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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Lars Pedersen
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Lars Pedersen wrote the following 4 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Thirty-Year Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: A Danish Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study. 2017

Adelborg, Kasper / Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet / Schmidt, Morten / Munch, Troels / Pedersen, Lars / Nielsen, Per Hostrup / Bøtker, Hans Erik / Toft Sørensen, Henrik. ·From the Department of Clinical Epidemiology (K.A., E.H.-P., M.S., T.M., L.P., H.T.S.), Department of Cardiology (K.A., H.E.B.), and Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (P.H.N.), Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. kade@clin.au.dk. · From the Department of Clinical Epidemiology (K.A., E.H.-P., M.S., T.M., L.P., H.T.S.), Department of Cardiology (K.A., H.E.B.), and Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (P.H.N.), Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. ·Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes · Pubmed #28500223.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Data are sparse on long-term mortality after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. We examined short-term and long-term mortality of patients undergoing CABG surgery and a general population comparison cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: Linking data from Danish registries, we conducted a nationwide, population-based cohort study on 51 307 CABG patients and 513 070 individuals from the general population matched on age, sex, and calendar year (1980-2009). The mortality risk was higher in patients having isolated CABG surgery than in the general population, particularly during 0 to 30 days (3.2% versus 0.2%), 11 to 20 years (51.1% versus 35.6%), and 21 to 30 years (62.4% versus 44.8%), but not substantially higher during 31 to 364 days (2.9% versus 2.4%) or 1 to 10 years (30.7% versus 25.8%). The 30-day adjusted mortality rate ratio for isolated CABG surgery was 13.51 (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.59-14.49). Between 31 to 364 days and 1 to 10 years, the isolated CABG surgery cohort had a slightly higher mortality rate than the general population comparison cohort, adjusted mortality rate ratios of 1.15 (95% CI, 1.09-1.21) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.08-1.11), respectively. Between 11 to 20 years and 21 to 30 years, the adjusted mortality rate ratios were 1.62 (95% CI, 1.58-1.66) and 1.76 (95% CI, 1.62-1.91). Within 30 days, CABG patients had a 25-fold, a 26-fold, and a 18-fold higher risk of dying from myocardial infarction, heart failure, or stroke, respectively, than members of the general population comparison cohort. We found substantial heterogeneity in absolute mortality rates according to baseline risk groups. CONCLUSIONS: The isolated CABG cohort had a higher mortality rate than the general population comparison cohort, especially within 30 days of and 10 years after surgery.

2 Article Prognostic assessment of stable coronary artery disease as determined by coronary computed tomography angiography: a Danish multicentre cohort study. 2017

Nielsen, Lene H / Bøtker, Hans Erik / Sørensen, Henrik T / Schmidt, Morten / Pedersen, Lars / Sand, Niels Peter / Jensen, Jesper M / Steffensen, Flemming H / Tilsted, Hans Henrik / Bøttcher, Morten / Diederichsen, Axel / Lambrechtsen, Jess / Kristensen, Lone D / Øvrehus, Kristian A / Mickley, Hans / Munkholm, Henrik / Gøtzsche, Ole / Husain, Majed / Knudsen, Lars L / Nørgaard, Bjarne L. ·Department of Cardiology, Lillebaelt Hospital-Vejle, Kabbeltoft 25, DK-7100 Vejle, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital of South West Jutland, Esbjerg, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Regional Hospital Herning, Herning, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Svendborg Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Regional Hospital Silkeborg, Silkeborg, Denmark. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #27941018.

ABSTRACT: Aims: To examine the 3.5 year prognosis of stable coronary artery disease (CAD) as assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in real-world clinical practice, overall and within subgroups of patients according to age, sex, and comorbidity. Methods and results: This cohort study included 16,949 patients (median age 57 years; 57% women) with new-onset symptoms suggestive of CAD, who underwent CCTA between January 2008 and December 2012. The endpoint was a composite of late coronary revascularization procedure >90 days after CCTA, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death. The Kaplan-Meier estimator was used to compute 91 day to 3.5 year risk according to the CAD severity. Comparisons between patients with and without CAD were based on Cox-regression adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity, cardiovascular risk factors, concomitant cardiac medications, and post-CCTA treatment within 90 days. The composite endpoint occurred in 486 patients. Risk of the composite endpoint was 1.5% for patients without CAD, 6.8% for obstructive CAD, and 15% for three-vessel/left main disease. Compared with patients without CAD, higher relative risk of the composite endpoint was observed for non-obstructive CAD [hazard ratio (HR): 1.28; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01-1.63], obstructive one-vessel CAD (HR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.37-2.44), two-vessel CAD (HR: 2.97; 95% CI: 2.09-4.22), and three-vessel/left main CAD (HR: 4.41; 95% CI :2.90-6.69). The results were consistent in strata of age, sex, and comorbidity. Conclusion: Coronary artery disease determined by CCTA in real-world practice predicts the 3.5 year composite risk of late revascularization, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death across different groups of age, sex, or comorbidity burden.

3 Article Time-dependent effect of preinfarction angina pectoris and intermittent claudication on mortality following myocardial infarction: A Danish nationwide cohort study. 2015

Schmidt, Morten / Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet / Pedersen, Lars / Sørensen, Henrik Toft / Bøtker, Hans Erik. ·Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allé 43-45, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark; Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgårdsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. Electronic address: morten.schmidt@clin.au.dk. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allé 43-45, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgårdsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #25846654.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: As proxies for local and remote ischemic preconditioning, we examined whether preinfarction angina pectoris and intermittent claudication influenced mortality following myocardial infarction. METHODS: Using medical registries, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study of all first-time myocardial infarction patients in Denmark during 2004-2012 (n=70,458). We computed all-cause and coronary mortality rate ratios (MRRs). We categorized time between angina/claudication presentation and subsequent myocardial infarction as 0-14, 15-30, 31-90, and > 90 days. We adjusted for age, sex, coronary intervention, comorbidities, and medication use. RESULTS: Among all myocardial infarction patients, 18.4% had prior angina and 3.8% had prior intermittent claudication. Compared to patients without prior angina, the adjusted 30-day coronary MRR was 0.85 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.80-0.92) for stable and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.58-0.79) for unstable angina patients. The mortality reduction increased when angina presented close to myocardial infarction and was higher for unstable than for stable angina. Thus, the 30-day coronary MRR was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.51-1.02) for stable angina and 0.35 (95% CI: 0.17-0.73) for unstable angina presenting within 14 days before MI. The results were robust for all-cause mortality and in numerous subgroups, including women, diabetics, patients treated with PCI, and patients treated with and without cardioprotective drugs. Preinfarction intermittent claudication was associated with higher short- and long-term mortality compared to patients without intermittent claudication. CONCLUSIONS: Preinfarction angina reduced 30-day mortality, particularly when unstable angina closely preceded MI. Preinfarction intermittent claudication was associated with increased short- and long-term mortality.

4 Article Neither long-term statin use nor atherosclerotic disease is associated with risk of colorectal cancer. 2010

Robertson, Douglas J / Riis, Anders Hammerich / Friis, Søren / Pedersen, Lars / Baron, John A / Sørensen, Henrik Toft. ·VA Medical Center, White River Junction, Vermont 05009, USA. douglas.robertson@va.gov ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #20816860.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Statin use has been reported to reduce risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) whereas atherosclerotic disease has been reported to increase risk, but findings have been inconsistent. We aimed to establish the association of statin use and coronary atherosclerosis with CRC. METHODS: We performed a population-based case control study of patients with a first diagnosis of CRC cancer between January 1, 1991, and December 31, 2008 (n = 9979), using the Danish National Registry of Patients. As many as 10 population controls were matched to each patient using risk set sampling (n = 99,790). Statin use before cancer diagnosis (or control index date) was determined via county prescription databases and evidence of coronary atherosclerosis using International Classification of Diseases codes. We calculated incidence rate ratios using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for multiple covariates. RESULTS: Among patients with CRC, statin use was modest (7.7%), but 23.5% of use was long term (≥5 years). Ever use of statins (≥2 prescriptions) slightly reduced CRC risk, compared with relative to never/rare use (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.87, 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.96). However, long-term use did not affect risk compared with never/rare use (IRR = 0.95, 95% 0.80-1.12). No associations were observed between atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, or stroke, and CRC incidence. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a weak inverse association between ever use of statins and CRC incidence, there was no trend with increasing duration of use, so statins do not appear to reduce CRC risk. We did not confirm the reported association between atherosclerosis and CRC risk.