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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Jonathon A. Leipsic
Based on 162 articles published since 2010
(Why 162 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, J. A. Leipsic wrote the following 162 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous7160967 / Shah, Amar B / Kirsch, Jacobo / Bolen, Michael A / Batlle, Juan C / Brown, Richard K J / Eberhardt, Robert T / Hurwitz, Lynne M / Inacio, Joao R / Jin, Jill O / Krishnamurthy, Rajesh / Leipsic, Jonathon A / Rajiah, Prabhakar / Singh, Satinder P / White, Richard D / Zimmerman, Stefan L / Abbara, Suhny. ·Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York. Electronic address: ashah27@northwell.edu. · Panel Chair, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida. · Panel Vice-Chair, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute and Baptist Health of South Florida, Miami, Florida. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts; American College of Cardiology. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; American College of Physicians. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, Maryland. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392597.

ABSTRACT: Chronic chest pain (CCP) of a cardiac etiology is a common clinical problem. The diagnosis and classification of the case of chest pain has rapidly evolved providing the clinician with multiple cardiac imaging strategies. Though scintigraphy and rest echocardiography remain as appropriate imaging tools in the diagnostic evaluation, new technology is available. Current evidence supports the use of alternative imaging tests such as coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), cardiac MRI (CMRI), or Rb-82 PET/CT. Since multiple imaging modalities are available to the clinician, the most appropriate noninvasive imaging strategy will be based upon the patient's clinical presentation and clinical status. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). 2018

Hecht, Harvey S / Blaha, Michael J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Cury, Ricardo C / Budoff, Matt / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: harvey.hecht@mountsinai.org. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Division of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176, United States. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, United States. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29793848.

ABSTRACT: The goal of CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of CAC scanning on all noncontrast CT scans, irrespective of the indication, in order to facilitate clinical decision-making, with recommendations for subsequent patient management. The CAC-DRS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the total calcium score and the number of involved arteries. General recommendations are provided for further management of patients with different degrees of calcified plaque burden based on CAC-DRS classification. In addition, CAC-DRS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit quality assurance and tracking patient outcomes with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

3 Guideline Clinical indications for coronary artery calcium scoring in asymptomatic patients: Expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2017

Hecht, Harvey / Blaha, Michael J / Berman, Daniel S / Nasir, Khurram / Budoff, Matthew / Leipsic, Jonathon / Blankstein, Ron / Narula, Jagat / Rumberger, John / Shaw, Leslee J. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: hhecht@aol.com. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, FL, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division) and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · The Princeton Longevity Center, Princeton, NJ, USA. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28283309.

ABSTRACT: This expert consensus statement summarizes the available data regarding the prognostic value of CAC in the asymptomatic population and its ability to refine individual risk prediction, addresses the limitations identified in the current traditional risk factor-based treatment strategies recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines including use of the Pooled Cohort Equations (PCE), and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Recommendation Statement for Statin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults. It provides CAC based treatment recommendations both within the context of the shared decision making model espoused by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines and independent of these guidelines.

4 Guideline SCCT guidelines for the performance and acquisition of coronary computed tomographic angiography: A report of the society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee: Endorsed by the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). 2016

Abbara, Suhny / Blanke, Philipp / Maroules, Christopher D / Cheezum, Michael / Choi, Andrew D / Han, B Kelly / Marwan, Mohamed / Naoum, Chris / Norgaard, Bjarne L / Rubinshtein, Ronen / Schoenhagen, Paul / Villines, Todd / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. · Cardiology Service Ft. Belvoir Community Hospital, Ft. Belvoir, VA, United States. · Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington DC, United States. · Minneapolis Heart Institute and Children's Heart Clinic, Minneapolis, MN, United States. · Cardiology Department, University Hospital, Erlangen, Germany. · Concord Hospital, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus University Hospital-Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark. · Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center & Rappaport School of Medicine- Technion- IIT, Haifa, Israel. · Cardiovascular Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, United States. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27780758.

ABSTRACT: In response to recent technological advancements in acquisition techniques as well as a growing body of evidence regarding the optimal performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA), the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee has produced this update to its previously established 2009 "Guidelines for the Performance of Coronary CTA" (1). The purpose of this document is to provide standards meant to ensure reliable practice methods and quality outcomes based on the best available data in order to improve the diagnostic care of patients. Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines for the Interpretation is published separately (2). The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee ensures compliance with all existing standards for the declaration of conflict of interest by all authors and reviewers for the purpose ofclarity and transparency.

5 Guideline Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS): An Expert Consensus Document of SCCT, ACR and NASCI: Endorsed by the ACC. 2016

Cury, Ricardo C / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Agatston, Arthur / Berman, Daniel S / Budoff, Matthew J / Dill, Karin E / Jacobs, Jill E / Maroules, Christopher D / Rubin, Geoffrey D / Rybicki, Frank J / Schoepf, U Joseph / Shaw, Leslee J / Stillman, Arthur E / White, Charles S / Woodard, Pamela K / Leipsic, Jonathon A. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27609151.

ABSTRACT: The intent of CAD-RADS - Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) in order to facilitate decision-making regarding further patient management. The suggested CAD-RADS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the highest-grade coronary artery lesion documented by coronary CTA. It ranges from CAD-RADS 0 (Zero) for the complete absence of stenosis and plaque to CAD-RADS 5 for the presence of at least one totally occluded coronary artery and should always be interpreted in conjunction with the impression found in the report. Specific recommendations are provided for further management of patients with stable or acute chest pain based on the CAD-RADS classification. The main goal of CAD-RADS is to standardize reporting of coronary CTA results and to facilitate communication of test results to referring physicians along with suggestions for subsequent patient management. In addition, CAD-RADS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit education, research, peer-review and quality assurance with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

6 Guideline CAD-RADS(TM) Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Cury, Ricardo C / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Agatston, Arthur / Berman, Daniel S / Budoff, Matthew J / Dill, Karin E / Jacobs, Jill E / Maroules, Christopher D / Rubin, Geoffrey D / Rybicki, Frank J / Schoepf, U Joseph / Shaw, Leslee J / Stillman, Arthur E / White, Charles S / Woodard, Pamela K / Leipsic, Jonathon A. ·Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL, 33176, United States. Electronic address: rcury@baptisthealth.net. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen-Nürnberg, Department of Cardiology, Ulmenweg 18, 90154, Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: Stephan.Achenbach@uk-erlangen.de. · Baptist Health Medical Grp, 1691 Michigan Avenue, Miami, FL, 33139, United States. Electronic address: ArthurSAg@baptisthealth.net. · Cedars-Sinai Med Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Taper Building, Rm 1258, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, United States. Electronic address: bermand@cshs.org. · 1124 W. Carson Street, Torrance, CA, 90502, United States. Electronic address: mbudoff@labiomed.org. · 5841 South Maryland Ave, MC2026, Chicago, IL, 60637, United States. Electronic address: kdill@radiology.bsd.uchicago.edu. · 550 First Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, United States. Electronic address: jill.jacobs@nyumc.org. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: christopher.maroules@gmail.com. · 2400 Pratt Street, Room 8020, DCRI Box 17969, Durham, NC, 27715, United States. Electronic address: grubin@duke.edu. · The Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON, CA K1H 8L6, Canada. Electronic address: frybicki@toh.on.ca. · 25 Courtenay Dr., Charleston, SC, 29425, United States. Electronic address: schoepf@musc.edu. · 1256 Briarcliff Rd. NE, Rm 529, Atlanta, GA, 30324, United States. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. · 1364 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, United States. Electronic address: aestill@emory.edu. · University of Maryland, 22 S. Greene St., Baltimore, MD, 21201, United States. Electronic address: cwhite@umm.edu. · Mallinckrodt Instit of Radiology, 510 S Kingshighway Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63110, United States. Electronic address: woodardp@mir.wustl.edu. · Department of Radiology|St. Paul's Hospital, 2nd Floor, Providence Building, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, United States. Electronic address: jleipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27318587.

ABSTRACT: The intent of CAD-RADS - Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) in order to facilitate decision-making regarding further patient management. The suggested CAD-RADS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the highest-grade coronary artery lesion documented by coronary CTA. It ranges from CAD-RADS 0 (Zero) for the complete absence of stenosis and plaque to CAD-RADS 5 for the presence of at least one totally occluded coronary artery and should always be interpreted in conjunction with the impression found in the report. Specific recommendations are provided for further management of patients with stable or acute chest pain based on the CAD-RADS classification. The main goal of CAD-RADS is to standardize reporting of coronary CTA results and to facilitate communication of test results to referring physicians along with suggestions for subsequent patient management. In addition, CAD-RADS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit education, research, peer-review and quality assurance with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

7 Guideline Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease. 2014

Boodhwani, Munir / Andelfinger, Gregor / Leipsic, Jonathon / Lindsay, Thomas / McMurtry, M Sean / Therrien, Judith / Siu, Samuel C / Anonymous6930795. ·Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: mboodhwani@ottawaheart.ca. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Radiology, University of British Colombia, Vancouver, British Colombia, Canada. · Division of Vascular Surgery, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #24882528.

ABSTRACT: This Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement aims to provide succinct perspectives on key issues in the management of thoracic aortic disease (TAD). This document is not a comprehensive overview of TAD and important elements of the epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, and management of acute aortic syndromes are deliberately not discussed; readers are referred to the 2010 guidelines published by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, and other stakeholders. Rather, this document is a practical guide for clinicians managing adult patients with TAD. Topics covered include size thresholds for surgical intervention, emerging therapies, imaging modalities, medical and lifestyle management, and genetics of TAD. The primary panel consisted of experts from a variety of disciplines that are essential for comprehensive management of TAD patients. The methodology involved a focused literature review with an emphasis on updates since 2010 and the use of Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology to arrive at specific recommendations. The final document then underwent review by a secondary panel. This document aims to provide recommendations for most patients and situations. However, the ultimate judgement regarding the management of any individual patients should be made by their health care team.

8 Editorial Plaque, Pressure, and Risk: The Story Unfolds. 2019

Leipsic, Jonathon / Anastasius, Malcolm / Blanke, Philipp. ·Department of Medical Imaging and Division of Cardiology, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: JLeipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. · Department of Medical Imaging and Division of Cardiology, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #31097162.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Coronary CT Angiography to Guide Treatment Decision Making: Lessons From the SYNTAX II Trial. 2018

Nørgaard, Bjarne L / Leipsic, Jonathon / Achenbach, Stephan. ·Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Electronic address: bnorgaard@dadlnet.dk. · Department of Radiology, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Cardiology, Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #29802015.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography - The evidence dominates! 2017

Shaw, Leslee J / Villines, Todd / Blankstein, Ron / Abbara, Suhny / Weigold, Guy / Slim, Ahmad / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. · Walter Reed Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. · MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington DC, United States. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States. · The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28017553.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Developing a Deeper Understanding of Sex Differences in the Diagnostic Performance of Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging Toward a More Personalized Approach. 2016

Kueh, Shaw Hua Anthony / Sellers, Stephanie / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·From the Department of Radiology (S.H.K., S.S., J.L.) and Department of Cardiology (J.L.), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · From the Department of Radiology (S.H.K., S.S., J.L.) and Department of Cardiology (J.L.), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. jleipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27811152.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Diagnostic Algorithms for Stable Chest Pain: From Opinion to Science Lessons From PROMISE. 2016

Leipsic, Jonathon / Naoum, Christopher / Blanke, Philipp. ·Department of Medical Imaging and Division of Cardiology, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: jleipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. · Department of Cardiology, Concord Hospital, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Medical Imaging and Division of Cardiology, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27256832.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future. - John F. Kennedy. 2016

Leipsic, Jonathon A. ·Canada Research Chair, Advanced Cardiac Imaging and Vice Chairman of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: jleipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27145696.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial From Newton to the Coronaries: Computational Fluid Dynamics Has Entered the Clinical Scene. 2016

Nørgaard, Bjarne L / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. Electronic address: bnorgaard@dadlnet.dk. · Department of Radiology, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26897680.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial President's Page. 2015

Leipsic, Jonathon A. ·Canada Research Chair, Advanced Cardiac Imaging and Vice Chairman of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: jleipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #26411313.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Cardiac CT in asymptomatic diabetes mellitus: role of non-invasive atherosclerosis imaging in high-risk asymptomatic individuals. 2015

Cademartiri, Filippo / Maffei, Erica / Nistri, Stefano / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Department of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands filippocademartiri@gmail.com. · Department of Radiology, Giovanni XXIII Clinic, Monastier di Treviso, Italy. · Department of Cardiology, CMSR, Altavilla Vicentina, Italy. · Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26041310.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Expert opinion: How and when to perform CT myocardial perfusion imaging. 2015

Boiselle, Phillip M / Choe, Yeon Hyeon / Leipsic, Jonathon / Pugliese, Francesca / Schoepf, U Joseph / Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn. · ·J Thorac Imaging · Pubmed #25844977.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Is atherosclerotic heart disease in COPD a distinct phenotype? 2011

Man, S F Paul / Leipsic, Jonathon A / Man, Jonathan P / Sin, Donald D. ·Respirology Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; University of British Columbia Institute for Heart + Lung Health, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: pman@providencehealth.bc.ca. · Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Respirology Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; University of British Columbia Institute for Heart + Lung Health, Vancouver, BC, Canada. ·Chest · Pubmed #21896514.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Review CT-Derived Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR 2020

Huang, Alex L / Maggiore, Paul L / Brown, Richard A / Turaga, Mansi / Reid, Anna B / Merkur, Jacob / Blanke, Philipp / Leipsic, Jonathon A. ·Department of Medical Imaging, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. ·Can Assoc Radiol J · Pubmed #32063007.

ABSTRACT: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) has emerged as the preferred modality in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, but it is limited by modest specificity. By applying principles of computational fluid dynamics, flow fraction reserve, a measure of lesion-specific ischemia that is used to guide revascularization, can be noninvasively derived from CCTA, the so-called computed tomography-derived flow fractional reserve (FFR

20 Review How accurate is atherosclerosis imaging by coronary computed tomography angiography? 2019

Nakanishi, Rine / Motoyama, Sadako / Leipsic, Jonathon / Budoff, Matthew J. ·Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Toho University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: rine.n@med.toho-u.ac.jp. · Department of Cardiology, Fujita Health University, Aichi, Japan. · St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Los Angeles BioMedical Research Institute at Harbor UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #31302029.

ABSTRACT: Invasive coronary plaque imaging such as intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography has been widely used to observe culprit or non-culprit coronary atherosclerosis, as well as optimize stent sizing, apposition and deployment. Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is non-invasively available to assess coronary artery disease (CAD) and has become an appropriate strategy to evaluate patients with suspected CAD. Given recent technologies, semi-automated plaque software is available to identify coronary plaque stenosis, volume and characteristics and potentially allows to be used for the assessment of more details of plaque information, progression and future risk as a surrogate tool of the invasive imaging modalities. This review article aims to focus on various evidence in coronary plaque imaging by coronary CTA and describes how accurate coronary CTA can classify coronary atherosclerosis.

21 Review FFR 2018

Leipsic, Jonathon / Weir-McCall, Jonathan / Blanke, Philipp. ·St Paul's Hospital & University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia Vancouver, Canada. ·Interv Cardiol · Pubmed #30443268.

ABSTRACT: Coronary computed tomography (CT) is well established for the assessment of symptomatic patients with suspected but not yet confirmed coronary artery disease with high diagnostic accuracy and risk prediction. Until recently, coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) has played a limited role in the management of complex coronary artery disease (CAD) and in planning revascularisation strategies. With the advent of FFR

22 Review Fractional flow reserve computed tomography in the evaluation of coronary artery disease. 2017

Kueh, Shaw Hua / Boroditsky, Matthew / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. · McMaster University, Ontario, Canada. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. ·Cardiovasc Diagn Ther · Pubmed #29255690.

ABSTRACT: Amongst patients with suspected obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), less than a third of patients have obstructive disease on invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and fewer still have flow-limiting obstructive disease as determined by invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). FFR is a powerful tool in guiding revascularization of flow-limiting lesions which in turn improves clinical outcome in those with haemodynamically significant obstructive disease. However FFR is infrequently performed due to the cost, time and patient discomfort the procedure entails. Further advances in non-invasive imaging has allowed FFR to be derived non-invasively by applying computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling to the coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) dataset without the need to induce hyperemia or modify the standard CCTA acquisition protocol. FFR derived from CCTA has been shown to have excellent correlation with invasive FFR and remains diagnostically robust in presence of reduced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), coronary calcification and motion artifact. More recently, new data have emerged evaluating the clinical impact of fractional flow reserve computed tomography (FFRCT) on the assessment and management of patients with stable chest pain. One such study is the Prospective LongitudinAl trial of FFRCT: Outcome and Resource IMpacts (PLATFORM) study which showed an improved patient selection for ICA using CCTA-FFRCT approach by increasing the likelihood of identifying obstructive CAD at ICA amongst those intended for invasive testing. CCTA-FFRCT may therefore serve as efficacious gatekeeper to ICA that enriches the ICA population. The utility of FFRCT has also helped deepened our understanding of CAD. Through CFD modeling, it is now recognized that there are mechanistic forces of wall shear stress (WSS) and axial plaque force acting on coronary plaques. This has created further interest in exploring the possible interplay between these mechanistic forces on the development of coronary plaque and vulnerability of these plaques to rupture.

23 Review Coronary CT Angiography Derived Fractional Flow Reserve: The Game Changer in Noninvasive Testing. 2017

Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde / Jensen, Jesper Møller / Blanke, Philipp / Sand, Niels Peter / Rabbat, Mark / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Department Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8200, Aarhus N, Denmark. bnorgaard@dadlnet.dk. · Department Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8200, Aarhus N, Denmark. · Department of Radiology and Medicine, St. Paul´s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department Cardiology, Hospital of South West Denmark, Esbjerg, and Institute of regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark. · Medicine and Radiology, Division of Cardiology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. ·Curr Cardiol Rep · Pubmed #28940026.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the scientific basis of CT derived fractional flow reserve (FFR

24 Review Interpreting results of coronary computed tomography angiography-derived fractional flow reserve in clinical practice. 2017

Rabbat, Mark G / Berman, Daniel S / Kern, Morton / Raff, Gilbert / Chinnaiyan, Kavitha / Koweek, Lynne / Shaw, Leslee J / Blanke, Philipp / Scherer, Markus / Jensen, Jesper M / Lesser, John / Nørgaard, Bjarne L / Pontone, Gianluca / De Bruyne, Bernard / Bax, Jeroen J / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Department of Medicine and Radiology, Division of Cardiology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; Edward Hines Jr. Veteran's Affairs Hospital, Hines, IL, USA. Electronic address: mrabbat@lumc.edu. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Imaging, USA. · VA Long Beach HCS, Department of Cardiology, University of California Irvine, USA. · Beaumont Health, Department of Cardiology, USA. · Duke University, Department of Medicine and Radiology, USA. · Emory University, Department of Cardiology, USA. · St. Paul's Hospital & University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, Canada. · Sanger Heart and Vascular Institute, Department of Cardiology, USA. · Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Denmark. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, USA. · Cardiologico Monzino, Department of Cardiovascular Imaging, Milan, Italy. · OLV Ziekenhuis Aalst, Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Belgium. · Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, The Netherlands. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28666784.

ABSTRACT: The application of computational fluid dynamics to coronary computed tomography angiography allows Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) to be calculated non-invasively (FFR

25 Review Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology? 2016

Ahmadi, Amir / Stone, Gregg W / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee J / Villines, Todd C / Kern, Morton J / Hecht, Harvey / Erlinge, David / Ben-Yehuda, Ori / Maehara, Akiko / Arbustini, Eloisa / Serruys, Patrick / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M / Narula, Jagat. ·From the Mount Sinai Heart, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (A.A., H.H., J.N.) · Columbia University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY (G.W.S., A.M.) · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (A.A., J.L.) · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (L.J.S.) · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD (T.C.V.) · University of California Irvine (M.J.K.) · Lund University, Sweden (D.E.) · University of California San Diego (O.B.-Y.) · Policlinico San Matteo Pavia Fondazione, Pravia, Italy (E.A.) · Imperial College, London, United Kingdom (P.S.) · and Leesburg Regional Medical Centre, FL (H.M.G.-G.). ·Circ Res · Pubmed #27390334.

ABSTRACT: Risk stratification in patients with stable ischemic heart disease is essential to guide treatment decisions. In this regard, whether coronary anatomy, physiology, or plaque morphology is the best determinant of prognosis (and driver an effective therapeutic risk reduction) remains one of the greatest ongoing debates in cardiology. In the present report, we review the evidence for each of these characteristics and explore potential algorithms that may enable a practical diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease.

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