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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Taiwan
Based on 1,212 articles published since 2009
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These are the 1212 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Taiwan during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE). 2017

Lip, Gregory Y H / Coca, Antonio / Kahan, Thomas / Boriani, Giuseppe / Manolis, Antonis S / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Oto, Ali / Potpara, Tatjana S / Steffel, Jan / Marín, Francisco / de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen / de Simone, Giovanni / Tzou, Wendy S / Chiang, Chern-En / Williams, Bryan / Anonymous4830918 / Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei / Gorenek, Bulent / Fauchier, Laurent / Savelieva, Irina / Hatala, Robert / van Gelder, Isabelle / Brguljan-Hitij, Jana / Erdine, Serap / Lovic, Dragan / Kim, Young-Hoon / Salinas-Arce, Jorge / Field, Michael. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Karolinska Institutet Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital Corp, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cardiology Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy. · Third Department of Cardiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. · Department of Internal Medicine, Holbaek Hospital and Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Memorial Ankara Hospital, Heart and Health Foundation of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey. · School of Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade University, Belgrade, Serbia. · Electrophysiology and Cardiac Devices, Department of Cardiology, University Heart Center Zurich; Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB-Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Cardiology Department, Medicine School, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, via S. Pansini 5, bld # 1, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Cardiac Electrophysiology, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, UK. · Colentina University Hospital, Medicine Faculty, University of Medicine "Carol Davila"-Bucharest Romania. · Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Trousseau, Tours, France. · St George's University Of London, London, UK. · National Cardiovascular Institute, NUSCH, Bratislava, Slovak Republic. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · University Medical Centre, Hypertension Department, Hospital Dr. Peter Drzaja, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School, Head of Hypertension Department, Istanbul, Turkey. · Clinic for internal disease Intermedica, Cardiology department-Hypertension centere, Serbia. · Korea University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Clínica Delgado, Miraflores, Pérou. · University of Wisconsin, Clinical Science Center, Madison, USA. ·Europace · Pubmed #28881872.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient.

2 Guideline Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: executive summary of a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE). 2017

Lip, Gregory Y H / Coca, Antonio / Kahan, Thomas / Boriani, Giuseppe / Manolis, Antonis S / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Oto, Ali / Potpara, Tatjana S / Steffel, Jan / Marín, Francisco / de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen / de Simone, Giovanni / Tzou, Wendy S / En Chiang, Chern / Williams, Bryan. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University of Birmingham, UK. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, c/Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital Corp, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cardiology Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy. · Third Department of Cardiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. · Department of Internal Medicine, Holbaek Hospital and Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Memorial Ankara Hospital; Heart and Health Foundation of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey. · School of Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, Belgrade University, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Cardiology, Electrophysiology and Cardiac Devices, University Heart Center Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB-Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Cardiology Department, Medicine School, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, via S. Pansini 5, bld # 1, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Cardiac Electrophysiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Cardiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, UK. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother · Pubmed #28541499.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in HTN patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), CAD, or HF. In addition, high doses of thiazide diuretics commonly used to treat HTN, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on HTN and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment on the care of a specific patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all individual factors presented. This is an executive summary of the full document co-published by EHRA in EP-Europace.

3 Guideline 2010 guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology for the management of hypertension. 2010

Chiang, Chern-En / Wang, Tzung-Dau / Li, Yi-Heng / Lin, Tsung-Hsien / Chien, Kuo-Liong / Yeh, Hung-I / Shyu, Kou-Gi / Tsai, Wei-Chuen / Chao, Ting-Hsing / Hwang, Juey-Jen / Chiang, Fu-Tien / Chen, Jyh-Hong / Anonymous5430675. ·Division of Cardiology and General Clinical Research Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. ·J Formos Med Assoc · Pubmed #20970072.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for atherosclerosis-related mortality and morbidity. In this document, the Hypertension Committee of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology provides new guidelines for hypertension management. The key messages are as follows. (1) The life-time risk for hypertension is 90%. (2) Both the increase in the prevalence rate and the relative risk of hypertension for causing cardiovascular events are higher in Asians than in Caucasians. (3) The control rate has been improved significantly in Taiwan from 2.4% to 21% in men, and from 5% to 29% in women in recent years (1995-2002). (4) Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) = 130/80 mmHg are thresholds of treatment for high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, stroke, established coronary heart disease, and coronary heart disease equivalents (carotid artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and abdominal aortic aneurysm). (5) Ambulatory and home BP monitoring correlate more closely with end-organ damage and have a stronger relationship with cardiovascular events than office BP monitoring, but the feasibility of home monitoring makes it a more attractive alternative. (6) Patients with masked hypertension have higher cardiovascular risk than those with white-coat hypertension. (7) Lifestyle changes should be encouraged in all patients, and include the following six items: S-ABCDE (Salt restriction; Alcohol limitation; Body weight reduction; Cessation of smoking; Diet adaptation; Exercise adoption). (8) When pharmacological therapy is needed, physicians should consider "PROCEED" (Previous experience of patient; Risk factors; Organ damage; Contraindication or unfavorable conditions; Expert or doctor judgment; Expense or cost; Delivery and compliance) to decide the optimal treatment. (9) The main benefits of antihypertensive agents are derived from lowering of BP per se, and are generally independent of the drugs being used, except that certain associated cardiovascular conditions might favor certain classes of drugs. (10) There are five major classes of drugs: thiazide diuretics; β-blockers; calcium channel blockers; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs); and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Any one of these can be used as the initial treatment, except for β-blockers, which are only indicated in patients with heart failure, a history of coronary heart disease, and hyperadrenergic state. (11) A standard dose of any one of the five major classes of antihypertensive drugs can produce an ∼10-mmHg decrease in systolic BP (rule of 10) and a 5-mmHg decrease in diastolic BP (rule of 5), after placebo subtraction. (11) Combination therapy is frequently needed for optimal control of BP, and the amount of the decrease in BP by a two-drug combination is approximately the same as the sum of the decrease by each individual drug (∼20 mmHg in systolic BP and 10 mmHg in diastolic BP) if their mechanisms of action are independent, with the exception of the combination of ACEIs and ARBs. (13) An ACEI or ARB plus a calcium channel blocker or a diuretic (A + C or A + D) are reasonable two-drug combinations, and A+C + D is a reasonable three-drug combination, unless patients have special indications for β-blockers. (14) Single-pill (fixed-dose) combinations that contain more than one drug in a single tablet are highly recommended because they reduce pill burden and cost, and improve compliance. (15) Very elderly patients (> 80 years) should be treated without delay, but BP should be reduced gradually and more cautiously. Finally, these guidelines are not mandatory; the responsible physician's decision remains most important in hypertension management.

4 Editorial Usefulness of Fragmented QRS Complex for Diagnosis and Outcome Prediction in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease. 2017

Wang, Chun-Li. ·Cardiovascular Department, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. · College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan. ·Acta Cardiol Sin · Pubmed #29167611.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Stenting or bypass surgery for unprotected left main coronary artery disease-still a long rally to go. 2016

Tsai, Tzu-Hsien / Cheng, Cheng-I. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. ·J Thorac Dis · Pubmed #27746958.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Reliable and stable computer-aided diagnosis systems for images. 2016

Yang, Hsuan-Chia / Lu, Richard / Wu, Chieh-Chen / Li, Yu-Chuan Jack. ·Institute of Biomedical Informatics, National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; International Center for Health Information Technology (ICHIT), Taipei Medical University, Taiwan. · Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; International Center for Health Information Technology (ICHIT), Taipei Medical University, Taiwan; Chair, Department of Dermatology, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: jack@tmu.edu.tw. ·Comput Methods Programs Biomed · Pubmed #27040839.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review Endothelial Dysfunction in Primary Aldosteronism. 2019

Chen, Zheng-Wei / Tsai, Cheng-Hsuan / Pan, Chien-Ting / Chou, Chia-Hung / Liao, Che-Wei / Hung, Chi-Sheng / Wu, Vin-Cent / Lin, Yen-Hung / Anonymous3981603. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. librajohn7@hotmail.com. · Cardiovascular center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. librajohn7@hotmail.com. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin 64041, Taiwan. librajohn7@hotmail.com. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. chenghsuan.richard.tsai@gmail.com. · Cardiovascular center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. chenghsuan.richard.tsai@gmail.com. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Jin-Shan Branch, New Taipei City 20844, Taiwan. chenghsuan.richard.tsai@gmail.com. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. pan.chienting.m@gmail.com. · Cardiovascular center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. pan.chienting.m@gmail.com. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin 64041, Taiwan. pan.chienting.m@gmail.com. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei 10041, Taiwan. joan640124@yahoo.com.tw. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Hsin-Chu 30059, Taiwan. yo.ahliao@gmail.com. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. petrehcs@gmail.com. · Cardiovascular center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. petrehcs@gmail.com. · Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. dr.vincentwu@gmail.com. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. austinr34@gmail.com. · Cardiovascular center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 10002, Taiwan. austinr34@gmail.com. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #31640178.

ABSTRACT: Primary aldosteronism (PA) is characterized by excess production of aldosterone from the adrenal glands and is the most common and treatable cause of secondary hypertension. Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone that participates in the regulation of electrolyte balance, blood pressure, and tissue remodeling. The excess of aldosterone caused by PA results in an increase in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and even arrhythmia and heart failure. Endothelial dysfunction is a well-established fundamental cause of cardiovascular diseases and also a predictor of worse clinical outcomes. Accumulating evidence indicates that aldosterone plays an important role in the initiation and progression of endothelial dysfunction. Several mechanisms have been shown to contribute to aldosterone-induced endothelial dysfunction, including aldosterone-mediated vascular tone dysfunction, aldosterone- and endothelium-mediated vascular inflammation, aldosterone-related atherosclerosis, and vascular remodeling. These mechanisms are activated by aldosterone through genomic and nongenomic pathways in mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent and independent manners. In addition, other cells have also been shown to participate in these mechanisms. The complex interactions among endothelium, inflammatory cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts are crucial for aldosterone-mediated endothelial dysregulation. In this review, we discuss the association between aldosterone and endothelial function and the complex mechanisms from a molecular aspect. Furthermore, we also review current clinical research of endothelial dysfunction in patients with PA.

8 Review Value of ST-segment change in lead aVR in diagnosing left main disease in Non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome-A meta-analysis. 2019

Lee, Gien-Kuo / Hsieh, Yen-Ping / Hsu, Shang-Wei / Lan, Shou-Jen / Soni, Kshitij. ·Department of Healthcare, Administration, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan. · Emergency Department, Wei Gong Memorial Hospital, Miaoli, Taiwan. · Emergency Department, BenQ medical center, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China. · Department of Long Term Care, National Quemoy University, Kinmen, Taiwan. · Department of Medical Research, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. ·Ann Noninvasive Electrocardiol · Pubmed #31532060.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous researches proved that the ST-segment elevation (STE) in lead aVR had great significance on the prediction of severe left main lesion or serious multivessel lesions. The current research is to summarize the published data and evaluate the overall association of STE in lead aVR and left main coronary artery disease (LMD) in Non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. METHODS: Literature searching was performed in the online database, and a systematic review was conducted based on the searched results. Meaningful STE in lead aVR was summarized and analyzed for odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). RESULTS: Twenty-seven articles were included for final data analysis. Compared with STE < 0.05, STE ≥ 0.05 mV was associated with a higher incidence rate of LMD (OR = 6.64, 95% CI: 4.80 ~ 9.17), and the degree of STE in lead aVR was significantly associated with LMD. Myocardial infarction was more likely to occur in patients with STE ≥ 0.05 mV than in patients with STE < 0.05 mV (OR = 3.12, 95% CI: 1.73 ~ 5.62). CONCLUSIONS: The STE in lead aVR and the degree of STE are independent predictors in diagnosing LMD or myocardial infarction.

9 Review A performance guide for major risk factors control in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Taiwan. 2019

Li, Yi-Heng / Chen, Jaw-Wen / Lin, Tsung-Hsien / Wang, Yu-Chen / Wu, Chau-Chung / Yeh, Hung-I / Huang, Chin-Chou / Chang, Kuan-Cheng / Wu, Cho-Kai / Chen, Po-Wei / Huang, Chen-Wei / Chen, Zhih-Cherng / Chang, Wei-Ting / Huang, Wei-Chun / Wang, Chih-Yuan / Lee, Mei-Yueh / Chao, A-Ching / Fu, Wei-Ren / Tsai, Li-Kai / Tang, Sung-Chun / Chan, Hsin-Lung / Yang, Yi-Ching / Wu, Yen-Wen / Hwang, Juey-Jen / Lin, Jiunn-Lee. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan. · Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asia University Hospital, China Medical University College of Medicine and Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Bioethics, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Department of Medical Education, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Cardiovascular Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital and College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Pharmacy, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy & Science, Tainan, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine and Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Department of Neurology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Stroke Center and Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Family Medicine, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Family Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan. · Cardiology Division, Cardiovascular Medical Center, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan; National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. · Cardiology Division, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin, Yun-Lin, Taiwan. Electronic address: jueyhwang@ntu.edu.tw. · Cardiology Division, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Electronic address: jiunnleelin@gmail.com. ·J Formos Med Assoc · Pubmed #31113748.

ABSTRACT: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), including coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral artery disease, carries a high morbidity and mortality. Risk factor control is especially important for patients with ASCVD to reduce recurrent cardiovascular events. Clinical guidelines have been developed by the Taiwan Society of Cardiology, Taiwan Society of Lipids and Atherosclerosis, and Diabetes Association of Republic of China (Taiwan) to assist health care professionals in Taiwan about the control of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes mellitus. This article is to highlight the recommendations about blood pressure, cholesterol, and sugar control for ASCVD. Some medications that are beneficial for ASCVD were also reviewed. We hope the clinical outcomes of ASCVD can be improved in Taiwan through the implementation of these recommendations.

10 Review An evaluation of pitavastatin for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. 2019

Chan, Paul / Shao, Li / Tomlinson, Brian / Zhang, Yuzhen / Liu, Zhong-Min. ·a Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine , Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University , Taipei City , Taiwan . · b The VIP Department , Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine , Shanghai , China. · c Research Center for Translational Medicine , Shanghai East Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University School of Medicine , Shanghai , China. · d Department of Medicine & Therapeutics , The Chinese University of Hong Kong , Shatin , Hong Kong. · e Department of Cardiac Surgery , Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University , Shanghai , China. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #30482061.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Statins are the first line of therapy to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in order to decrease cardiovascular events. Pitavastatin is the latest statin to be introduced to the market. Areas covered: In this article, the authors review the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pitavastatin. The authors also review a recent cardiovascular outcome study. Expert opinion: Pitavastatin produces dose-dependent reductions in LDL-C at lower doses than other statins. The maximum approved dose of 4 mg reduces LDL-C by about 40-49% in different patient groups and is equivalent to atorvastatin 20 mg in this effect. Pitavastatin undergoes minimal metabolism so drug-drug interactions are less likely than with many other statins, but it can interact with some drugs that inhibit drug transporters. Compared with other statins, it has been associated with greater increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and it was found to be less likely to cause new onset diabetes. In a recent study in Japanese patients with stable coronary artery disease, pitavastatin 4 mg was more effective than pitavastatin 1 mg in reducing cardiovascular events. Therefore, the highest dose may be preferred in high-risk patients.

11 Review Primary Aldosteronism and Cerebrovascular Diseases. 2018

Chen, Zheng Wei / Hung, Chi Sheng / Wu, Vin Cent / Lin, Yen Hung / Anonymous3200980. ·Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin, Taiwan. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. austinr34@gmail.com. ·Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) · Pubmed #30513556.

ABSTRACT: As diagnostic techniques have advanced, primary aldosteronism (PA) has emerged as the most common cause of secondary hypertension. The excess of aldosterone caused by PA resulted in not only cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, and heart failure, but also cerebrovascular complications, such as stroke and transient ischemic attack. Moreover, PA is associated more closely with these conditions than is essential hypertension. In this review, we present up-to-date findings on the association between PA and cerebrovascular diseases.

12 Review Lipid Lowering Therapy for Acute Coronary Syndrome and Coronary Artery Disease: Highlights of the 2017 Taiwan Lipid Guidelines for High Risk Patients. 2018

Li, Yi-Heng / Chao, Ting-Hsing / Liu, Ping-Yen / Ueng, Kwo-Chang / Yeh, Hung-I. ·Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan. · Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital. · School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. · Departments of Internal Medicine and Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei. · Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan. ·Acta Cardiol Sin · Pubmed #30271086.

ABSTRACT: Intensive lipid lowering therapy is important in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD). The 2017 Taiwan Lipid Guidelines for High Risk Patients was recently published. The guideline suggests that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) should be the primary target, and that the treatment goal of LDL-C is < 70 mg/dL for patients with ACS or stable CAD. A lower target of < 55 mg/dL is appropriate for patients with ACS and diabetes mellitus. Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) < 100 mg/dL can be considered as the secondary target after achieving the LDL-C goal for patients with a triglyceride level > 200 mg/dL. Statins are usually the first-line therapy. Moderate or high intensity statins are preferred, and up-titration to the highest recommended and tolerable dose to reach the target is necessary. Combination therapy with statins and other lipid-lowering drugs can also be considered. We hope the clinical outcomes of patients with ACS or CAD can be improved in Taiwan through the implementation of the guideline recommendations.

13 Review Application of left ventricular strain to patients with coronary artery disease. 2018

Takeuchi, Masaaki / Wu, Victor Chien-Chia. ·Department of Laboratory and Transfusion Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health Hospital, Kitakyushu, Japan. · Division of Cardiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan. ·Curr Opin Cardiol · Pubmed #29889135.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Myocardial strain imaging has gained popularity during the last decade in various clinical scenarios. The objective of this article was to review the potential application of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) strains in patients with coronary artery disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Reports on the diagnostic accuracy of myocardial deformation analysis using 2D and 3D speckle-tracking analyses to detect significant coronary stenosis at rest or during stress and to evaluate myocardial viability are limited. A newer 2D strain approach that uses layer-specific strain analysis might be sensitive in the detection of subtle regional myocardial dysfunction induced by myocardial ischemia. However, its potential accuracy is controversial. The regional assessment of wall motion by 2D/3D strain is not recommended because of measurement variabilities. SUMMARY: Further studies are required for the adoption of this technology in patients with coronary artery disease.

14 Review State-of-the-art acute phase management of Kawasaki disease after 2017 scientific statement from the American Heart Association. 2018

Liu, Yi-Ching / Lin, Ming-Tai / Wang, Jou-Kou / Wu, Mei-Hwan. ·Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital and Medical College, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: mingtailin@ntu.edu.tw. · Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital and Medical College, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Pediatr Neonatol · Pubmed #29706362.

ABSTRACT: Kawasaki disease (KD) has become the most common form of pediatric systemic vasculitis. Although patients with KD received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy, coronary arterial lesions (CALs) still occurred in 5%-10% of these patients during the acute stage. CALs may persist and even progress to stenosis or obstruction. Therefore, CALs following KD are currently the leading cause of acquired heart diseases in children. The etiology of CALs remains unknown despite more than four decades of research. Two unsolved problems are IVIG unresponsiveness and the diagnosis of incomplete KD. The two subgroups of KD patients with these problems have a high risk of CAL. In April 2017, the American Heart Association (AHA) updated the guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management of KD. Compared with the previous KD guidelines published in 2004, the new guidelines provide solutions to the aforementioned two problems and emphasize risk stratification by using coronary artery Z score systems, as well as coronary severity-based management and long-term follow-up. Therefore, in this study, we merged the AHA Scientific Statement in 2017 with recent findings for Taiwanese KD patients to provide potential future care directions for Taiwanese patients with KD.

15 Review Cadmium and atherosclerosis: A review of toxicological mechanisms and a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies. 2018

Tinkov, Alexey A / Filippini, Tommaso / Ajsuvakova, Olga P / Skalnaya, Margarita G / Aaseth, Jan / Bjørklund, Geir / Gatiatulina, Eugenia R / Popova, Elizaveta V / Nemereshina, Olga N / Huang, Pai-Tsang / Vinceti, Marco / Skalny, Anatoly V. ·Yaroslavl State University, Yaroslavl, Russia; Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia; Institute of Cellular and Intracellular Symbiosis, Russian Academy of Sciences, Orenburg, Russia. Electronic address: tinkov.a.a@gmail.com. · CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · All-Russian Research Institute of Phytopathology, Odintsovo, Moscow Region, Russia. · Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia. · Faculty of Public Health, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway; Research Department, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Brumunddal, Norway. · Council for Nutritional and Environmental Medicine, Mo i Rana, Norway. · South-Ural State Medical University, Chelyabinsk, Russia. · St. Joseph University in Tanzania, St. Joseph College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. · Wan Fang Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC. · Yaroslavl State University, Yaroslavl, Russia; Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia; Orenburg State University, Orenburg, Russia; Trace Element Institute for UNESCO, Lyon, France. ·Environ Res · Pubmed #29358116.

ABSTRACT: Cadmium has been proposed to be the one of the factors of atherosclerosis development, although the existing data are still controversial. The primary objective of the present study is the review and the meta-analysis of studies demonstrating the association between Cd exposure and atherosclerosis as well as review of the potential mechanisms of such association. We performed a systematic search in the PubMed-Medline database using the MeSH terms cadmium, cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, mortality and humans up through December 20, 2017. Elevated urinary Cd levels were associated with increased mortality for cardiovascular disease (HR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.07-1.67) as well as elevated blood Cd levels (HR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.24-2.56). Analysis restricted to never smokers showed similar, though more imprecise, results. Consistently, we also observed an association between Cd exposure markers (blood and urine) and coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral artery disease. Moreover, Cd exposure was associated with atherogenic changes in lipid profile. High Cd exposure was associated with higher TC levels (OR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.10-2.01), higher LDL-C levels (OR = 1.31, 95% CI 0.99-1.73) and lower HDL-C levels (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.09-3.55). The mechanisms of atherogenic effect of cadmium may involve oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, enhanced lipid synthesis, up-regulation of adhesion molecules, prostanoid dysbalance, as well as altered glycosaminoglycan synthesis.

16 Review The prevention of coronary arterial abnormalities in Kawasaki disease: A meta-analysis of the corticosteroid effectiveness. 2018

Yang, Tsung-Ju / Lin, Ming-Tai / Lu, Chun-Yi / Chen, Jong-Min / Lee, Ping-Ing / Huang, Li-Min / Wu, Mei-Hwan / Chang, Luan-Yin. ·Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan. · Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan. Electronic address: cylu@ntuh.gov.tw. · Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan. Electronic address: lychang@ntu.edu.tw. ·J Microbiol Immunol Infect · Pubmed #28927685.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The use of corticosteroid in Kawasaki disease (KD) remains controversial among current guidelines. The objective of this study is to summarize the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroid to prevent coronary arterial lesions in Kawasaki disease, both as initial and rescue therapy. METHODS: The Medline, EMBASE, Google scholar, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Japanese Institutional Repositories Online were searched for studies up to 31 March 2017. Studies that compared incidence of coronary artery lesions between regimens with corticosteroid and regimen without it in a well-defined controlled group were included. The incidence of coronary artery lesion was analyzed by meta-analysis. RESULTS: Nineteen studies published between 1999 and 2016 fulfilled eligibility criteria. There were 3591 patients included for analysis. There was a significant reduction in incidence of coronary artery lesions with usage of corticosteroid with a pooled odds ratio of 0.72 (95% CI 0.57-0.92; p = 0.01) than that without usage of corticosteroid. In general, a greater effect was seen in the patient received corticosteroid as initial and adjuvant therapy with intravenous immune globulin (pooled odds ratio 0.39, 95% CI 0.21-0.73, p = 0.007) than those who received corticosteroid as rescue therapy. The risk reduction was statistically significant in Japanese groups (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.42-0.75 in fixed effects model) but not significant in non-Japanese groups (OR 1.45, 95% CI 0.91-2.30 in fixed effects model). CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated an overall reduction in incidence of coronary artery lesions with the use of corticosteroid as initial and adjuvant treatment for Kawasaki disease.

17 Review 2017 Multimodality Appropriate Use Criteria for Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging: Expert Consensus of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging. 2017

Anonymous3890925 / Beck, Kyongmin Sarah / Kim, Jeong A / Choe, Yeon Hyeon / Hian, Sim Kui / Hoe, John / Hong, Yoo Jin / Kim, Sung Mok / Kim, Tae Hoon / Kim, Young Jin / Kim, Yun Hyeon / Kuribayashi, Sachio / Lee, Jongmin / Leong, Lilian / Lim, Tae-Hwan / Lu, Bin / Park, Jae Hyung / Sakuma, Hajime / Yang, Dong Hyun / Yaw, Tan Swee / Wan, Yung-Liang / Zhang, Zhaoqi / Zhao, Shihua / Yong, Hwan Seok. ·Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 06591, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang 10380, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 06351, Korea. · Department of Cardiology, Sarawak General Hospital Heart Centre, Sarawak 93586, Malaysia. · Department of Radiology, Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore 228510, Singapore. · Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 06273, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju 61469, Korea. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University, Tokyo 9608582, Japan. · Department of Radiology, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu 41944, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Hong Kong College of Radiologists, Hong Kong 251114, China. · Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Beijing 100037, China. · Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Goyang 10475, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Mie University Hospital, Mie 5148507, Japan. · Department of Cardiology, National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore 169609, Singapore. · Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Institute for Radiological Research, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan. · Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100029, China. · Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 08308, Korea. ·Korean J Radiol · Pubmed #29089819.

ABSTRACT: In 2010, the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (ASCI) provided recommendations for cardiac CT and MRI, and this document reflects an update of the 2010 ASCI appropriate use criteria (AUC). In 2016, the ASCI formed a new working group for revision of AUC for noninvasive cardiac imaging. A major change that we made in this document is the rating of various noninvasive tests (exercise electrocardiogram, echocardiography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, radionuclide imaging, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography/angiography), compared side by side for their applications in various clinical scenarios. Ninety-five clinical scenarios were developed from eight selected pre-existing guidelines and classified into four sections as follows: 1) detection of coronary artery disease, symptomatic or asymptomatic; 2) cardiac evaluation in various clinical scenarios; 3) use of imaging modality according to prior testing; and 4) evaluation of cardiac structure and function. The clinical scenarios were scored by a separate rating committee on a scale of 1-9 to designate appropriate use, uncertain use, or inappropriate use according to a modified Delphi method. Overall, the AUC ratings for CT were higher than those of previous guidelines. These new AUC provide guidance for clinicians choosing among available testing modalities for various cardiac diseases and are also unique, given that most previous AUC for noninvasive imaging include only one imaging technique. As cardiac imaging is multimodal in nature, we believe that these AUC will be more useful for clinical decision making.

18 Review Preventing coronary artery lesions in Kawasaki disease. 2017

Kuo, Ho-Chang. ·Kawasaki Disease Center, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Electronic address: erickuo48@yahoo.com.tw. ·Biomed J · Pubmed #28651735.

ABSTRACT: A form of systemic vasculitis that affects mostly small and medium-sized vessels, Kawasaki disease (KD) is most commonly found in children under the age of 5 years old. Though its etiology is unknown, KD has been the most frequent acquired heart disease in developing countries. Its incidence has increased over recent decades in many centuries, including Japan, Korea, and China. The most severe complications of KD are coronary artery lesions (CAL), including dilation, fistula, aneurysm, arterial remodeling, stenosis, and occlusion. Aneurysm formation has been observed in 20-25% of KD patients that do not receive intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment, and in 3-5% that do receive it. Coronary artery dilation has been found in about 30% of KD patients in the acute stage, although mostly in the transient form. Diminishing the occurrence and regression of CAL is a vital part of treating KD. In this review article, I demonstrate the clinical method to prevent CAL formation used at the Kawasaki Disease Center in Taiwan.

19 Review Effectiveness of endurance exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease: A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. 2017

Chen, Yu-Chi / Tsai, Jen-Chen / Liou, Yiing-Mei / Chan, Paul. ·1 Institute of Clinical Nursing, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · 2 School of Nursing, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · 3 Institute of Community Care, Director of School Health Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · 4 Department of Internal Medicine, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs · Pubmed #28565969.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Exercise interventions apparently reduce the risks of and prevent coronary artery disease (CAD). Developing an exercise intervention for patients with CAD is a rapidly expanding focus worldwide. The results of previous studies are inconsistent and difficult to interpret across various types of exercise programme. AIM: This study aimed to update prior systemic reviews and meta-analyses in order to determine the overall effects of endurance exercise training on patients with CAD. METHODS: The databases (PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE and Cochrane Library) were searched for the interventions published between January 1, 2000, and May 31, 2015. Comprehensive meta-analysis software was used to evaluate the heterogeneity of the selected studies and to calculate mean differences (MDs) while considering effect size. RESULTS: A total of 18 studies with 1286 participants were included. Endurance exercise interventions at a moderate to high training intensity significantly reduced resting systolic blood pressure (MD: -3.8 mmHg, p = 0.01) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD: -5.5 mg/dL, p = 0.02), and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD: 3.8 mg/dL, p < 0.001). There were also significant positive changes in peak oxygen consumption (MD: 3.47 mL/kg/min, p < 0.001) and left ventricular ejection fraction (MD: 2.6%, p = 0.03) after the interventions. Subgroup analysis results revealed that exercise interventions of 60-90 minutes per week with a programme duration of >12 weeks had beneficial effects on functional capacity, cardiac function and a number of cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Endurance exercise training has a positive effect on major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and functional capacity. Nurses can develop endurance exercise recommendations for incorporation into care plans of clinically stable CAD patients following an acute cardiac event or revascularisation procedure.

20 Review 2017 Taiwan lipid guidelines for high risk patients. 2017

Li, Yi-Heng / Ueng, Kwo-Chang / Jeng, Jiann-Shing / Charng, Min-Ji / Lin, Tsung-Hsien / Chien, Kuo-Liong / Wang, Chih-Yuan / Chao, Ting-Hsing / Liu, Ping-Yen / Su, Cheng-Huang / Chien, Shih-Chieh / Liou, Chia-Wei / Tang, Sung-Chun / Lee, Chun-Chuan / Yu, Tse-Ya / Chen, Jaw-Wen / Wu, Chau-Chung / Yeh, Hung-I / Anonymous30898. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan. · School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Stroke Center and Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Departments of Internal Medicine and Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Departments of Internal Medicine and Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Department of Internal Medicine, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Departments of Internal Medicine and Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Electronic address: hungi.yeh@msa.hinet.net. ·J Formos Med Assoc · Pubmed #28242176.

ABSTRACT: In Taiwan, the prevalence of hyperlipidemia increased due to lifestyle and dietary habit changes. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) are all significant predicting factors of coronary artery disease in Taiwan. We recognized that lipid control is especially important in patients with existed atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD), including coronary artery disease (CAD), ischemic stroke and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Because the risk of ASCVD is high in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), lipid control is also necessary in these patients. Lifestyle modification is the first step to control lipid. Weight reduction, regular physical exercise and limitation of alcohol intake all reduce triglyceride (TG) levels. Lipid-lowering drugs include HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), cholesterol absorption inhibitors (ezetimibe), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, nicotinic acids (niacin), fibric acids derivatives (fibrates), and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids. Statin is usually the first line therapy. Combination therapy with statin and other lipid-lowering agents may be considered in some clinical settings. For patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and stable CAD, LDL-C < 70 mg/dL is the major target. A lower target of LDL-C <55 mg/dL can be considered in ACS patients with DM. After treating LDL-C to target, non-HDL-C can be considered as a secondary target for patients with TG ≥ 200 mg/dL. The suggested non-HDL-C target is < 100 mg/dL in ACS and CAD patients. For patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack presumed to be of atherosclerotic origin, statin therapy is beneficial and LDL-C < 100 mg/dL is the suggested target. For patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis or intracranial arterial stenosis, in addition to antiplatelets and blood pressure control, LDL-C should be lowered to < 100 mg/dL. Statin is necessary for DM patients with CV disease and the LDL-C target is < 70 mg/dL. For diabetic patients who are ≥ 40 years of age, or who are < 40 years of age but have additional CV risk factors, the LDL-C target should be < 100 mg/dL. After achieving LDL-C target, combination of other lipid-lowering agents with statin is reasonable to attain TG < 150 mg/dL and HDL-C >40 in men and >50 mg/dL in women in DM. LDL-C increased CV risk in patients with CKD. In adults with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 mL/min/1.73m

21 Review Coronary artery aneurysm after implantation of a bioresorbable vascular scaffold: Case report and literature review. 2017

Chua, Su-Kiat / Cheng, Jun-Jack. ·School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Department of General Medicine, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Medical College, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28164433.

ABSTRACT: A 55-year-old man underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention for the middle left circumflex artery with a 3.5 × 28-mm bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS). At 18 months, follow-up coronary angiography showed ectatic change with aneurysm formation over the BVS. Optical coherence tomography revealed absence of strut continuity at the aneurysm site, in the middle of the BVS. A literature review identified nine patients with intrascaffold aneurysm, including the present patient, which developed 6-32 months after BVS implantation. Of these nine patients, four underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic total occlusion. The pathogenesis of coronary artery aneurysm is multifactorial. Most patients receive no further intervention, but long-term dual antiplatelet therapy is sometimes prescribed in conjunction with regular follow-up. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

22 Review Impact of Indoxyl Sulfate on Progenitor Cell-Related Neovascularization of Peripheral Arterial Disease and Post-Angioplasty Thrombosis of Dialysis Vascular Access. 2017

Wu, Chih-Cheng / Hung, Szu-Chun / Kuo, Ko-Lin / Tarng, Der-Cherng. ·Cardiovascular Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Hsinchu Branch, Hsinchu 30059, Taiwan. chihchengwumd@gmail.com. · National Tsing-Hua University, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan. chihchengwumd@gmail.com. · School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. chihchengwumd@gmail.com. · Division of Nephrology, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation and School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 97004, Taiwan. szuchun.hung@gmail.com. · Division of Nephrology, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation and School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 97004, Taiwan. kolinkuo8@gmail.com. · Institutes of Physiology and Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. dctarng@vghtpe.gov.tw. · Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. dctarng@vghtpe.gov.tw. ·Toxins (Basel) · Pubmed #28067862.

ABSTRACT: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of vascular disease, which is associated with considerable health care costs. Vascular disease in CKD differs clinically and pathobiologically from that in patients with normal renal function. Besides the traditional risk factors, retention of uremic toxins contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in patients with CKD. Indoxyl sulfate is a protein-bound uremic toxin and is inefficiently removed by conventional dialysis. Accumulating evidence suggests that indoxyl sulfate is a vascular toxin involved in atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, vascular calcification and vascular repair. Clinically, indoxyl sulfate is associated with total and cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. Recent studies have indicated that in addition to coronary and cerebral arteries, indoxyl sulfate plays a role in peripheral artery disease (PAD) and dialysis graft thrombosis. Emerging evidence suggests that indoxyl sulfate is implicated via novel mechanisms, including progenitor cell-related neovascularization and tissue factor-related hypercoagulability. These findings raise the possibility that strategies targeting serum indoxyl sulfate may have the potential to improve the outcomes of PAD and dialysis vascular access in patients with CKD.

23 Review Epsilon wave on an electronic loop in a case of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia with myocarditis: an updated definition of the Epsilon wave. 2017

Fontaine, Guy Hugues / Duthoit, Guillaume / Li, Guoliang / Andreoletti, L / Gandjbakhch, Estelle / Frank, Robert. ·Unité de Rythmologie, CHU Pitié-Salpêtrière, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris. · Pacemaker department, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, ROC. · Clinical virology unit (EA4684), CHU of Reims, France. ·Europace · Pubmed #28062531.

ABSTRACT: A young man presented with a history of myocarditis with palpitations and dizziness. He had implantation of a loop recorder that showed repetitive short episodes of VT. In addition, there were fragmented potentials immediately following the large and sharp electrograms (EGMs) before as well as after episodes of VT suggesting an Epsilon wave. This signal can be observed in multiple cardiac conditions including coronary artery disease. It was originally recorded on the epicardium as well as on the endocardium. However, in ARVD it can be defined as an electric signal observed after the end of the QRS complex in the right as opposed to the left precordial leads (difference ≥ 25 ms). It can also be an aid to the diagnosis of patients with ARVD who have other signs or symptoms suggesting ARVD including episodes of myocarditis. This potential consists of a slurring at the end of the QRS complex or an independent potential after the return to the isoelectric line. It can be better observed by increasing amplification of the ECG tracing as well as double speed using the Fontaine lead system. Epsilon wave too small to be recorded on the standard ECG can be extracted by Signal Averaging ECG SAECG).

24 Review Post-valvular surgery multi-vessel coronary artery spasm - A literature review. 2016

Formica, Francesco / Bamodu, Oluwaseun Adebayo / Mariani, Serena / Paolini, Giovanni. ·Cardiac Surgery Unit, San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Medicine and Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy. · The Masters Level II Program in Cardiac Surgery, Cardiac Anesthesia and Cardiology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy. · Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan. · Department of Medical Research & Education, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan. ·Int J Cardiol Heart Vasc · Pubmed #28616513.

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery spasm (CAS) refers to the spontaneous or stimuli-induced transient, often localized and intense subtotal or total constriction/occlusion of the epicardial coronary artery, usually concomitant with

25 Review Update on ADAMTS13 and VWF in cardiovascular and hematological disorders. 2016

Akyol, Omer / Akyol, Sumeyya / Chen, Chu-Huang. ·Vascular and Medicinal Research, Texas Heart Institute, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. Electronic address: oakyol@texasheart.org. · Vascular and Medicinal Research, Texas Heart Institute, Houston, TX, USA; Medical Biochemist, TUBITAK/BIDEB Scholar, Ankara, Turkey. · Vascular and Medicinal Research, Texas Heart Institute, Houston, TX, USA; Lipid Science and Aging Research Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Center for Lipid Biosciences, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. ·Clin Chim Acta · Pubmed #27746209.

ABSTRACT: Endothelial cells (EC) respond to injury by releasing numerous factors, including von Willebrand factor (VWF). High circulating levels of unusually large VWF multimers (UL-VWFM) have strong procoagulant activity and facilitate platelet adhesion and aggregation by interacting with platelets after an acute event superimposed on peripheral arterial disease and coronary artery disease. ADAMTS13-a disintegrin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motif type 1 member 13-regulates a key physiological process of coagulation in the circulation by cleaving VWF multimers into small, inactive fragments. Low levels of ADAMTS13 in the blood may play a role in cardiovascular and hematological disorders, and clarifying its role may help improve disease management. The genetic, pharmacological, physiological, and pathological aspects related to ADAMTS13/VWF have been extensively investigated. Here, we provide an update on recent findings of the relationship between ADAMTS13 and hematological/cardiovascular disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, arterial thrombosis, thrombotic microangiopathy, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, heart failure, and hypertension.

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