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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Morton J. Kern
Based on 36 articles published since 2010
(Why 36 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Morton Kern wrote the following 36 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Guideline Focused update of expert consensus statement: Use of invasive assessments of coronary physiology and structure: A position statement of the society of cardiac angiography and interventions. 2018

Lotfi, Amir / Davies, Justin E / Fearon, William F / Grines, Cindy L / Kern, Morton J / Klein, Lloyd W. ·Baystate Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Springfield, Massachusetts. · Imperial Colleges, London, United Kingdom. · Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California. · Northwell Health, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. · Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California. · Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29968425.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Newsflash, PCI Works: Stenting Stenoses Increases Coronary Blood Flow During Exercise and Reduces Ischemia. 2018

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Orange, California; Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California. Electronic address: mortonkern2007@gmail.com. · Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California; Department of Cardiology, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #30139443.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio Pressure Pullback With Virtual Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Planning: Seeing the Future of Coronary Interventions? 2018

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California; and the University of California, Irvine, Orange, California. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29673508.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial A Perspective on Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Stenoses in Series: Methods, Myths, and Best Practices? 2018

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·Medicine, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California. · Medicine, University of California at Irvine. · Cardiology, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California. ·JAMA Cardiol · Pubmed #29562076.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Stimulating Extracardiac Collaterals via Right Internal Mammary Artery Occlusion: Another Step Into an Undiscovered Country. 2017

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·From the Department of Medicine, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System and University of California, Irvine. mortonkern2007@gmail.com. · From the Department of Medicine, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System and University of California, Irvine. ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28566293.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Does the Natural History of Atherosclerosis Follow an Ischemic Dose-Response Curve? 2016

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California; Department of Medicine and Cardiology, University of California, Irvine, California. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27884242.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Does the AToMIC trial explode concerns of contrast coagulopathy? 2016

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Long Beach Medical Center, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27865075.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Validating Practicality: Impact of Right Atrial Pressure on Fractional Flow Reserve. 2016

Kern, Morton J. ·Cardiology Division, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California; Department of Medicine, Veterans Administration Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, California. Electronic address: Mortonkern2007@gmail.com. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26896892.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Selecting the Right Fractional Flow Reserve in an Unsteady State: Keep It Simple. 2015

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California; Division of Cardiology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California. Electronic address: mortonkern2007@gmail.com. · Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California; Division of Cardiology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California. Electronic address: aseto@uci.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26205442.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Is the left main just another artery to FFR? 2015

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26097053.

ABSTRACT: This meta-analysis includes all prospective FFR studies of the left main artery with outcomes. Patients who had deferral of revascularization in FFR-negative stenoses had no difference in cardiovascular events compared with patients who underwent revascularization. FFR-guided revascularization of left main stenosis is safe and effective.

11 Editorial 38 mm Stents: go big and go long. 2015

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Long Beach Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25616168.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Reconciling poststenotic pressure with hyperemic flow: comparing coronary flow reserve, instantaneous wave-free ratio, and fractional flow reserve. 2014

Kern, Morton J. ·From the Department of Medicine, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, CA; and Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine. ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25139085.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Robotic-assist PCI: precision guided PCI or a rube goldberg solution? 2014

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Department of Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, Los Angeles, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24753172.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Intravascular imaging: when two images are better than one. 2013

Patel, Pranav M / Kern, Morton J. · ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #23418117.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Optimizing femoral access outcomes: how far can we go? 2011

Seto, Arnold / Kern, Morton J. · ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #21681892.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Approach-avoidance of side-branch wire entrapment. 2010

Kern, Morton J. · ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #20162703.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review The occult hemodynamically significant left main stenosis in the asymptomatic patient: Reconciling the visual-functional mismatch - A case report and review of screening appropriateness and assessment of left main in patient with multi-vessel CAD. 2018

Balouch, Maryam / Ballard-Hernandez, Jennifer / Kim, Min / Seto, Arnold / Kern, Morton. ·Palomar Medical Center Escondido, United States. · Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, United States; University of California, Irvine, United States. · Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, United States; University of California, Irvine, United States. Electronic address: min.kim2@va.gov. ·Cardiovasc Revasc Med · Pubmed #29627360.

ABSTRACT: We present a 40 year old asymptomatic man with mild left main artery narrowing who demonstrated extreme discordance between symptom presentation and ischemic burden i.e. visual (angiographic) and ischemic (functional) mismatch. The use of an appropriately selected screening stress test can lead to an appropriate decision for revascularization, supported by landmark risk assessment documents and revascularization trials.

18 Review Interpreting results of coronary computed tomography angiography-derived fractional flow reserve in clinical practice. 2017

Rabbat, Mark G / Berman, Daniel S / Kern, Morton / Raff, Gilbert / Chinnaiyan, Kavitha / Koweek, Lynne / Shaw, Leslee J / Blanke, Philipp / Scherer, Markus / Jensen, Jesper M / Lesser, John / Nørgaard, Bjarne L / Pontone, Gianluca / De Bruyne, Bernard / Bax, Jeroen J / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Department of Medicine and Radiology, Division of Cardiology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; Edward Hines Jr. Veteran's Affairs Hospital, Hines, IL, USA. Electronic address: mrabbat@lumc.edu. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Imaging, USA. · VA Long Beach HCS, Department of Cardiology, University of California Irvine, USA. · Beaumont Health, Department of Cardiology, USA. · Duke University, Department of Medicine and Radiology, USA. · Emory University, Department of Cardiology, USA. · St. Paul's Hospital & University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, Canada. · Sanger Heart and Vascular Institute, Department of Cardiology, USA. · Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Denmark. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, USA. · Cardiologico Monzino, Department of Cardiovascular Imaging, Milan, Italy. · OLV Ziekenhuis Aalst, Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Belgium. · Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, The Netherlands. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28666784.

ABSTRACT: The application of computational fluid dynamics to coronary computed tomography angiography allows Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) to be calculated non-invasively (FFR

19 Review A Closer Look at Fractional Flow Reserve in Complex Anatomic Subsets: Left Main Disease, Bifurcation Lesions, and Saphenous Vein Grafts. 2016

Lange, David C / Kern, Morton J. ·Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles, CA. · University of California, Irvine and VA Long Beach, Irvine, CA. ·Rev Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #27667376.

ABSTRACT: Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a well-validated tool for determining the functional significance of a coronary artery stenosis, facilitating clinical decisions regarding the need for revascularization. FFR-guided revascularization improves clinical and economic outcomes. However, its application remains challenging in certain complex anatomic subsets, including left main coronary artery stenosis, bifurcation disease, and saphenous vein graft disease. This article reviews recent data supporting the use of FFR in these complex anatomic subsets.

20 Review Standardization of Fractional Flow Reserve Measurements. 2016

Toth, Gabor G / Johnson, Nils P / Jeremias, Allen / Pellicano, Mariano / Vranckx, Pascal / Fearon, William F / Barbato, Emanuele / Kern, Morton J / Pijls, Nico H J / De Bruyne, Bernard. ·University Heart Centre Graz, Graz, Austria. · Weatherhead PET Center for Preventing and Reversing Atherosclerosis, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Medical School and Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas. · Stony Brook University and Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. · Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Aalst, Belgium. · Hartcentrum Hasselt, Division of Cardiology and Critical Care Medicine, Hasselt, Belgium. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California. · Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Aalst, Belgium; Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Irvine Medical Center, University of California, Irvine, California. · Irvine Medical Center, University of California, Irvine, California; Department of Cardiology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands. · Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Aalst, Belgium. Electronic address: bernard.de.bruyne@olvz-aalst.be. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27515335.

ABSTRACT: Pressure wire-based fractional flow reserve is considered the standard of reference for evaluation of the ischemic potential of coronary stenoses and the expected benefit from revascularization. Accordingly, its application in daily practice or for research purposes has to be as standardized as possible to avoid technical or operator-related artifacts in pressure recordings. This document proposes a standardized way of acquiring, recording, interpreting, and archiving the pressure tracings for daily practice and for the purpose of clinical research involving a core laboratory. Proposed standardized steps enhance the uniformity of clinical practices and data interpretation.

21 Review Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology? 2016

Ahmadi, Amir / Stone, Gregg W / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee J / Villines, Todd C / Kern, Morton J / Hecht, Harvey / Erlinge, David / Ben-Yehuda, Ori / Maehara, Akiko / Arbustini, Eloisa / Serruys, Patrick / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M / Narula, Jagat. ·From the Mount Sinai Heart, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (A.A., H.H., J.N.) · Columbia University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY (G.W.S., A.M.) · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (A.A., J.L.) · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (L.J.S.) · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD (T.C.V.) · University of California Irvine (M.J.K.) · Lund University, Sweden (D.E.) · University of California San Diego (O.B.-Y.) · Policlinico San Matteo Pavia Fondazione, Pravia, Italy (E.A.) · Imperial College, London, United Kingdom (P.S.) · and Leesburg Regional Medical Centre, FL (H.M.G.-G.). ·Circ Res · Pubmed #27390334.

ABSTRACT: Risk stratification in patients with stable ischemic heart disease is essential to guide treatment decisions. In this regard, whether coronary anatomy, physiology, or plaque morphology is the best determinant of prognosis (and driver an effective therapeutic risk reduction) remains one of the greatest ongoing debates in cardiology. In the present report, we review the evidence for each of these characteristics and explore potential algorithms that may enable a practical diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease.

22 Review Invasive Testing for Coronary Artery Disease: FFR, IVUS, OCT, NIRS. 2016

Groves, Elliott M / Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868-3298, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 3120 Natural Sciences II, Irvine, CA 92697-2715, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868-3298, USA; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, 5901 East Seventh Street, Long Beach, CA 90822, USA. Electronic address: aseto@uci.edu. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868-3298, USA; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, 5901 East Seventh Street, Long Beach, CA 90822, USA. ·Heart Fail Clin · Pubmed #26567976.

ABSTRACT: Coronary angiography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and guides revascularization strategies. The emergence of new diagnostic modalities has provided clinicians with adjunctive physiologic and image-based data to help formulate treatment strategies. Fractional flow reserve can predict whether percutaneous intervention will benefit a patient. Intravascular ultrasonography and optical coherence tomography are intracoronary imaging modalities that facilitate the anatomic visualization of the vessel lumen and characterize plaques. Near-infrared spectroscopy can characterize plaque composition and potentially provide valuable prognostic information. This article reviews the indications, basic technology, and supporting clinical studies for these modalities.

23 Review Limitations and Pitfalls of Fractional Flow Reserve Measurements and Adenosine-Induced Hyperemia. 2015

Seto, Arnold H / Tehrani, David / Kern, Morton J. ·Department of Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 5901 East 7th Street 111C, Long Beach, CA 90822, USA. Electronic address: arnoldseto@yahoo.com. · Department of Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 5901 East 7th Street 111C, Long Beach, CA 90822, USA. ·Interv Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #28581929.

ABSTRACT: Coronary hemodynamic measurements provide a critical tool to assess the ischemic potential of coronary stenoses. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a reliable method to relate translesional coronary pressures to hyperemic myocardial blood flow. Although a basic understanding in FFR can be quickly achieved, many of the nuances and potential pitfalls require special attention. The authors discuss the practical setup of coronary pressure measurement, the most common pitfalls in technique and ways to avoid them, and the limitations of available pharmacologic hyperemic methods.

24 Review Invasive testing for coronary artery disease: FFR, IVUS, OCT, NIRS. 2014

Groves, Elliott M / Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868-3298, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 3120 Natural Sciences II, Irvine, CA 92697-2715, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868-3298, USA; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, 5901 East Seventh Street, Long Beach, CA 90822, USA. Electronic address: aseto@uci.edu. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868-3298, USA; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, 5901 East Seventh Street, Long Beach, CA 90822, USA. ·Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #25091966.

ABSTRACT: Coronary angiography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and guides revascularization strategies. The emergence of new diagnostic modalities has provided clinicians with adjunctive physiologic and image-based data to help formulate treatment strategies. Fractional flow reserve can predict whether percutaneous intervention will benefit a patient. Intravascular ultrasonography and optical coherence tomography are intracoronary imaging modalities that facilitate the anatomic visualization of the vessel lumen and characterize plaques. Near-infrared spectroscopy can characterize plaque composition and potentially provide valuable prognostic information. This article reviews the indications, basic technology, and supporting clinical studies for these modalities.

25 Review Current concepts of integrated coronary physiology in the catheterization laboratory. 2010

Kern, Morton J / Samady, Habib. ·Division of Cardiology, University of California, Irvine, California 92868-4080, USA. mkern@uci.edu ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #20117397.

ABSTRACT: Over the last 15 years, the use of invasive coronary physiology in the catheterization laboratory has demonstrated favorable outcomes for decision making in patients with intermediate single-vessel stenoses, complex bifurcation and ostial branch stenoses, multivessel coronary artery disease, and left main stenoses. A recent large multicenter study (FAME [FFR versus Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation]) found that a physiologically-guided approach was superior to the standard angiographically-guided approach for percutaneous revascularization in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease. This review addresses selected pertinent concepts and studies supporting the integration of coronary physiology in the catheterization laboratory for optimal patient outcomes.

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