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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Thomas A. Zelniker
Based on 2 articles published since 2009
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Thomas A. Zelniker wrote the following 2 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Edoxaban in atrial fibrillation patients with established coronary artery disease: Insights from ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48. 2019

Zelniker, Thomas A / Ruff, Christian T / Wiviott, Stephen D / Blanc, Jean-Jacques / Cappato, Riccardo / Nordio, Francesco / Mercuri, Michele F / Lanz, Hans / Antman, Elliott M / Braunwald, Eugene / Giugliano, Robert P. ·1 TIMI Study Group, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. · 2 CHU de Brest Hôpital de la Cavale Blanche, Brest Cedex, France. · 3 Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Research Center, IRCCS Humanitas Research Center, Milan, Italy. · 4 Daiichi Sankyo Pharma Development, Basking Ridge, USA. · 5 Daiichi Sankyo Europe GmbH, München, Germany. ·Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovasc Care · Pubmed #30039978.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND:: The relative efficacy and safety profile of the oral Factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and established coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been analyzed. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: In the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 trial, two edoxaban regimens were compared with warfarin in 21,105 patients with atrial fibrillation and CHADS RESULTS:: The 4510 patients (21.4%) with known CAD were older, more likely male, on aspirin, with lower creatinine clearance and higher CHADS CONCLUSION:: The reduction in ischemic events with the higher-dose edoxaban regimen versus warfarin was greater in patients with CAD, while bleeding was significantly reduced with edoxaban regardless of CAD status. The efficacy and safety profile of the lower-dose edoxaban regimen relative to warfarin was unaffected by CAD status.

2 Article Early aspirin use and the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. 2017

Kim, Miae / Bergmark, Brian A / Zelniker, Thomas A / Mehra, Mandeep R / Stewart, Garrick C / Page, Deborah S / Woodcome, Erica L / Smallwood, Jennifer A / Gabardi, Steven / Givertz, Michael M. ·Center for Advanced Heart Disease, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · TIMI Study Group, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Center for Advanced Heart Disease, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: mgivertz@bwh.harvard.edu. ·J Heart Lung Transplant · Pubmed #28781013.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Little is known about the influence of aspirin on clinical expression of CAV. METHODS: We followed 120 patients with OHT at a single center for a median of 7 years and categorized them by the presence or absence of early aspirin therapy post-transplant (aspirin treatment ≥6 months in the first year). The association between aspirin use and time to the primary end-point of angiographic moderate or severe CAV (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade ≥2) was investigated. Propensity scores for aspirin treatment were estimated using boosting models and applied by inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). RESULTS: Despite a preponderance of risk factors for CAV among patients receiving aspirin (male sex, ischemic heart disease as the etiology of heart failure, and smoking), aspirin therapy was associated with a lower rate of moderate or severe CAV at 5 years. Event-free survival was 95.9% for patients exposed to aspirin compared with 79.6% for patients without aspirin exposure (log-rank p = 0.005). IPTW-weighted Cox regression revealed a powerful inverse association between aspirin use and moderate to severe CAV (adjusted hazard ratio 0.13; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.59), which was directionally consistent for CAV of any severity (adjusted hazard ratio 0.50; 95% confidence interval 0.23-1.08). CONCLUSIONS: This propensity score-based comparative observational analysis suggests that early aspirin exposure may be associated with a reduced risk of development of moderate to severe CAV. These findings warrant prospective validation in controlled investigations.