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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by James K. Min
Based on 218 articles published since 2010
(Why 218 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, J. K. Min wrote the following 218 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous3040905 / Akers, Scott R / Panchal, Vandan / Ho, Vincent B / Beache, Garth M / Brown, Richard K J / Ghoshhajra, Brian B / Greenberg, S Bruce / Hsu, Joe Y / Kicska, Gregory A / Min, James K / Stillman, Arthur E / Stojanovska, Jadranka / Abbara, Suhny / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Principal Author, VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: akerssco@me.com. · Research Author, Internal Medicine Resident, Henry Ford Allegiance Health, Jackson, Michigan. · Panel Vice-Chair, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, California. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; American College of Cardiology. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Panel Chair, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #28473096.

ABSTRACT: In patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), imaging has major and diverse roles. First, imaging is valuable in determining and documenting the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia, hibernation, scarring, and/or the presence, site, and severity of obstructive coronary lesions. Second, imaging findings are important in determining the course of management of patients with suspected chronic myocardial ischemia and better defining those patients best suited for medical therapy, angioplasty/stenting, or surgery. Third, imaging is also necessary to determine the long-term prognosis and likely benefit from various therapeutic options by evaluating ventricular function, diastolic relaxation, and end-systolic volume. Imaging studies are also required to demonstrate other abnormalities, such as congenital/acquired coronary anomalies and severe left ventricular hypertrophy, that can produce angina in the absence of symptomatic coronary obstructive disease due to atherosclerosis. Clinical risk assessment is necessary to determine the pretest probability of CAD. Multiple methods are available to categorize patients as low, medium, or high risk for developing CAD. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. 2014

Wolk, Michael J / Bailey, Steven R / Doherty, John U / Douglas, Pamela S / Hendel, Robert C / Kramer, Christopher M / Min, James K / Patel, Manesh R / Rosenbaum, Lisa / Shaw, Leslee J / Stainback, Raymond F / Allen, Joseph M / Anonymous3410779. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #24355759.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG). Testing for the evaluation of new or worsening symptoms following a prior test or procedure was found to be Appropriate. In addition, testing was found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate for patients within 90 days of an abnormal or uncertain prior result. Pre-operative testing was rated Appropriate or May Be Appropriate only for patients who had poor functional capacity and were undergoing vascular or intermediate risk surgery with 1 or more clinical risk factors or an organ transplant. The exercise ECG was suggested as an Appropriate test for cardiac rehabilitation clearance or for exercise prescription purposes. Testing in asymptomatic patients was generally found to be Rarely Appropriate, except for calcium scoring and exercise testing in intermediate and high-risk individuals and either stress or anatomic imaging in higher-risk individuals, which were all rated as May Be Appropriate. All modalities of follow-up testing after a prior test or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 2 years and within 5 years after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in the absence of new symptoms were rated Rarely Appropriate. Pre-operative testing for patients with good functional capacity, prior normal testing within 1 year, or prior to low-risk surgery also were found to be Rarely Appropriate. Imaging for an exercise prescription or prior to the initiation of cardiac rehabilitation was Rarely Appropriate except for cardiac rehabilitation clearance for heart failure patients.

3 Guideline ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions American Association for Thoracic Surgery American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Heart Failure Society of America Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Society of Thoracic Surgeons. 2012

Patel, Manesh R / Bailey, Steven R / Bonow, Robert O / Chambers, Charles E / Chan, Paul S / Dehmer, Gregory J / Kirtane, Ajay J / Wann, L Samuel / Ward, R Parker / Douglas, Pamela S / Patel, Manesh R / Bailey, Steven R / Altus, Philip / Barnard, Denise D / Blankenship, James C / Casey, Donald E / Dean, Larry S / Fazel, Reza / Gilchrist, Ian C / Kavinsky, Clifford J / Lakoski, Susan G / Le, D Elizabeth / Lesser, John R / Levine, Glenn N / Mehran, Roxana / Russo, Andrea M / Sorrentino, Matthew J / Williams, Mathew R / Wong, John B / Wolk, Michael J / Bailey, Steven R / Douglas, Pamela S / Hendel, Robert C / Kramer, Christopher M / Min, James K / Patel, Manesh R / Shaw, Leslee / Stainback, Raymond F / Allen, Joseph M. ·Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Representative. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #22678595.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

4 Guideline ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2012

Anonymous810721 / Patel, Manesh R / Dehmer, Gregory J / Hirshfeld, John W / Smith, Peter K / Spertus, John A / Anonymous820721 / Masoudi, Frederick A / Dehmer, Gregory J / Patel, Manesh R / Smith, Peter K / Chambers, Charles E / Ferguson, T Bruce / Garcia, Mario J / Grover, Frederick L / Holmes, David R / Klein, Lloyd W / Limacher, Marian C / Mack, Michael J / Malenka, David J / Park, Myung H / Ragosta, Michael / Ritchie, James L / Rose, Geoffrey A / Rosenberg, Alan B / Russo, Andrea M / Shemin, Richard J / Weintraub, William S / Anonymous830721 / Wolk, Michael J / Bailey, Steven R / Douglas, Pamela S / Hendel, Robert C / Kramer, Christopher M / Min, James K / Patel, Manesh R / Shaw, Leslee / Stainback, Raymond F / Allen, Joseph M / Anonymous840721 / Anonymous850721 / Anonymous860721 / Anonymous870721 / Anonymous880721 / Anonymous890721 / Anonymous900721 / Anonymous910721. · ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #22424518.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD). Additionally, percutaneous coronary intervention may have a role in revascularization of patients with high burden of CAD. The primary objective of the appropriate use criteria is to improve physician decision making and patient education regarding expected benefits from revascularization and to guide future research.

5 Editorial Outcomes in Stable Coronary Disease: Is Defining High-Risk Atherosclerotic Plaque Important? 2019

Shaw, Leslee J / Blankstein, Ron / Min, James K. ·Department of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. Electronic address: les2035@med.cornell.edu. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: https://twitter.com/RonBlankstein. · Department of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #30678760.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial A New Decade of Old Questions: Steps Toward Demonstrating the Efficacy of Physiologic CAD Evaluation by CT. 2019

Min, James K / Jaffer, Farouc A. ·Department of Radiology and Medicine, Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical College and the New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. Electronic address: jkm2001@med.cornell.edu. · Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #30219399.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Cardiovascular computed tomographic angiography: Entering into the 5th stage. 2018

Min, James K / Feuchtner, Gudrun M / Villines, Todd C. ·New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, 413 E. 69th Street, Suite 108, New York City, NY 10021, United States. Electronic address: jkm2001@med.cornell.edu. · Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Uniformed Services University School of Medicine and the Walter Reed Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29759895.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial The Immediate Effects of Statins on Coronary Atherosclerosis: Can Phenotype Explain Outcome? 2018

Min, James K / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical College and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. Electronic address: runone123@gmail.com. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine, and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28917681.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Look Backwards But Live Forwards. 2017

Min, James K. ·Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York; Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. Electronic address: runone123@gmail.com. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27085450.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial CAD-RADS: A Giant First Step Toward a Common Lexicon? 2016

Chandrashekhar, Y / Min, James K / Hecht, Harvey / Narula, Jagat. ·University of Minnesota School of Medicine, and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27609154.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Assessing Hemodynamically Significant CAD by Difference in Contrast Opacification of CT Angiograms: An Exercise in Seeing and Believing. 2016

Min, James K. ·Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York; Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. Electronic address: runone123@gmail.com. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27372015.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Diagnosis of Coronary Disease and Icing on the Cake. 2015

Min, James K / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26381774.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial FFR Derived From Coronary CT Angiography: Solving the Calcification Dilemma of Coronary CT Angiography. 2015

Budoff, Matthew J / Min, James K. ·Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California. Electronic address: mbudoff@labiomed.org. · Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York; Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26381767.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Comparing outcomes and costs following cardiovascular imaging: a SPARC…but further illumination is needed. 2014

Villines, Todd C / Min, James K. ·Department of Medicine (Cardiology Service), Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. Electronic address: todd.c.villines@health.mil. · Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #24412452.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial The synergy between percutaneous therapies and noninvasive diagnostic imaging. 2013

Min, James K. ·Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College and the New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. Electronic address: jkm2001@med.cornell.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24156962.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Diagnostic accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography in patients post-coronary artery bypass grafting. 2012

Min, James K / Kochar, Minisha. · ·Indian Heart J · Pubmed #22664807.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial The relative nature of a "normal" myocardial perfusion SPECT. 2010

Min, James K / Bell, George W. · ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #21042900.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review The Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography year in review - 2018. 2018

Al'Aref, Subhi J / Mrsic, Zorana / Feuchtner, Gudrun / Min, James K / Villines, Todd C. ·Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, USA. · Cardiac CT Program and Cardiovascular Research, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria. · Cardiac CT Program and Cardiovascular Research, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: todd.c.villines.mil@mail.mil. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #30361179.

ABSTRACT: Since the introduction of ≥64 detector row coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) as a noninvasive imaging modality, various clinical trials have established its diagnostic performance and prognostic significance when compared to other anatomic and functional tests for coronary artery disease (CAD). CCTA has been increasingly utilized for a wide range of clinical scenarios, driven by both advances in technology as well as data showing improvement in outcomes. Accumulating evidence has continually refined and supported the central role of CCTA within clinical care, and this year has witnessed continued evolution of the application of CCTA within healthcare and translational research. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the year of the Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (JCCT), highlighting the evidence base supporting the appropriate application of cardiac computed tomography across numerous clinical domains.

19 Review Machine learning in cardiac CT: Basic concepts and contemporary data. 2018

Singh, Gurpreet / Al'Aref, Subhi J / Van Assen, Marly / Kim, Timothy Suyong / van Rosendael, Alexander / Kolli, Kranthi K / Dwivedi, Aeshita / Maliakal, Gabriel / Pandey, Mohit / Wang, Jing / Do, Virginie / Gummalla, Manasa / De Cecco, Carlo N / Min, James K. ·Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC, USA; University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC, USA. · Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, USA. Electronic address: jkm2001@med.cornell.edu. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29754806.

ABSTRACT: Propelled by the synergy of the groundbreaking advancements in the ability to analyze high-dimensional datasets and the increasing availability of imaging and clinical data, machine learning (ML) is poised to transform the practice of cardiovascular medicine. Owing to the growing body of literature validating both the diagnostic performance as well as the prognostic implications of anatomic and physiologic findings, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is now a well-established non-invasive modality for the assessment of cardiovascular disease. ML has been increasingly utilized to optimize performance as well as extract data from CCTA as well as non-contrast enhanced cardiac CT scans. The purpose of this review is to describe the contemporary state of ML based algorithms applied to cardiac CT, as well as to provide clinicians with an understanding of its benefits and associated limitations.

20 Review Evolving, innovating, and revolutionary changes in cardiovascular imaging: We've only just begun! 2018

Shaw, Leslee J / Hachamovitch, Rory / Min, James K / Di Carli, Marcelo / Mieres, Jennifer H / Phillips, Lawrence / Blankstein, Ron / Einstein, Andrew / Taqueti, Viviany R / Hendel, Robert / Berman, Daniel S. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. lshaw3@emory.edu. · Emory University Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, 1462 Clifton Rd NE, Room 529, Atlanta, GA, 30324, USA. lshaw3@emory.edu. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Hofstra University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA. · Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #29468466.

ABSTRACT: In this review, we highlight the need for innovation and creativity to reinvent the field of nuclear cardiology. Revolutionary ideas brought forth today are needed to create greater value in patient care and highlight the need for more contemporary evidence supporting the use of nuclear cardiology practices. We put forth discussions on the need for disruptive innovation in imaging-guided care that places the imager as a central force in care coordination. Value-based nuclear cardiology is defined as care that is both efficient and effective. Novel testing strategies that defer testing in lower risk patients are examples of the kind of innovation needed in today's healthcare environment. A major focus of current research is the evolution of the importance of ischemia and the prognostic significance of non-obstructive atherosclerotic plaque and coronary microvascular dysfunction. Embracing novel paradigms, such as this, can aid in the development of optimal strategies for coronary disease management. We hope that our article will spurn the field toward greater innovation and focus on transformative imaging leading the way for new generations of novel cardiovascular care.

21 Review Evaluation of Atherosclerotic Plaque in Non-invasive Coronary Imaging. 2018

Dwivedi, Aeshita / Al'Aref, Subhi J / Lin, Fay Y / Min, James K. ·Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA. jkm2001@med.cornell.edu. ·Korean Circ J · Pubmed #29441745.

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Over the last decade coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) has gained wide acceptance as a reliable, cost-effective and non-invasive modality for diagnosis and prognostication of CAD. Use of CCTA is now expanding to characterization of plaque morphology and identification of vulnerable plaque. Additionally, CCTA is developing as a non-invasive modality to monitor plaque progression, which holds future potential in individualizing treatment. In this review, we discuss the role of CCTA in diagnosis and management of CAD. Additionally, we discuss the recent advancements and the potential clinical applications of CCTA in management of CAD.

22 Review Diagnostic performance of cardiac imaging methods to diagnose ischaemia-causing coronary artery disease when directly compared with fractional flow reserve as a reference standard: a meta-analysis. 2017

Danad, Ibrahim / Szymonifka, Jackie / Twisk, Jos W R / Norgaard, Bjarne L / Zarins, Christopher K / Knaapen, Paul / Min, James K. ·Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USA. · HeartFlow, Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA. · Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #27141095.

ABSTRACT: Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), stress echocardiography (SE), invasive coronary angiography (ICA), coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), fractional flow reserve (FFR) derived from CCTA (FFRCT), and cardiac magnetic resonance (MRI) imaging when directly compared with an FFR reference standard. Method and results: PubMed and Web of Knowledge were searched for investigations published between 1 January 2002 and 28 February 2015. Studies performing FFR in at least 75% of coronary vessels for the diagnosis of ischaemic coronary artery disease (CAD) were included. Twenty-three articles reporting on 3788 patients and 5323 vessels were identified. Meta-analysis was performed for pooled sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios (LR), diagnostic odds ratio, and summary receiver operating characteristic curves. In contrast to ICA, CCTA, and FFRCT reports, studies evaluating SPECT, SE, and MRI were largely retrospective, single-centre and with generally smaller study samples. On a per-patient basis, the sensitivity of CCTA (90%, 95% CI: 86-93), FFRCT (90%, 95% CI: 85-93), and MRI (90%, 95% CI: 75-97) were higher than for SPECT (70%, 95% CI: 59-80), SE (77%, 95% CI: 61-88), and ICA (69%, 95% CI: 65-75). The highest and lowest per-patient specificity was observed for MRI (94%, 95% CI: 79-99) and for CCTA (39%, 95% CI: 34-44), respectively. Similar specificities were noted for SPECT (78%, 95% CI: 68-87), SE (75%, 95% CI: 63-85), FFRCT (71%, 95% CI: 65-75%), and ICA (67%, 95% CI: 63-71). On a per-vessel basis, the highest sensitivity was for CCTA (pooled sensitivity, 91%: 88-93), MRI (91%: 84-95), and FFRCT (83%, 78-87), with lower sensitivities for ICA (71%, 69-74), and SPECT (57%: 49-64). Per-vessel specificity was highest for MRI (85%, 79-89), FFRCT (78%: 78-81), and SPECT (75%: 69-80), whereas ICA (66%: 64-68) and CCTA (58%: 55-61) yielded a lower specificity. Conclusions: In this meta-analysis comparing cardiac imaging methods directly to FFR, MRI had the highest performance for diagnosis of ischaemia-causing CAD, with lower performance for SPECT and SE. Anatomic methods of CCTA and ICA yielded lower specificity, with functional assessment of coronary atherosclerosis by SE, SPECT, and FFRCT improving accuracy.

23 Review Multimodality Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Computed Tomography. 2016

Lee, Ji Hyun / Han, Donghee / Danad, Ibrahim / Hartaigh, Bríain Ó / Lin, Fay Y / Min, James K. ·Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.; Department of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Ultrasound · Pubmed #27081438.

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and various cardiovascular imaging modalities have been introduced for the purpose of diagnosing and determining the severity of CAD. More recently, advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have contributed to the widespread clinical application of cardiac CT for accurate and noninvasive evaluation of CAD. In this review, we focus on imaging assessment of CAD based upon CT, which includes coronary artery calcium screening, coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, and fractional flow reserve CT. Further, we provide a discussion regarding the potential implications, benefits and limitations, as well as the possible future directions according to each modality.

24 Review Role of computed tomography screening for detection of coronary artery disease. 2016

Han, Donghee / Lee, Ji Hyun / Hartaigh, Bríain Ó / Min, James K. ·Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York; Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY. · Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York; Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY; Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. Electronic address: jkm2001@med.cornell.edu. ·Clin Imaging · Pubmed #26342860.

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western populations, and the prediction and prevention of CAD is an inherent challenge facing current health care societies. Computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a noninvasive imaging tool in the field of cardiovascular disease. Notably, CT scanning for detection of coronary artery calcium (CAC) has proven useful in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes as well as early identification of CAD. In asymptomatic persons undergoing screening for CAD, CAC is well established as a surrogate of CAD risk and has demonstrated incremental benefit over and above traditional risk prediction tools. In addition, a zero CAC score has shown to reflect a substantially lower risk of CAD and may therefore be considered an important marker of CAD protection. Irrespective of screening in the asymptomatic population, CAC scanning has also displayed a beneficial role in the symptomatic population, specifically as gatekeeper in guiding further treatment decision making. Further still, the combination of alternative CT screening strategies such as CT screening for lung cancer with CAC scanning may hold particular promise as an effective screening approach by lowering overall health costs as well as limiting radiation exposure.

25 Review Noninvasive Fractional Flow Reserve Derived from Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography for the Diagnosis of Lesion-specific Ischemia. 2015

Danad, Ibrahim / Baskaran, Lohendran / Min, James K. ·Department of Radiology, Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, 413 East 69th Street, New York, NY 10021, USA. · Department of Radiology, Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, 413 East 69th Street, New York, NY 10021, USA. Electronic address: jkm2001@med.cornell.edu. ·Interv Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #28581934.

ABSTRACT: Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary computed tomography angiography (FFR

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