Giuseppe / Wahl, Richard L / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: tschind3@jhmi.edu. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Specialties in Medicine, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. · Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·Semin Nucl Med · Pubmed #24948151.

ABSTRACT: Myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT/CT or with PET/CT is a mainstay in clinical practice for the diagnostic assessment of downstream, flow-limiting effects of epicardial lesions during hyperemic flows and for risk stratification of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with multivessel CAD, the relative distribution of radiotracer uptake in the left ventricular myocardium during stress and rest accurately identifies flow-limiting epicardial lesions or the most advanced, so called culprit, lesion. Often, less severe obstructive CAD lesions may go undetected or underdiagnosed. The concurrent ability of PET/CT with radiotracer kinetic modeling to determine myocardial blood flow (MBF) in absolute terms (mL/g/min) at rest and during vasomotor stress allows the computation of regional myocardial flow reserve (MFR) as an adjunct to the visual interpretation of myocardial perfusion studies. Adding the noninvasive evaluation and quantification of MBF and MFR by PET imaging to the visual analysis of myocardial perfusion may (1) identify subclinical CAD, (2) better characterize the extent and severity of CAD burden, and (3) assess "balanced" decreases of MBF in all 3 major coronary artery vascular territories. Recent investigations have demonstrated that PET-determined reductions in hyperemic MBF or MFR in patients with subclinical or clinically manifest CAD are predictive of increased relative risk of future cardiovascular events and clinical outcome. Quantifying MFR with PET enables the identification and characterization of coronary vasodilator dysfunction as functional precursor of the CAD process, which offers the unique opportunity to monitor its response to lifestyle or risk factor modification by preventive medical care. Whether an improvement or even normalization of hyperemic MBF or the MFR in subclinical or in clinically manifest CAD confers an improved long-term cardiovascular outcome remains untested. Nonetheless, given the recent growth in the clinical utilization of myocardial perfusion PET, image-guided and personalized preventive care of vascular health may become a reality in the near future.

9 Review Anatomic versus physiologic assessment of coronary artery disease. Role of coronary flow reserve, fractional flow reserve, and positron emission tomography imaging in revascularization decision-making. 2013

Gould, K Lance / Johnson, Nils P / Bateman, Timothy M / Beanlands, Rob S / Bengel, Frank M / Bober, Robert / Camici, Paolo G / Cerqueira, Manuel D / Chow, Benjamin J W / Di Carli, Marcelo F / Dorbala, Sharmila / Gewirtz, Henry / Gropler, Robert J / Kaufmann, Philipp A / Knaapen, Paul / Knuuti, Juhani / Merhige, Michael E / Rentrop, K Peter / Ruddy, Terrence D / Schelbert, Heinrich R / Schindler, Thomas H / Schwaiger, Markus / Sdringola, Stefano / Vitarello, John / Williams, Kim A / Gordon, Donald / Dilsizian, Vasken / Narula, Jagat. ·Weatherhead PET Center for Preventing and Reversing Atherosclerosis, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: K.Lance.Gould@uth.tmc.edu. · Weatherhead PET Center for Preventing and Reversing Atherosclerosis, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas. · Mid America Heart Institute, Cardiovascular Consultants PA, and the University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri. · Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Klinik für Nuklearmedizin, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany. · Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Vita-Salute University San Raffaele and San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Molecular & Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, and Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cardiology Division, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Radiological Sciences, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri. · Cardiac Imaging and Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. · Heart Center of Niagara, Niagara Falls, New York. · Gramercy Cardiac Diagnostic, New York, New York. · Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Specialties in Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universität München, München, Germany. · Cardiovascular Specialists of Frederick, Frederick, Maryland. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. · Cardiovascular Associates of the Southeast, Birmingham, Alabama. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #23954338.

ABSTRACT: Angiographic severity of coronary artery stenosis has historically been the primary guide to revascularization or medical management of coronary artery disease. However, physiologic severity defined by coronary pressure and/or flow has resurged into clinical prominence as a potential, fundamental change from anatomically to physiologically guided management. This review addresses clinical coronary physiology-pressure and flow-as clinical tools for treating patients. We clarify the basic concepts that hold true for whatever technology measures coronary physiology directly and reliably, here focusing on positron emission tomography and its interplay with intracoronary measurements.

10 Review Targeted PET/CT imaging of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques: microcalcification with sodium fluoride and inflammation with fluorodeoxyglucose. 2013

Chen, Wengen / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. wchen5@umm.edu ·Curr Cardiol Rep · Pubmed #23605466.

ABSTRACT: A significant majority of atherosclerotic plaque ruptures occur in coronary arteries exhibiting none or only modest luminal narrowing on coronary angiography. Emerging data suggest the biological composition of an atherosclerotic plaque (vulnerability to rupture) rather than its degree of stenosis or size is the major determinants for acute clinical events. Thus, the pursuit for noninvasive molecular imaging probes that target plaque composition, such as inflammation and/or microcalcification is a creditable goal. 18 F-fluorodioxyglucose (18 F-FDG) is a metabolic probe that can be imaged using positron emission tomography (PET)/computer tomography (CT) technology to target plaque macrophage glucose utilization and inflammation. Vascular plaque 18 F-FDG uptake has been linked to cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. More recently, another molecular probe 18 F-sodium fluoride (18 F-NaF) was introduced for PET imaging, which targets active microcalcifications in atherosclerotic plaques. Little is known regarding the role of early microcalcification in the initiation and progression of plaque, partly because of lack of a noninvasive imaging modality targeting molecular calcification. 18 F-NaF PET/CT imaging could provide new insights into the complex interaction of plaque, and facilitate understanding the mechanism of plaque calcification. Moreover, when these 2 molecular probes, 18 F-FDG and 18 F-NaF, that target distinct biological processes in an atherosclerotic plaque are used in combination, they may further elucidate the link between local inflammation, microcalcification, progression to plaque rupture, and cardiovascular event.

11 Review Quantitative PET/CT measures of myocardial flow reserve and atherosclerosis for cardiac risk assessment and predicting adverse patient outcomes. 2013

Valenta, Ines / Dilsizian, Vasken / Quercioli, Alessandra / Ruddy, Terrence D / Schindler, Thomas H. ·Department of Specialties in Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac PET/CT, University Hospitals of Geneva, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4,Geneva, Switzerland. ines_valenta@hotmail.com ·Curr Cardiol Rep · Pubmed #23397541.

ABSTRACT: Conventional scintigraphic myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT/CT or with PET/CT has evolved as an important clinical tool for the diagnostic assessment of flow-limiting epicardial lesions and risk stratification of patients with suspected CAD. By determining the relative distribution of radiotracer-uptake in the left-ventricular (LV) myocardium during stress, the presence of flow-limiting CAD lesions can be identified. While this approach successfully identifies epicardial coronary artery lesions, the presence of subclinical and non-obstructive CAD may go undetected. In this direction, the concurrent ability of PET/CT to assess absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) in ml/g/min, rather that relative regional distribution of radiotracer-uptake, and myocardial flow reserve (MFR), expands the scope of conventional myocardial perfusion imaging from the identification of more advanced and flow-limiting epicardial lesions to (1) subclinical CAD, (2) an improved characterization of the extent and severity of CAD burden, and (3) the discovery of "balanced" reduction in myocardial blood flow as a consequence of 3 vessel CAD. Concurrent to the PET data, the CT component of the hybrid PET/CT allows the assessment of coronary artery calcification as an indirect surrogate for CAD burden, without contrast, or with contrast angiography to directly denote coronary stenosis and/or plaque morphology with CT. Hybrid PET/CT system, therefore, has the potential to not only identify and characterize flow-limiting epicardial lesions but also subclinical stages of functional and/or structural stages of CAD. Whether the application of PET/CT for an optimal assessment of coronary pathology, its downstream effects on myocardial perfusion, and coronary circulatory function will in effect lead to changes in clinical decision-making process, investiture in preventive health care, and improved long-term outcome, awaits scientific verification.

12 Review The influence of insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes mellitus on vascular tone and myocardial blood flow. 2012

Valenta, Ines / Dilsizian, Vasken / Quercioli, Alessandra / Schelbert, Heinrich R / Schindler, Thomas H. ·Department of Specialities in Medicine, Divisions of Cardiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Curr Cardiol Rep · Pubmed #22205177.

ABSTRACT: Among individuals with cardiovascular risk factors, reductions in coronary vasodilator capacity with or without diabetes mellitus (DM) carry important diagnostic and prognostic information. Positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging in concert with tracer kinetic modeling allows the assessment of absolute regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest and its response to various forms of vasomotor stress. Such noninvasive evaluation of myocardial flow reserve (MFR) or the vasodilator capacity of the coronary circulation expands the possibilities of conventional scintigraphic myocardial perfusion imaging from identifying flow-limiting epicardial coronary artery lesions to understanding the underlying pathophysiology of diabetic vasculopathy, microcirculatory dysfunction, and its atherothrombotic sequelae. Invaluable mechanistic insights were recently reported with PET by unraveling important effects of insulin resistance, obesity, and DM on the function of the coronary circulation. Such noninvasive assessment of coronary circulatory dysfunction enables monitoring its response to antidiabetic medication and/or behavioral interventions related to weight, diet, and physical activity that may evolve as a promising tool for an image-guided and personalized preventive diabetic vascular care. Whether PET-guided improvement or normalization of hyperemic MBF and/or MFR will translate into improved patient outcome in DM is a laudable goal to pursue next.

13 Review The year in coronary artery disease. 2010

Achenbach, Stephan / Kramer, Christopher M / Zoghbi, William A / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. stephan.achenbach@uk-erlangen.de ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #20947052.

ABSTRACT: Imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease. Imaging is used for the detection of underlying coronary artery stenoses in patients with stable or chronic chest pain, for the assessment of myocardial scar and viability, for assessing prognosis, or for predicting complications. Echocardiography, nuclear imaging, cardiac magnetic resonance, and-more recently-computed tomography are powerful tools to provide answers to these questions. New technology, new contrast agents, and newly developed imaging protocols widen the applicability and increase accuracy of these imaging modalities, and new clinical studies provide information on their diagnostic potential and their therapeutic as well as prognostic value. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging modalities influence the selection of the most appropriate imaging approach in different clinical scenarios. This article outlines some of the most important developments of the past 12 months in the field of echocardiography, nuclear imaging, cardiac magnetic resonance, and computed tomography as they pertain to coronary artery disease.

14 Review Cardiac PET imaging for the detection and monitoring of coronary artery disease and microvascular health. 2010

Schindler, Thomas H / Schelbert, Heinrich R / Quercioli, Alessandra / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac Imaging, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. thomas.schindler@hcuge.ch ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #20541718.

ABSTRACT: Positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging in concert with tracer-kinetic modeling affords the assessment of regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) of the left ventricle in absolute terms (milliliters per gram per minute). Assessment of MBF both at rest and during various forms of vasomotor stress provides insight into early and subclinical abnormalities in coronary arterial vascular function and/or structure, noninvasively. The noninvasive evaluation and quantification of MBF and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional myocardial perfusion imaging from detection of end-stage, advanced, and flow-limiting, epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD) to early stages of atherosclerosis or microvascular dysfunction. Recent studies have shown that impaired hyperemic MBF or MFR with PET, with or without accompanying CAD, is predictive of increased relative risk of death or progression of heart failure. Quantitative approaches that measure MBF with PET identify multivessel CAD and offer the opportunity to monitor responses to lifestyle and/or risk factor modification and to therapeutic interventions. Whether improvement or normalization of hyperemic MBF and/or the MFR will translate to improvement in long-term cardiovascular outcome remains clinically untested. In the meantime, absolute measures of MBF with PET can be used as a surrogate marker for coronary vascular health, and to monitor therapeutic interventions. Although the assessment of myocardial perfusion with PET has become an indispensable tool in cardiac research, it remains underutilized in clinical practice. Individualized, image-guided cardiovascular therapy may likely change this paradigm in the near future.

15 Review Screening asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus for coronary artery disease: does it improve patient outcome? 2010

Shirani, Jamshid / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·Department of Cardiology, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA 17822-2160, USA. jshirani1@geisinger.edu ·Curr Cardiol Rep · Pubmed #20425169.

ABSTRACT: The increasing global burden, the reported high prevalence of rapidly progressive coronary artery disease (CAD), and the atypical nature of CAD presentation in type 2 diabetes mellitus have encouraged development of strategies for detecting occult CAD in this population. Several recent prospective studies have addressed the value of screening for CAD in asymptomatic diabetic patients. The overall message of these studies is that despite detection of silent ischemia in a notable proportion of these patients, the dynamic nature of myocardial ischemia, the prohibitive cost of screening all asymptomatic patients, and the proven efficacy of primary preventive strategies would mandate implementation of better clinical risk stratification strategies for identifying at-risk individuals. Questions still remain as to what best strategy would allow proper patient selection through logical stepwise approaches to screening and whether that would alter patients' outcome when added to rigorously implemented primary preventive measures.

16 Review The year in coronary artery disease. 2009

Achenbach, Stephan / Dilsizian, Vasken / Kramer, Christopher M / Zoghbi, William A. ·Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. stephan.achenbach@uk-erlangen.de ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #19520351.

ABSTRACT: Technology in cardiovascular imaging continues to evolve rapidly. Along with new technology, new imaging approaches are continuously being developed and evaluated in various clinical settings. The workup of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the major areas in which imaging is applied. Some of the most important aspects include diagnosing CAD through direct coronary visualization or imaging of ischemia; assessing left ventricular function, scar, and viability; and providing prognostic information both in patients with known CAD and in asymptomatic individuals at risk for disease. This article will outline some of the recent developments in the field of echocardiography, nuclear imaging, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and computed tomography (CT) as they pertain to CAD.

17 Review Nuclear cardiac stress testing in the era of molecular medicine. 2008

Vesely, Mark R / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagonistic Radiology, University of Maryland Hospital and School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201-1595, USA. ·J Nucl Med · Pubmed #18322120.

ABSTRACT: The objective of cardiac stress testing is to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) and to prevent future adverse events, such as myocardial infarction or death. The progression from electrocardiographically based stress testing to current SPECT and PET technologies has brought improvements in diagnostic efficacy and resolution. Myocardial perfusion imaging facilitates management of CAD in elective and acute settings by providing valuable diagnostic and prognostic information. Hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT systems impart complementary information of coronary anatomy and its physiologic significance on blood flow reserve. In the current era, diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease is increasingly defined by underlying molecular and genomic aberrations rather than by clinical signs and symptoms alone. Nuclear imaging is uniquely primed to exploit the targeting of expressed cell-surface molecules and intracellular processes of cardiovascular disease and to foster the development of innovative therapeutic interventions in the future.

18 Article Clinical Quantification of Myocardial Blood Flow Using PET: Joint Position Paper of the SNMMI Cardiovascular Council and the ASNC. 2018

Murthy, Venkatesh L / Bateman, Timothy M / Beanlands, Rob S / Berman, Daniel S / Borges-Neto, Salvador / Chareonthaitawee, Panithaya / Cerqueira, Manuel D / deKemp, Robert A / DePuey, E Gordon / Dilsizian, Vasken / Dorbala, Sharmila / Ficaro, Edward P / Garcia, Ernest V / Gewirtz, Henry / Heller, Gary V / Lewin, Howard C / Malhotra, Saurabh / Mann, April / Ruddy, Terrence D / Schindler, Thomas H / Schwartz, Ronald G / Slomka, Piotr J / Soman, Prem / Di Carli, Marcelo F / Anonymous351087 / Anonymous361087. ·Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan vlmurthy@med.umich.edu. · Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, Missouri. · National Cardiac PET Centre, Division of Cardiology, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Departments of Imaging and Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mt. Sinai St. Luke's and Mt. Sinai West Hospitals, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute, Morristown Medical Center, Morristown, NJ, USA. · Cardiac Imaging Associates, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York. · Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Cardiology Division, Department of Medicine, and Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York; and. · Division of Cardiology, Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ·J Nucl Med · Pubmed #29242396.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Article How to approach an inappropriately ordered myocardial perfusion stress study: A case-based ethics discussion. 2015

Srivastava, Ajay V / Kontak, Andrew / Shaw, Leslee J / Dickert, Neal W / Dilsizian, Vasken / Dorbala, Sharmila / Shirani, Jamshid / Einstein, Andrew J. ·Division of Cardiology, Heart and Vascular Institute, Scripps Clinic Torrey Pines, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA. srivastava.ajay@scrippshealth.org. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Radiology and Medicine (Cardiology), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Cardiology, St. Luke's University Health Network, Bethlehem, PA, USA. · Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #26271958.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Article (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging of coronary atherosclerosis and plaque inflammation. 2010

Chen, Wengen / Dilsizian, Vasken. ·University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, 21201, USA. wchen5@umm.edu ·Curr Cardiol Rep · Pubmed #20425174.

ABSTRACT: The emphasis of current cardiovascular imaging modalities is on the anatomic detection of coronary artery luminal narrowing. However, in the clinical setting, vulnerable plaques that are not flow limiting may account for the majority of cardiovascular events. Thus, the pursuit for developing noninvasive imaging techniques that target vulnerable plaques is a laudable goal. Recent studies have demonstrated the clinical feasibility of direct visualization and characterization of coronary and carotid artery plaques with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography imaging. In experimental studies, the intensity of FDG uptake has been shown to correlate with macrophage density and inflammatory state of plaques. Vascular plaque FDG uptake has been linked to cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Anti-inflammatory drugs and statins have been shown to attenuate FDG uptake in plaques. Thus, the identification of FDG uptake in vascular plaques may have important clinical implications for predicting and preventing future cardiovascular events.

21 Article Putting the face to a name: concurrent assessment of vascular morphology and biology. 2009

Dilsizian, Vasken / Narula, Jagat. ·University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #19833316.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Article 18F-FDG uptake as a surrogate marker for antecedent ischemia. 2008

Dilsizian, Vasken. ·University of Maryland Hospital andSchool of MedicineBaltimore, Maryland, USA. vdilsizian@umm.edu ·J Nucl Med · Pubmed #18997055.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --