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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Tanveer S. Rab
Based on 9 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Tanveer Rab wrote the following 9 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline The Rationale for Performance of Coronary Angiography and Stenting Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: From the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Ramee, Stephen / Anwaruddin, Saif / Kumar, Gautam / Piana, Robert N / Babaliaros, Vasilis / Rab, Tanveer / Klein, Lloyd W / Anonymous11460889 / Anonymous11470889. ·Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: lloydklein@comcast.net. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27931592.

ABSTRACT: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective, nonsurgical treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The optimal treatment strategy for treating concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been tested prospectively in a randomized clinical trial. Nevertheless, it is standard practice in the United States to perform coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention for significant CAD at least 1 month before TAVR. All existing clinical trials were designed using this strategy. Therefore, it is wrong to extrapolate current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Appropriate Use Criteria against invasive procedures in asymptomatic patients to the TAVR population when evaluating the quality of care by cardiologists or hospitals. In this statement from the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the ACC, it is recommended that percutaneous coronary intervention should be considered in all patients with significant proximal coronary stenosis in major coronary arteries before TAVR, even though the indication is not covered in current guidelines.

2 Review Left Main Disease: What Is the Correct Approach to Revascularization? 2018

Rab, Tanveer / King, Spencer B. ·From the Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ·Cardiol Rev · Pubmed #29794807.

ABSTRACT: Percutaneous coronary intervention of the left main coronary artery has evolved through registries and meta analyses, supported by results from the EXCEL [Everolimus-Eluting Stents (EES) or Bypass Surgery for Left Main Coronary Artery Disease] and NOBLE (Percutaneous Coronary Angioplasty versus Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Treatment of Unprotected Left Main Stenosis) trials as an acceptable alternative to coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with low and intermediate Syntax scores. Advances in stenting strategies and the availability of larger diameter drug-eluting stents improve patient safety and optimize procedural and patient outcomes.

3 Review Role of Invasive Functional Assessment in Surgical Revascularization of Coronary Artery Disease. 2018

Baibhav, Bipul / Gedela, Maheedhar / Moulton, Michael / Pavlides, Gregory / Pompili, Vincent / Rab, Tanveer / Dangas, George / Bhatt, Deepak L / Siddique, Aleem / Chatzizisis, Yiannis S. ·Cardiovascular Division (B.B., G.P. V.P., Y.S.C.). · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. Sands Constellation Heart Institute, Rochester Regional Health, NY (B.B.). · Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls (M.G.). · Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery (M.M., A.S.). · Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (T.R.). · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (G.D.). · Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart and Vascular Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B.). · Cardiovascular Division (B.B., G.P. V.P., Y.S.C.) ychatzizisis@icloud.com. ·Circulation · Pubmed #29661951.

ABSTRACT: In patients with stable coronary artery disease, percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with improved outcomes if the lesion is deemed significant by invasive functional assessment using fractional flow reserve. Recent studies have shown that a revascularization strategy using instantaneous wave-free ratio is noninferior to fractional flow reserve in patients with intermediate-grade stenoses. The decision to perform coronary artery bypass grafting surgery is usually based on anatomic assessment of stenosis severity by coronary angiography. The data on the role of invasive functional assessment in guiding surgical revascularization are limited. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic and prognostic significance of invasive functional assessment in patients considered for coronary artery bypass grafting. In addition, we critically discuss ongoing and future clinical trials on the role of invasive functional assessment in surgical revascularization.

4 Review Current Interventions for the Left Main Bifurcation. 2017

Rab, Tanveer / Sheiban, Imad / Louvard, Yves / Sawaya, Fadi J / Zhang, Jun Jie / Chen, Shao Liang. ·Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: srab@emory.edu. · Division of Cardiology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Divsion of Cardiology, Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud, Massy, France. · Division of Cardiology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. · Division of Cardiology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28473107.

ABSTRACT: Contemporary clinical trials, registries, and meta-analyses, supported by recent results from the EXCEL (Everolimus-Eluting Stents or Bypass Surgery for Left Main Coronary Artery Disease) and NOBLE (Percutaneous Coronary Angioplasty Versus Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Treatment of Unprotected Left Main Stenosis) trials, have established percutaneous coronary intervention of left main coronary stenosis as a safe alternative to coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with low and intermediate SYNTAX (Synergy Between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Taxus and Cardiac Surgery) scores. As left main percutaneous coronary intervention gains acceptance, it is imperative to increase awareness for patient selection, risk scoring, intracoronary imaging, vessel preparation, and choice of stenting techniques that will optimize procedural and patient outcomes.

5 Review Contemporary Approach to Coronary Bifurcation Lesion Treatment. 2016

Sawaya, Fadi J / Lefèvre, Thierry / Chevalier, Bernard / Garot, Phillipe / Hovasse, Thomas / Morice, Marie-Claude / Rab, Tanveer / Louvard, Yves. ·Ramsay-Générale de Santé, Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud, Hôpital Privé Jacques Cartier, Massy and Hôpital Privé Claude Galien, Quincy, France. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Ramsay-Générale de Santé, Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud, Hôpital Privé Jacques Cartier, Massy and Hôpital Privé Claude Galien, Quincy, France. Electronic address: y.louvard@angio-icps.com. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27659563.

ABSTRACT: Coronary bifurcations are frequent and account for approximately 20% of all percutaneous coronary interventions. Nonetheless, they remain one of the most challenging lesion subsets in interventional cardiology in terms of a lower procedural success rate and increased rates of long-term adverse cardiac events. Provisional side branch stenting should be the default approach in the majority of cases and we propose easily applicable and reproducible stepwise techniques associated with low risk of failure and complications.

6 Review A Practical Approach to Mechanical Circulatory Support in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: An Interventional Perspective. 2016

Atkinson, Tamara M / Ohman, E Magnus / O'Neill, William W / Rab, Tanveer / Cigarroa, Joaquin E / Anonymous1150867. ·Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Division of Cardiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. Electronic address: cigarroa@ohsu.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27151604.

ABSTRACT: Percutaneous mechanical circulatory support has been used to stabilize patients in cardiogenic shock and provide hemodynamic support during high-risk percutaneous coronary interventions for several decades. The goal of this paper is to provide a practical approach to percutaneous mechanical circulatory support in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with cardiogenic shock and/or high risk features to aid in decision making for interventional cardiologists.

7 Article Double Kissing Crush Versus Provisional Stenting for Left Main Distal Bifurcation Lesions: DKCRUSH-V Randomized Trial. 2017

Chen, Shao-Liang / Zhang, Jue-Jie / Han, Yaling / Kan, Jing / Chen, Lianglong / Qiu, Chunguang / Jiang, Tiemin / Tao, Ling / Zeng, Hesong / Li, Li / Xia, Yong / Gao, Chuanyu / Santoso, Teguh / Paiboon, Chootopol / Wang, Yan / Kwan, Tak W / Ye, Fei / Tian, Nailiang / Liu, Zhizhong / Lin, Song / Lu, Chengzhi / Wen, Shangyu / Hong, Lang / Zhang, Qi / Sheiban, Imad / Xu, Yawei / Wang, Lefeng / Rab, Tanveer S / Li, Zhanquan / Cheng, Guanchang / Cui, Lianqun / Leon, Martin B / Stone, Gregg W. ·Division of Cardiology, Nanjing First Hospital and Key Laboratory of Targeted Intervention of Cardiovascular Disease, Collaboratory Innovation Center for Cardiovascular Disease Translational Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. Electronic address: chmengx@126.com. · Division of Cardiology, Nanjing First Hospital and Key Laboratory of Targeted Intervention of Cardiovascular Disease, Collaboratory Innovation Center for Cardiovascular Disease Translational Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. · Division of Cardiology, Shenyang Northern Hospital, Shenyang, China. · Division of Cardiology, United Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China. · Division of Cardiology, Zhengzhou University First Hospital, Zhengzhou, China. · Division of Cardiology, Armed Police Medical University, Tianjin, China. · Division of Cardiology, Xijin Hospital, 4th Military Medical University, Xi'an, China. · Division of Cardiology, Wuhan Tongji Hospital, United Medical University, Wuhan, China. · Division of Cardiology, Guangzhou Red Cross Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. · Division of Cardiology, Xuzhou Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Xuzhou, China. · Division of Cardiology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital, Zhengzhou, China. · Division of Cardiology, Medistra Hospital, University of Indonesia Medical School, Jakarda, Indonesia. · Division of Cardiology, Bankok General Hospital, Bankok, Thailand. · Division of Cardiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China. · Division of Cardiology, Beth Israel Hospital, New York, New York. · Division of Cardiology, Nanjing Heart Center, Nanjing, China. · Division of Cardiology, Tianjin 1(st) Central Hospital, Tianjin, China. · Division of Cardiology, Daqin Oil General Hospital, Daqin, China. · Division of Cardiology, Jiangxi Provincial People's Hospital, Nanchang, China. · Division of Cardiology, Shanghai East Hospital, Shanghai, China. · Division of Cardiology, Pederzoli Hospital-Peschiera del Garda, Verona, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Shanghai, China. · Division of Cardiology, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Beijing, China. · Division of Cardiology, Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · Division of Cardiology, Liaoning Provincial People's Hospital, Shenyang, China. · Division of Cardiology, Huaihe Hospital, Henan University, Kaifeng, China. · Division of Cardiology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, China. · Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. · Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. Electronic address: gs2184@columbia.edu. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #29096915.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Provisional stenting (PS) is the most common technique used to treat distal left main (LM) bifurcation lesions in patients with unprotected LM coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The double kissing (DK) crush planned 2-stent technique has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in non-LM bifurcations compared with PS, and in LM bifurcations compared with culotte stenting, but has never been compared with PS in LM bifurcation lesions. OBJECTIVES: The authors sought to determine whether a planned DK crush 2-stent technique is superior to PS for patients with true distal LM bifurcation lesions. METHODS: The authors randomized 482 patients from 26 centers in 5 countries with true distal LM bifurcation lesions (Medina 1,1,1 or 0,1,1) to PS (n = 242) or DK crush stenting (n = 240). The primary endpoint was the 1-year composite rate of target lesion failure (TLF): cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction, or clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Routine 13-month angiographic follow-up was scheduled after ascertainment of the primary endpoint. RESULTS: TLF within 1 year occurred in 26 patients (10.7%) assigned to PS, and in 12 patients (5.0%) assigned to DK crush (hazard ratio: 0.42; 95% confidence interval: 0.21 to 0.85; p = 0.02). Compared with PS, DK crush also resulted in lower rates of target vessel myocardial infarction I (2.9% vs. 0.4%; p = 0.03) and definite or probable stent thrombosis (3.3% vs. 0.4%; p = 0.02). Clinically driven target lesion revascularization (7.9% vs. 3.8%; p = 0.06) and angiographic restenosis within the LM complex (14.6% vs. 7.1%; p = 0.10) also tended to be less frequent with DK crush compared with PS. There was no significant difference in cardiac death between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: In the present multicenter randomized trial, percutaneous coronary intervention of true distal LM bifurcation lesions using a planned DK crush 2-stent strategy resulted in a lower rate of TLF at 1 year than a PS strategy. (Double Kissing and Double Crush Versus Provisional T Stenting Technique for the Treatment of Unprotected Distal Left Main True Bifurcation Lesions: A Randomized, International, Multi-Center Clinical Trial [DKCRUSH-V]; ChiCTR-TRC-11001213).

8 Article Stent fracture is associated with a higher mortality in patients with type-2 diabetes treated by implantation of a second-generation drug-eluting stent. 2017

Ge, Zhen / Liu, Zhi-Zhong / Kan, Jing / Zhang, Jun-Jie / Li, Sui-Ji / Tian, Nai-Liang / Ye, Fei / Qian, Xue-Song / Yang, Song / Chen, Meng-Xuan / Rab, Tanveer S / Chen, Shao-Liang. ·Division of Division of Cardiology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 68 Changle Road, 210006, Nanjing, China. · Division of Cardiology, Jintan People Hospital, Jintan, China. · Division of Cardiology, Zhangjiagang People Hospital, Jiangsu, China. · Division of Cardiology, Yixin People Hospital, Wuxi, China. · Emory College of Arts and Science, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Division of Division of Cardiology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 68 Changle Road, 210006, Nanjing, China. chmengx@126.com. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28631105.

ABSTRACT: Type 2 diabetes correlates with clinical events after the implantation of a second-generation drug-eluting stent (DES). The rate and prognostic value of stent fracture (SF) in patients with diabetes who underwent DES implantation remain unknown. A total of 1160 patients with- and 2251 without- diabetes, who underwent surveillance angiography at 1 year after DES implantation between June 2004 and August 2014, were prospectively studied. The primary endpoints included the incidence of SF and a composite major adverse cardiac event [MACE, including myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac death, and target-vessel revascularization (TVR)] at 1-year follow-up and at the end of follow-up for overall patients, and target lesion failure [TLF, including cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction (TVMI) and target lesion revascularization (TLR)] at the end of study for SF patients. In general, diabetes was associated with a higher rate of MACE at 1-year (18.4 vs. 12.9%) and end of follow-up (24.0 vs. 18.6%, all p < 0.001), compared with those in patients who did not have diabetes. The 1-year SF rate was comparable among patients with diabetes (n = 153, 13.2%) and non-diabetic patients (n = 273, 12.1%, p > 0.05). Diabetic patients with SF had a 2.6-fold increase of SF-related cardiac death at the end of study and threefold increase of re-repeat TLR when compared with non-diabetic patients with SF (5.9 vs. 2.2%, p = 0.040; 6.5 vs. 2.2%, p = 0.032), respectively. Given the fact that diabetes is correlated with increased MACE rate, SF in diabetic patients translates into differences in mortality and re-repeat TLR compared with the non-diabetic group.

9 Article Cutoff Value and Long-Term Prediction of Clinical Events by FFR Measured Immediately After Implantation of a Drug-Eluting Stent in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: 1- to 3-Year Results From the DKCRUSH VII Registry Study. 2017

Li, Sui-Ji / Ge, Zhen / Kan, Jing / Zhang, Jun-Jie / Ye, Fei / Kwan, Tak W / Santoso, Teguh / Yang, Song / Sheiban, Imad / Qian, Xue-Song / Tian, Nai-Liang / Rab, Tanveer S / Tao, Ling / Chen, Shao-Liang. ·Division of Cardiology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China; Division of Cardiology, Jintan People's Hospital, Jintan, China. · Division of Cardiology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. · Division of Cardiology, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital, New York, New York. · Division of Cardiology, Medistra Hospital, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Division of Cardiology, Yixin People's Hospital, Yixin, China. · Division of Cardiology, Turin University Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Zhangjiagang People's Hospital, ZhangjiaGang, China. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Division of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, 4th Military Medical University, Xi'an, China. · Division of Cardiology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. Electronic address: chmengx@126.com. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28456699.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the cutoff of post-drug-eluting stent (DES) fractional flow reserve (FFR) for prediction of 1- to 3-year target vessel failure (TVF). BACKGROUND: FFR immediately after a DES implantation correlates with clinical events. However, the cutoff of post-DES FFR for predicting long-term clinical events remains understudied. METHODS: Between May 2012 and September 2013, a total of 1,476 patients who had FFR <0.8 at maximal and at baseline underwent DES implantation were prospectively studied in 9 centers. Post-DES FFR was repeat measured. The primary endpoint was the 1-year TVF rate after procedures. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were used to calculate the post-DES FFR value for TVF, then patients were classified on the basis of this value and followed up for 3 years. RESULTS: By the end of the first year, 88 (6.0%) TVFs were recorded. A post-DES FFR ≤0.88 strongly correlated with TVF. Disease in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), stent length, and stent diameter were independent factors of impaired post-DES FFR, whereas post-procedure FFR ≤0.88 was the only predictor of TVF, with 40 (4.0%) TVFs in the FFR >0.88 and 48 (8.0%) in the FFR ≤0.88 group (p = 0.001), mainly driven by target vessel revascularization (3.8% vs. 8.8%; p = 0.005) and cardiac death (0.2% vs. 1.3%; p = 0.017). The difference in TVF between 2 groups was maintained through 3-year follow-up (p = 0.002). For patients with LAD lesions, a post-DES FFR ≤0.905 predicted 1-year TVF. CONCLUSIONS: Post-DES FFR strongly correlated with TVF rate. Mechanisms attributed to and treatments for impaired FFR after stenting should be studied in future studies. (Post-DES FFR Predicts the Clinical Outcomes: DK CRUSH-VII, A Prospective, Multicenter, Registry Study [DK CRUSH-VII]; ChiCTR-PRCH-12001976).