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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Morton J. Kern
Based on 28 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Morton Kern wrote the following 28 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Editorial Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio Pressure Pullback With Virtual Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Planning: Seeing the Future of Coronary Interventions? 2018

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California; and the University of California, Irvine, Orange, California. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29673508.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Stimulating Extracardiac Collaterals via Right Internal Mammary Artery Occlusion: Another Step Into an Undiscovered Country. 2017

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·From the Department of Medicine, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System and University of California, Irvine. mortonkern2007@gmail.com. · From the Department of Medicine, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System and University of California, Irvine. ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28566293.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Does the AToMIC trial explode concerns of contrast coagulopathy? 2016

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Long Beach Medical Center, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27865075.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Selecting the Right Fractional Flow Reserve in an Unsteady State: Keep It Simple. 2015

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California; Division of Cardiology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California. Electronic address: mortonkern2007@gmail.com. · Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California; Division of Cardiology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California. Electronic address: aseto@uci.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26205442.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Is the left main just another artery to FFR? 2015

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26097053.

ABSTRACT: This meta-analysis includes all prospective FFR studies of the left main artery with outcomes. Patients who had deferral of revascularization in FFR-negative stenoses had no difference in cardiovascular events compared with patients who underwent revascularization. FFR-guided revascularization of left main stenosis is safe and effective.

6 Editorial 38 mm Stents: go big and go long. 2015

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Long Beach Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25616168.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Robotic-assist PCI: precision guided PCI or a rube goldberg solution? 2014

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Department of Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, Los Angeles, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24753172.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Intravascular imaging: when two images are better than one. 2013

Patel, Pranav M / Kern, Morton J. · ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #23418117.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Optimizing femoral access outcomes: how far can we go? 2011

Seto, Arnold / Kern, Morton J. · ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #21681892.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Approach-avoidance of side-branch wire entrapment. 2010

Kern, Morton J. · ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #20162703.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Cardiac catheterization on the road less traveled: navigating the radial versus femoral debate. 2009

Kern, Morton J. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #19926043.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Devices, biology, imaging, and the regulatory processes... 2009

Chandrashekhar, Y / Kern, Morton J / Narula, Jagat. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #19442958.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Anchoring the stent: comment on treatment of ostial lesions using the Szabo technique. A case series by Applegate R et al. 2008

Kern, Morton J. · ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #19009628.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Review Interpreting results of coronary computed tomography angiography-derived fractional flow reserve in clinical practice. 2017

Rabbat, Mark G / Berman, Daniel S / Kern, Morton / Raff, Gilbert / Chinnaiyan, Kavitha / Koweek, Lynne / Shaw, Leslee J / Blanke, Philipp / Scherer, Markus / Jensen, Jesper M / Lesser, John / Nørgaard, Bjarne L / Pontone, Gianluca / De Bruyne, Bernard / Bax, Jeroen J / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Department of Medicine and Radiology, Division of Cardiology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; Edward Hines Jr. Veteran's Affairs Hospital, Hines, IL, USA. Electronic address: mrabbat@lumc.edu. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Imaging, USA. · VA Long Beach HCS, Department of Cardiology, University of California Irvine, USA. · Beaumont Health, Department of Cardiology, USA. · Duke University, Department of Medicine and Radiology, USA. · Emory University, Department of Cardiology, USA. · St. Paul's Hospital & University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, Canada. · Sanger Heart and Vascular Institute, Department of Cardiology, USA. · Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Denmark. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, USA. · Cardiologico Monzino, Department of Cardiovascular Imaging, Milan, Italy. · OLV Ziekenhuis Aalst, Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Belgium. · Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, The Netherlands. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28666784.

ABSTRACT: The application of computational fluid dynamics to coronary computed tomography angiography allows Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) to be calculated non-invasively (FFR

15 Review A Closer Look at Fractional Flow Reserve in Complex Anatomic Subsets: Left Main Disease, Bifurcation Lesions, and Saphenous Vein Grafts. 2016

Lange, David C / Kern, Morton J. ·Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles, CA. · University of California, Irvine and VA Long Beach, Irvine, CA. ·Rev Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #27667376.

ABSTRACT: Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a well-validated tool for determining the functional significance of a coronary artery stenosis, facilitating clinical decisions regarding the need for revascularization. FFR-guided revascularization improves clinical and economic outcomes. However, its application remains challenging in certain complex anatomic subsets, including left main coronary artery stenosis, bifurcation disease, and saphenous vein graft disease. This article reviews recent data supporting the use of FFR in these complex anatomic subsets.

16 Review Standardization of Fractional Flow Reserve Measurements. 2016

Toth, Gabor G / Johnson, Nils P / Jeremias, Allen / Pellicano, Mariano / Vranckx, Pascal / Fearon, William F / Barbato, Emanuele / Kern, Morton J / Pijls, Nico H J / De Bruyne, Bernard. ·University Heart Centre Graz, Graz, Austria. · Weatherhead PET Center for Preventing and Reversing Atherosclerosis, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Medical School and Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas. · Stony Brook University and Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. · Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Aalst, Belgium. · Hartcentrum Hasselt, Division of Cardiology and Critical Care Medicine, Hasselt, Belgium. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California. · Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Aalst, Belgium; Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Irvine Medical Center, University of California, Irvine, California. · Irvine Medical Center, University of California, Irvine, California; Department of Cardiology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands. · Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Aalst, Belgium. Electronic address: bernard.de.bruyne@olvz-aalst.be. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27515335.

ABSTRACT: Pressure wire-based fractional flow reserve is considered the standard of reference for evaluation of the ischemic potential of coronary stenoses and the expected benefit from revascularization. Accordingly, its application in daily practice or for research purposes has to be as standardized as possible to avoid technical or operator-related artifacts in pressure recordings. This document proposes a standardized way of acquiring, recording, interpreting, and archiving the pressure tracings for daily practice and for the purpose of clinical research involving a core laboratory. Proposed standardized steps enhance the uniformity of clinical practices and data interpretation.

17 Review Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology? 2016

Ahmadi, Amir / Stone, Gregg W / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee J / Villines, Todd C / Kern, Morton J / Hecht, Harvey / Erlinge, David / Ben-Yehuda, Ori / Maehara, Akiko / Arbustini, Eloisa / Serruys, Patrick / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M / Narula, Jagat. ·From the Mount Sinai Heart, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (A.A., H.H., J.N.) · Columbia University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY (G.W.S., A.M.) · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (A.A., J.L.) · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (L.J.S.) · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD (T.C.V.) · University of California Irvine (M.J.K.) · Lund University, Sweden (D.E.) · University of California San Diego (O.B.-Y.) · Policlinico San Matteo Pavia Fondazione, Pravia, Italy (E.A.) · Imperial College, London, United Kingdom (P.S.) · and Leesburg Regional Medical Centre, FL (H.M.G.-G.). ·Circ Res · Pubmed #27390334.

ABSTRACT: Risk stratification in patients with stable ischemic heart disease is essential to guide treatment decisions. In this regard, whether coronary anatomy, physiology, or plaque morphology is the best determinant of prognosis (and driver an effective therapeutic risk reduction) remains one of the greatest ongoing debates in cardiology. In the present report, we review the evidence for each of these characteristics and explore potential algorithms that may enable a practical diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease.

18 Review Invasive testing for coronary artery disease: FFR, IVUS, OCT, NIRS. 2014

Groves, Elliott M / Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868-3298, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 3120 Natural Sciences II, Irvine, CA 92697-2715, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868-3298, USA; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, 5901 East Seventh Street, Long Beach, CA 90822, USA. Electronic address: aseto@uci.edu. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868-3298, USA; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, 5901 East Seventh Street, Long Beach, CA 90822, USA. ·Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #25091966.

ABSTRACT: Coronary angiography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and guides revascularization strategies. The emergence of new diagnostic modalities has provided clinicians with adjunctive physiologic and image-based data to help formulate treatment strategies. Fractional flow reserve can predict whether percutaneous intervention will benefit a patient. Intravascular ultrasonography and optical coherence tomography are intracoronary imaging modalities that facilitate the anatomic visualization of the vessel lumen and characterize plaques. Near-infrared spectroscopy can characterize plaque composition and potentially provide valuable prognostic information. This article reviews the indications, basic technology, and supporting clinical studies for these modalities.

19 Review Current concepts of integrated coronary physiology in the catheterization laboratory. 2010

Kern, Morton J / Samady, Habib. ·Division of Cardiology, University of California, Irvine, California 92868-4080, USA. mkern@uci.edu ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #20117397.

ABSTRACT: Over the last 15 years, the use of invasive coronary physiology in the catheterization laboratory has demonstrated favorable outcomes for decision making in patients with intermediate single-vessel stenoses, complex bifurcation and ostial branch stenoses, multivessel coronary artery disease, and left main stenoses. A recent large multicenter study (FAME [FFR versus Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation]) found that a physiologically-guided approach was superior to the standard angiographically-guided approach for percutaneous revascularization in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease. This review addresses selected pertinent concepts and studies supporting the integration of coronary physiology in the catheterization laboratory for optimal patient outcomes.

20 Review Acute heart failure syndromes and coronary perfusion. 2008

Beohar, Nirat / Erdogan, Ata K / Lee, Daniel C / Sabbah, Hani N / Kern, Morton J / Teerlink, John / Bonow, Robert O / Gheorghiade, Mihai. ·Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 60611, USA. n-beohar@northwestern.edu ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #18582629.

ABSTRACT: Acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS), with a high post-discharge mortality and rehospitalization rate, represent a significant public health burden. The treatment of patients hospitalized with AHFS often includes the use of vasoactive medications such as inotropes and vasodilators. Although such agents are frequently used, their safety and efficacy remain controversial. A significant number of patients with heart failure have underlying coronary artery disease and may be at greater risk from hemodynamic alterations that can diminish coronary perfusion. In AHFS, the relationship among vasoactive medications, coronary perfusion, and potential myocardial injury needs further investigation. Newer techniques now available to evaluate coronary perfusion should provide guidance for the evaluation of existing and future vasoactive therapies for AHFS.

21 Article The clinical evaluation of the CADence device in the acoustic detection of coronary artery disease. 2018

Thomas, Joseph L / Ridner, Michael / Cole, Jason H / Chambers, Jeffrey W / Bokhari, Sabahat / Yannopoulos, Demetris / Kern, Morton / Wilson, Robert F / Budoff, Matthew J. ·Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor UCLA, Torrance, CA, USA. jthomas@labiomed.org. · Harbor UCLA Medical Center, 1000 West Carson Street, Box 405, Torrance, CA, 90509, USA. jthomas@labiomed.org. · Heart Center Research, Huntsville, AL, USA. · Cardiology Associates, Mobile, AL, USA. · Metropolitan Heart and Vascular Institute, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · University of California - Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. · Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor UCLA, Torrance, CA, USA. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #29936668.

ABSTRACT: The noninvasive detection of turbulent coronary flow may enable diagnosis of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) using novel sensor and analytic technology. Eligible patients (n = 1013) with chest pain and CAD risk factors undergoing nuclear stress testing were studied using the CADence (AUM Cardiovascular Inc., Northfield MN) acoustic detection (AD) system. The trial was designed to demonstrate non-inferiority of AD for diagnostic accuracy in detecting significant CAD as compared to an objective performance criteria (sensitivity 83% and specificity 80%, with 15% non-inferiority margins) for nuclear stress testing. AD analysis was blinded to clinical, core lab-adjudicated angiographic, and nuclear data. The presence of significant CAD was determined by computed tomographic (CCTA) or invasive angiography. A total of 1013 subjects without prior coronary revascularization or Q-wave myocardial infarction were enrolled. Primary analysis was performed on subjects with complete angiographic and AD data (n = 763) including 111 subjects (15%) with severe CAD based on CCTA (n = 34) and invasive angiography (n = 77). The sensitivity and specificity of AD were 78% (p = 0.012 for non-inferiority) and 35% (p < 0.001 for failure to demonstrate non-inferiority), respectively. AD results had a high 91% negative predictive value for the presence of significant CAD. AD testing failed to demonstrate non-inferior diagnostic accuracy as compared to the historical performance of a nuclear stress OPC due to low specificity. AD sensitivity was non-inferior in detecting significant CAD with a high negative predictive value supporting a potential value in excluding CAD.

22 Article Is Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio a New Standard of Care for Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Lesions? More Questions Than Answers. 2017

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·Departments of Medicine (M.J.K.) and Cardiology (A.H.S.), Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, University of California, Irvine. mortonkern2007@gmail.com. · Departments of Medicine (M.J.K.) and Cardiology (A.H.S.), Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, University of California, Irvine. ·Circulation · Pubmed #29229617.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Article MY APPROACH to the patient diagnosed with significant left main disease: Use of FFR, IVUS, and OCT. 2016

Kern, Morton J. ·University California Irvine, Orange, CA. Electronic address: mortonkern2007@gmail.com. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #27553817.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Article 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care: Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiología Intervencionista; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention. 2015

Rihal, Charanjit S / Naidu, Srihari S / Givertz, Michael M / Szeto, Wilson Y / Burke, James A / Kapur, Navin K / Kern, Morton / Garratt, Kirk N / Goldstein, James A / Dimas, Vivian / Tu, Thomas / Anonymous5050826. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: rihal@mayo.edu. · Division of Cardiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, New York. · Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Division of Cardiology, Lehigh Valley Heart Specialists, Allentown, Pennsylvania. · Cardiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Cardiology, UCI Medical Center, Orange, California. · Department of Cardiac and Vascular Services, Heart and Vascular Institute of New York, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, New York. · Division of Cardiology, Beaumont Heart Center Clinic, Royal Oak, Michigan. · Pediatric Cardiology, UT Southwestern, Dallas, Texas. · Louisville Cardiology Group, Interventional Cardiology, Louisville, Kentucky. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #25861962.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Article Variations of coronary hemodynamic responses to intravenous adenosine infusion: implications for fractional flow reserve measurements. 2014

Seto, Arnold H / Tehrani, David M / Bharmal, Murtaza I / Kern, Morton J. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Long Beach Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Salem, Virginia; Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24282074.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Continuous intravenous adenosine infusion reportedly produces stable and maximal hyperemia to allow for fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement; however, several observers have noted variation of the coronary/aortic (Pd/Pa) pressure ratio during the course of an adenosine infusion. METHODS: Pd/Pa pressure recordings during continuous peripheral intravenous adenosine infusion were examined in 51 patients (68 measurements) with data collected for at least 150 sec and for at least 30 sec after the lowest Pd/Pa reading. The lowest recorded Pd/Pa ratio was used as the true FFR value at maximal hyperemia. The highest subsequent Pd/Pa during the remaining period of adenosine infusion was recorded. A separate cohort of 12 patients had Pd/Pa values measured with both peripheral and central infusion. RESULTS: The average FFR value was 0.82 ± 0.10 and was recorded 99 ± 33 sec into the infusion. The Pd/Pa value showed a subsequent average increase of 0.08 ± 0.07 at 135 ± 32 sec. From the lowest measurement, Pd/Pa changed from a ratio ≤0.80 to >0.80 in 28% of recordings. In the cohort with matched recordings, central infusion reduced the severity (mean change of 0.08 vs. 0.11, P = 0.09) but not the incidence of Pd/Pa variability compared with peripheral infusion. CONCLUSION: Instability of Pd/Pa measurements is common over the course of a continuous intravenous adenosine infusion. FFR remains valid as the lowest value of Pd/Pa observed, however, Pd/Pa variability may subsequently occur and complicate pullback measurements for serial or multiple lesions.

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