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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles by Geertruida H. de Bock
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, G. H. de Bock wrote the following 3 articles about Coronary Artery Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative and quantitative stress CMR perfusion analysis: a meta-analysis. 2017

van Dijk, R / van Assen, M / Vliegenthart, R / de Bock, G H / van der Harst, P / Oudkerk, M. ·Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1 EB 45, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Center for Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1 EB 45, Groningen, The Netherlands. m.oudkerk@umcg.nl. ·J Cardiovasc Magn Reson · Pubmed #29178905.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) perfusion imaging is a promising modality for the evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) due to high spatial resolution and absence of radiation. Semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of CMR perfusion are based on signal-intensity curves produced during the first-pass of gadolinium contrast. Multiple semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters have been introduced. Diagnostic performance of these parameters varies extensively among studies and standardized protocols are lacking. This study aims to determine the diagnostic accuracy of semi- quantitative and quantitative CMR perfusion parameters, compared to multiple reference standards. METHOD: Pubmed, WebOfScience, and Embase were systematically searched using predefined criteria (3272 articles). A check for duplicates was performed (1967 articles). Eligibility and relevance of the articles was determined by two reviewers using pre-defined criteria. The primary data extraction was performed independently by two researchers with the use of a predefined template. Differences in extracted data were resolved by discussion between the two researchers. The quality of the included studies was assessed using the 'Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies Tool' (QUADAS-2). True positives, false positives, true negatives, and false negatives were subtracted/calculated from the articles. The principal summary measures used to assess diagnostic accuracy were sensitivity, specificity, andarea under the receiver operating curve (AUC). Data was pooled according to analysis territory, reference standard and perfusion parameter. RESULTS: Twenty-two articles were eligible based on the predefined study eligibility criteria. The pooled diagnostic accuracy for segment-, territory- and patient-based analyses showed good diagnostic performance with sensitivity of 0.88, 0.82, and 0.83, specificity of 0.72, 0.83, and 0.76 and AUC of 0.90, 0.84, and 0.87, respectively. In per territory analysis our results show similar diagnostic accuracy comparing anatomical (AUC 0.86(0.83-0.89)) and functional reference standards (AUC 0.88(0.84-0.90)). Only the per territory analysis sensitivity did not show significant heterogeneity. None of the groups showed signs of publication bias. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical value of semi-quantitative and quantitative CMR perfusion analysis remains uncertain due to extensive inter-study heterogeneity and large differences in CMR perfusion acquisition protocols, reference standards, and methods of assessment of myocardial perfusion parameters. For wide spread implementation, standardization of CMR perfusion techniques is essential. TRIAL REGISTRATION: CRD42016040176 .

2 Review Validation and prognosis of coronary artery calcium scoring in nontriggered thoracic computed tomography: systematic review and meta-analysis. 2013

Xie, Xueqian / Zhao, Yingru / de Bock, Geertruida H / de Jong, Pim A / Mali, Willem P / Oudkerk, Matthijs / Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn. ·Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #23756678.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Coronary calcium score (CS), traditionally based on electrocardiography-triggered computed tomography (CT), predicts cardiovascular risk. Currently, nontriggered thoracic CT is extensively used, such as in lung cancer screening. The purpose of the study was to determine the correlation in CS between nontriggered and electrocardiography-triggered CT, and to evaluate the prognostic performance of the CS derived from nontriggered CT. METHODS AND RESULTS: PubMed, Embase, and Web of Knowledge were searched until November 2012. Two reviewers independently screened 2120 records to identify studies reporting the CS in nontriggered CT and extracted information. Study quality was evaluated by standardized assessment tools. Cohen κ was extracted for agreement of CS categories between nontriggered and electrocardiography-triggered CT (validation). Hazard ratio (HR) was extracted for prognostic performance. Five studies about validation comprising 1316 individuals were included. Five studies about prognosis comprising 34 028 cardiac asymptomatic individuals, mainly from lung cancer screening trials, were included. All studies were of high quality. Meta-analysis could only be performed for validation studies because studies on prognostic performance were highly heterogeneous. Pooled Cohen κ for agreement between the 2 techniques was 0.89 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.95) for increasing CS categories. Increasing CS categories were associated with increasing risk of cardiovascular death or events. Nontriggered CT yielded false-negative CS in 8.8% of individuals and underestimated high CS in 19.1% of individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis shows the prognostic value and potential role of nontriggered assessment of coronary calcium, but it does not suggest that electrocardiography-triggered CT should be replaced by nontriggered examinations.

3 Article High-pitch versus sequential mode for coronary calcium in individuals with a high heart rate: Potential for dose reduction. 2018

Vonder, Marleen / Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn / Kaatee, Merel A / van der Aalst, Carlijn M / van Ooijen, Peter M A / de Bock, Geertruida H / Gratama, Jan Willem / Kuijpers, Dirkjan / de Koning, Harry J / Oudkerk, Matthijs. ·University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.vonder@umcg.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: r.vliegenthart@umcg.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.a.kaatee@umcg.nl. · Erasmus MC, Dept. of Public Health, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.vanderaalst@erasmusmc.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: p.m.a.van.ooijen@umcg.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.h.de.bock@umcg.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands; Gelre Ziekenhuizen, Dept. of Radiology, Apeldoorn, The Netherlands. Electronic address: j.w.gratama@gelre.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands; HMC-Bronovo, Dept. of Radiology, The Hague, The Netherlands. Electronic address: t.kuijpers@haaglandenmc.nl. · Erasmus MC, Dept. of Public Health, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: h.dekoning@erasmusmc.nl. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North-East Netherlands (CMI-NEN), Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.oudkerk@umcg.nl. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29551663.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To determine the impact of high-pitch spiral acquisition on radiation dose and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk stratification by coronary artery calcium (CAC) assessment with computed tomography in individuals with a high heart rate. METHODS: Of the ROBINSCA trial, 1990 participants with regular rhythm and heart rates >65 beats per minute (bpm) were included. As reference, 390 participants with regular heart rates ≤65 bpm were used. All participants underwent prospectively electrocardiographically(ECG)-triggered imaging of the coronary arteries using dual source CT at 120 kVp, 80 ref mAs using both high-pitch spiral mode and sequential mode. Radiation dose, Agatston score, number of positive scores, as well as median absolute difference of the Agatston score were determined and participants were stratified into CVD risk categories. RESULTS: A similar percentage of participants with low heart rates and high heart rates had a positive CAC score in data sets acquired in high-pitch spiral (low heart rate: 57.7%, high heart rate: 55.8%) and sequential mode (58.0%, 54.7%, p = n.s.). The median absolute difference in Agatston scores between acquisition modes was 14.2% and 9.2%, for the high and low heart rate groups, respectively. Excellent agreement for risk categorization between the two data acquisition modes was found for the high (κ = 0.927) and low (κ = 0.946) heart rate groups. Radiation dose was 48% lower for high-pitch spiral versus sequential acquisitions. CONCLUSION: Radiation dose for the quantification of coronary calcium can be reduced by 48% when using the high-pitch spiral acquisition mode compared to the sequential mode in participants with a regular high heart rate. CVD risk stratification agreement between the two modes of data acquisition is excellent.