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  Site Guide ··   
Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Dr. Leslee Shaw
Based on 178 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, L. J. Shaw wrote the following 178 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8
1 Guideline Coronary computed tomographic imaging in women: An expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2018

Truong, Quynh A / Rinehart, Sarah / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Berman, Daniel S / Bullock-Palmer, Renee / Carrascosa, Patricia / Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M / Dey, Damini / Ferencik, Maros / Fuechtner, Gudrun / Hecht, Harvey / Jacobs, Jill E / Lee, Sang-Eun / Leipsic, Jonathan / Lin, Fay / Meave, Aloha / Pugliese, Francesca / Sierra-Galán, Lilia M / Williams, Michelle C / Villines, Todd C / Shaw, Leslee J / Anonymous3891033. ·Weill Cornell Medicine, USA. Electronic address: qat9001@med.cornell.edu. · Piedmont Healthcare, USA. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, USA. · University of Erlangan, Germany. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA. · Deborah Heart and Lung Center, USA. · Maipu Diagnosis, Argentina. · William Beaumont Hospital, USA. · Oregon Health & Science University, USA. · Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. · Mount Sinai Health System, USA. · NYU Langone Medical Center, USA. · Severance Hospital, South Korea. · Providence Healthcare, Canada. · Weill Cornell Medicine, USA. · Ignacio Chavez National Institute for Cardiology, Mexico. · William Harvey Research Institute, UK. · American British Cowdray Medical Center, Mexico. · British Heart Foundation, UK. · Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences F Edward Hebert School of Medicine, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #30392926.

ABSTRACT: This expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) provides an evidence synthesis on the use of computed tomography (CT) imaging for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease in women. From large patient and population cohorts of asymptomatic women, detection of any coronary artery calcium that identifies females with a 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk of >7.5% may more effectively triage women who may benefit from pharmacologic therapy. In addition to accurate detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), CT angiography (CTA) identifies nonobstructive atherosclerotic plaque extent and composition which is otherwise not detected by alternative stress testing modalities. Moreover, CTA has superior risk stratification when compared to stress testing in symptomatic women with stable chest pain (or equivalent) symptoms. For the evaluation of symptomatic women both in the emergency department and the outpatient setting, there is abundant evidence from large observational registries and multi-center randomized trials, that CT imaging is an effective procedure. Although radiation doses are far less for CT when compared to nuclear imaging, radiation dose reduction strategies should be applied in all women undergoing CT imaging. Effective and appropriate use of CT imaging can provide the means for improved detection of at-risk women and thereby focus preventive management resulting in long-term risk reduction and improved clinical outcomes.

2 Guideline CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). 2018

Hecht, Harvey S / Blaha, Michael J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Cury, Ricardo C / Budoff, Matt / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: harvey.hecht@mountsinai.org. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Division of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176, United States. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, United States. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29793848.

ABSTRACT: The goal of CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of CAC scanning on all noncontrast CT scans, irrespective of the indication, in order to facilitate clinical decision-making, with recommendations for subsequent patient management. The CAC-DRS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the total calcium score and the number of involved arteries. General recommendations are provided for further management of patients with different degrees of calcified plaque burden based on CAC-DRS classification. In addition, CAC-DRS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit quality assurance and tracking patient outcomes with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

3 Guideline Clinical indications for coronary artery calcium scoring in asymptomatic patients: Expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2017

Hecht, Harvey / Blaha, Michael J / Berman, Daniel S / Nasir, Khurram / Budoff, Matthew / Leipsic, Jonathon / Blankstein, Ron / Narula, Jagat / Rumberger, John / Shaw, Leslee J. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: hhecht@aol.com. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, FL, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division) and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · The Princeton Longevity Center, Princeton, NJ, USA. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28283309.

ABSTRACT: This expert consensus statement summarizes the available data regarding the prognostic value of CAC in the asymptomatic population and its ability to refine individual risk prediction, addresses the limitations identified in the current traditional risk factor-based treatment strategies recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines including use of the Pooled Cohort Equations (PCE), and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Recommendation Statement for Statin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults. It provides CAC based treatment recommendations both within the context of the shared decision making model espoused by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines and independent of these guidelines.

4 Guideline Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS): An Expert Consensus Document of SCCT, ACR and NASCI: Endorsed by the ACC. 2016

Cury, Ricardo C / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Agatston, Arthur / Berman, Daniel S / Budoff, Matthew J / Dill, Karin E / Jacobs, Jill E / Maroules, Christopher D / Rubin, Geoffrey D / Rybicki, Frank J / Schoepf, U Joseph / Shaw, Leslee J / Stillman, Arthur E / White, Charles S / Woodard, Pamela K / Leipsic, Jonathon A. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27609151.

ABSTRACT: The intent of CAD-RADS - Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) in order to facilitate decision-making regarding further patient management. The suggested CAD-RADS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the highest-grade coronary artery lesion documented by coronary CTA. It ranges from CAD-RADS 0 (Zero) for the complete absence of stenosis and plaque to CAD-RADS 5 for the presence of at least one totally occluded coronary artery and should always be interpreted in conjunction with the impression found in the report. Specific recommendations are provided for further management of patients with stable or acute chest pain based on the CAD-RADS classification. The main goal of CAD-RADS is to standardize reporting of coronary CTA results and to facilitate communication of test results to referring physicians along with suggestions for subsequent patient management. In addition, CAD-RADS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit education, research, peer-review and quality assurance with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

5 Guideline CAD-RADS(TM) Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Cury, Ricardo C / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Agatston, Arthur / Berman, Daniel S / Budoff, Matthew J / Dill, Karin E / Jacobs, Jill E / Maroules, Christopher D / Rubin, Geoffrey D / Rybicki, Frank J / Schoepf, U Joseph / Shaw, Leslee J / Stillman, Arthur E / White, Charles S / Woodard, Pamela K / Leipsic, Jonathon A. ·Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL, 33176, United States. Electronic address: rcury@baptisthealth.net. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen-Nürnberg, Department of Cardiology, Ulmenweg 18, 90154, Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: Stephan.Achenbach@uk-erlangen.de. · Baptist Health Medical Grp, 1691 Michigan Avenue, Miami, FL, 33139, United States. Electronic address: ArthurSAg@baptisthealth.net. · Cedars-Sinai Med Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Taper Building, Rm 1258, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, United States. Electronic address: bermand@cshs.org. · 1124 W. Carson Street, Torrance, CA, 90502, United States. Electronic address: mbudoff@labiomed.org. · 5841 South Maryland Ave, MC2026, Chicago, IL, 60637, United States. Electronic address: kdill@radiology.bsd.uchicago.edu. · 550 First Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, United States. Electronic address: jill.jacobs@nyumc.org. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: christopher.maroules@gmail.com. · 2400 Pratt Street, Room 8020, DCRI Box 17969, Durham, NC, 27715, United States. Electronic address: grubin@duke.edu. · The Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON, CA K1H 8L6, Canada. Electronic address: frybicki@toh.on.ca. · 25 Courtenay Dr., Charleston, SC, 29425, United States. Electronic address: schoepf@musc.edu. · 1256 Briarcliff Rd. NE, Rm 529, Atlanta, GA, 30324, United States. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. · 1364 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, United States. Electronic address: aestill@emory.edu. · University of Maryland, 22 S. Greene St., Baltimore, MD, 21201, United States. Electronic address: cwhite@umm.edu. · Mallinckrodt Instit of Radiology, 510 S Kingshighway Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63110, United States. Electronic address: woodardp@mir.wustl.edu. · Department of Radiology|St. Paul's Hospital, 2nd Floor, Providence Building, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, United States. Electronic address: jleipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27318587.

ABSTRACT: The intent of CAD-RADS - Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) in order to facilitate decision-making regarding further patient management. The suggested CAD-RADS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the highest-grade coronary artery lesion documented by coronary CTA. It ranges from CAD-RADS 0 (Zero) for the complete absence of stenosis and plaque to CAD-RADS 5 for the presence of at least one totally occluded coronary artery and should always be interpreted in conjunction with the impression found in the report. Specific recommendations are provided for further management of patients with stable or acute chest pain based on the CAD-RADS classification. The main goal of CAD-RADS is to standardize reporting of coronary CTA results and to facilitate communication of test results to referring physicians along with suggestions for subsequent patient management. In addition, CAD-RADS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit education, research, peer-review and quality assurance with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

6 Guideline ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. 2014

Wolk, Michael J / Bailey, Steven R / Doherty, John U / Douglas, Pamela S / Hendel, Robert C / Kramer, Christopher M / Min, James K / Patel, Manesh R / Rosenbaum, Lisa / Shaw, Leslee J / Stainback, Raymond F / Allen, Joseph M / Anonymous3380779. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #24355759.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG). Testing for the evaluation of new or worsening symptoms following a prior test or procedure was found to be Appropriate. In addition, testing was found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate for patients within 90 days of an abnormal or uncertain prior result. Pre-operative testing was rated Appropriate or May Be Appropriate only for patients who had poor functional capacity and were undergoing vascular or intermediate risk surgery with 1 or more clinical risk factors or an organ transplant. The exercise ECG was suggested as an Appropriate test for cardiac rehabilitation clearance or for exercise prescription purposes. Testing in asymptomatic patients was generally found to be Rarely Appropriate, except for calcium scoring and exercise testing in intermediate and high-risk individuals and either stress or anatomic imaging in higher-risk individuals, which were all rated as May Be Appropriate. All modalities of follow-up testing after a prior test or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 2 years and within 5 years after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in the absence of new symptoms were rated Rarely Appropriate. Pre-operative testing for patients with good functional capacity, prior normal testing within 1 year, or prior to low-risk surgery also were found to be Rarely Appropriate. Imaging for an exercise prescription or prior to the initiation of cardiac rehabilitation was Rarely Appropriate except for cardiac rehabilitation clearance for heart failure patients.

7 Guideline ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions American Association for Thoracic Surgery American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Heart Failure Society of America Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Society of Thoracic Surgeons. 2012

Patel, Manesh R / Bailey, Steven R / Bonow, Robert O / Chambers, Charles E / Chan, Paul S / Dehmer, Gregory J / Kirtane, Ajay J / Wann, L Samuel / Ward, R Parker / Douglas, Pamela S / Patel, Manesh R / Bailey, Steven R / Altus, Philip / Barnard, Denise D / Blankenship, James C / Casey, Donald E / Dean, Larry S / Fazel, Reza / Gilchrist, Ian C / Kavinsky, Clifford J / Lakoski, Susan G / Le, D Elizabeth / Lesser, John R / Levine, Glenn N / Mehran, Roxana / Russo, Andrea M / Sorrentino, Matthew J / Williams, Mathew R / Wong, John B / Wolk, Michael J / Bailey, Steven R / Douglas, Pamela S / Hendel, Robert C / Kramer, Christopher M / Min, James K / Patel, Manesh R / Shaw, Leslee / Stainback, Raymond F / Allen, Joseph M. ·Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Representative. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #22678595.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

8 Guideline ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2012

Anonymous780721 / Patel, Manesh R / Dehmer, Gregory J / Hirshfeld, John W / Smith, Peter K / Spertus, John A / Anonymous790721 / Masoudi, Frederick A / Dehmer, Gregory J / Patel, Manesh R / Smith, Peter K / Chambers, Charles E / Ferguson, T Bruce / Garcia, Mario J / Grover, Frederick L / Holmes, David R / Klein, Lloyd W / Limacher, Marian C / Mack, Michael J / Malenka, David J / Park, Myung H / Ragosta, Michael / Ritchie, James L / Rose, Geoffrey A / Rosenberg, Alan B / Russo, Andrea M / Shemin, Richard J / Weintraub, William S / Anonymous800721 / Wolk, Michael J / Bailey, Steven R / Douglas, Pamela S / Hendel, Robert C / Kramer, Christopher M / Min, James K / Patel, Manesh R / Shaw, Leslee / Stainback, Raymond F / Allen, Joseph M / Anonymous810721 / Anonymous820721 / Anonymous830721 / Anonymous840721 / Anonymous850721 / Anonymous860721 / Anonymous870721 / Anonymous880721. · ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #22424518.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD). Additionally, percutaneous coronary intervention may have a role in revascularization of patients with high burden of CAD. The primary objective of the appropriate use criteria is to improve physician decision making and patient education regarding expected benefits from revascularization and to guide future research.

9 Guideline The role of radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging for asymptomatic individuals. 2011

Hendel, Robert C / Abbott, Brian G / Bateman, Timothy M / Blankstein, Ron / Calnon, Dennis A / Leppo, Jeffrey A / Maddahi, Jamshid / Schumaecker, Matthew M / Shaw, Leslee J / Ward, R Parker / Wolinsky, David G / Anonymous2920682. ·University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #21181519.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Coronary artery calcium screening: current status and recommendations from the European Society of Cardiac Radiology and North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging. 2008

Oudkerk, Matthijs / Stillman, Arthur E / Halliburton, Sandra S / Kalender, Willi A / Möhlenkamp, Stefan / McCollough, Cynthia H / Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn / Shaw, Leslee J / Stanford, William / Taylor, Allen J / van Ooijen, Peter M A / Wexler, Lewis / Raggi, Paolo / Anonymous2010604 / Anonymous2020604. ·Department of Radiology, Groningen University Hospital, Hanzeplein 1, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands. ·Eur Radiol · Pubmed #18651153.

ABSTRACT: Current guidelines and literature on screening for coronary artery calcium for cardiac risk assessment are reviewed for both general and special populations. It is shown that for both general and special populations a zero score excludes most clinically relevant coronary artery disease. The importance of standardization of coronary artery calcium measurements by multidetector CT is discussed.

11 Editorial Coronary Plaque Volume and Stenosis: Important Determinants of Myocardial Ischemia. 2018

Blankstein, Ron / Shaw, Leslee J / Di Carli, Marcelo F. ·Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division) and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: rblankstein@bwh.harvard.edu. · Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division) and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #29406856.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Net Health Benefit: Positive for CAC Scanning. 2017

Shaw, Leslee J / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota/VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: shekh003@umn.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28797421.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Can Stress CMR Impact Care in the Era After COURAGE and FAME-2? 2017

Kwong, Raymond Y / Shaw, Leslee J / Nagel, Eike. ·Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: rykwong@bwh.harvard.edu. · Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Institute for Experimental and Translational Cardiovascular Imaging, DZHK Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28473099.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial SCCT and CTA - The future is now. 2017

Shaw, Leslee J. ·Room 529, 1462 Clifton Road NE, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28420591.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography - The evidence dominates! 2017

Shaw, Leslee J / Villines, Todd / Blankstein, Ron / Abbara, Suhny / Weigold, Guy / Slim, Ahmad / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. · Walter Reed Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. · MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington DC, United States. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States. · The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28017553.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Risk Detection Among Asymptomatic Patients With Diabetes: Is It Time for a Varied Approach? 2016

Shaw, Leslee J / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27832904.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Coronary Artery Calcium and Shared Decision Making. 2016

Hecht, Harvey S / Shaw, Leslee J / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Minnesota & VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27151526.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Imaging Atherosclerosis for Global Predictive Health and Wellness. 2016

Awad, Mosaab / Eshtehardi, Parham / Shaw, Leslee J. ·Emory University Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Emory University Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26970998.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial The benefits of advanced risk reclassification. 2016

Eshtehardi, Parham / Isiadinso, Ijeoma / Shaw, Leslee J. ·Division of Cardiology, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute (ECCRI), Emory University School of Medicine, 1462 Clifton Rd NE, Room 529, Atlanta, GA, 30324, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute (ECCRI), Emory University School of Medicine, 1462 Clifton Rd NE, Room 529, Atlanta, GA, 30324, USA. lshaw3@emory.edu. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #26396024.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Arterial Calcification in Cardiovascular Risk Prediction: Should We Shift the Target for Screening Beyond the Coronaries? 2015

Xie, Joe X / Shaw, Leslee J. ·From the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. · From the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Lshaw3@emory.edu. ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26659367.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial The never-ending story on coronary calcium: is it predictive, punitive, or protective? 2015

Shaw, Leslee J / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Division of Cardiology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Division of Cardiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: jnarula@acc.org. · University of Minnesota/Division of Cardiology, VA Medical Center Cardiology, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #25835439.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial The exercise test is alive and well when coupled with coronary calcium scoring. 2015

Shaw, Leslee J. ·Department of Cardiology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25677887.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Anatomy vs physiology: is that the question? 2014

Shaw, Leslee J. ·ECCRI, Emory University School of Medicine, 1529 Clifton Rd NE, Rm 529, Atlanta, GA, USA, lshaw3@emory.edu. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #24469847.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Anatomy trumps all! 2013

Shaw, Leslee / Achenbach, Stephan / Narula, Jagat. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #23764103.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Progression of coronary calcium scores: harder gets the evidence. 2012

Shaw, Leslee J / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #22498338.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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