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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Dirkjan Kuijpers
Based on 6 articles published since 2009
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, D. Kuijpers wrote the following 6 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Effects of Caffeine on Myocardial Blood Flow: A Systematic Review. 2018

van Dijk, Randy / Ties, Daan / Kuijpers, Dirkjan / van der Harst, Pim / Oudkerk, Matthijs. ·Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. r.van.dijk02@umcg.nl. · Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. r.van.dijk02@umcg.nl. · Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. d.ties@umcg.nl. · Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. d.ties@umcg.nl. · Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. t.kuijpers@haaglandenmc.nl. · HMC-Bronovo, Haaglanden Medisch Centrum, Department of Radiology, Haaglanden Medisch Centrum-Bronovo, 2597 AX The Hague, The Netherlands. t.kuijpers@haaglandenmc.nl. · Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. p.van.der.harst@umcg.nl. · Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. p.van.der.harst@umcg.nl. · Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. m.oudkerk@umcg.nl. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #30104545.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed stimulants worldwide. It is a well-recognized antagonist of adenosine and a potential cause of false-negative functional measurements during vasodilator myocardial perfusion. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the evidence regarding the effects of caffeine intake on functional measurements of myocardial perfusion in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Pubmed, Web of Science, and Embase were searched using a predefined electronic search strategy. Participants-healthy subjects or patients with known or suspected CAD. Comparisons-recent caffeine intake versus no caffeine intake. Outcomes-measurements of functional myocardial perfusion. Study design-observational. Fourteen studies were deemed eligible for this systematic review. There was a wide range of variability in study design with varying imaging modalities, vasodilator agents, serum concentrations of caffeine, and primary outcome measurements. The available data indicate a significant influence of recent caffeine intake on cardiac perfusion measurements during adenosine and dipyridamole induced hyperemia. These effects have the potential to affect the clinical decision making by re-classification to different risk-categories.

2 Review Imaging the myocardial ischemic cascade. 2018

Stillman, Arthur E / Oudkerk, Matthijs / Bluemke, David A / de Boer, Menko Jan / Bremerich, Jens / Garcia, Ernest V / Gutberlet, Matthias / van der Harst, Pim / Hundley, W Gregory / Jerosch-Herold, Michael / Kuijpers, Dirkjan / Kwong, Raymond Y / Nagel, Eike / Lerakis, Stamatios / Oshinski, John / Paul, Jean-François / Slart, Riemer H J A / Thourani, Vinod / Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn / Wintersperger, Bernd J. ·Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. aestill@emory.edu. · Center of Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, University of Basel Hospital, Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. · Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Genetics, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Departments of Internal Medicine & Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. · Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiology, Haaglanden Medical Center, The Hague, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Institute for Experimental and Translational Cardiovascular Imaging, DZHK Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, University Hospital, Frankfurt/Main, Germany. · Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Radiology, Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris, France. · Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiac Surgery, MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #29556943.

ABSTRACT: Non-invasive imaging plays a growing role in the diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease from its earliest manifestations of endothelial dysfunction to myocardial infarction along the myocardial ischemic cascade. Experts representing the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging and the European Society of Cardiac Radiology have worked together to organize the role of non-invasive imaging along the framework of the ischemic cascade. The current status of non-invasive imaging for ischemic heart disease is reviewed along with the role of imaging for guiding surgical planning. The issue of cost effectiveness is also considered. Preclinical disease is primarily assessed through the coronary artery calcium score and used for risk assessment. Once the patient becomes symptomatic, other imaging tests including echocardiography, CCTA, SPECT, PET and CMR may be useful. CCTA appears to be a cost-effective gatekeeper. Post infarction CMR and PET are the preferred modalities. Imaging is increasingly used for surgical planning of patients who may require coronary artery bypass.

3 Review Coronary Artery Calcium Imaging in the ROBINSCA Trial: Rationale, Design, and Technical Background. 2018

Vonder, Marleen / van der Aalst, Carlijn M / Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn / van Ooijen, Peter M A / Kuijpers, Dirkjan / Gratama, Jan Willem / de Koning, Harry J / Oudkerk, Matthijs. ·University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. · Erasmus MC-University Medical Centre, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands; University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen, The Netherlands. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands; Department of Radiology, Haaglanden Medical Center Bronovo, The Hague, The Netherlands. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands; Department of Radiology, Gelre Hospital, Apeldoorn, The Netherlands. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.oudkerk@umcg.nl. ·Acad Radiol · Pubmed #28843465.

ABSTRACT: RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the rationale, design, and technical background of coronary artery calcium (CAC) imaging in the large-scale population-based cardiovascular disease screening trial (Risk Or Benefit IN Screening for CArdiovascular Diseases [ROBINSCA]). MATERIALS AND METHODS: First, literature search was performed to review the logistics, setup, and settings of previously performed CAC imaging studies, and current clinical CAC imaging protocols of participating centers in the ROBINSCA trial were evaluated. A second literature search was performed to evaluate the impact of computed tomography parameter settings on CAC score. RESULTS: Based on literature reviews and experts opinion an imaging protocol accompanied by data management protocol was created for ROBINSCA. The imaging protocol should consist of a fixed tube voltage, individually tailored tube current setting, mid-diastolic electrocardiography-triggering, fixed field-of-view, fixed reconstruction kernel, fixed slice thickness, overlapping reconstruction and without iterative reconstruction. The analysis of scans is performed with one type and version of CAC scoring software, by two dedicated and experienced researchers. The data management protocol describes the organization of data handling between the coordinating center, participating centers, and core analysis center. CONCLUSION: In this paper we describe the rationale and technical considerations to be taken in developing CAC imaging protocol, and we present a detailed protocol that can be implemented for CAC screening purposes.

4 Article T1 reactivity as an imaging biomarker in myocardial tissue characterization discriminating normal, ischemic and infarcted myocardium. 2019

van Assen, Marly / van Dijk, Randy / Kuijpers, Dirkjan / Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn / Oudkerk, Matthijs. ·Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, EB 45, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiovascular Imaging, HMC-Bronovo, The Hague, The Netherlands. · Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. m.oudkerk@rug.nl. · Institute for Diagnostic Accuracy, Groningen, The Netherlands. m.oudkerk@rug.nl. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #31093894.

ABSTRACT: To demonstrate the potential for differentiating normal and diseased myocardium without Gadolinium using rest and stress T1-mapping. Patients undergoing 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as part of clinical work-up due to suspicion of coronary artery disease (CAD) were included. Adenosine stress perfusion MRI and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging were performed to identify ischemic and infarcted myocardium. Patients were retrospectively categorized into an ischemic, infarct and control group based on conventional acquisitions. Patient with both ischemic and infarcted myocardium were excluded. A total of 64 patients were included: ten with myocardial ischemia, 15 with myocardial infarction, and 39 controls. A native Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI) T1-mapping acquisition was performed at rest and stress. Pixel-wise myocardial T1-maps were acquired in short-axis view with inline motion-correction. Short-axis T1-maps were manually contoured using conservative septal sampling. Regions of interest were sampled in ischemic and infarcted areas detected on perfusion and LGE images. T1 reactivity was calculated as the percentage difference in T1 values between rest and stress. Remote myocardium was defined as myocardium without defects in the ischemic and infarcted group whereas normal myocardium is found in the control group only. Native T1-values were significantly higher in infarcted myocardium in rest and stress [median 1044 ms (interquartile range (IQR) 985-1076) and 1053 ms (IQR 989-1088)] compared to ischemic myocardium [median 961 ms (IQR 939-988) and 958 ms (IQR 945-988)]. T1-reactivity was significantly lower in ischemic and infarcted myocardium [median 0.00% (IQR - 0.18 to 0.16) and 0.41% (IQR 0.09-0.86)] compared to remote myocardium [median 3.54% (IQR 1.48-5.78) and 3.21% (IQR 1.95-4.79)]. Rest-stress T1-mapping is able to distinguish between normal, ischemic, infarcted and remote myocardium using native T1-values and T1-reactivity, and holds potential as an imaging biomarker for tissue characterization in MRI.

5 Article High-pitch versus sequential mode for coronary calcium in individuals with a high heart rate: Potential for dose reduction. 2018

Vonder, Marleen / Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn / Kaatee, Merel A / van der Aalst, Carlijn M / van Ooijen, Peter M A / de Bock, Geertruida H / Gratama, Jan Willem / Kuijpers, Dirkjan / de Koning, Harry J / Oudkerk, Matthijs. ·University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.vonder@umcg.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: r.vliegenthart@umcg.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.a.kaatee@umcg.nl. · Erasmus MC, Dept. of Public Health, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.vanderaalst@erasmusmc.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: p.m.a.van.ooijen@umcg.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.h.de.bock@umcg.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands; Gelre Ziekenhuizen, Dept. of Radiology, Apeldoorn, The Netherlands. Electronic address: j.w.gratama@gelre.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands; HMC-Bronovo, Dept. of Radiology, The Hague, The Netherlands. Electronic address: t.kuijpers@haaglandenmc.nl. · Erasmus MC, Dept. of Public Health, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: h.dekoning@erasmusmc.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.oudkerk@umcg.nl. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29551663.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To determine the impact of high-pitch spiral acquisition on radiation dose and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk stratification by coronary artery calcium (CAC) assessment with computed tomography in individuals with a high heart rate. METHODS: Of the ROBINSCA trial, 1990 participants with regular rhythm and heart rates >65 beats per minute (bpm) were included. As reference, 390 participants with regular heart rates ≤65 bpm were used. All participants underwent prospectively electrocardiographically(ECG)-triggered imaging of the coronary arteries using dual source CT at 120 kVp, 80 ref mAs using both high-pitch spiral mode and sequential mode. Radiation dose, Agatston score, number of positive scores, as well as median absolute difference of the Agatston score were determined and participants were stratified into CVD risk categories. RESULTS: A similar percentage of participants with low heart rates and high heart rates had a positive CAC score in data sets acquired in high-pitch spiral (low heart rate: 57.7%, high heart rate: 55.8%) and sequential mode (58.0%, 54.7%, p = n.s.). The median absolute difference in Agatston scores between acquisition modes was 14.2% and 9.2%, for the high and low heart rate groups, respectively. Excellent agreement for risk categorization between the two data acquisition modes was found for the high (κ = 0.927) and low (κ = 0.946) heart rate groups. Radiation dose was 48% lower for high-pitch spiral versus sequential acquisitions. CONCLUSION: Radiation dose for the quantification of coronary calcium can be reduced by 48% when using the high-pitch spiral acquisition mode compared to the sequential mode in participants with a regular high heart rate. CVD risk stratification agreement between the two modes of data acquisition is excellent.

6 Article Effects of caffeine intake prior to stress cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging on regadenoson- versus adenosine-induced hyperemia as measured by T1 mapping. 2017

van Dijk, R / Kuijpers, D / Kaandorp, T A M / van Dijkman, P R M / Vliegenthart, R / van der Harst, P / Oudkerk, M. ·Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1 EB 45, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiovascular Imaging, HMC-Bronovo, The Hague, The Netherlands. · Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1 EB 45, Groningen, The Netherlands. m.oudkerk@umcg.nl. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28547666.

ABSTRACT: The antagonistic effects of caffeine on adenosine receptors are a possible cause of false-negative stress perfusion imaging. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of coffee intake <4 h prior to stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in regadenoson- versus adenosine-induced hyperemia as measured with T1-mapping. 98 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease referred for either adenosine or regadenoson perfusion CMR were included in this analysis. Twenty-four patients reported coffee consumption <4 h before CMR (15 patients with adenosine, and 9 patients with regadenoson); 74 patients reported no coffee intake (50 patients with adenosine, and 24 patients with regadenoson). T1 mapping was performed using a modified look-locker inversion recovery sequence. T1 reactivity was determined by subtracting T1