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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Vincent B. Ho
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Vincent B. Ho wrote the following 4 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous3940905 / Akers, Scott R / Panchal, Vandan / Ho, Vincent B / Beache, Garth M / Brown, Richard K J / Ghoshhajra, Brian B / Greenberg, S Bruce / Hsu, Joe Y / Kicska, Gregory A / Min, James K / Stillman, Arthur E / Stojanovska, Jadranka / Abbara, Suhny / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Principal Author, VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: akerssco@me.com. · Research Author, Internal Medicine Resident, Henry Ford Allegiance Health, Jackson, Michigan. · Panel Vice-Chair, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, California. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; American College of Cardiology. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Panel Chair, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #28473096.

ABSTRACT: In patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), imaging has major and diverse roles. First, imaging is valuable in determining and documenting the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia, hibernation, scarring, and/or the presence, site, and severity of obstructive coronary lesions. Second, imaging findings are important in determining the course of management of patients with suspected chronic myocardial ischemia and better defining those patients best suited for medical therapy, angioplasty/stenting, or surgery. Third, imaging is also necessary to determine the long-term prognosis and likely benefit from various therapeutic options by evaluating ventricular function, diastolic relaxation, and end-systolic volume. Imaging studies are also required to demonstrate other abnormalities, such as congenital/acquired coronary anomalies and severe left ventricular hypertrophy, that can produce angina in the absence of symptomatic coronary obstructive disease due to atherosclerosis. Clinical risk assessment is necessary to determine the pretest probability of CAD. Multiple methods are available to categorize patients as low, medium, or high risk for developing CAD. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Review ACR Appropriateness Criteria Acute Nonspecific Chest Pain-Low Probability of Coronary Artery Disease. 2015

Hoffmann, Udo / Akers, Scott R / Brown, Richard K J / Cummings, Kristopher W / Cury, Ricardo C / Greenberg, S Bruce / Ho, Vincent B / Hsu, Joe Y / Min, James K / Panchal, Kalpesh K / Stillman, Arthur E / Woodard, Pamela K / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: uhoffmann@partners.org. · VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute and Baptist Health of South Florida, Miami, Florida. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · Diagnostic Imaging, Los Angeles, California. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, American College of Cardiology. · University of Cincinnati Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #26653833.

ABSTRACT: Primary imaging options in patients at low risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) who present with undifferentiated chest pain and without signs of ischemia are functional testing with exercise or pharmacologic stress-based electrocardiography, echocardiography, or myocardial perfusion imaging to exclude myocardial ischemia after rule-out of myocardial infarction and early cardiac CT because of its high negative predictive value to exclude CAD. Although possible, is not conclusive whether triple-rule-out CT (CAD, pulmonary embolism, and aortic dissection) might improve the efficiency of patient management. More advanced noninvasive tests such as cardiac MRI and invasive imaging with transesophageal echocardiography or coronary angiography are rarely indicated. With increased likelihood of noncardiac causes, a number of diagnostic tests, among them ultrasound of the abdomen, MR angiography of the aorta with or without contrast, x-ray rib views, x-ray barium swallow, and upper gastrointestinal series, can also be appropriate. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. This recommendation is based on excellent evidence, including several randomized comparative effectiveness trials and blinded observational cohort studies.

3 Review ACR Appropriateness Criteria® chronic chest pain--high probability of coronary artery disease. 2011

Earls, James P / White, Richard D / Woodard, Pamela K / Abbara, Suhny / Atalay, Michael K / Carr, J Jeffrey / Haramati, Linda B / Hendel, Robert C / Ho, Vincent B / Hoffman, Udo / Khan, Arfa R / Mammen, Leena / Martin, Edward T / Rozenshtein, Anna / Ryan, Thomas / Schoepf, Joseph / Steiner, Robert M / White, Charles S. ·Fairfax Radiological Consultants, Fairfax, Virginia, USA. jpearls@yahoo.com ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #21962781.

ABSTRACT: Imaging is valuable in determining the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia and the severity of obstructive coronary lesions in patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease. Imaging is critical for defining patients best suited for medical therapy or intervention, and findings can be used to predict long-term prognosis and the likely benefit from various therapeutic options. Chest radiography, radionuclide single photon-emission CT, radionuclide ventriculography, and conventional coronary angiography are the imaging modalities historically used in evaluating suspected chronic myocardial ischemia. Stress echocardiography, PET, cardiac MRI, and multidetector cardiac CT have all been more recently shown to be valuable in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease. Other imaging techniques may be helpful in those patients who do not present with signs classic for angina pectoris or in those patients who do not respond as expected to standard management. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

4 Article The feasibility of 350 μm spatial resolution coronary magnetic resonance angiography at 3 T in humans. 2012

Gharib, Ahmed M / Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z / Ho, Vincent B / Födi, Eszter / Herzka, Daniel A / Ohayon, Jacques / Stuber, Matthias / Pettigrew, Roderic I. ·National Institutes of Health, NIDDK, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. agharib@mail.nih.gov ·Invest Radiol · Pubmed #22551651.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The purposes of this study were to (1) develop a high-resolution 3-T magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique with an in-plane resolution approximate to that of multidetector coronary computed tomography (MDCT) and a voxel size of 0.35 × 0.35 × 1.5 mm³ and to (2) investigate the image quality of this technique in healthy participants and preliminarily in patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 3-T coronary MRA technique optimized for an image acquisition voxel as small as 0.35 × 0.35 × 1.5 mm³ (high-resolution coronary MRA [HRC]) was implemented and the coronary arteries of 22 participants were imaged. These included 11 healthy participants (average age, 28.5 years; 5 men) and 11 participants with CAD (average age, 52.9 years; 5 women) as identified on MDCT. In addition, the 11 healthy participants were imaged using a method with a more common spatial resolution of 0.7 × 1 × 3 mm³ (regular-resolution coronary MRA [RRC]). Qualitative and quantitative comparisons were made between the 2 MRA techniques. RESULTS: Normal vessels and CAD lesions were successfully depicted at 350 × 350 μm² in-plane resolution with adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio. The CAD findings were consistent among MDCT and HRC. The HRC showed a 47% improvement in sharpness despite a reduction in SNR (by 72%) and in contrast-to-noise ratio (by 86%) compared with the regular-resolution coronary MRA. CONCLUSION: This study, as a first step toward substantial improvement in the resolution of coronary MRA, demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining at 3 T a spatial resolution that approximates that of MDCT. The acquisition in-plane pixel dimensions are as small as 350 × 350 μm² with a 1.5-mm slice thickness. Although SNR is lower, the images have improved sharpness, resulting in image quality that allows qualitative identification of disease sites on MRA consistent with MDCT.