Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Renu Virmani
Based on 108 articles published since 2010
(Why 108 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, R. Virmani wrote the following 108 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Editorial Vulnerable Plaques, Vulnerable Patients, and Intravascular Imaging. 2018

Stone, Gregg W / Mintz, Gary S / Virmani, Renu. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; The Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. Electronic address: gs2184@columbia.edu. · The Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York. · CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, Maryland. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #30336825.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Pathologic intimal thickening: Are we any closer to understand early transitional plaques that lead to symptomatic disease? 2018

Sakamoto, Atsushi / Torii, Sho / Jinnouchi, Hiroyuki / Finn, Aloke V / Virmani, Renu / Kolodgie, Frank D. ·CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, 20878, MD, USA. · CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, 20878, MD, USA; University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, 20878, MD, USA. Electronic address: rvirmani@cvpath.org. ·Atherosclerosis · Pubmed #29801687.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Myocardial Bridge and the Progression of Atherosclerotic Plaque in the Proximal Segment. 2018

Torii, Sho / Virmani, Renu / Finn, Aloke. ·From the CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD. · From the CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD. rvirmani@cvpath.org. ·Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol · Pubmed #29793989.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial The Stress of Plaque Prognostication. 2018

Virmani, Renu / Torii, Sho / Mori, Hiroyoshi / Finn, Aloke V. ·CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland. Electronic address: rvirmani@cvpath.org. · CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland. · CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland; University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28917692.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial The Mystery of Spotty Calcification: Can We Solve It by Optical Coherence Tomography? 2016

Yahagi, Kazuyuki / Joner, Michael / Virmani, Renu. ·From CVPath Institute Inc, Gaithersburg, MD. · From CVPath Institute Inc, Gaithersburg, MD. rvirmani@cvpath.org. ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26743464.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Embolic Myocardial Infarction as a Consequence of Atrial Fibrillation: A Prevailing Disease of the Future. 2015

Kolodgie, Frank D / Virmani, Renu / Finn, Aloke V / Romero, Maria E. ·From CVPath Institute Inc, Gaithersburg, MD (F.D.K., R.V., M.E.R.) · and Department of Medicine, Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, GA (A.V.F.). ·Circulation · Pubmed #26216083.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Should CMR Become the New Darling of Noninvasive Imaging for the Monitoring of Progression and Regression of Coronary Heart Disease? 2015

Yahagi, Kazuyuki / Joner, Michael / Virmani, Renu. ·CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland. · CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland. Electronic address: rvirmani@cvpath.org. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #26184619.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Does neointimal characterization following DES implantation predict long-term outcomes? 2014

Sakakura, Kenichi / Joner, Michael / Virmani, Renu. ·CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland. · CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland. Electronic address: rvirmani@cvpath.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25124010.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Glagov's phenomenon: has our understanding of vascular remodeling changed? 2014

Joner, Michael / Virmani, Renu. ·CVPath Institute Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA. ·Coron Artery Dis · Pubmed #24492456.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Are our tools for the identification of TCFA ready and do we know them? 2011

Virmani, Renu. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #21679901.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial New morphological insights on coronary plaque rupture: bridging the gap from anatomy to clinical presentation? 2011

Alfonso, Fernando / Virmani, Renu. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #21251633.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Drug-eluting coronary stents: insights from preclinical and pathology studies. 2020

Torii, Sho / Jinnouchi, Hiroyuki / Sakamoto, Atsushi / Kutyna, Matthew / Cornelissen, Anne / Kuntz, Salome / Guo, Liang / Mori, Hiroyoshi / Harari, Emanuel / Paek, Ka Hyun / Fernandez, Raquel / Chahal, Diljon / Romero, Maria E / Kolodgie, Frank D / Gupta, Anuj / Virmani, Renu / Finn, Aloke V. ·CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. · School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA. · CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. afinn@cvpath.org. · School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA. afinn@cvpath.org. ·Nat Rev Cardiol · Pubmed #31346257.

ABSTRACT: Implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) is the dominant treatment strategy for patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. However, the first-generation DES had substantial drawbacks, including delayed healing, local hypersensitivity reactions and neoatherosclerosis, which all led to a steady increase in major adverse cardiovascular events over time. Subsequently, newer-generation DES were introduced with thinner struts, different scaffold designs (to improve deliverability while maintaining radial strength), different durable and biodegradable polymers - and in some cases no polymer (to improve vascular biocompatibility) - and new antiproliferative drug types and doses. Currently, >30 different DES are commercially available in Europe, with fewer available in the USA but with many new entrants coming onto the US market in the next few years. Never before have cardiologists been faced with so many choices of stent, each with its own unique design. In this Review, we detail preclinical and pathology studies for each stent design, examining thromboresistance, speed of neointimal coverage and completeness of healing, including endothelialization. We conclude by discussing how these design characteristics might affect the potential for shortening the minimum duration of dual antiplatelet therapy needed after coronary intervention.

13 Review Coronary artery calcification: recent developments in our understanding of its pathologic and clinical significance. 2018

Sakamoto, Atsushi / Virmani, Renu / Finn, Aloke V. ·CVPath institute, Gaithersburg. ·Curr Opin Cardiol · Pubmed #30307412.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Prior investigations have shown the close association between coronary artery calcification (CAC) and total atherosclerotic plaque burden as well as the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. However, recent pathologic and imaging-based studies suggested that massive dense calcifications are usually associated with stable plaque; whereas, micro calcifications, especially in the thin fibrous cap, are related to vulnerable characteristics. Further, the molecular mechanisms for initiation/progression of vascular calcification are highly complex and still need to be elucidated. In this manuscript, we discuss recent advancement in our understanding of CAC from the basic, pathologic, and clinical perspectives. RECENT FINDINGS: Research on the relationship between genetic polymorphisms and CAC has been growing and may potentially lead to future precision-based medicine. In basic research field, more attention has been focused on the relationship between inflammation and vascular calcification. Large-scale imaging based studies support the association between statin and calcification progression, maybe one of the ways by which statins prevent cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, the mechanism responsible for this effect is still not fully understood. Optical coherence tomography has improved resolution to detect CAC over traditional CT and may be especially promising for the detection of calcified nodules. SUMMARY: A better understanding of CAC in all of its forms will advance our understanding of its natural history of atherosclerosis. More work is needed to understand the basic molecular mechanisms responsible for the initiation/progression of CAC, which may eventually lead to the development of effective treatments for atherosclerosis.

14 Review Algorithmic Approach for Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Stent Implantation During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. 2018

Shlofmitz, Evan / Shlofmitz, Richard A / Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi / Rahim, Hussein M / Virmani, Renu / Hill, Jonathan M / Matsumura, Mitsuaki / Mintz, Gary S / Maehara, Akiko / Landmesser, Ulf / Stone, Gregg W / Ali, Ziad A. ·Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Cardiology, St. Francis Hospital, 100 Port Washington Boulevard, Suite 105, Roslyn, NY 11576, USA; Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway 9th Floor, New York, NY 10019, USA. · Department of Cardiology, St. Francis Hospital, 100 Port Washington Boulevard, Suite 105, Roslyn, NY 11576, USA. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. · CVPath Institute, 19 Firstfield Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA. · London Bridge Hospital, 2nd Floor, St Olaf House, London SE1 2PR, UK; Department of Cardiology, King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, SE5 9RS, UK. · Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway 9th Floor, New York, NY 10019, USA. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA; Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway 9th Floor, New York, NY 10019, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, Berlin 12200, Germany. · Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Cardiology, St. Francis Hospital, 100 Port Washington Boulevard, Suite 105, Roslyn, NY 11576, USA; Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway 9th Floor, New York, NY 10019, USA. Electronic address: zaa2112@columbia.edu. ·Interv Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #29983145.

ABSTRACT: Intravascular imaging plays a key role in optimizing outcomes for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) utilizes a user-friendly interface and provides high-resolution images. OCT can be used as part of daily practice in all stages of a coronary intervention: baseline lesion assessment, stent selection, and stent optimization. Incorporating a standardized, algorithmic approach when using OCT allows for precision PCI.

15 Review Coronary Artery Calcification and its Progression: What Does it Really Mean? 2018

Mori, Hiroyoshi / Torii, Sho / Kutyna, Matthew / Sakamoto, Atsushi / Finn, Aloke V / Virmani, Renu. ·Cardiovascular Pathology Institute, Gaithersburg, Maryland. · Cardiovascular Pathology Institute, Gaithersburg, Maryland; University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: afinn@cvpath.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #29301708.

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery calcification is concomitant with the development of advanced atherosclerosis. Coronary artery calcification pathologically begins as microcalcifications (0.5 to 15.0 μm) and grows into larger calcium fragments, which eventually result in sheet-like deposits (>3 mm). This evolution is observed to occur concurrently with the progression of plaque. These fragments and sheets of calcification can be easily identified by radiography as well as by computed tomography and intravascular imaging. Many imaging modalities have proposed spotty calcification to be a predictor of unstable plaque and have suggested more extensive calcification to be associated with stable plaques and perhaps the use of statin therapy. We will review the pathology of coronary calcification in humans with a focus on risk factors, relationship with plaque progression, correlation with plaque (in)stability, and effect of pharmacologic interventions.

16 Review Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: implication of very late scaffold thrombosis. 2017

Mori, Hiroyoshi / Virmani, Renu / Finn, Aloke V. ·aCVPath Institute, Gaithersburg bUniversity of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Coron Artery Dis · Pubmed #28692483.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review Bioresorbable Scaffold: The Emerging Reality and Future Directions. 2017

Sotomi, Yohei / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Collet, Carlos / Tenekecioglu, Erhan / Virmani, Renu / Kleiman, Neal S / Serruys, Patrick W. ·From the Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Y.S., C.C.) · ThoraxCenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Y.O., E.T.) · Cardialysis, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Y.O.) · CVPath, Institute Inc, Gaithersburg, MD (R.V.) · Department of Cardiology (NSK), Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Texas (N.S.K.) · and NHLI, Imperial College London, United Kingdom (P.W.S.). ·Circ Res · Pubmed #28408454.

ABSTRACT: In the era of drug-eluting stents, large-scale randomized trials and all-comer registries have shown excellent clinical results. However, even the latest-generation drug-eluting stent has not managed to address all the limitations of permanent metallic coronary stents, such as the risks of target lesion revascularization, neoatherosclerosis, preclusion of late lumen enlargement, and the lack of reactive vasomotion. Furthermore, the risk of very late stent, although substantially reduced with newer-generation drug-eluting stent, still remains. These problems were anticipated to be solved with the advent of fully biodegradable devices. Fully bioresorbable coronary scaffolds have been designed to function transiently to prevent acute recoil, but have retained the capability to inhibit neointimal proliferation by eluting immunosuppressive drugs. Nevertheless, long-term follow-up data of the leading bioresorbable scaffold (Absorb) are becoming available and have raised a concern about the relatively higher incidence of scaffold thrombosis. To reduce the rate of clinical events, improvements in the device, as well as implantation procedure, are being evaluated. This review will focus on the current CE-mark approved bioresorbable scaffolds, their basic characteristics, and clinical results. In addition, we summarize the current limitations of bioresorbable scaffold and their possible solutions.

18 Review Pathology of Human Coronary and Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis and Vascular Calcification in Diabetes Mellitus. 2017

Yahagi, Kazuyuki / Kolodgie, Frank D / Lutter, Christoph / Mori, Hiroyoshi / Romero, Maria E / Finn, Aloke V / Virmani, Renu. ·From the CVPath Institute, Inc, Gaithersburg, MD (K.Y., F.D.K., C.L., H.M., M.E.R., A.V.F., R.V.) · and University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore (A.V.F.). ·Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol · Pubmed #27908890.

ABSTRACT: The continuing increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the general population is predicted to result in a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-associated progression of atherosclerosis are not fully understood, at clinical and pathological levels, there is an appreciation of increased disease burden and higher levels of arterial calcification in these subjects. Plaques within the coronary arteries of patients with diabetes mellitus generally exhibit larger necrotic cores and significantly greater inflammation consisting mainly of macrophages and T lymphocytes relative to patients without diabetes mellitus. Moreover, there is a higher incidence of healed plaque ruptures and positive remodeling in hearts from subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus, suggesting a more active atherogenic process. Lesion calcification in the coronary, carotid, and other arterial beds is also more extensive. Although the role of coronary artery calcification in identifying cardiovascular disease and predicting its outcome is undeniable, our understanding of how key hormonal and physiological alterations associated with diabetes mellitus such as insulin resistance and hyperglycemia influence the process of vascular calcification continues to grow. Important drivers of atherosclerotic calcification in diabetes mellitus include oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, alterations in mineral metabolism, increased inflammatory cytokine production, and release of osteoprogenitor cells from the marrow into the circulation. Our review will focus on the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus- and type 2 diabetes mellitus-associated vascular disease with particular focus on coronary and carotid atherosclerotic calcification.

19 Review Acute coronary syndromes without coronary plaque rupture. 2016

Kanwar, Siddak S / Stone, Gregg W / Singh, Mandeep / Virmani, Renu / Olin, Jeffrey / Akasaka, Takashi / Narula, Jagat. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1190 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10029, USA. · Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 161 Washington Avenue, New York, New York 10032, USA. · Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · CVPath Institute, 19 Firstfield Road, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878, USA. · Wakayama Medical University, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama, Wakayama Prefecture 641-8509, Japan. ·Nat Rev Cardiol · Pubmed #26911330.

ABSTRACT: The latest advances in plaque imaging have provided clinicians with opportunities to treat acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and provide individualized treatment recommendations based not only on clinical manifestations, angiographic characteristics, and biomarker data, but also on the findings of plaque morphology. Although a substantial proportion of ACS events originate from plaques with an intact fibrous cap (IFC), clinicians predominantly equate ACS with plaque rupture arising from thin-cap fibroatheromas. In this Review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of plaque morphology in ACS with IFC, reviewing contemporary data from intravascular imaging. We also explore whether use of such imaging might provide a roadmap for more effective management of patients with ACS.

20 Review Pathophysiology of native coronary, vein graft, and in-stent atherosclerosis. 2016

Yahagi, Kazuyuki / Kolodgie, Frank D / Otsuka, Fumiyuki / Finn, Aloke V / Davis, Harry R / Joner, Michael / Virmani, Renu. ·CVPath Institute, Inc., 19 Firstfield Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA. · Department of Medicine, Emory University Hospital, 550 Peachtree Street, Nebraska, Atlanta, GA 30308, USA. ·Nat Rev Cardiol · Pubmed #26503410.

ABSTRACT: Plaque rupture, usually of a precursor lesion known as a 'vulnerable plaque' or 'thin-cap fibroatheroma', is the leading cause of thrombosis. Less-frequent aetiologies of coronary thrombosis are erosion, observed with greatest incidence in women aged <50 years, and eruptive calcified nodules, which are occasionally identified in older individuals. Various treatments for patients with coronary artery disease, such as CABG surgery and interventional therapies, have led to accelerated atherosclerosis. These processes occur within months to years, compared with the decades that it generally takes for native disease to develop. Morphological identifiers of accelerated atherosclerosis include macrophage-derived foam cells, intraplaque haemorrhage, and thin fibrous cap. Foam-cell infiltration can be observed within 1 year of a saphenous vein graft implantation, with subsequent necrotic core formation and rupture ensuing after 7 years in over one-third of patients. Neoatherosclerosis occurs early and with greater prevalence in drug-eluting stents than in bare-metal stents and, although rare, complications of late stent thrombosis from rupture are associated with high mortality. Comparison of lesion progression in native atherosclerotic disease, atherosclerosis in saphenous vein grafts, and in-stent neoatherosclerosis provides insight into the pathogenesis of atheroma formation in natural and iatrogenic settings.

21 Review Neoatherosclerosis From a Pathologist's Point of View. 2015

Romero, Maria E / Yahagi, Kazuyuki / Kolodgie, Frank D / Virmani, Renu. ·From the CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD. · From the CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD. rvirmani@cvpath.org. ·Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol · Pubmed #26399921.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Review Neoatherosclerosis: overview of histopathologic findings and implications for intravascular imaging assessment. 2015

Otsuka, Fumiyuki / Byrne, Robert A / Yahagi, Kazuyuki / Mori, Hiroyoshi / Ladich, Elena / Fowler, David R / Kutys, Robert / Xhepa, Erion / Kastrati, Adnan / Virmani, Renu / Joner, Michael. ·CVPath Institute, Inc., 19 Firstfield Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA. · Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universitat München, Munich, Germany. · Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Baltimore, MD, USA. · CVPath Institute, Inc., 19 Firstfield Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA mjoner@cvpath.org michaeljoner@me.com. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #25994755.

ABSTRACT: Despite the reduction in late thrombotic events with newer-generation drug-eluting stents (DES), late stent failure remains a concern following stent placement. In-stent neoatherosclerosis has emerged as an important contributing factor to late vascular complications including very late stent thrombosis and late in-stent restenosis. Histologically, neoatherosclerosis is characterized by accumulation of lipid-laden foamy macrophages within the neointima with or without necrotic core formation and/or calcification. The development of neoatherosclerosis may occur in months to years following stent placement, whereas atherosclerosis in native coronary arteries develops over decades. Pathologic and clinical imaging studies have demonstrated that neoatherosclerosis occurs more frequently and at an earlier time point in DES when compared with bare metal stents, and increases with time in both types of implant. Early development of neoatherosclerosis has been identified not only in first-generation DES but also in second-generation DES. The mechanisms underlying the rapid development of neoatherosclerosis remain unknown; however, either absence or abnormal endothelial functional integrity following stent implantation may contribute to this process. In-stent plaque rupture likely accounts for most thrombotic events associated with neoatherosclerosis, while it may also be a substrate of in-stent restenosis as thrombosis may occur either symptomatically or asymptomatically. Intravascular optical coherence tomography is capable of detecting neoatherosclerosis; however, the shortcomings of this modality must be recognized. Future studies should assess the impact of iterations in stent technology and risk factor modification on disease progression. Similarly, refinements in imaging techniques are also warranted that will permit more reliable detection of neoatherosclerosis.

23 Review Impact of local flow haemodynamics on atherosclerosis in coronary artery bifurcations. 2015

Antoniadis, Antonios P / Giannopoulos, Andreas A / Wentzel, Jolanda J / Joner, Michael / Giannoglou, George D / Virmani, Renu / Chatzizisis, Yiannis S. ·Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #25983161.

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery bifurcations are susceptible to atherosclerosis as a result of the unique local flow patterns and the subsequent endothelial shear stress (ESS) environment that are conducive to the development of plaques. Along the lateral walls of the main vessel and side branches, a distinct flow pattern is observed with local low and oscillatory ESS, while high ESS develops at the flow divider (carina). Histopathologic studies have shown that the distribution of plaque at bifurcation regions is related to the local ESS patterns. The local ESS profile also influences the outcome of percutaneous coronary interventions in bifurcation lesions. A variety of invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities have enabled 3D reconstruction of coronary bifurcations and thereby detailed local ESS assessment by computational fluid dynamics. Highly effective strategies for treatment and ultimately prevention of atherosclerosis in coronary bifurcations are anticipated with the use of advanced imaging and computational fluid dynamic techniques.

24 Review Pathological aspects of bioresorbable stent implantation. 2015

Sanchez, Oscar D / Yahagi, Kazuyuki / Byrne, Robert A / Mori, Hiroyoshi / Zarpak, Roya / Wittchow, Eric / Foin, Nicolas / Virmani, Renu / Joner, Michael. ·CVPath Institute, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, USA. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #25983157.

ABSTRACT: The treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease has been revolutionised by the advent of drug-eluting stent therapy. However, concerns remain about complications late after stent implantation including late stent thrombosis, hypersensitivity reactions and neoatherosclerosis. In this respect, the introduction of fully bioresorbable stents (BRS)--which resorb over time and leave the arterial wall free of any metal constraints--represents a potentially important disruptive technology. However, although the concept is intuitively attractive, a thorough understanding of the histopathological changes seen after BRS implantation and an appreciation of comparative changes versus existing metal stent technologies are vital to guide BRS clinical usage. In this respect, translational investigation of polymer chemistry, biomedical engineering, as well as in vitro and in vivo testing in animal models is an important undertaking. This article will review the pathological aspects of BRS implantation with a focus on acute and chronic vascular reactions derived from preclinical animal studies, including insights from in vivo imaging. Finally, potential future directions of this novel therapeutic approach will be discussed.

25 Review Patient selection for elective revascularization to reduce myocardial infarction and mortality: new lessons from randomized trials, coronary physiology, and statistics. 2015

Gould, K Lance / Johnson, Nils P / Kaul, Sanjay / Kirkeeide, Richard L / Mintz, Gary S / Rentrop, K Peter / Sdringola, Stefano / Virmani, Renu / Narula, Jagat. ·From the Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Weatherhead PET Center for Preventing and Reversing Atherosclerosis, University of Texas Medical School at Houston and Memorial Hermann Hospital (K.L.G., N.P.J., R.L.K., S.S.) · Division of Cardiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (S.K.) · Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY (G.S.M.) · Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, New York Presbyterian Hospital, The University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell, New York (K.P.R.) · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, NY Langone Medical Center, New York (K.P.R.) · Gramercy Cardiac Diagnostic Services, New York, NY (K.P.R.) · CVPath Institute Inc, Gaithersburg, MD (R.V.) · and Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (J.N.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25977304.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

Next