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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Johannes H. C. Reiber
Based on 52 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, J. H. Reiber wrote the following 52 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Editorial QCA editorial. 2011

Costa, Ricardo A / Reiber, Johan H C. · ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #21455674.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Introduction to QCA, IVUS and OCT in interventional cardiology. 2011

Reiber, Johan H C. · ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #21337024.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Technological development of cardiovascular computed tomography and the need for an unbiased scientific review of clinical utility. 2008

Schoenhagen, Paul / Reiber, Johan H C. · ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #18574874.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Review Biomechanical Modeling to Improve Coronary Artery Bifurcation Stenting: Expert Review Document on Techniques and Clinical Implementation. 2015

Antoniadis, Antonios P / Mortier, Peter / Kassab, Ghassan / Dubini, Gabriele / Foin, Nicolas / Murasato, Yoshinobu / Giannopoulos, Andreas A / Tu, Shengxian / Iwasaki, Kiyotaka / Hikichi, Yutaka / Migliavacca, Francesco / Chiastra, Claudio / Wentzel, Jolanda J / Gijsen, Frank / Reiber, Johan H C / Barlis, Peter / Serruys, Patrick W / Bhatt, Deepak L / Stankovic, Goran / Edelman, Elazer R / Giannoglou, George D / Louvard, Yves / Chatzizisis, Yiannis S. ·Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Cardiovascular Engineering and Atherosclerosis Laboratory, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece; Cardiovascular Department, Guy's and St Thomas' National Health Service Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. · FEops, Ghent, Belgium; IBiTech-bioMMeda, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. · California Medical Innovations Institute, San Diego, California. · Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics (LaBS), Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering "Giulio Natta," Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy. · National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Cardiology and Clinical Research Institute, Kyushu Medical Center, Fukuoka, Japan. · Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Cardiovascular Engineering and Atherosclerosis Laboratory, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Biomedical Instrument Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. · Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan. · Cardiovascular Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan. · Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics (LaBS), Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering "Giulio Natta," Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy; Biomechanics Laboratory, Thoraxcenter, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Biomechanics Laboratory, Thoraxcenter, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Melbourne Medical School and Melbourne School of Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia, and Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Cardiovascular Engineering and Atherosclerosis Laboratory, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud, Massy, France. · Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Cardiovascular Engineering and Atherosclerosis Laboratory, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece. Electronic address: ychatzizisis@icloud.com. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26315731.

ABSTRACT: Treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions remains an ongoing challenge for interventional cardiologists. Stenting of coronary bifurcations carries higher risk for in-stent restenosis, stent thrombosis, and recurrent clinical events. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding application and use of biomechanical modeling in the study of stent properties, local flow dynamics, and outcomes after percutaneous coronary interventions in bifurcation lesions. Biomechanical modeling of bifurcation stenting involves computational simulations and in vitro bench testing using subject-specific arterial geometries obtained from in vivo imaging. Biomechanical modeling has the potential to optimize stenting strategies and stent design, thereby reducing adverse outcomes. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish the translation of pre-clinical findings to the clinical arena.

5 Review Cardiac MR perfusion image processing techniques: a survey. 2012

Gupta, Vikas / Kirişli, Hortense A / Hendriks, Emile A / van der Geest, Rob J / van de Giessen, Martijn / Niessen, Wiro / Reiber, Johan H C / Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F. ·Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Med Image Anal · Pubmed #22297264.

ABSTRACT: First-pass cardiac MR perfusion (CMRP) imaging has undergone rapid technical advancements in recent years. Although the efficacy of CMRP imaging in the assessment of coronary artery diseases (CAD) has been proven, its clinical use is still limited. This limitation stems, in part, from manual interaction required to quantitatively analyze the large amount of data. This process is tedious, time-consuming, and prone to operator bias. Furthermore, acquisition and patient related image artifacts reduce the accuracy of quantitative perfusion assessment. With the advent of semi- and fully automatic image processing methods, not only the challenges posed by these artifacts have been overcome to a large extent, but a significant reduction has also been achieved in analysis time and operator bias. Despite an extensive literature on such image processing methods, to date, no survey has been performed to discuss this dynamic field. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the current state of the field with a categorical study, along with a future perspective on the clinical acceptance of image processing methods in the diagnosis of CAD.

6 Review Dedicated bifurcation analysis: basic principles. 2011

Tuinenburg, Joan C / Koning, Gerhard / Rareş, Andrei / Janssen, Johannes P / Lansky, Alexandra J / Reiber, Johan H C. ·Division of Image Processing, LKEB, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. J.C.Tuinenburg@lumc.nl ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #21327913.

ABSTRACT: Over the last several years significant interest has arisen in bifurcation stenting, in particular stimulated by the European Bifurcation Club. Traditional straight vessel analysis by QCA does not satisfy the requirements for such complex morphologies anymore. To come up with practical solutions, we have developed two models, a Y-shape and a T-shape model, suitable for bifurcation QCA analysis depending on the specific anatomy of the coronary bifurcation. The principles of these models are described in this paper, as well as the results of validation studies carried out on clinical materials. It can be concluded that the accuracy, precision and applicability of these new bifurcation analyses are conform the general guidelines that have been set many years ago for conventional QCA-analyses.

7 Clinical Trial Impact of the Everolimus-eluting Bioresorbable Scaffold in Coronary Atherosclerosis. 2016

Campos, Carlos M / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M / Muramatsu, Takashi / de Araujo Gonçalves, Pedro / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Dudek, Dariusz / Thuesen, Leif / Webster, Mark W I / Kitslaar, Pieter / Veldhof, Susan / Reiber, Johan H C / Nieman, Koen / Ormiston, John A / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Heart Institute (InCor), University of São Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Department of Interventional Cardiology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: hect2701@gmail.com. · Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Cardiology, Fujita Health University Hospital, Toyoake, Japan. · Cardiology Department, Hospital de Santa Cruz, CHLO, Lisbon, Portugal; Hospital da Luz, Cardiovascular Center, ESS, Lisbon, Portugal; CEDOC, Chronic Diseases Research Center, FCM-NOVA, Lisbon, Portugal. · Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. · Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. · Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. · Medis Medical Imaging Systems, B.V., Leiden, The Netherlands; Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Abbott Vascular, Diegem, Belgium. · Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Radiology, Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, NHLI, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. ·Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) · Pubmed #26739828.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold has been shown to decrease total plaque areas in the treated segment. However, it is unknown whether plaque size is modified in scaffolded segments only or whether the modification extends to other coronary segments. METHODS: Absorb Cohort A is a single-arm, prospective study, with safety and imaging endpoints, in which 30 patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with the first generation Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold. Noninvasive multislice computed tomography imaging was performed in 18 patients at 18 months and 5 years of follow-up. The present study was an intrapatient comparison of matched segments (normalized by the segment length) of the scaffolded region with nonintervened segments for lumen volume, vessel volume, plaque volume, plaque burden, and percent change in plaque atheroma volume. RESULTS: All 18 scaffolded segments could be analyzed. In the nonintervened segments, 1 of 72 segments had a motion artifact and was excluded. Serial comparison showed that the scaffolded segments showed no significant change in the mean plaque burden, total atheroma volume, total lumen volume, or vessel volume between 18 months and 5 years. Conversely, the untreated segments showed a significant increase in plaque burden (2.7 ± 6.5%; P < .01) and normalized plaque volumes (8.0 ± 22.8mm(3); P < .01). This resulted in a significant difference in plaque burden between scaffolded and nonintervened segments (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: In this small series, the Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold showed the potential to provide an additional benefit to pharmacological therapy in locally reducing progression of percent plaque burden. These findings need to be confirmed in larger studies.

8 Clinical Trial Detection of coronary plaques using MR coronary vessel wall imaging: validation of findings with intravascular ultrasound. 2013

Gerretsen, Suzanne / Kessels, Alfons G / Nelemans, Patty J / Dijkstra, Jouke / Reiber, Johan H C / van der Geest, Rob J / Katoh, Marcus / Waltenberger, Johannes / van Engelshoven, Jos M A / Botnar, Rene M / Kooi, M Eline / Leiner, Tim. ·Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229HX, Maastricht, The Netherlands. ·Eur Radiol · Pubmed #22782568.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Compared with X-ray coronary angiography (CAG), magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary vessel wall (MR-CVW) may provide more information about plaque burden and coronary remodelling. We compared MR-CVW with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), the standard of reference for coronary vessel wall imaging, with regard to plaque detection and wall thickness measurements. METHODS: In this study 17 patients with chest pain, who had been referred for CAG, were included. Patients underwent IVUS and MR-CVW imaging of the right coronary artery (RCA). Subsequently, the coronary vessel wall was analysed for the presence and location of coronary plaques. RESULTS: Fifty-two matching RCA regions of interest were available for comparison. There was good agreement between IVUS and MR-CVW for qualitative assessment of presence of disease, with a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 76%. Wall thickness measurements demonstrated a significant difference between mean wall thickness on IVUS and MR-CVW (0.48 vs 1.24 mm, P < 0.001), but great heterogeneity between wall thickness measurements, resulting in a low correlation between IVUS and MR-CVW. CONCLUSIONS: MR-CVW has high sensitivity for the detection of coronary vessel wall thickening in the RCA compared with IVUS. However, the use of MRI for accurate absolute wall thickness measurements is not supported when a longitudinal acquisition orientation is used.

9 Article In-stent fractional flow reserve variations and related optical coherence tomography findings: the FFR-OCT co-registration study. 2018

Pyxaras, Stylianos A / Adriaenssens, Tom / Barbato, Emanuele / Ughi, Giovanni Jacopo / Di Serafino, Luigi / De Vroey, Frederic / Toth, Gabor / Tu, Shengxian / Reiber, Johan H C / Bax, Jeroen J / Wijns, William. ·Cardiovascular Research Center Aalst, OLV Clinic, Aalst, Belgium. · I Medizinische Klinik, Landshut-Achdorf Hospital, Landshut, Germany. · Cardiovascular Diseases, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · University Heart Center Graz, Graz, Austria. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Cardiology, Heart & Lung Center, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Cardiovascular Research Center Aalst, OLV Clinic, Aalst, Belgium. william.wyns@nuigalway.ie. · The Lambe Institute for Translational Medicine and Curam, National University of Ireland, Galway, University Road, Galway, Ireland. william.wyns@nuigalway.ie. · Saolta University Healthcare Group, Galway, Ireland. william.wyns@nuigalway.ie. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #29080150.

ABSTRACT: We sought to assess in-stent variations in fractional flow reserve (FFR) in patients with previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and to associate any drop in FFR with findings by optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Suboptimal post-PCI FFR values were previously associated with poor outcomes. It is not known to which extent in-stent pressure loss contributes to reduced FFR. In this single-arm observational study, 26 patients who previously underwent PCI with drug-eluting stent or scaffold implantation were enrolled. Motorized FFR pullback during continuous intravenous adenosine infusion and OCT assessments was performed. Post-PCI FFR < 0.94 was defined as suboptimal. At a median of 63 days after PCI (interquartile range: 59-64 days), 18 out of 26 patients (72%) had suboptimal FFR. The in-stent drop in FFR was significantly higher in patients with suboptimal FFR vs. patients with optimal FFR (0.08 ± 0.07 vs. 0.01 ± 0.02, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that an in-stent FFR variation of > 0.03 was associated with suboptimal FFR. In patients with suboptimal FFR, the OCT analyses revealed higher mean neointimal area (respectively: 1.06 ± 0.80 vs. 0.51 ± 0.23 mm

10 Article Automatic identification of coronary tree anatomy in coronary computed tomography angiography. 2017

Cao, Qing / Broersen, Alexander / de Graaf, Michiel A / Kitslaar, Pieter H / Yang, Guanyu / Scholte, Arthur J / Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F / Reiber, Johan H C / Dijkstra, Jouke. ·Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, C2S, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, Albinusdreef 2, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Medis Medical Imaging Systems BV, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Laboratory of Image Science and Technology, Southeast University, Nanjing, China. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, C2S, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, Albinusdreef 2, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands. j.dijkstra@lumc.nl. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28647774.

ABSTRACT: An automatic coronary artery tree labeling algorithm is described to identify the anatomical segments of the extracted centerlines from coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) images. This method will facilitate the automatic lesion reporting and risk stratification of cardiovascular disease. Three-dimensional (3D) models for both right dominant (RD) and left dominant (LD) coronary circulations were built. All labels in the model were matched with their possible candidates in the extracted tree to find the optimal labeling result. In total, 83 CCTA datasets with 1149 segments were included in the testing of the algorithm. The results of the automatic labeling were compared with those by two experts. In all cases, the proximal parts of main branches including LM were labeled correctly. The automatic labeling algorithm was able to identify and assign labels to 89.2% RD and 83.6% LD coronary tree segments in comparison with the agreements of the two experts (97.6% RD, 87.6% LD). The average precision of start and end points of segments was 92.0% for RD and 90.7% for LD in comparison with the manual identification by two experts while average differences in experts is 1.0% in RD and 2.2% in LD cases. All cases got similar clinical risk scores as the two experts. The presented fully automatic labeling algorithm can identify and assign labels to the extracted coronary centerlines for both RD and LD circulations.

11 Article Accuracy and reproducibility of fast fractional flow reserve computation from invasive coronary angiography. 2017

van Rosendael, A R / Koning, G / Dimitriu-Leen, A C / Smit, J M / Montero-Cabezas, J M / van der Kley, F / Jukema, J W / Reiber, J H C / Bax, J J / Scholte, A J H A. ·Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Postal zone 2300 RC, 2333 ZA, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Medis Medical Imaging Systems B.V., Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Postal zone 2300 RC, 2333 ZA, Leiden, The Netherlands. a.j.h.a.scholte@lumc.nl. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28642995.

ABSTRACT: Fractional flow reserve (FFR) guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with favourable outcome compared with revascularization based on angiographic stenosis severity alone. The feasibility of the new image-based quantitative flow ratio (QFR) assessed from 3D quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count using three different flow models has been reported recently. The aim of the current study was to assess the accuracy, and in particular, the reproducibility of these three QFR techniques when compared with invasive FFR. QFR was derived (1) from adenosine induced hyperaemic coronary angiography images (adenosine-flow QFR [aQFR]), (2) from non-hyperemic images (contrast-flow QFR [cQFR]) and (3) using a fixed empiric hyperaemic flow [fixed-flow QFR (fQFR)]. The three QFR values were calculated in 17 patients who prospectively underwent invasive FFR measurement in 20 vessels. Two independent observers performed the QFR analyses. Mean difference, standard deviation and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) between invasive FFR and aQFR, cQFR and fQFR for observer 1 were: 0.01 ± 0.04 (95% LOA: -0.07; 0.10), 0.01 ± 0.05 (95% LOA: -0.08; 0.10), 0.01 ± 0.04 (95% LOA: -0.06; 0.08) and for observer 2: 0.00 ± 0.03 (95% LOA: -0.06; 0.07), -0.01 ± 0.03 (95% LOA: -0.07; 0.05), 0.00 ± 0.03 (95% LOA: -0.06; 0.05). Values between the 2 observers were (to assess reproducibility) for aQFR: 0.01 ± 0.04 (95% LOA: -0.07; 0.09), for cQFR: 0.02 ± 0.04 (95% LOA: -0.06; 0.09) and for fQFR: 0.01 ± 0.05 (95% LOA: -0.07; 0.10). In a small number of patients we showed good accuracy of three QFR techniques (aQFR, cQFR and fQFR) to predict invasive FFR. Furthermore, good inter-observer agreement of the QFR values was observed between two independent observers.

12 Article A novel four-dimensional angiographic approach to assess dynamic superficial wall stress of coronary arteries in vivo: initial experience in evaluating vessel sites with subsequent plaque rupture. 2017

Wu, Xinlei / von Birgelen, Clemens / Muramatsu, Takashi / Li, Yingguang / Holm, Niels Ramsing / Reiber, Johan H C / Tu, Shengxian. ·Med-X Research Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #28262624.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: Repetitive, fluctuating stress is an important biomechanical mechanism that underlies the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. We developed a novel coronary angiography-based method for in vivo four-dimensional analysis of dynamic superficial wall stress (SWS) in coronary plaques and applied it for the first time in two clinical cases. Our aim was to investigate the potential relationship between dynamic stress concentration at baseline and plaque rupture during acute coronary syndrome (ACS) several months later. METHODS AND RESULTS: Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions of the interrogated arteries were performed at several phases of the cardiac cycle, followed by finite element analysis to obtain the dynamic SWS data. The peak stress at baseline was found at the distal and proximal lesion longitudinal shoulders, being 121.8 kPa and 98.0 kPa, respectively. Intriguingly, in both cases, the sites with the highest SWS concentration at baseline co-registered with the location of plaque rupture during ACS, respectively six and 18 months after the baseline angiographic assessment. CONCLUSIONS: A novel angiography-based analysis method for four-dimensional evaluation of dynamic SWS was feasible for investigating plaque biomechanical behaviour in vivo. Initial experience suggests that this technique could be useful in exploring mechanisms of future plaque rupture.

13 Article Quantitative angiography methods for bifurcation lesions: a consensus statement update from the European Bifurcation Club. 2017

Collet, Carlos / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Cavalcante, Rafael / Grundeken, Maik / Généreux, Philippe / Popma, Jeffrey / Costa, Ricardo / Stankovic, Goran / Tu, Shengxian / Reiber, Johan H C / Aben, Jean-Paul / Lassen, Jens Flensted / Louvard, Yves / Lansky, Alexandra / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #28067200.

ABSTRACT: Bifurcation lesions represent one of the most challenging lesion subsets in interventional cardiology. The European Bifurcation Club (EBC) is an academic consortium whose goal has been to assess and recommend the appropriate strategies to manage bifurcation lesions. The quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) methods for the evaluation of bifurcation lesions have been subject to extensive research. Single-vessel QCA has been shown to be inaccurate for the assessment of bifurcation lesion dimensions. For this reason, dedicated bifurcation software has been developed and validated. These software packages apply the principles of fractal geometry to address the "step-down" in the bifurcation and to estimate vessel diameter accurately. This consensus update provides recommendations on the QCA analysis and reporting of bifurcation lesions based on the most recent scientific evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies and delineates future advances in the field of QCA dedicated bifurcation analysis.

14 Article Assessment of endothelial shear stress in patients with mild or intermediate coronary stenoses using coronary computed tomography angiography: comparison with invasive coronary angiography. 2017

Huang, Dexiao / Muramatsu, Takashi / Li, Yingguang / Yang, Wenjie / Nagahara, Yasuomi / Chu, Miao / Kitslaar, Pieter / Sarai, Masayoshi / Ozaki, Yukio / Chatzizisis, Yiannis S / Yan, Fuhua / Reiber, Johan H C / Wu, Renhua / Pu, Jun / Tu, Shengxian. ·Department of Medical Imaging, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Medical College of Shantou University, Shantou, 515041, Guangdong, People's Republic of China. · Department of Cardiology, Fujita Health University Hospital, Toyoake, Japan. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Biomedical Instrument Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. · Cardiovascular Biology and Biomechanics Laboratory, Cardiovascular Division, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA. · Department of Medical Imaging, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Medical College of Shantou University, Shantou, 515041, Guangdong, People's Republic of China. cjr.wurenhua@vip.163.com. · Department of Cardiology, Ren Ji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. pujun310@hotmail.com. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27796815.

ABSTRACT: Characterization of endothelial shear stress (ESS) may allow for prediction of the progression of atherosclerosis. The aim of this investigation was to develop a non-invasive approach for in vivo assessment of ESS by coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and to compare it with ESS derived from invasive coronary angiography (ICA). A total of 41 patients with mild or intermediate coronary stenoses who underwent both CTA and ICA were included in the analysis. Two geometrical models of the interrogated vessels were reconstructed separately from CTA and ICA images. Subsequently, computational fluid dynamics were applied to calculate the ESS, from which ESS

15 Article Anatomical and functional assessment of Tryton bifurcation stent before and after final kissing balloon dilatation: Evaluations by three-dimensional coronary angiography, optical coherence tomography imaging and fractional flow reserve. 2017

Pyxaras, Stylianos A / Toth, Gabor G / Di Gioia, Giuseppe / Ughi, Giovanni J / Tu, Shengxian / Rusinaru, Dan / Adriaenssens, Tom / Reiber, Johan H C / Leon, Martin B / Bax, Jeroen J / Wijns, William. ·Cardiovascular Research Center Aalst, OLV Clinic, Aalst, Belgium. · II. Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum Coburg, Coburg, Germany. · Department of Cardiology, University Heart Centre, Graz, Austria. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Columbia University Medical Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · Department of Cardiology, Heart & Lung Centrum, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · The Lambe Institute for Translational Medicine and Curam, National University of Ireland, Galway and Saolta University Healthcare Group, Galway, Ireland. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27567002.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To assess the anatomical and functional impact of final kissing balloon inflation (FKBI) after implantation of a dedicated bifurcation stent system. BACKGROUND: Current evidence suggests clinical benefit of FKBI in patients undergoing bifurcation dilatation using the Tryton side branch stent (Tryton-SBS). We hypothesized that FKBI improves anatomical reconstruction and functional results of bifurcation treated by Tryton-SBS. METHODS: An unselected group of patients with complex bifurcation coronary lesions undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with Tryton-SBS underwent paired anatomical assessment with two- and three-dimensional quantitative coronary analysis (2D- and 3D-QCA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT), including 3D reconstruction before and after FKBI. Functional assessment by fractional flow reserve (FFR) was performed in the main branch (MB) and side branch (SB) before and after FKBI. RESULTS: Paired pre- and post-FKBI data were obtained in 10 patients. By OCT imaging, FKBI increased both the SB ostial area (4.93 ± 2.81 vs. 7.43 ± 2.87 mm CONCLUSIONS: In patients with complex bifurcation stenosis undergoing PCI with a dedicated bifurcation system, FKBI is associated with improved anatomical and functional results at the SB level, without compromising the result at the MB. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

16 Article Prediction of atherosclerotic disease progression using LDL transport modelling: a serial computed tomographic coronary angiographic study. 2017

Sakellarios, Antonis / Bourantas, Christos V / Papadopoulou, Stella-Lida / Tsirka, Zeta / de Vries, Ton / Kitslaar, Pieter H / Girasis, Chrysafios / Naka, Katerina K / Fotiadis, Dimitrios I / Veldhof, Susan / Stone, Greg W / Reiber, Johan H C / Michalis, Lampros K / Serruys, Patrick W / de Feyter, Pim J / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M. ·Unit of Medical Technology and Intelligent Information Systems, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. · Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Cardiology, Barts Health NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Interventional Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, z120 Dr Molerwaterplein 40, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. · Abbott Vascular, Diegem, Belgium. · Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Interventional Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, z120 Dr Molerwaterplein 40, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands hect2701@gmail.com. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26985077.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To investigate the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) transport simulation in reconstructed arteries derived from computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) to predict coronary segments that are prone to progress. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-two patients admitted with an acute coronary event who underwent 64-slice CTCA after percutaneous coronary intervention and at 3-year follow-up were included in the analysis. The CTCA data were used to reconstruct the coronary anatomy of the untreated vessels at baseline and follow-up, and LDL transport simulation was performed in the baseline models. The computed endothelial shear stress (ESS), LDL concentration, and CTCA-derived plaque characteristics were used to identify predictors of substantial disease progression (defined as an increase in the plaque burden at follow-up higher than two standard deviations of the intra-observer variability of the expert who performed the analysis). Fifty-eight vessels were analysed. High LDL concentration [odds ratio (OR): 2.16; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.64-2.84; P = 0.0054], plaque burden (OR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.13-1.72; P = 0.0017), and plaque area (OR: 3.46; 95% CI: 2.20-5.44; P≤ 0.0001) were independent predictors of a substantial disease progression at follow-up. The ESS appears as a predictor of disease progression in univariate analysis but was not an independent predictor when the LDL concentration was entered into the multivariate model. The accuracy of the model that included the LDL concentration was higher than the accuracy of the model that included the ESS (65.1 vs. 62.5%). CONCLUSIONS: LDL transport modelling appears a better predictor of atherosclerotic disease progression than the ESS, and combined with the atheroma characteristics provided by CTCA is able to detect with a moderate accuracy segments that will exhibit a significant plaque burden increase at mid-term follow-up.

17 Article Total coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden assessment by CT angiography for detecting obstructive coronary artery disease associated with myocardial perfusion abnormalities. 2016

Kishi, Satoru / Magalhães, Tiago A / Cerci, Rodrigo J / Matheson, Matthew B / Vavere, Andrea / Tanami, Yutaka / Kitslaar, Pieter H / George, Richard T / Brinker, Jeffrey / Miller, Julie M / Clouse, Melvin E / Lemos, Pedro A / Niinuma, Hiroyuki / Reiber, Johan H C / Rochitte, Carlos E / Rybicki, Frank J / Di Carli, Marcelo F / Cox, Christopher / Lima, Joao A C / Arbab-Zadeh, Armin. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Catholic University of Paraná (PUC-PR), Brazil. · Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Radiology, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center / Medis Medical Imaging Systems, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. · Heart Institute (InCor), University of Sao Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. · Division of Cardiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the Department of Radiology, The University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, Canada. · Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: azadeh1@jhmi.edu. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #26817414.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Total atherosclerotic plaque burden assessment by CT angiography (CTA) is a promising tool for diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) but its validation is restricted to small clinical studies. We tested the feasibility of semi-automatically derived coronary atheroma burden assessment for identifying patients with hemodynamically significant CAD in a large cohort of patients with heterogenous characteristics. METHODS: This study focused on the CTA component of the CORE320 study population. A semi-automated contour detection algorithm quantified total coronary atheroma volume defined as the difference between vessel and lumen volume. Percent atheroma volume (PAV = [total atheroma volume/total vessel volume] × 100) was the primary metric for assessment (n = 374). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) determined the diagnostic accuracy for identifying patients with hemodynamically significant CAD defined as ≥50% stenosis by quantitative coronary angiography and associated myocardial perfusion abnormality by SPECT. RESULTS: Of 374 patients, 139 (37%) had hemodynamically significant CAD. The AUC for PAV was 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73-0.83) compared with 0.84 [0.79-0.88] by standard expert CTA interpretation (p = 0.02). Accuracy for both CTA (0.91 [0.87, 0.96]) and PAV (0.86 [0.81-0.91]) increased after excluding patients with history of CAD (p < 0.01 for both). Bland-Altman analysis revealed good agreement between two observers (bias of 280.2 mm(3) [161.8, 398.7]). CONCLUSIONS: A semi-automatically derived index of total coronary atheroma volume yields good accuracy for identifying patients with hemodynamically significant CAD, though marginally inferior to CTA expert reading. These results convey promise for rapid, reliable evaluation of clinically relevant CAD.

18 Article Enhanced characterization of calcified areas in intravascular ultrasound virtual histology images by quantification of the acoustic shadow: validation against computed tomography coronary angiography. 2016

Broersen, Alexander / de Graaf, Michiel A / Eggermont, Jeroen / Wolterbeek, Ron / Kitslaar, Pieter H / Dijkstra, Jouke / Bax, Jeroen J / Reiber, Johan H C / Scholte, Arthur J. ·Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. a.broersen@lumc.nl. · Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Postal zone 2300 RC, 2333 ZA, Leiden, The Netherlands. · The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Medis Medical Imaging Systems bv, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26667446.

ABSTRACT: We enhance intravascular ultrasound virtual histology (VH) tissue characterization by fully automatic quantification of the acoustic shadow behind calcified plaque. VH is unable to characterize atherosclerosis located behind calcifications. In this study, the quantified acoustic shadows are considered calcified to approximate the real dense calcium (DC) plaque volume. In total, 57 patients with 108 coronary lesions were included. A novel post-processing step is applied on the VH images to quantify the acoustic shadow and enhance the VH results. The VH and enhanced VH results are compared to quantitative computed tomography angiography (QTA) plaque characterization as reference standard. The correlation of the plaque types between enhanced VH and QTA differs significantly from the correlation with unenhanced VH. For DC, the correlation improved from 0.733 to 0.818. Instead of an underestimation of DC in VH with a bias of 8.5 mm(3), there was a smaller overestimation of 1.1 mm(3) in the enhanced VH. Although tissue characterization within the acoustic shadow in VH is difficult, the novel algorithm improved the DC tissue characterization. This algorithm contributes to accurate assessment of calcium on VH and could be applied in clinical studies.

19 Article The impact of image resolution on computation of fractional flow reserve: coronary computed tomography angiography versus 3-dimensional quantitative coronary angiography. 2016

Liu, Lili / Yang, Wenjie / Nagahara, Yasuomi / Li, Yingguang / Lamooki, Saeb R / Muramatsu, Takashi / Kitslaar, Pieter / Sarai, Masayoshi / Ozaki, Yukio / Barlis, Peter / Yan, Fuhua / Reiber, Johan H C / Tu, Shengxian. ·Biomedical Instrument Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Department of Cardiology, Fujita Health University Hospital, Toyoake, Japan. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Biomedical Instrument Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. sxtu@sjtu.edu.cn. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26507326.

ABSTRACT: Calculation of fractional flow reserve (FFR) based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) requires reconstruction of patient-specific coronary geometry and estimation of hyperemic flow rate. Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA) are two dominating imaging modalities used for the geometrical reconstruction. Our aim was to investigate the impact of image resolution as inherently associated with these two imaging modalities on geometrical reconstruction and subsequent FFR calculation. Patients with mild or intermediate coronary stenoses who underwent both CCTA and ICA were included. CCTA images were acquired either by 320-row area detector CT or by 128-slice dual-source CT. Two geometrical models were reconstructed separately from CCTA and ICA, from which FFRCTA and FFRQCA were subsequently calculated using CFD simulations, applying the same hyperemic flow rate derived from the ICA images at the inlet boundaries. A total of 57 vessels in 41 patients were analyzed. Average diameter stenosis was 43.4 ± 10.8 % by 3D QCA. Reasonably good correlation between FFRCTA and FFRQCA was observed (r = 0.71, p < 0.001). The difference between FFRCTA and FFRQCA was correlated with the deviation between minimal lumen areas by CCTA and by ICA (ρ = 0.34, p = 0.01), but not with plaque volume (ρ = -0.09, p = 0.51) or calcified plaque volume (ρ = 0.01, p = 0.95). Applying the cutoff value of ≤0.8 to both FFRCTA and FFRQCA, the agreement between FFRCTA and FFRQCA in discriminating functional significant stenoses was moderate (kappa 0.47, p < 0.001). Disagreement was found in 10 (17.5 %) vessels. Acceptable correlation between FFRCTA and FFRQCA was observed, while their agreement in distinguishing functional significant stenosis was moderate. Our results suggest that image resolution has a significant impact on FFR computation.

20 Article Accurate and reproducible reconstruction of coronary arteries and endothelial shear stress calculation using 3D OCT: comparative study to 3D IVUS and 3D QCA. 2015

Toutouzas, Konstantinos / Chatzizisis, Yiannis S / Riga, Maria / Giannopoulos, Andreas / Antoniadis, Antonios P / Tu, Shengxian / Fujino, Yusuke / Mitsouras, Dimitrios / Doulaverakis, Charalampos / Tsampoulatidis, Ioannis / Koutkias, Vassilis G / Bouki, Konstantina / Li, Yingguang / Chouvarda, Ioanna / Cheimariotis, Grigorios / Maglaveras, Nicos / Kompatsiaris, Ioannis / Nakamura, Sunao / Reiber, Johan H C / Rybicki, Frank / Karvounis, Haralambos / Stefanadis, Christodoulos / Tousoulis, Dimitris / Giannoglou, George D. ·First Department of Cardiology, Hippokration Hospital, Athens University Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; First Department of Cardiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece. Electronic address: ychatzizisis@icloud.com. · First Department of Cardiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; First Department of Cardiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; Biomedical Instrument Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Cardiology, New Tokyo Hospital, Chiba, Japan. · Applied Imaging Science Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Information Technologies Institute, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Laboratory of Medical Informatics, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece; Institute of Applied Biosciences, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Second Department of Cardiology, General Hospital of Nikaia, Piraeus, Greece. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Atherosclerosis · Pubmed #25932791.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Geometrically-correct 3D OCT is a new imaging modality with the potential to investigate the association of local hemodynamic microenvironment with OCT-derived high-risk features. We aimed to describe the methodology of 3D OCT and investigate the accuracy, inter- and intra-observer agreement of 3D OCT in reconstructing coronary arteries and calculating ESS, using 3D IVUS and 3D QCA as references. METHODS-RESULTS: 35 coronary artery segments derived from 30 patients were reconstructed in 3D space using 3D OCT. 3D OCT was validated against 3D IVUS and 3D QCA. The agreement in artery reconstruction among 3D OCT, 3D IVUS and 3D QCA was assessed in 3-mm-long subsegments using lumen morphometry and ESS parameters. The inter- and intra-observer agreement of 3D OCT, 3D IVUS and 3D QCA were assessed in a representative sample of 61 subsegments (n = 5 arteries). The data processing times for each reconstruction methodology were also calculated. There was a very high agreement between 3D OCT vs. 3D IVUS and 3D OCT vs. 3D QCA in terms of total reconstructed artery length and volume, as well as in terms of segmental morphometric and ESS metrics with mean differences close to zero and narrow limits of agreement (Bland-Altman analysis). 3D OCT exhibited excellent inter- and intra-observer agreement. The analysis time with 3D OCT was significantly lower compared to 3D IVUS. CONCLUSIONS: Geometrically-correct 3D OCT is a feasible, accurate and reproducible 3D reconstruction technique that can perform reliable ESS calculations in coronary arteries.

21 Article Non-culprit coronary lesions in young patients have higher rates of atherosclerotic progression. 2015

Li, Jiantao / Han, Yunfeng / Jing, Jing / Tu, Shengxian / Chen, Weiren / Reiber, Johan H C / Chen, Yundai. ·Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25749848.

ABSTRACT: The present study aimed to investigate whether non-culprit coronary lesions (NCCLs) in young patients (<45 years) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stents have higher rates of atherosclerotic progression than older patients. Eight hundred and forty-eight consecutive patients who underwent successful PCI with stents and second coronary angiography in a single center from January 7, 2008 to May 7, 2013 were enrolled. NCCL progression was assessed using three-dimensional quantitative coronary angiography and was defined as ≥ 10% diameter reduction of preexisting stenoses of ≥ 50%, ≥ 30% diameter reduction of <50% stenoses, development of a new stenosis of ≥ 30% in a previously normal segment, or progression to total occlusion. The mean time interval between two catheterization was 10.79 months; 136 (16.0%) patients exhibited progression of NCCLs. Multivariate Cox regression analysis (stepwise) showed young age to be an independent determinant of NCCL progression. Compared with the older patients(≥ 45 years), the crude hazard ratio (HR) for NCCL progression in the young patients(<45 years) was 2.17 (95% CI 1.42-3.30; P < 0.001); the association remained significant after adjustment for sex, ST elevation myocardial infarction, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum lipids, fasting blood glucose, smoking, drinking, hypertension, family history of coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, medication use and NCCL characteristics (adjusted HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.06-2.72; P = 0.029). NCCLs in young patients (<45 years) with coronary artery disease have high rates of atherosclerotic progression.

22 Article Co-registration of optical coherence tomography and X-ray angiography in percutaneous coronary intervention. the Does Optical Coherence Tomography Optimize Revascularization (DOCTOR) fusion study. 2015

Hebsgaard, Lasse / Nielsen, Troels Munck / Tu, Shengxian / Krusell, Lars Romer / Maeng, Michael / Veien, Karsten Tange / Raungaard, Bent / Terkelsen, Christian Juhl / Kaltoft, Anne / Reiber, Johan H C / Lassen, Jens Flensted / Christiansen, Evald Høj / Holm, Niels Ramsing. ·Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. Electronic address: niels.holm@ki.au.dk. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #25585362.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Intracoronary imaging provides accurate lesion delineation and precise measurements for sizing and positioning of coronary stents. During percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), it may be challenging to identify corresponding segments between intracoronary imaging and angiography. Computer based online co-registration may aid the target segment identification. METHODS: The DOCTOR fusion study was a prospective, single arm, observational study including patients admitted for elective PCI. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was acquired pre-stent implantation for sizing of stents. The operator subsequently indicated on the angiogram the target area as identified by OCT. Computer based co-registration was performed on-line immediately after pre-stent acquisition to assess feasibility. The cumulated numerical difference between operator based, and computer based co-registration was assessed as the "Operator Registration Error". The operator implanted the stent blind to the co-registrated angiogram. The difference between the co-registered stent border positions and the actual stent deployment border positions was the "Geographic Miss Distance". RESULTS: Twenty-two patients were included in the study. Two patients were excluded due to missing pre or post-OCT acquisitions. Online co-registration pre-stenting was successful in all analyzed cases. The mean "Operator Registration Error" was 5.4±3.5mm. The mean "Geographic Miss Distance" was 5.4±2.6mm. Without access to the computer-based co-registration, segments of the target lesion indicated on OCT were left uncovered by stent in 14 patients (70%). CONCLUSION: Computer based online co-registration of OCT and angiography is feasible. Frequent inaccuracies in operator based registration indicate that computer aided co-registration may reduce errors in corresponding OCT findings to the angiogram.

23 Article A novel method to assess coronary artery bifurcations by OCT: cut-plane analysis for side-branch ostial assessment from a main-vessel pullback. 2015

Karanasos, Antonios / Tu, Shengxian / van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S / Ligthart, Jurgen M R / Witberg, Karen / Van Mieghem, Nicolas / van Geuns, Robert-Jan / de Jaegere, Peter / Zijlstra, Felix / Reiber, Johan H C / Regar, Evelyn. ·Department of Interventional Cardiology, Thoraxcentre, BA-585, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Gravendijkwal 230, 3015 CE Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Image Processing, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Interventional Cardiology, Thoraxcentre, BA-585, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Gravendijkwal 230, 3015 CE Rotterdam, The Netherlands e.regar@erasmusmc.nl. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25227268.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: In coronary bifurcations assessment, evaluation of side-branch (SB) ostia by an optical coherence tomography (OCT) pullback performed in the main branch (MB) could speed up lesion evaluation and minimize contrast volume. Dedicated software that reconstructs the cross-sections perpendicular to the SB centreline could improve this assessment. We aimed to validate a new method for assessing the SB ostium from an OCT pullback performed in the MB. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-one sets of frequency-domain OCT pullbacks from 28 patients, both from the MB and the SB of a coronary artery bifurcation were analysed. Measurements of the SB ostium from the SB pullback were used as a reference. Measurements of the SB ostium from the MB pullback were then performed in a laboratory setting by (i) conventional analysis and (ii) cut-plane analysis, and the measurement error for each analysis was estimated. Correlations of SB ostium measurements acquired from the MB pullback in comparison with reference measurements acquired from the SB pullback were higher with cut-plane analysis compared with conventional analysis, albeit not reaching statistical significance (area: rcut-plane = 0.927 vs. rconventional = 0.870, P = 0.256; mean diameter: rcut-plane = 0.918 vs. rconventional = 0.788, P = 0.056; minimum diameter: rcut-plane = 0.841 vs. rconventional = 0.812, P = 0.734; maximum diameter: rcut-plane = 0.770 vs. rconventional = 0.635, P = 0.316). Cut-plane analysis was associated with lower absolute error than conventional analysis (area: 0.56 ± 0.45, vs. 1.50 ± 1.31 mm(2), P < 0.001; mean diameter: 0.18 ± 0.14 vs. 0.44 ± 0.30 mm, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Measurements of SB ostium performed in a laboratory setting by cut-plane analysis of an OCT pullback of the main branch have high correlation with reference measurements performed in a SB OCT pullback and lower error compared with conventional analysis.

24 Article Automatic detection and quantification of the Agatston coronary artery calcium score on contrast computed tomography angiography. 2015

Ahmed, Wehab / de Graaf, Michiel A / Broersen, Alexander / Kitslaar, Pieter H / Oost, Elco / Dijkstra, Jouke / Bax, Jeroen J / Reiber, Johan H C / Scholte, Arthur J. ·Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Postal zone 2300 RC, 2333 ZA, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25159031.

ABSTRACT: Potentially, Agatston coronary artery calcium (CAC) score could be calculated on contrast computed tomography coronary angiography (CTA). This will make a separate non-contrast CT scan superfluous. This study aims to assess the performance of a novel fully automatic algorithm to detect and quantify the Agatston CAC score in contrast CTA images. From a clinical registry, 20 patients were randomly selected for each CAC category (i.e. 0, 1-99, 100-399, 400-999, ≥1,000). The Agatston CAC score on non-contrast CT was calculated manually, while the novel algorithm was used to automatically detect and quantify Agatston CAC score in contrast CTA images. The resulting Agatston CAC scores were validated against the non-contrast images. A total of 100 patients (60 ± 11 years, 63 men) were included. The median CAC score on non-contrast CT was 145 (IQR 5-760), whereas the contrast CTA CAC score was 170 (IQR 23-594) (P = 0.004). The automatically computed CAC score showed a high correlation (R = 0.949; P < 0.001) and intra-class correlation (R = 0.863; P < 0.001) with non-contrast CT CAC score. Moreover, agreement within CAC categories was good (κ 0.588). Fully automatic detection of Agatston CAC score on contrast CTA is feasible and showed high correlation with non-contrast CT CAC score. This could imply a radiation dose reduction and time saving by omitting the non-contrast scan.

25 Article Temporal evolution of strut light intensity after implantation of bioresorbable polymeric intracoronary scaffolds in the ABSORB cohort B trial-an application of a new quantitative method based on optical coherence tomography. 2014

Nakatani, Shimpei / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Ishibashi, Yuki / Eggermont, Jeroen / Zhang, Yao-Jun / Campos, Carlos M / Cho, Yun Kyeong / Liu, Shengnan / Dijkstra, Jouke / Reiber, Johan H C / Perkins, Laura / Sheehy, Alexander / Veldhof, Susan / Rapoza, Richard / van Es, Gerrit-Anne / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M / van Geuns, Robert-Jan / Serruys, Patrick W / Anonymous5890797. ·Thoraxcenter, Department of Cardiology, Erasmus MC. ·Circ J · Pubmed #24942012.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Quantitative light intensity analysis of the strut core by optical coherence tomography (OCT) may enable assessment of changes in the light reflectivity of the bioresorbable polymeric scaffold from polymer to provisional matrix and connective tissues, with full disappearance and integration of the scaffold into the vessel wall. The aim of this report was to describe the methodology and to apply it to serial human OCT images post procedure and at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months in the ABSORB cohort B trial. METHODS AND RESULTS: In serial frequency-domain OCT pullbacks, corresponding struts at different time points were identified by 3-dimensional foldout view. The peak and median values of light intensity were measured in the strut core by dedicated software. A total of 303 corresponding struts were serially analyzed at 3 time points. In the sequential analysis, peak light intensity increased gradually in the first 24 months after implantation and reached a plateau (relative difference with respect to baseline [%Dif]: 61.4% at 12 months, 115.0% at 24 months, 110.7% at 36 months), while the median intensity kept increasing at 36 months (%Dif: 14.3% at 12 months, 75.0% at 24 months, 93.1% at 36 months). CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative light intensity analysis by OCT was capable of detecting subtle changes in the bioresorbable strut appearance over time, and could be used to monitor the bioresorption and integration process of polylactide struts.

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