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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Suresh R. Mulukutla
Based on 17 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Suresh Mulukutla wrote the following 17 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline SCAI expert consensus statement: 2016 best practices in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: (Endorsed by the cardiological society of india, and sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia intervencionista; Affirmation of value by the Canadian Association of interventional cardiology-Association canadienne de cardiologie d'intervention). 2016

Naidu, Srihari S / Aronow, Herbert D / Box, Lyndon C / Duffy, Peter L / Kolansky, Daniel M / Kupfer, Joel M / Latif, Faisal / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Rao, Sunil V / Swaminathan, Rajesh V / Blankenship, James C. ·Division of Cardiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, New York. ssnaidu@winthrop.org. · Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Cardiovascular Institute, Providence, RI. · West Valley Medical Center, Caldwell, ID. · FirstHealth of the Carolinas, Pinehurst, NC. · Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · University of Illinois School of Medicine-Peoria, Peoria, IL. · University of Oklahoma and VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK. · University of Pittsburgh and VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Greenberg Division of Cardiology, New York, NY. · Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27137680.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Stents and statins: history, clinical outcomes and mechanisms. 2010

Nair, Pradeep K / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Marroquin, Oscar C. ·Center for Interventional Cardiology Research, Cardiovascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, A-333 PUH, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #20828351.

ABSTRACT: The 1980s witnessed the inception of both stents and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). While they evolved separately, it was soon realized that they each offered a unique and powerful mechanism for targeting the major offender in cardiovascular disease, namely atherosclerosis. Coincidentally, the first statin was approved by the US FDA in 1987, the same year that the coronary stent was conceived. Since that time, stents and statins have revolutionized the field of cardiovascular medicine and their paths have been intertwined. Several pivotal randomized clinical trials have established statins as an effective therapy for improving clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) among patients presenting with stable coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes. In addition, chronic statin therapy and acute loading of statins prior to PCI has consistently been shown to limit periprocedural myocardial necrosis. The mechanism for improved clinical outcomes with statins has clearly been associated with statin-induced reductions in LDL. In addition, statins may also exert 'pleiotropic' effects, independent of LDL lowering, that might counteract the inflammatory and prothrombotic mileu created with PCI. This article provides a brief historical perspective of the evolution of the use of statins and stents in patients with coronary artery disease, an evaluation of the available clinical data supporting the use of statins in patients undergoing PCI across a wide spectrum of clinical scenarios, and a discussion of the potential mechanisms of the benefit of statins in these patients.

3 Article Postoperative outcomes and management strategies for coronary artery disease in patients in need of a lung transplantation. 2017

Khandhar, Sameer J / Althouse, Andrew D / Mulukutla, Suresh / Kormos, Robert / Toma, Catalin / Marroquin, Oscar / Volz, Elizabeth / Tefera, Leben / Bermudez, Christian. ·Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. ·Clin Transplant · Pubmed #28658533.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients requiring lung transplantation (LTx) may also have coronary artery disease (CAD). The peri-operative management and long-term outcomes of these patients are not well established. METHODS: Patients referred for LTx from 2008 to 2014 were included in this study. CAD was defined by angiography as no CAD (stenosis <20%), moderate CAD (20%-69%), and significant CAD (stenosis ≥70%). Revascularization was per recommendations of local heart team. Postoperative cardiovascular outcomes and long-term survival are reported. RESULTS: A total of 1493 patients were screened for LTx during this period and 656 received a transplant. Of the patients that underwent LTx, 51% had no CAD, 33% had moderate non-obstructive CAD, and 16% had obstructive CAD. Forty-three patients underwent revascularization. There was a no increased risk of peri-operative cardiovascular events or for adjusted mortality for patients with obstructive CAD (HR=1.24, 95% CI: 0.83-1.86, P=.290) including those requiring revascularization. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high prevalence of coronary disease in the population of patients with advanced lung disease requiring lung transplantation. Careful evaluation and treatment can allow for patients with all severities of CAD including those requiring revascularization to successfully undergo LTx.

4 Article Revascularization heart team recommendations as an adjunct to appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization in patients with complex coronary artery disease. 2016

Sanchez, Carlos E / Dota, Anthony / Badhwar, Vinay / Kliner, Dustin / Smith, A J Conrad / Chu, Danny / Toma, Catalin / Wei, Lawrence / Marroquin, Oscar C / Schindler, John / Lee, Joon S / Mulukutla, Suresh R. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Heart and Vascular Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. mulukutlasr@upmc.edu. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, VA Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. mulukutlasr@upmc.edu. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26527352.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate how a comprehensive evidence-based clinical review by a multidisciplinary revascularization heart team on treatment decisions for revascularization in patients with complex coronary artery disease using SYNTAX scores combined with Society of Thoracic Surgeons-derived clinical variables can be additive to the utilization of Appropriate Use Criteria for coronary revascularization. BACKGROUND: Decision-making regarding the use of revascularization for coronary artery disease has come under major scrutiny due to inappropriate overuse of revascularization. There is little data in routine clinical practice evaluating how a structured, multidisciplinary heart team approach may be used in combination with the Appropriate Use Criteria for revascularization. METHODS: From May 1, 2012 to January 1, 2015, multidisciplinary revascularization heart team meetings were convened to discuss evidence-based management of 301 patients with complex coronary artery disease. Heart team recommendations were adjudicated with the Appropriate Use Criteria for coronary revascularization for each clinical scenario using the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions' Quality Improvement Toolkit (SCAI-QIT) Appropriate Use Criteria App. RESULTS: Concordance of the Heart Team to Appropriate Use Criteria had a 99.3% appropriate primary indication for coronary revascularization. Among patients who underwent percutaneous revascularization, 34.9% had an inappropriate or uncertain indication as recommended by the Heart Team. Patients with uncertain or inappropriate percutaneous coronary interventions had significantly higher SYNTAX score (27.3 ± 6.6; 28.5 ± 5.5; 19.2 ± 6; P < 0.0001) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons-Predicted Risk of Mortality (6.1% ± 4.7%; 8.1% ± 6.3%; 3.7% ± 4.1%; P < 0.0081) compared to appropriate indications, frequently had concomitant forms of advanced comorbidities and frailty in the setting of symptomatic coronary artery disease. CONCLUSIONS: A formal, multidisciplinary revascularization heart team can provide proper validation for clinical decisions and should be considered in combination with the Appropriate Use Criteria for coronary revascularization to formulate revascularization strategies for individuals in a patient-centered fashion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

5 Article High-risk percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with reverse left ventricular remodeling and improved outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease and reduced ejection fraction. 2015

Daubert, Melissa A / Massaro, Joseph / Liao, Lawrence / Pershad, Ashish / Mulukutla, Suresh / Magnus Ohman, Erik / Popma, Jeffrey / O'Neill, William W / Douglas, Pamela S. ·Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. Electronic address: melissa.daubert@duke.edu. · Harvard Clinical Research Institute, Boston, MA; Boston University, Boston, MA. · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. · Banner Good Samaritan Hospital, Phoenix, AZ. · University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA. · Harvard Clinical Research Institute, Boston, MA; Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, Boston, MA. · Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #26385039.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Therapies that reverse pathologic left ventricular (LV) remodeling are often associated with improved outcomes. The incidence and impact of reverse LV remodeling after high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are unknown. METHODS: The PROTECT II study was a multicenter trial in patients with complex, multivessel coronary artery disease and reduced ejection fraction (EF) that revealed an increase in visual EF after high-risk PCI. Among patients with quantitative echocardiography (LV volumes and biplane EF), we assessed the extent and predictors of reverse LV remodeling, defined as improved systolic function with an absolute increase in EF ≥5% and correlated these findings with clinical events. RESULTS: Quantitative echocardiography was performed in 184 patients at baseline and longest follow-up. Mean EF at baseline was 27.1%. Ninety-three patients (51%) demonstrated reverse LV remodeling with an absolute increase in EF of 13.2% (P < .001). End-systolic volume decreased from 137.7 to 106.6 mL (P = .002). No significant change in EF or end-systolic volume was seen among non-remodelers. Reverse LV remodeling occurred more frequently in patients with more extensive revascularization (odds ratio, 7.52; 95% CI [1.31-43.25]) and was associated with significantly fewer major adverse events (composite of death/myocardial infarction/stroke/transient ischemic attack): 9.7% versus 24.2% (P = .009). There was also a greater reduction in New York Heart Association class III/IV heart failure among reverse LV remodelers (66.7% to 24.0%) than non-remodelers (56.3% to 34.4%), P = .045. CONCLUSIONS: Reverse LV remodeling can occur after high-risk PCI in patients with complex coronary artery disease and reduced EF and is associated with improved clinical outcomes.

6 Article Safety and efficacy of implementing a multidisciplinary heart team approach for revascularization in patients with complex coronary artery disease: an observational cohort pilot study. 2014

Chu, Danny / Anastacio, Melissa M / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Lee, Joon S / Smith, A J Conrad / Marroquin, Oscar C / Sanchez, Carlos E / Morell, Victor O / Cook, Chris C / Lico, Serrie C / Wei, Lawrence M / Badhwar, Vinay. ·Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania2Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania3Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ·JAMA Surg · Pubmed #25207883.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Since the advent of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, the multidisciplinary heart team (MHT) approach has rapidly become the standard of care for patients undergoing the procedure. However, little is known about the potential effect of MHT on patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of implementing the MHT approach for patients with complex CAD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Observational cohort pilot study of 180 patients with CAD involving more than 1 vessel in a single major academic tertiary/quaternary medical center. From May 1, 2012, through May 31, 2013, MHT meetings were convened to discuss evidence-based management of CAD. All cases were reviewed by a team of interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons within 72 hours of angiography. All clinical data were reviewed by the team to adjudicate optimal treatment strategies. Final recommendations were based on a consensus decision. Outcome measures were tracked for all patients to determine the safety and efficacy profile of this pilot program. EXPOSURES: Multidisciplinary heart team meeting. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Thirty-day periprocedural mortality and rate of major adverse cardiac events. RESULTS: Most of the patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG); a small percentage of patients underwent a hybrid procedure or medical management. Incidence of 30-day periprocedural mortality was low across all groups of patients (PCI group, 5 of 64 [8%]; CABG group, 1 of 87 [1%]). The rate of major adverse cardiac events during a median follow-up of 12.1 months ranged from 12 of 87 patients (14%) in the CABG group to 15 of 64 (23%) in the PCI group. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Outcomes of patients with complex CAD undergoing the optimal treatment strategy recommended by the MHT were similar to those of published national standards. Implementation of the MHT approach for patients with complex CAD is safe and efficacious.

7 Article Risk factors for incident peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes: results from the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation in type 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Trial. 2014

Althouse, Andrew D / Abbott, J Dawn / Forker, Alan D / Bertolet, Marnie / Barinas-Mitchell, Emma / Thurston, Rebecca C / Mulukutla, Suresh / Aboyans, Victor / Brooks, Maria Mori / Anonymous470787. ·Corresponding author: Maria Mori Brooks, mbrooks@pitt.edu. ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #24595631.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to define risk factors for incidence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in a large cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), overall and within the context of differing glycemic control strategies. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation in Type 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) randomized controlled trial assigned participants to insulin-sensitizing (IS) therapy versus insulin-providing (IP) therapy. A total of 1,479 participants with normal ankle-brachial index (ABI) at study entry were eligible for analysis. PAD outcomes included new ABI ≤0.9 with decrease at least 0.1 from baseline, lower extremity revascularization, or lower extremity amputation. Baseline risk factors within the overall cohort and time-varying risk factors within each assigned glycemic control arm were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: During an average 4.6 years of follow-up, 303 participants (20.5%) experienced an incident case of PAD. Age, sex, race, and baseline smoking status were all significantly associated with incident PAD in the BARI 2D cohort. Additional baseline risk factors included pulse pressure, HbA1c, and albumin-to-creatinine ratio (P < 0.05 for each). In stratified analyses of time-varying covariates, changes in BMI, LDL, HDL, systolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure were most predictive among IS patients, while change in HbA1c was most predictive among IP patients. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with T2DM, traditional cardiovascular risk factors were the main predictors of incident PAD cases. Stratified analyses showed different risk factors were predictive for patients treated with IS medications versus those treated with IP medications.

8 Article Comparison of drug-eluting and bare metal stents in large coronary arteries: findings from the NHLBI dynamic registry. 2014

Chan, Chi Yuen / Vlachos, Helen / Selzer, Faith / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Marroquin, Oscar C / Abbott, Dawn J / Holper, Elizabeth M / Williams, David O. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24323698.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of drug-eluting stents (DES) compared to bare-metal stents (BMS) for patients with large coronary vessels. BACKGROUND: Randomized trials have demonstrated that DES reduce the risk of target vessel revascularization (TVR) compared to BMS. This benefit is less pronounced as artery diameter increases. Whether DES are superior to BMS for larger coronary arteries in the setting of routine clinical practice is unknown. METHODS: We analyzed data from 869 patients undergoing de novo lesion PCI with reference vessel diameter greater than or equal to 3.5 mm in the NHLBI Dynamic Registry according to whether they were treated with DES or BMS. Patients were followed for 3 years for the occurrence of cardiovascular events. RESULTS: At 3-year follow-up, rates of TVR at 3 years were similar and low in both groups (4.4% vs. 3.7%, P = 0.62). After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, the adjusted hazard ratio for 3-year MI for DES was 1.85 (95% CI 0.93-3.7, P = 0.08), for TVR at 3 years 1.14 (95% CI 0.52-2.49, P = 0.75) and for mortality 0.89 (95%CI 0.49-1.62, P = 0.71). CONCLUSIONS: In our study of the unrestricted use of DES for patients with lesions in larger diameter coronary arteries, first generation DES did not reduce 3-year risk of TVR. Our findings do not support the preferred use of DES over BMS for patients with lesions located in arteries >3.5 mm. It is unknown whether secondary generation DES can offer better outcome compared to BMS in large coronary vessels. Further study on this issue is warranted.

9 Article Outcomes of small coronary artery stenting with bare-metal stents versus drug-eluting stents: results from the NHLBI Dynamic Registry. 2014

Parikh, Shailja V / Luna, Michael / Selzer, Faith / Marroquin, Oscar C / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Abbott, J Dawn / Holper, Elizabeth M. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas-Southwestern, Dallas, Texas. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #21735515.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Examine 1-year outcomes of patients with small coronary arteries in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry (NHLBI) undergoing drug-eluting stent (DES) vs. bare-metal stent (BMS) placement. BACKGROUND: While randomized trials of DES vs. BMS demonstrate reduced target vessel revascularization, it is unclear whether similar outcomes are seen in unselected patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for small coronary arteries. METHODS: Utilizing patients from the NHLBI Registry Waves 1-3 for BMS (1997-2002) and Waves 4-5 for DES (2004 and 2006), demographic, angiographic, in-hospital, and 1-year outcome data of patients with small coronary arteries treated with BMS (n = 686) vs. DES (n = 669) were evaluated. Small coronary artery was defined as 2.50-3.00 mm in diameter. RESULTS: Compared to BMS-treated patients, the mean lesion length of treated lesions was longer in the DES treated group (16.7 vs. 13.1 mm, P < 0.001) and the mean reference vessel size of attempted lesions was smaller (2.6 vs. 2.7 mm, P < 0.001). Adjusted analyses of 1-year outcomes revealed that DES patients were at lower risk to undergo coronary artery bypass graft surgery (Hazard Ratio [HR] 0.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.17-0.95, P = 0.04), repeat PCI (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.35-0.82, P = 0.004), and experience the combined major adverse cardiovascular event rate (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.42-0.83, P = 0.002). There was no difference in the risk of death and myocardial infarction (MI) (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.46-1.35, P = 0.38). CONCLUSIONS: In this real-world registry, patients with small coronary arteries treated with DES had significantly lower rates of repeat revascularization and major adverse cardiovascular events at 1 year compared to patients treated with BMS, with no increase in the risk of death and MI. These data confirm the efficacy and safety of DES over BMS in the treatment of small coronary arteries in routine clinical practice.

10 Article Benefit of long-term dual anti-platelet therapy in patients treated with drug-eluting stents: from the NHLBI dynamic registry. 2013

Mulukutla, Suresh R / Marroquin, Oscar C / Vlachos, Helen A / Selzer, Faith / Toma, Catalin / Kip, Kevin E / Abbott, J Dawn / Holper, Elizabeth / Lee, Joon S / Khandhar, Sameer / Kutcher, Michael / Kelsey, Sheryl / Smith, Conrad / Faxon, David / Williams, David O. ·University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. mulukutlasr@upmc.edu ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #23211356.

ABSTRACT: The optimal duration of dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation is an important, unanswered question. This study was designed to evaluate the association of varying durations of DAPT on clinical outcomes after DES implantation for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry, patients enrolled in the last 2 waves after index percutaneous coronary intervention with DES and who were event free at the time of landmark analysis were included. Landmark analysis was performed 12 and 24 months after percutaneous coronary intervention, and patients were stratified according to continued use of DAPT or not. Subjects were evaluated for rates of death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis at 4 years from their index procedures. The numbers of evaluable patients were 2,157 and 1,918 for the 12- and 24-month landmarks, respectively. In both landmark analyses, there was a significantly lower 4-year rate of death or myocardial infarction in the group that continued DAPT compared to the group that did not (12 months: 10.5% vs 14.5%, p = 0.01; 24 months: 5.7% vs 8.6%, p = 0.02). Beneficial differences in the group that continued on DAPT were preserved after multivariate and propensity adjustment. There were no significant differences in definite stent thrombosis in either landmark analysis. In conclusion, at 12 and 24 months after DES implantation, continued use of DAPT was associated with lower 4-year risk for death and myocardial infarction.

11 Article Serum protein profiles predict coronary artery disease in symptomatic patients referred for coronary angiography. 2012

LaFramboise, William A / Dhir, Rajiv / Kelly, Lori A / Petrosko, Patricia / Krill-Burger, John M / Sciulli, Christin M / Lyons-Weiler, Maureen A / Chandran, Uma R / Lomakin, Aleksey / Masterson, Robert V / Marroquin, Oscar C / Mulukutla, Suresh R / McNamara, Dennis M. ·University of Pittsburgh, Department of Pathology, 5230 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, USA. laframboisewa@upmc.edu ·BMC Med · Pubmed #23216991.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: More than a million diagnostic cardiac catheterizations are performed annually in the US for evaluation of coronary artery anatomy and the presence of atherosclerosis. Nearly half of these patients have no significant coronary lesions or do not require mechanical or surgical revascularization. Consequently, the ability to rule out clinically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) using low cost, low risk tests of serum biomarkers in even a small percentage of patients with normal coronary arteries could be highly beneficial. METHODS: Serum from 359 symptomatic subjects referred for catheterization was interrogated for proteins involved in atherogenesis, atherosclerosis, and plaque vulnerability. Coronary angiography classified 150 patients without flow-limiting CAD who did not require percutaneous intervention (PCI) while 209 required coronary revascularization (stents, angioplasty, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery). Continuous variables were compared across the two patient groups for each analyte including calculation of false discovery rate (FDR ≤ 1%) and Q value (P value for statistical significance adjusted to ≤ 0.01). RESULTS: Significant differences were detected in circulating proteins from patients requiring revascularization including increased apolipoprotein B100 (APO-B100), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), resistin, osteopontin, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and N-terminal fragment protein precursor brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pBNP) and decreased apolipoprotein A1 (APO-A1). Biomarker classification signatures comprising up to 5 analytes were identified using a tunable scoring function trained against 239 samples and validated with 120 additional samples. A total of 14 overlapping signatures classified patients without significant coronary disease (38% to 59% specificity) while maintaining 95% sensitivity for patients requiring revascularization. Osteopontin (14 times) and resistin (10 times) were most frequently represented among these diagnostic signatures. The most efficacious protein signature in validation studies comprised osteopontin (OPN), resistin, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) and interferon γ (IFNγ) as a four-marker panel while the addition of either CRP or adiponectin (ACRP-30) yielded comparable results in five protein signatures. CONCLUSIONS: Proteins in the serum of CAD patients predominantly reflected (1) a positive acute phase, inflammatory response and (2) alterations in lipid metabolism, transport, peroxidation and accumulation. There were surprisingly few indicators of growth factor activation or extracellular matrix remodeling in the serum of CAD patients except for elevated OPN. These data suggest that many symptomatic patients without significant CAD could be identified by a targeted multiplex serum protein test without cardiac catheterization thereby eliminating exposure to ionizing radiation and decreasing the economic burden of angiographic testing for these patients.

12 Article Real-world use of the Impella 2.5 circulatory support system in complex high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention: the USpella Registry. 2012

Maini, Brijeshwar / Naidu, Srihari S / Mulukutla, Suresh / Kleiman, Neal / Schreiber, Theodore / Wohns, David / Dixon, Simon / Rihal, Charanjit / Dave, Rajesh / O'Neill, William. ·Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA. bmaini@pinnaclehealth.org ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #22105829.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We report on the real-world, multicenter experience of the Impella 2.5 circulatory support system during high-risk PCI, a subset of the larger USpella Registry. BACKGROUND: Standard of care for most patients with compromised ventricular function with multivessel or high-risk coronary lesions has been coronary artery bypass grafting. In poor operative candidates, high-risk PCI is increasingly considered, despite an increased risk for periprocedural hemodynamic compromise. METHODS: 175 consecutive patients who underwent high-risk PCI with prophylactic support of the Impella 2.5 were evaluated. The primary safety endpoint was the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 30 days. Secondary endpoints included safety and efficacy related to the device and patient outcomes, including survival at 12 months. RESULTS: Overall angiographic revascularization was successful in 99% of patients and in 90% of those with multivessel revascularization, resulting in a reduction of the mean SYNTAX score post-PCI from 36 ± 15 to 18 ± 15 (P < 0.0001) and an improvement of the ejection fraction (from 31 ± 15% to 36 ± 14%, P < 0.0001). In 51% of patients, the functional status improved by one or more NYHA class (P < 0.001). At 30-day follow-up, the rate of MACE was 8%, and survival was 96%, 91%, and 88% at 30 days, 6 months, and 12 months, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The use of Impella 2.5 in high-risk PCI appeared feasible and safe in the real-world setting. The utilization of the Impella 2.5 was successful, resulting in favorable short- and midterm angiographic, procedural and clinical outcomes.

13 Article Comparison of bare-metal and drug-eluting stents in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the NHLBI Dynamic Registry). 2011

Green, Sandy M / Selzer, Faith / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Tadajweski, Edward J / Green, Jamie A / Wilensky, Robert L / Laskey, Warren K / Cohen, Howard A / Rao, Sunil V / Weisbord, Steven D / Lee, Joon S / Reis, Steven E / Kip, Kevin E / Kelsey, Sheryl F / Williams, David O / Marroquin, Oscar C. ·Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #21890077.

ABSTRACT: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a disproportionate burden of coronary artery disease and commonly undergo revascularization. The role and safety of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using drug-eluting stents (DESs) verses bare-metal stents in patients with CKD not on renal replacement therapy has not been fully evaluated. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of DES in patients with CKD not on renal replacement therapy. Patients were drawn from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry and were stratified by renal function based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Of the 4,157 participants, 1,108 had CKD ("low GFR" <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), whereas 3,049 patients had normal renal function ("normal GFR" ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). For each stratum of renal function we compared risk of death, myocardial infarction, or repeat revascularization between subjects who received DESs and bare-metal stents at the index procedure. Patients with low GFR had higher 1-year rates of death and myocardial infarction and a decreased rate of repeat revascularization compared to patients with normal GFR. Use of DESs was associated with a decreased need for repeat revascularization in the normal-GFR group (adjusted hazard ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.79, p <0.001) but not in the low-GFR group (hazard ratio 0.69, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 1.06, p = 0.09). Risks of death and myocardial infarction were not different between the 2 stents in either patient population. In conclusion, presence of CKD predicted poor outcomes after PCI with high rates of mortality regardless of stent type. The effect of DES in decreasing repeat revascularization appeared to be attenuated in these patients.

14 Article Increased adverse events after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with COPD: insights from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute dynamic registry. 2011

Enriquez, Jonathan R / Parikh, Shailja V / Selzer, Faith / Jacobs, Alice K / Marroquin, Oscar / Mulukutla, Suresh / Srinivas, Vankeepuram / Holper, Elizabeth M. ·Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. · Division of Cardiology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA. · Division of Cardiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. · Division of Cardiology, Jack D. Weiler/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY. · Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX. Electronic address: Elizabeth.Holper@UTSouthwestern.edu. ·Chest · Pubmed #21527507.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with COPD are at higher risk for death after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), but other clinical outcomes and possible associations with adverse events have not been described. METHODS: Using waves 1 through 5 (1999-2006) of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry, patients with COPD (n = 860) and without COPD (n = 10,048) were compared. Baseline demographics, angiographic characteristics, and in-hospital and 1-year adverse events were compared. RESULTS: Patients with COPD were older (mean age 66.8 vs 63.2 years, P < .001), more likely to be women, and more likely to have a history of diabetes, prior myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, renal disease, and smoking. Patients with COPD also had a lower mean ejection fraction (49.1% vs 53.0%, P < .001) and a greater mean number of significant lesions (3.2 vs 3.0, P = .006). Rates of in-hospital death (2.2% vs 1.1%, P = .003) and major entry site complications (6.6% vs 4.2%, P < .001) were higher in pulmonary patients. At discharge, pulmonary patients were significantly less likely to be prescribed aspirin (92.4% vs 95.3%, P < .001), β-blockers (55.7% vs 76.2%, P < .001), and statins (60.0% vs 66.8%, P < .001). After adjustment, patients with COPD had significantly increased risk of death (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.01-1.67) and repeat revascularization (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.02-1.46) at 1 year, compared with patients without COPD. CONCLUSIONS: COPD is associated with higher mortality rates and repeat revascularization within 1 year after PCI. These higher rates of adverse outcomes may be associated with lower rates of guideline-recommended class 1 medications prescribed at discharge.

15 Article Temporal changes in the outcomes of patients with diabetes mellitus undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute dynamic registry. 2011

Holper, Elizabeth M / Abbott, J Dawn / Mulukutla, Suresh / Vlachos, Helen / Selzer, Faith / McGuire, Darren / Faxon, David P / Laskey, Warren / Srinivas, Vankeepuram S / Marroquin, Oscar C / Jacobs, Alice K. ·Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. elizabeth.holper@utsouthwestern.edu ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #21315225.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are at higher risk for adverse outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). METHODS: To determine whether outcomes have improved over time, we analyzed data from 2,838 consecutive patients with medically treated DM, including 1,066 patients (37.6%) treated with insulin, in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry undergoing PCI registered in waves 1 (1997-1998), 2 (1999), 3 (2001-2002), 4 (2004), and 5 (2006). We compared baseline demographics and 1-year outcomes in the overall cohort and in analyses stratified by recruitment wave and insulin use. RESULTS: Crude mortality rates by chronological wave were 9.5%, 12.5%, 8.9%, 11.6%, and 6.6% (P value(trend) = .33) among those treated with insulin and, respectively, 9.7%, 6.5%, 4.1%, 5.4%, and 4.7% (P value(trend) = .006) among patients treated with oral agents,. The adjusted hazard ratios of death, myocardial infarction (MI), and overall major adverse cardiovascular events (death, MI, revascularization) in insulin-treated patients with DM in waves 2 to 5 as compared with wave 1 were either higher or the same. In contrast, the similar adjusted hazard ratios for oral agent-treated patients with DM were either similar or lower. CONCLUSIONS: Significant improvements over time in adverse events by 1 year were detected in patients with DM treated with oral agents. In insulin-treated diabetic patients, despite lower rates of repeat revascularization over time, death and MI following PCI have not significantly improved. These findings underscore the need for continued efforts at optimizing outcomes among patients with DM undergoing PCI, especially those requiring insulin treatment.

16 Article Poor 1-year outcomes after percutaneous coronary interventions in systemic lupus erythematosus: report from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry. 2008

Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen / Selzer, Faith / Manzi, Susan / Kip, Kevin E / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Marroquin, Oscar C / Smitherman, Thomas C / Kuller, Lewis H / Williams, David O / Wasko, Mary Chester M. ·Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3500 Terrace Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. mckinnonk@dom.pitt.edu ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #20031679.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have premature and accelerated atherosclerosis. Although percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is used frequently to treat coronary artery disease in SLE, little is known regarding PCI outcomes immediately after PCI and after discharge. METHODS AND RESULTS: Baseline demographic, procedure-related, and adverse outcome data on consecutive patients undergoing PCI during 5 recruitment "waves" of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry across 23 clinical centers were collected. SLE patients (n=28) were compared with non-SLE patients (n=3385). SLE patients were younger and more often female in comparison with non-SLE patients undergoing PCI. SLE patients were less likely than non-SLE patients to have hyperlipidemia but had a similar prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco use. The prevalence of multivessel disease was similar between groups. Initial intervention success (by angiographic definition) was not significantly different between groups. At 1 year, SLE patients were more likely to experience a myocardial infarction (15.6% versus 4.8%, P=0.01) and more often required repeat PCI (31.3% versus 11.8%, P=0.009) than non-SLE patients, even after adjustment for important covariates. CONCLUSIONS: SLE patients had significantly worse cardiovascular outcomes at 1 year than non-SLE patients. Even considering the small number of SLE patients, these differences were striking. Further study is warranted to explore other factors potentially accounting for this disparity, including SLE disease activity and duration, presence of hypercoagulable state, and immunosuppressive therapy.

17 Article Impact of drug-eluting stents among insulin-treated diabetic patients: a report from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry. 2008

Mulukutla, Suresh R / Vlachos, Helen A / Marroquin, Oscar C / Selzer, Faith / Holper, Elizabeth M / Abbott, J Dawn / Laskey, Warren K / Williams, David O / Smith, Conrad / Anderson, William D / Lee, Joon S / Srinivas, Vankeepuram / Kelsey, Sheryl F / Kip, Kevin E. ·Cardiovascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. mulukutlasr@upmc.edu ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #19212456.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of drug-eluting stents (DES) compared with bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with insulin- and noninsulin-treated diabetes. BACKGROUND: Diabetes is a powerful predictor of adverse events after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI), and insulin-treated diabetic patients have worse outcomes. The DES are efficacious among patients with diabetes; however, their safety and efficacy, compared with BMS, among insulin-treated versus noninsulin-treated diabetic patients is not well established. METHODS: Using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry, we evaluated 1-year outcomes of insulin-treated (n = 817) and noninsulin-treated (n = 1,749) patients with diabetes who underwent PCI with DES versus BMS. RESULTS: The use of DES, compared with BMS, was associated with a lower risk for repeat revascularization for both noninsulin-treated patients (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45 to 0.76) and insulin-treated subjects (adjusted HR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.90). With respect to safety in the overall diabetic population, DES use was associated with a reduction of death or myocardial infarction (adjusted HR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96). However, this benefit was confined to the population of noninsulin-treated patients (adjusted HR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.81). Among insulin-treated patients, there was no difference in death or myocardial infarction risk between DES- and BMS-treated patients (adjusted HR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.39). CONCLUSIONS: Drug-eluting stents are associated with lower risk for repeat revascularization compared with BMS in treating coronary artery disease among patients with either insulin- or noninsulin-treated diabetes. In addition, DES use is not associated with any significant increased safety risk compared with BMS. These findings suggest that DES should be the preferred strategy for diabetic patients.