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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Tamara Garcia-Camarero
Based on 7 articles published since 2009
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Tamara Garcia Camarero wrote the following 7 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Directional coronary atherectomy: a time for reflection. Should we let it go? 2009

Cubeddu, Roberto J / Truong, Quynh A / Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo / Garcia-Camarero, Tamara / Okada, David R / Kiernan, Thomas J / Inglessis, Ignacio / Palacios, Igor F. ·Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #19755338.

ABSTRACT: A series of interventional tools have emerged since the advent of percutaneous coronary angioplasty. Several are fundamental and used routinely, while others less favourable have fallen short of mainstream therapy and/or have settled as a niche device. We present an overview of the evolution of directional coronary atherectomy (DCA), a unique device that was originally conceived in 1984 to solve the limitations of balloon angioplasty. Unfortunately, we have witnessed its use fall significantly out of favour due to premature and controversial study results. In many interventional laboratories DCA is no longer available. However, we strongly feel that allowing DCA to join the list of extinct interventional tools would be very unfortunate. We, herein, present a series of complex percutaneous coronary procedures to illustrate the convenience of DCA use as a lesion-specific niche device. Finally, DCA offers a valuable distinct clinical research function as it allows for in vivo pathological coronary tissue examination. In conclusion, we plead for its continued production and use as an interventional niche device for the wellbeing of our patients.

2 Clinical Trial Prospective application of pre-defined intravascular ultrasound criteria for assessment of intermediate left main coronary artery lesions results from the multicenter LITRO study. 2011

de la Torre Hernandez, Jose M / Hernández Hernandez, Felipe / Alfonso, Fernando / Rumoroso, Jose R / Lopez-Palop, Ramon / Sadaba, Mario / Carrillo, Pilar / Rondan, Juan / Lozano, Iñigo / Ruiz Nodar, Juan M / Baz, Jose A / Fernandez Nofrerias, Eduard / Pajin, Fernando / Garcia Camarero, Tamara / Gutierrez, Hipolito / Anonymous2340700. ·Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, IFIMAV, Santander, Spain. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #21757111.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study is a prospective validation of 6 mm(2) as a minimum lumen area (MLA) cutoff value for revascularization of left main coronary artery (LMCA) lesions. BACKGROUND: Lesions involving the LMCA are prognostically relevant. Angiography has important limitations in the evaluation of LMCA lesions with intermediate severity. An MLA of 6 mm(2) assessed by intravascular ultrasound has been proposed as a cutoff value to determine lesion severity, but there are no large studies evaluating the prospective application and safety of this approach. METHODS: We have designed a multicenter, prospective study. Consecutive patients with intermediate lesions in unprotected LMCA were evaluated with intravascular ultrasound. An MLA <6 mm(2) was used as criterion for revascularization. RESULTS: A total of 354 patients were included in 22 centers. LMCA revascularization was performed in 90.5% (152 of 168) of patients with an MLA <6 mm(2) and was deferred in 96% (179 of 186) of patients with an MLA of 6 mm(2) or more. A large scatter was observed between both groups regarding angiographic parameters. In a 2-year follow-up period, cardiac death-free survival was 97.7% in the deferred group versus 94.5% in the revascularized group (p = 0.5), and event-free survival was 87.3% versus 80.6%, respectively (p = 0.3). In the 2-year period, only 8 (4.4%) patients in the deferred group required subsequent LMCA revascularization, none with an infarction. CONCLUSIONS: Angiographic measurements are not reliable in the assessment of intermediate LMCA lesions. An MLA of 6 mm(2) or more is a safe value for deferring revascularization of the LMCA, given the application of the clinical and angiographic inclusion criteria used in this study.

3 Article Multivessel disease in patients over 75years old with ST elevated myocardial infarction. Current management strategies and related clinical outcomes in the ESTROFA MI+75 nation-wide registry. 2018

de La Torre Hernandez, Jose M / Gomez Hospital, Joan A / Baz, Jose A / Brugaletta, Salvatore / Perez de Prado, Armando / Linares, Jose A / Lopez Palop, Ramón / Cid, Belen / Garcia Camarero, Tamara / Diego, Alejandro / Gutierrez, Hipolito / Fernandez Diaz, Jose A / Sanchis, Juan / Alfonso, Fernando / Blanco, Roberto / Botas, Javier / Navarro Cuartero, Javier / Moreu, Jose / Bosa, Francisco / Vegas, Jose M / Elizaga, Jaime / Arrebola, Antonio L / Hernandez, Felipe / Salvatella, Neus / Monteagudo, Marta / Gomez Jaume, Alfredo / Carrillo, Xavier / Martin Reyes, Roberto / Lozano, Fernando / Rumoroso, Jose R / Andraka, Leire / Dominguez, Antonio J. ·Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, Servicio de Cardiologia, Santander, Spain. Electronic address: he1thj@humv.es. · Hospital de Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital de Vigo, Servicio de Cardiologia, Vigo, Spain. · Hospital Clinic, Servicio de Cardiologia, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital de Leon, Leon, Servicio de Cardiologia, Spain. · Hospital Clinico de Zaragoza, Servicio de Cardiologia, Zaragoza, Spain. · Hospital San Juan, Servicio de Cardiologia, Alicante, Spain. · Hospital de Santiago de Compostela, Servicio de Cardiologia, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, Servicio de Cardiologia, Santander, Spain. · Hospital Clinico de Salamanca, Servicio de Cardiologia, Salamanca, Spain. · Hospital Clinico de Valladolid, Servicio de Cardiologia, Valladolid, Spain. · Hospital Puerta de Hierro, Servicio de Cardiologia, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital Clinico de Valencia, Servicio de Cardiologia, Valencia, Spain. · Hospital de la Princesa, Servicio de Cardiologia, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital de Cruces, Bilbao, Servicio de Cardiologia, Spain. · Hospital de Alcorcon, Servicio de Cardiologia, Alcorcon, Spain. · Hospital de Albacete, Servicio de Cardiologia, Albacete, Spain. · Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Servicio de Cardiologia, Toledo, Spain. · Hospital Clinico de Tenerife, Servicio de Cardiologia, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain. · Hospital de Cabueñes, Servicio de Cardiologia, Gijon, Spain. · Hospital Gregorio Marañon, Servicio de Cardiologia, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Servicio de Cardiologia, Granada, Spain. · Hospital 12 de Octubre, Servicio de Cardiologia, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital del Mar, Servicio de Cardiología, Grup de Recerca Biomèdica en Malalties del Cor, IMIM (Hospital del Mar Reseach Institute), Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital Dr Peset, Servicio de Cardiologia, Valencia, Spain. · Hospital Son Espases, Servicio de Cardiologia, Palma de Mallorca, Spain. · Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Servicio de Cardiologia, Badalona, Spain. · Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Servicio de Cardiologia, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital de Ciudad Real, Servicio de Cardiologia, Ciudad Real, Spain. · Hospital de Galdacano, Servicio de Cardiologia, Bilbao, Spain. · Hospital de Basurto, Servicio de Cardiologia, Bilbao, Spain. · Hospital Virgen de la Victoria, Servicio de Cardiologia, Malaga, Spain. ·Cardiovasc Revasc Med · Pubmed #29306670.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In elderly patients with ST elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) and multivessel disease (MVD the outcomes related with different revascularization strategies are not well known. METHODS: Subgroup-analysis of a nation-wide registry of primary angioplasty in the elderly (ESTROFA MI+75) with 3576 patients over 75years old from 31 centers. Patients with MVD were analyzed to describe treatment approaches and 2years outcomes. RESULTS: Of 1830 (51%) with MVD, 847 (46%) underwent multivessel revascularization either in acute (51%), staged (44%) or both procedures (5%). Patients with previous myocardial infarction and those receiving drug-eluting stents or IIb-IIIa inhibitors were more prone to be revascularized, whereas older patients, females and those with Killip III-IV, renal failure and higher ejection fraction were less likely. Survival free of cardiac death and infarction at 2years was better for those undergoing multivessel PCI (85.8% vs. 80.4%, p<0.0008), regardless of Killip class. Multivessel PCI was protective of cardiac death and infarction (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40-0.89; p=0.011). Complete revascularization made no difference in outcomes among those patients undergoing multivessel PCI. The best prognosis corresponded to those undergoing multivessel PCI in staged procedures (p<0.001). A propensity score matching analysis (514 patients in each group) yielded similar results. CONCLUSIONS: In elderly patients with STEMI and MVD, multivessel PCI was related with better outcomes especially after staged procedures. Among those undergoing multivessel PCI, anatomically defined completeness of revascularization had not prognostic influence. SUMMARY: We sought to investigate the revascularization strategies applied and their prognostic implications in patients aged over 75years with ST elevated myocardial infarction showing multivessel disease. Of 1830 patients, 847 (46%) underwent multivessel PCI either in acute (51%), staged (44%) or both procedures (5%). Multivessel PCI was independent predictor of cardiac death and infarction with the best prognosis corresponding to those undergoing staged procedures.

4 Article Procedural resources utilization and clinical outcomes with bioresorbable everolimus-eluting scaffolds and Pt-Cr everolimus-eluting stent with resorbable abluminal polymer in clinical practice. A randomized trial. 2017

de la Torre Hernandez, Jose M / Garcia Camarero, Tamara / Lee, Dae-Hyun / Sainz Laso, Fermin / Veiga Fernandez, Gabriela / Pino, Tania / Rubio, Silvia / Legarra, Pablo / Valdivia, Jorge R / Zueco Gil, Javier. ·Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, Department of Cardiology, Interventional Cardiology Unit, Santander, Spain. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27807948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We sought to compare the procedural implications of using bioresorbable everolimus-eluting scaffolds (BVS) and Pt-Cr everolimus-eluting stent with abluminal bioabsorbable polymer (Synergy). BACKGROUND: There are important differences in the respective platforms, which could impact on procedural performance, complications and outcomes. METHODS: A prospective, randomized single center study including consecutive patients in stable clinical condition and with lesions amenable to be treated with BVS according to predefined criteria. Patients were randomized to either treatment with BVS or Synergy. All procedural data were collected and 12 months clinical follow up conducted. Primary objectives were fluoroscopy time, median dose-area product, contras agent volumen, and peri-procedural troponin release. RESULTS: A total of 200 patients were included, 100 in BVS group and 100 in Synergy group. No significant differences were observed in baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics. Predilatation (97.6 vs. 25.4%; P < 0.001), postdilatation (64.8 vs. 38.4%: P < 0.01), and use of 2 wires (20.8 vs. 10%; P = 0.02) were more frequent with BVS. The BVS group showed a significant increase in fluoroscopy time (18%), dose-area product (20%), and contrast volume (10%). Post-procedural increase of creatinine was similar and amount of TnI release was significantly higher with BVS but incidence of peri-procedural infarction was comparable. Clinical outcomes at 12 months were similar with definite thrombosis being 1% with BVS and 0% with Synergy. CONCLUSIONS: The use of BVS in comparison with the Synergy stent in a similar lesional setting is associated with a higher use of resources in the procedure, more radiation, and higher TnI release. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

5 Article Clinical impact of intravascular ultrasound guidance in drug-eluting stent implantation for unprotected left main coronary disease: pooled analysis at the patient-level of 4 registries. 2014

de la Torre Hernandez, Jose M / Baz Alonso, José A / Gómez Hospital, Joan A / Alfonso Manterola, Fernando / Garcia Camarero, Tamara / Gimeno de Carlos, Federico / Roura Ferrer, Gerard / Recalde, Angel Sanchez / Martínez-Luengas, Iñigo Lozano / Gomez Lara, Josep / Hernandez Hernandez, Felipe / Pérez-Vizcayno, María J / Cequier Fillat, Angel / Perez de Prado, Armando / Gonzalez-Trevilla, Agustín Albarrán / Jimenez Navarro, Manuel F / Mauri Ferre, Josepa / Fernandez Diaz, Jose A / Pinar Bermudez, Eduardo / Zueco Gil, Javier / Anonymous4770788. ·Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain. Electronic address: he1thj@humv.es. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Meixoeiro, Vigo, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital La Paz, Madrid, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de Leon, Leon, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Virgen de la Victoria, Malaga, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Puerta de Hierro, Madrid, Spain. · Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24650399.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study sought to investigate the clinical impact of the use of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) during revascularization of patients with left main coronary artery (LM) disease with drug-eluting stents (DES). BACKGROUND: Whether the use of IVUS during the procedure adds a clinical benefit remains unclear. There is only 1 previous observational study, with relevant limitations, supporting the value of this strategy. METHODS: We performed a patient-level pooled analysis of 4 registries of patients with LM disease treated with DES in Spain. A propensity score-matching method was used to obtain matched pairs of patients with and without IVUS guidance. RESULTS: A total of 1,670 patients were included, and 505 patients (30.2%) underwent DES implantation under IVUS guidance (IVUS group). By means of the matching method, 505 patients without the use of IVUS during revascularization were selected (no-IVUS group). Survival free of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and target lesion revascularization at 3 years was 88.7% in the IVUS group and 83.6% in the no-IVUS group (p = 0.04) for the overall population, and 90% and 80.7%, respectively (p = 0.03), for the subgroups with distal LM lesions. The incidence of definite and probable thrombosis was significantly lower in the IVUS group (0.6% vs. 2.2%; p = 0.04). Finally, IVUS-guided revascularization was identified as an independent predictor for major adverse events in the overall population (hazard ratio: 0.70, 95% confidence interval: 0.52 to 0.99; p = 0.04) and in the subgroup with distal lesions (hazard ratio: 0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.34 to 0.90; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this pooled analysis show an association of IVUS guidance during percutaneous coronary intervention with better outcomes in patients with LM disease undergoing revascularization with DES.

6 Article Comparison of paclitaxel-eluting vs. everolimus-eluting stents implanted simultaneously in different lesions of the same coronary artery: 12-month follow-up with optical coherence tomography. 2013

de la Torre Hernández, Jose M / Lee, Dae-Hyun / Garcia-Camarero, Tamara / Sainz Laso, Fermin / Zueco, Javier. ·Unidad de Cardiología Intervencionista, Cardiología Valdecilla, Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #24384292.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows a detailed assessment of intimal coverage and strut apposition which are well known substrates for late thrombosis. This study sought to assess and compare long-term coverage and apposition of PES and EES implanted in different lesions of the same coronary artery (and in the same patient). METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 30 patients were included. In these patients PES and EES were implanted in the same vessel in two similar lesions. The selection of the stent for each lesion was random. At 12 months, 30 PES were examined analysing 154±90 struts/stents and 30 EES analysing 158±72 struts/stents. The proportion of uncovered struts was 0.8±1.3% for EES and 1.5±2.9% for PES (p=0.3), and the proportion of malapposed struts was 1.25±2.1% and 0.98±2%, respectively (p=0.2). A pooled analysis was performed using the random effects model, given the significant heterogeneity found, which did not show significant differences between EES and PES for non-coverage (RR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.32-1.67) or malapposition (RR 1.60, 95% CI: 0.56-4.61). The presence of non-coverage in malapposed struts was 62% with PES and 15% with EES (p<0.0001), the maximal malapposition area being significantly larger with PES (0.6±0.3 vs. 0.25±0.2 mm², p=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In highly matched conditions, with PES and EES implanted in the same artery, both DES showed a comparable degree of intimal coverage and apposition at one-year follow-up. A smaller area of malapposition with non-covered struts was found with EES.

7 Article Comparison of paclitaxel-eluting stents (Taxus) and everolimus-eluting stents (Xience) in left main coronary artery disease with 3 years follow-up (from the ESTROFA-LM registry). 2013

De la Torre Hernandez, Jose M / Alfonso, Fernando / Sanchez Recalde, Angel / Jimenez Navarro, Manuel F / Perez de Prado, Armando / Hernandez, Felipe / Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar / Roura, Gerard / Garcia Camarero, Tamara / Elizaga, Jaime / Rivero, Fernando / Gimeno, Federico / Calviño, Ramon / Moreu, Jose / Bosa, Francisco / Rumoroso, Jose R / Bullones, Juan A / Gallardo, Arsenio / Fernandez Diaz, Jose A / Ruiz Arroyo, Jose R / Aragon, Victor / Masotti, Monica / Anonymous300746. ·Hospital M. de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain. he1thj@humv.es ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #23273715.

ABSTRACT: Evidence regarding therapy with drug-eluting stents in the left main coronary artery (LM) is based mostly on trials performed with first-generation drug-eluting stents. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term clinical outcomes after treatment for unprotected LM disease with paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) and everolimus-eluting stents (EES). The ESTROFA-LM is a multicenter retrospective registry including consecutive patients with unprotected LM disease treated with PES or EES. A total of 770 patients have been included at 21 centers, 415 with treated PES and 355 with EES. Treatment with 2 stents was more frequent with PES (17% vs 10.4%, p = 0.007), whereas intravascular ultrasound was more frequently used with EES (35.2% vs 26%, p = 0.006). The 3-year death and infarction survival rates were 86.1% for PES and 87.3% for EES (p = 0.50) and for death, infarction, and target lesion revascularization were 83.6% versus 82% (p = 0.60), respectively. Definite or probable thrombosis was 1.6% for PES and 1.4% for EES (p = 0.80). The use of 2 stents, age, diabetes, and acute coronary syndromes were independent predictors of mortality. In the subgroup of distal lesions, the use of intravascular ultrasound was an independent predictor of better outcome. Comparison of propensity score-matched groups did not yield differences between the 2 stents. In conclusion, the results of this multicenter registry show comparable safety and efficacy at 3 years for PES and EES in the treatment of LM disease. The use of bifurcation stenting techniques in distal lesions was a relevant independent predictor for events. The use of intravascular ultrasound appears to have a positive impact on patients treated for LM distal disease.