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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Haissam Haddad
Based on 6 articles published since 2010
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Haissam Haddad wrote the following 6 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review The concept of ventricular reserve in heart failure and pulmonary hypertension: an old metric that brings us one step closer in our quest for prediction. 2011

Haddad, Francois / Vrtovec, Bojan / Ashley, Euan A / Deschamps, Alain / Haddad, Haissam / Denault, Andre Y. ·Stanford University School of Medicine, Falk Cardiovascular Research Center, Palo Alto, California, USA. fhaddad@stanford.edu ·Curr Opin Cardiol · Pubmed #21297465.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Ventricular reserve is emerging a strong predictor of outcome in heart failure and cardiovascular disease. Ventricular reserve is the term used to describe the extent of increase or change in ventricular function that occurs during exercise or pharmacological stress (typically with dobutamine). RECENT FINDINGS: The interest in ventricular reserve lies in its ability to assess viability in coronary artery disease, to predict clinical outcome and response to therapy in patients with heart failure and to screen patients for early cardiovascular disease. SUMMARY: In this paper, we will review the emerging role of ventricular reserve in heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. We will also explore the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of impaired ventricular reserve and discuss future directions of research in the field.

2 Article Update on revascularization in patients with heart failure and coronary artery disease. 2018

Hage, Fadi / Hage, Ali / Haddad, Haissam / Kiaii, Bob. ·Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa. · Department of Cardiac Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario. · Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. ·Curr Opin Cardiol · Pubmed #29135484.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review explores the recent findings surrounding the evaluation and the treatment of patients with heart failure and coronary artery disease. It also shed the light on the gaps in this area. RECENT FINDINGS: Surgical revascularization in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy has the potential to offer symptomatic and survival benefits. SUMMARY: Patients with heart failure and coronary artery disease should be considered candidates for revascularization on the basis of their symptoms, extent of the disease, and comorbidities. Surgical revascularization in these patients provides a symptomatic relief, and a survival benefit.

3 Article Long-Term Follow-Up of Outcomes With F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Imaging-Assisted Management of Patients With Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction Secondary to Coronary Disease. 2016

Mc Ardle, Brian / Shukla, Tushar / Nichol, Graham / deKemp, Robert A / Bernick, Jordan / Guo, Ann / Lim, Siok Ping / Davies, Ross A / Haddad, Haissam / Duchesne, Lloyd / Hendry, Paul / Masters, Roy / Ross, Heather / Freeman, Michael / Gulenchyn, Karen / Racine, Normand / Humen, Dennis / Benard, Francois / Ruddy, Terrence D / Chow, Benjamin J / Mielniczuk, Lisa / DaSilva, Jean N / Garrard, Linda / Wells, George A / Beanlands, Rob S B / Anonymous5330880. ·From the Molecular Function and Imaging Program, The National Cardiac PET Centre, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine and the Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of Surgery and the Cardiac Research Methods Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute and University of Ottawa, Canada (B.M., T.S., R.A.D., J.B., A.G., S.P.L., R.A.D., H.H., L.D., P.H., R.M., T.D.R., B.J.C., L.M., J.N.D., L.G., G.A.W., R.S.B.B.) · Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Washington-Harborview Center for Prehospital Emergency Care, Seattle, (G.N.) · Department of Medicine, Divisions of Cardiology, University Health Network and St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada (H.R., M.F.) · ES Garnett Memorial PET Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton Health Sciences, Canada (K.G.) · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, MontrĂ©al Heart Institute, Canada (N.R.) · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, London Health Sciences Centre, Canada (D.H.) · and Department of Molecular Oncology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada · and Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke, Canada (F.B.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27609816.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Whether viability imaging can impact long-term patient outcomes is uncertain. The PARR-2 study (Positron Emission Tomography and Recovery Following Revascularization) showed a nonsignificant trend toward improved outcomes at 1 year using an F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET)-assisted strategy in patients with suspected ischemic cardiomyopathy. When patients adhered to F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET recommendations, outcome benefit was observed. Long-term outcomes of viability imaging-assisted management have not previously been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. METHODS AND RESULTS: PARR-2 randomized patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction and suspected CAD being considered for revascularization or transplantation to standard care (n= 195) versus PET-assisted management (n=197) at sites participating in long-term follow-up. The predefined primary outcome was time to composite event (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or cardiac hospitalization). After 5 years, 105 (53%) patients in the PET arm and 111 (57%) in the standard care arm experienced the composite event (hazard ratio for time to composite event =0.82 [95% confidence interval 0.62-1.07]; P=0.15). When only patients who adhered to PET recommendations were included, the hazard ratio for the time to primary outcome was 0.73 (95% confidence interval 0.54-0.99; P=0.042). CONCLUSIONS: After a 5-year follow-up in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and suspected CAD, overall, PET-assisted management did not significantly reduce cardiac events compared with standard care. However, significant benefits were observed when there was adherence to PET recommendations. PET viability imaging may be best applied when there is likely to be adherence to imaging-based recommendations. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00385242.

4 Article Prognostic value of rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients after heart transplant. 2014

Mc Ardle, Brian A / Davies, Ross A / Chen, Li / Small, Gary R / Ruddy, Terrence D / Dwivedi, Girish / Yam, Yeung / Haddad, Haissam / Mielniczuk, Lisa M / Stadnick, Ellamae / Hessian, Renee / Guo, Ann / Beanlands, Rob S / deKemp, Robert A / Chow, Benjamin J W. ·From the Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (B.A.M.A., R.A.D., G.R.S., T.D.R., G.D., Y.Y., H.H., L.M.M., E.S., R.H., R.S.B., B.J.W.C.), National Cardiac PET Center (B.A.M.A., R.A.D., T.D.R., R.H., A.G., R.S.B., R.A.d., B.J.W.C.), and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Research Methods Center (L.C.), University of Ottawa Heart Institute. Ottawa, Canada. · From the Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (B.A.M.A., R.A.D., G.R.S., T.D.R., G.D., Y.Y., H.H., L.M.M., E.S., R.H., R.S.B., B.J.W.C.), National Cardiac PET Center (B.A.M.A., R.A.D., T.D.R., R.H., A.G., R.S.B., R.A.d., B.J.W.C.), and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Research Methods Center (L.C.), University of Ottawa Heart Institute. Ottawa, Canada. bchow@ottawaheart.ca. ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25182366.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cardiac allograft vasculopathy is a key prognostic determinant after heart transplant. Detection and risk stratification of patients with cardiac allograft vasculopathy are problematic. Positron emission tomography using rubidium-82 allows quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow and may have utility for risk stratification in this population. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with a history of heart transplant undergoing dipyridamole rubidium-82 positron emission tomography were prospectively enrolled. Myocardial perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction were recorded. Absolute flow quantification at rest and after dipyridamole stress as well as the ratio of mean global flow at stress and at rest, termed myocardial flow reserve, were calculated. Patients were followed for all-cause death, acute coronary syndrome, and heart failure hospitalization. A total of 140 patients (81% men; median age, 62 years; median follow-up, 18.2 months) were included. There were 14 events during follow-up (9 deaths, 1 acute coronary syndrome, and 4 heart failure admissions). In addition to baseline clinical variables (estimated glomerular filtration rate, previously documented cardiac allograft vasculopathy), relative perfusion defects, mean myocardial flow reserve, and mean stress myocardial blood flow were significant predictors of adverse outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormalities on rubidium-82 positron emission tomography were predictors of adverse events in heart transplant patients. Larger prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

5 Article Myocardial viability and impact of surgical ventricular reconstruction on outcomes of patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery: results of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure trial. 2014

Holly, Thomas A / Bonow, Robert O / Arnold, J Malcolm O / Oh, Jae K / Varadarajan, Padmini / Pohost, Gerald M / Haddad, Haissam / Jones, Robert H / Velazquez, Eric J / Birkenfeld, Bozena / Asch, Federico M / Malinowski, Marcin / Barretto, Rodrigo / Kalil, Renato A K / Berman, Daniel S / Sun, Jie-Lena / Lee, Kerry L / Panza, Julio A. ·Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill. Electronic address: t-holly@northwestern.edu. · Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill. · University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. · Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, Calif. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. · Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Duke University, Durham, NC. · Department of Nuclear Medicine PUM, Szczecin, Poland. · MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC. · Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland. · Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Instituto de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif. · Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY. ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #25152476.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: In the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure trial, surgical ventricular reconstruction plus coronary artery bypass surgery was not associated with a reduction in the rate of death or cardiac hospitalization compared with bypass alone. We hypothesized that the absence of viable myocardium identifies patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction who have a greater benefit with coronary artery bypass graft surgery and surgical ventricular reconstruction compared with bypass alone. METHODS: Myocardial viability was assessed by single photon computed tomography in 267 of the 1000 patients randomized to bypass or bypass plus surgical ventricular reconstruction in the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure. Myocardial viability was assessed on a per patient basis and regionally according to prespecified criteria. RESULTS: At 3 years, there was no difference in mortality or the combined outcome of death or cardiac hospitalization between those with and without viability, and there was no significant interaction between the type of surgery and the global viability status with respect to mortality or death plus cardiac hospitalization. Furthermore, there was no difference in mortality or death plus cardiac hospitalization between those with and without anterior wall or apical scar, and no significant interaction between the presence of scar in these regions and the type of surgery with respect to mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with coronary artery disease and severe regional left ventricular dysfunction, assessment of myocardial viability does not identify patients who will derive a mortality benefit from adding surgical ventricular reconstruction to coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

6 Article 18F-FDG PET imaging of myocardial viability in an experienced center with access to 18F-FDG and integration with clinical management teams: the Ottawa-FIVE substudy of the PARR 2 trial. 2010

Abraham, Arun / Nichol, Graham / Williams, Kathryn A / Guo, Ann / deKemp, Robert A / Garrard, Linda / Davies, Ross A / Duchesne, Lloyd / Haddad, Haissam / Chow, Benjamin / DaSilva, Jean / Beanlands, Rob S B / Anonymous3200653. ·National Cardiac PET Centre and Division of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Methods Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ·J Nucl Med · Pubmed #20237039.

ABSTRACT: METHODS: Included were patients with left ventricular dysfunction and suspected coronary artery disease being considered for revascularization. The patients had been randomized in PARR 2 to PET-assisted management (group 1) or standard care (group 2) and had been enrolled in Ottawa after August 1, 2002 (the date that on-site (18)F-FDG was initiated) (n = 111). The primary outcome was the composite endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or cardiac rehospitalization within 1 y. Data were compared with the rest of PARR 2 (PET-assisted management [group 3] or standard care [group 4]). RESULTS: In the Ottawa-FIVE subgroup of PARR 2, the cumulative proportion of patients experiencing the composite event was 19% (group 1), versus 41% (group 2). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression showed a benefit for the PET-assisted strategy (hazard ratio, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.72; P = 0.005). Compared with other patients in PARR 2, Ottawa-FIVE patients had a lower ejection fraction (25% +/- 7% vs. 27% +/- 8%, P = 0.04), were more often female (24% vs. 13%, P = 0.006), tended to be older (64 +/- 10 y vs. 62 +/- 10 y, P = 0.07), and had less previous coronary artery bypass grafting (13% vs. 21%, P = 0.07). For patients in the rest of PARR 2, there was no significant difference in events between groups 3 and 4. The observed effect of (18)F-FDG PET-assisted management in the 4 groups in the context of adjusted survival curves demonstrated a significant interaction (P = 0.016). Comparisons of the 2 arms in Ottawa-FIVE to the 2 arms in the rest of PARR 2 demonstrated a trend toward significance (standard care, P = 0.145; PET-assisted management, P = 0.057). CONCLUSION: In this post hoc group analysis, a significant reduction in cardiac events was observed in patients with (18)F-FDG PET-assisted management, compared with patients who received standard care. The results suggest that outcome may be benefited using (18)F-FDG PET in an experienced center with ready access to (18)F-FDG and integration with imaging, heart failure, and revascularization teams.