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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Brazil
Based on 679 articles published since 2008
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These are the 679 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Brazil during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Editorial Anger and Cardiovascular Disease: An Old and Complicated Relationship. 2018

Montenegro, Carlos Eduardo Lucena / Montenegro, Sergio Tavares. ·Pronto Socorro Cardiológico de Pernambuco (PROCAPE-UPE), Recife, PE - Brazil. · Centro Cardiológico Ovídio Montenegro (CECOM), Recife, PE - Brazil. · Real Hospital de Beneficência Portuguesa de Pernambuco, Recife, PE - Brazil. ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #30379258.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Adiponectin in Relation to Coronary Plaque Characteristics on Radiofrequency Intravascular Ultrasound and Cardiovascular Outcome. 2018

Mariani Junior, José. ·Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Instituto do Coração - HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP - Brazil. ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #30379253.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Genetic Risk in Coronary Artery Disease. 2018

Martinez, Paula F / Okoshi, Marina P. ·Faculdade de Fisioterapia da Universidade de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS - Brazil. · Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu (UNESP), Botucatu, SP - Brazil. ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #30110045.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial ORBITA Trial: Redefining the Role of Intervention in the Treatment of Stable Coronary Disease? 2018

Albuquerque, Luciano Cabral / Gomes, Walter José. ·São Lucas Hospital of the Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. · Disciplina de Cirurgia Cardiovascular e Cardiologia da Escola Paulista de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (EPM-UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brazil. ·Braz J Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #29617511.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Fifty Years of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery. 2017

Rocha, Eduardo Augusto Victor. ·Hospital Universitário Ciências Médicas de Minas Gerais (HUCM), Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. · Faculdade de Saúde e Ecologia Humana (FASEH), Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. ·Braz J Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #28977193.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Coronary CTA in the Evaluation of Stable Chest Pain: Clear Benefits, But Not for All. 2017

Blankstein, Ron / Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer / Bhatt, Deepak L. ·Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: rblankstein@partners.org. · Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital and State of São Paulo Cancer Institute (ICESP), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Preventive Medicine Center Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein and School of Medicine, Faculdade Israelita de Ciência da Saúde Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. · Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #28385305.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Lipoprotein Subfractions in Type 2 Diabetes. 2017

Roever, Leonardo / Resende, Elmiro Santos / Alpert, Joseph S. ·Federal University of Uberlândia, Department of Clinical Research, Uberlândia, Brazil. Electronic address: leonardoroever@hotmail.com. · Federal University of Uberlândia, Department of Clinical Research, Uberlândia, Brazil. · University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, USA. ·Heart Lung Circ · Pubmed #28087153.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Coronary computed tomography angiography: How should we act on what we find? 2017

Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer / Blankstein, Ron. ·Center for Clinical and Epidemiological Research, University Hospital and State of São Paulo Cancer Institute (ICESP), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Preventive Medicine Center, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. · Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division) and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. rblankstein@partners.org. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #27072002.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Non-HDL-C vs. LDL-C in Predicting the Severity of Coronary Atherosclerosis. 2016

Roever, Leonardo / Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe / Chagas, Antonio Carlos Palandri. ·Federal University of Uberlândia, Department of Clinical Research, Uberlândia, Brazil. Electronic address: leonardoroever@hotmail.com. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy; Department of AngioCardioNeurology, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzill, Italy. · Heart Institute (InCor), HCFMUSP- University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil; Faculty of Medicine ABC, Santo André, Brazil. ·Heart Lung Circ · Pubmed #27432736.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Cardiac Rehabilitation: Far Beyond Coronary Artery Disease. 2015

Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares de. ·Instituto do Coração Edson Saad, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #26761366.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Non-cardiac procedures after DES: an everyday issue awaiting answers. 2015

Esteves, Vinícius / Lemos, Pedro A. ·Heart Institute (InCor), University of São Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Hospital Rede D'or-São Luiz, Sao Paulo, Brazil. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26198062.

ABSTRACT: Need for non-cardiac surgery is a common event during the follow-up of patients treated drug-eluting stenting. The eventual associated risks of complications (bleeding and stent thrombosis) are relatively low. Larger clinical studies are needed to better delineate the optimal management of this population.

12 Editorial Exercising: the more, the better? 2015

Mattos, Fernando Ramos de. ·Clinics Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. ·Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) · Pubmed #26107352.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds in daily clinical practice: is the essential really invisible to the eyes? 2015

Abizaid, Alexandre / Costa, J Ribamar / Gibson, C Michael. ·Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: aabizaid@uol.com.br. · Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, Brazil. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #25720623.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafts for myocardial revascularization in insulin-dependent diabetic patients: time for wide clinical practice? 2015

Jatene, Fabio Biscegli / Kolh, Philippe. ·Cirurgia Cardiovascular, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital (CHU, ULg) of Liège, Liège, Belgium philippe.kolh@chu.ulg.ac.be. ·Eur J Cardiothorac Surg · Pubmed #25501320.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial The association of left ventricular mass with coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia: cause and effect or simple association? 2015

Roever, Leonardo / Pinto, Ibraim M / Chagas, Antonio Carlos Palandri. ·Heart Institute (InCor), HCFMUSP-University of São Paulo Medical School, Av. Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 44 05403-900 São Paulo, Brazil Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil leonardroever@hotmail.com. · Institute Dante Pazzanese of Cardiology, São Paulo, Brazil. · Heart Institute (InCor), HCFMUSP-University of São Paulo Medical School, Av. Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 44 05403-900 São Paulo, Brazil Faculty of Medicine ABC, ABC Foundation, Santo André, Brazil. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25381302.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Women are from SATURN and men are from an ASTEROID: deciphering the REVERSAL of coronary atheroma. 2014

Garcia-Garcia, Hector M / Campos, Carlos M / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Department of Interventional Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: hect2701@gmail.com. · Department of Interventional Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Heart Institute (InCor), University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Interventional Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25323164.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Precise vessel sizing: a trivial but crucial issue during left main stenting. 2014

Campos, Carlos M / Lemos, Pedro A. ·Department of Interventional Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Interventional Cardiology, Heart Institute (InCor), University of São Paulo, Brazil. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25142420.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: novel devices, novel interpretations, and novel interventions strategies. 2014

Campos, Carlos M / Lemos, Pedro A. ·Department of Interventional Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Heart Institute (InCor, University of São Paulo Medical Schoo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Department of Interventional Cardiology, Heart Institute (InCor), University of São Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24975261.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial South America: a land of innovators and innovation. 2014

Saad, Jamil A / Mandil, Ari. ·Serviço de Cardiologia dos Hospitais Felicio Rocho/Socor, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #24755379.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Is cardiac magnetic resonance one of cardiology's magic crystal balls? 2014

Gottlieb, Ilan / Camargo, Gabriel. ·National Institute of Cardiology, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Clínica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #24486279.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Left main percutaneous coronary intervention: growing in maturity. 2013

Feres, Fausto / Costa, Ricardo A. ·Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: fferes@lee.dante.br. · Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, Sao Paulo, Brazil. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24355116.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Review Imaging-guided pre-dilatation, stenting, post-dilatation: a protocolized approach highlighting the importance of intravascular imaging for implantation of bioresorbable scaffolds. 2018

Ali, Ziad A / Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan / Shlofmitz, Richard / Maehara, Akiko / Mintz, Gary S / Abizaid, Alexandre / Chamié, Daniel / Hill, Jonathan / Serruys, Patrick W / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Stone, Gregg W. ·a Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation , New York , NY , USA. · b Department of Cardiology , NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center , New York , NY , USA. · c Department of Cardiology , St Francis Hospital , Roslyn , NY , USA. · d Department of Cardiology , Instituto Dante Pazzanese of Cardiology , São Paulo , Brazil. · e Department of Cardiology , Cardiovascular Research Center , São Paulo , Brazil. · f Department of Cardiology , King's College , London , UK. · g Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine , London , UK. · h Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center , Rotterdam , The Netherlands. ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #29732926.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The advent of the fully bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) is the latest step in a series of advancements in the design of intracoronary stents over the past few decades. The novelty of this technology is in providing temporary vessel scaffolding and local antiproliferative therapy to prevent neointimal hyperplasia after percutaneous coronary intervention followed by gradual resorption of the scaffold to restore the native vessel anatomy and physiology - a process termed vascular reparative therapy. Areas covered: The first generation of BVS has not been able to fully match the high benchmark in safety and efficacy set by contemporary metallic drug-eluting stents. These shortcomings of BVS may be due to factors related to the device itself, the complexity of the underlying lesion, or the implantation technique. Expert commentary: Here, how intravascular imaging may be used to minimize these shortcomings is described and moreover, an imaging-guided step-by-step approach for BVS implantation that integrates the recently described pre-dilatation, stenting, post-dilatation (PSP) strategy is explained.

23 Review Practical Implications of Myocardial Viability Studies. 2018

Ker, Wilter Dos Santos / Nunes, Thais Helena Peixoto / Nacif, Marcelo Souto / Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco. ·Setor de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ, Brazil. · Serviço de Radiologia, Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ, Brazil. ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #29694555.

ABSTRACT: Many non-invasive methods, such as imaging tests, have been developed aiming to add a contribution to existing studies in estimating patients' prognosis after myocardial injury. This prognosis is proportional to myocardial viability, which is evaluated in coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction patients only. While myocardial viability represents the likelihood of a dysfunctional muscle (resulting from decreased oxygen supply for coronary artery obstruction), hibernation represents post-interventional functional recovery itself. This article proposes a review of pathophysiological basis of viability, diagnostic methods, prognosis and future perspectives of myocardial viability. An electronic bibliographic search for articles was performed in PubMed, Lilacs, Cochrane and Scielo databases, according to pre-established criteria. The studies showed the ability of many imaging techniques in detecting viable tissues in dysfunctional areas of left ventricle resulting from coronary artery injuries. These techniques can identify patients who may benefit from myocardial revascularization and indicate the most appropriate treatment.

24 Review Bioresorbable Coronary Scaffolds: Deployment Tips and Tricks and the Future of the Technology. 2018

Costa, J Ribamar / Abizaid, Alexandre. ·aINSTITUTO DANTE PAZZANESE DE CARDIOLOGIA, SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL. · bHOSPITAL DO CORAÇÃO (HCOR), SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL. · cHOSPITAL SÍRIO-LIBANÊS, SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL. ·Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J · Pubmed #29623171.

ABSTRACT: Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) were developed as an alternative to drug-eluting stents (DES) to facilitate vessel restoration and reduce the risk of future adverse events. However, recent meta-analyses and "real-world" registries have raised some concern about the safety of this novel technology, especially due to an increased risk of thrombosis within the first weeks of scaffold implantation. These devices appear to be less forgiving to poor implantation strategies when compared to contemporary DES. Moreover, problems with the first generation of these devices-bulky struts and high crossing prolife, prolonged resorption time, lack of x-ray visibility, and limited tolerance to postdilation-have restricted their clinical application and negatively impacted their short- to mid-term safety performance. However, the potential for long-term improvements has encouraged further research into strategies to overcome these limitations, and potentially safer next-generation devices are already undergoing in-human clinical evaluations. Based on the current literature and our center's experience with these devices, this review discusses various approaches to optimize BRS implantation, drawbacks related to current-generation BRS, and potentially advantageous features of three next-generation scaffold systems.

25 Review Mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting versus percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting for coronary artery disease: a pooled analysis of individual patient data. 2018

Head, Stuart J / Milojevic, Milan / Daemen, Joost / Ahn, Jung-Min / Boersma, Eric / Christiansen, Evald H / Domanski, Michael J / Farkouh, Michael E / Flather, Marcus / Fuster, Valentin / Hlatky, Mark A / Holm, Niels R / Hueb, Whady A / Kamalesh, Masoor / Kim, Young-Hak / Mäkikallio, Timo / Mohr, Friedrich W / Papageorgiou, Grigorios / Park, Seung-Jung / Rodriguez, Alfredo E / Sabik, Joseph F / Stables, Rodney H / Stone, Gregg W / Serruys, Patrick W / Kappetein, Arie Pieter. ·Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: s.head@erasmusmc.nl. · Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; Peter Munk Cardiac Centre and the Heart and Stroke Richard Lewar Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Norwich Medical School University of East Anglia and Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. · Heart Institute (InCor), University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. · Richard L Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. · Department of Cardiac Surgery, Herzzentrum Universität Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Cardiac Unit, Otamendi Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department Surgery, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Institute of Cardiovascular Medicine and Science, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Columbia University Medical Center and the Center for Clinical Trials, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA. · Imperial College London, London, UK. ·Lancet · Pubmed #29478841.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Numerous randomised trials have compared coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for patients with coronary artery disease. However, no studies have been powered to detect a difference in mortality between the revascularisation strategies. METHODS: We did a systematic review up to July 19, 2017, to identify randomised clinical trials comparing CABG with PCI using stents. Eligible studies included patients with multivessel or left main coronary artery disease who did not present with acute myocardial infarction, did PCI with stents (bare-metal or drug-eluting), and had more than 1 year of follow-up for all-cause mortality. In a collaborative, pooled analysis of individual patient data from the identified trials, we estimated all-cause mortality up to 5 years using Kaplan-Meier analyses and compared PCI with CABG using a random-effects Cox proportional-hazards model stratified by trial. Consistency of treatment effect was explored in subgroup analyses, with subgroups defined according to baseline clinical and anatomical characteristics. FINDINGS: We included 11 randomised trials involving 11 518 patients selected by heart teams who were assigned to PCI (n=5753) or to CABG (n=5765). 976 patients died over a mean follow-up of 3·8 years (SD 1·4). Mean Synergy between PCI with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX) score was 26·0 (SD 9·5), with 1798 (22·1%) of 8138 patients having a SYNTAX score of 33 or higher. 5 year all-cause mortality was 11·2% after PCI and 9·2% after CABG (hazard ratio [HR] 1·20, 95% CI 1·06-1·37; p=0·0038). 5 year all-cause mortality was significantly different between the interventions in patients with multivessel disease (11·5% after PCI vs 8·9% after CABG; HR 1·28, 95% CI 1·09-1·49; p=0·0019), including in those with diabetes (15·5% vs 10·0%; 1·48, 1·19-1·84; p=0·0004), but not in those without diabetes (8·7% vs 8·0%; 1·08, 0·86-1·36; p=0·49). SYNTAX score had a significant effect on the difference between the interventions in multivessel disease. 5 year all-cause mortality was similar between the interventions in patients with left main disease (10·7% after PCI vs 10·5% after CABG; 1·07, 0·87-1·33; p=0·52), regardless of diabetes status and SYNTAX score. INTERPRETATION: CABG had a mortality benefit over PCI in patients with multivessel disease, particularly those with diabetes and higher coronary complexity. No benefit for CABG over PCI was seen in patients with left main disease. Longer follow-up is needed to better define mortality differences between the revascularisation strategies. FUNDING: None.

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