Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Based on 293 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 293 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous3940905 / Akers, Scott R / Panchal, Vandan / Ho, Vincent B / Beache, Garth M / Brown, Richard K J / Ghoshhajra, Brian B / Greenberg, S Bruce / Hsu, Joe Y / Kicska, Gregory A / Min, James K / Stillman, Arthur E / Stojanovska, Jadranka / Abbara, Suhny / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Principal Author, VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: akerssco@me.com. · Research Author, Internal Medicine Resident, Henry Ford Allegiance Health, Jackson, Michigan. · Panel Vice-Chair, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, California. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; American College of Cardiology. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Panel Chair, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #28473096.

ABSTRACT: In patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), imaging has major and diverse roles. First, imaging is valuable in determining and documenting the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia, hibernation, scarring, and/or the presence, site, and severity of obstructive coronary lesions. Second, imaging findings are important in determining the course of management of patients with suspected chronic myocardial ischemia and better defining those patients best suited for medical therapy, angioplasty/stenting, or surgery. Third, imaging is also necessary to determine the long-term prognosis and likely benefit from various therapeutic options by evaluating ventricular function, diastolic relaxation, and end-systolic volume. Imaging studies are also required to demonstrate other abnormalities, such as congenital/acquired coronary anomalies and severe left ventricular hypertrophy, that can produce angina in the absence of symptomatic coronary obstructive disease due to atherosclerosis. Clinical risk assessment is necessary to determine the pretest probability of CAD. Multiple methods are available to categorize patients as low, medium, or high risk for developing CAD. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline CAD-RADS(TM) Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Cury, Ricardo C / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Agatston, Arthur / Berman, Daniel S / Budoff, Matthew J / Dill, Karin E / Jacobs, Jill E / Maroules, Christopher D / Rubin, Geoffrey D / Rybicki, Frank J / Schoepf, U Joseph / Shaw, Leslee J / Stillman, Arthur E / White, Charles S / Woodard, Pamela K / Leipsic, Jonathon A. ·Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL, 33176, United States. Electronic address: rcury@baptisthealth.net. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen-Nürnberg, Department of Cardiology, Ulmenweg 18, 90154, Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: Stephan.Achenbach@uk-erlangen.de. · Baptist Health Medical Grp, 1691 Michigan Avenue, Miami, FL, 33139, United States. Electronic address: ArthurSAg@baptisthealth.net. · Cedars-Sinai Med Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Taper Building, Rm 1258, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, United States. Electronic address: bermand@cshs.org. · 1124 W. Carson Street, Torrance, CA, 90502, United States. Electronic address: mbudoff@labiomed.org. · 5841 South Maryland Ave, MC2026, Chicago, IL, 60637, United States. Electronic address: kdill@radiology.bsd.uchicago.edu. · 550 First Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, United States. Electronic address: jill.jacobs@nyumc.org. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: christopher.maroules@gmail.com. · 2400 Pratt Street, Room 8020, DCRI Box 17969, Durham, NC, 27715, United States. Electronic address: grubin@duke.edu. · The Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON, CA K1H 8L6, Canada. Electronic address: frybicki@toh.on.ca. · 25 Courtenay Dr., Charleston, SC, 29425, United States. Electronic address: schoepf@musc.edu. · 1256 Briarcliff Rd. NE, Rm 529, Atlanta, GA, 30324, United States. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. · 1364 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, United States. Electronic address: aestill@emory.edu. · University of Maryland, 22 S. Greene St., Baltimore, MD, 21201, United States. Electronic address: cwhite@umm.edu. · Mallinckrodt Instit of Radiology, 510 S Kingshighway Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63110, United States. Electronic address: woodardp@mir.wustl.edu. · Department of Radiology|St. Paul's Hospital, 2nd Floor, Providence Building, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, United States. Electronic address: jleipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27318587.

ABSTRACT: The intent of CAD-RADS - Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) in order to facilitate decision-making regarding further patient management. The suggested CAD-RADS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the highest-grade coronary artery lesion documented by coronary CTA. It ranges from CAD-RADS 0 (Zero) for the complete absence of stenosis and plaque to CAD-RADS 5 for the presence of at least one totally occluded coronary artery and should always be interpreted in conjunction with the impression found in the report. Specific recommendations are provided for further management of patients with stable or acute chest pain based on the CAD-RADS classification. The main goal of CAD-RADS is to standardize reporting of coronary CTA results and to facilitate communication of test results to referring physicians along with suggestions for subsequent patient management. In addition, CAD-RADS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit education, research, peer-review and quality assurance with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

3 Editorial Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Coronary Artery Disease: What Is in the CArDs? 2018

Adkins, Christopher / Rezaie, Ali. ·GI Motility Program, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai, 8730 Alden Drive, Thalians Bldg, #E226, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA. · GI Motility Program, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai, 8730 Alden Drive, Thalians Bldg, #E226, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA. ali.rezaie@cshs.org. ·Dig Dis Sci · Pubmed #29307000.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Sex differences in coronary heart disease risk factors: rename it ischaemic heart disease! 2017

AlBadri, Ahmed / Wei, Janet / Mehta, Puja K / Shah, Rashmee / Herscovici, Romana / Gulati, Martha / Shufelt, Chrisandra / Bairey Merz, Noel. ·Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, California, USA. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · University of Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. ·Heart · Pubmed #28931566.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Coronary artery calcium scanning in symptomatic patients: Ready for use as a gatekeeper for further testing? 2017

Rozanski, Alan / Berman, Daniel S. ·Division of Cardiology, Mount Sinai St. Lukes Hospital, Mount Sinai Heart, 1111 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY, 10025, USA. arozanski@chpnet.org. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. arozanski@chpnet.org. · Departments of Imaging and Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #28205074.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Coronary ischemia: Global trigger of sudden cardiac death. 2017

Chugh, Sumeet S / Aro, Aapo L. ·Heart Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: sumeet.chugh@cshs.org. · Heart Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. ·Heart Rhythm · Pubmed #27697623.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Use of coronary artery calcium scanning as a triage for cardiac ischemia testing. 2017

Rozanski, Alan / Uretsky, Seth / Berman, Daniel S. ·Division of Cardiology and Department of Medicine, Mt Sinai St. Lukes and Roosevelt Hospitals, 1111 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY, 10025, USA. arozanski@chpnet.org. · The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. arozanski@chpnet.org. · The Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Morristown Medical Center, Morristown, NJ, USA. · The Departments of Imaging and Medicine and Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #26846368.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Coronary Artery Calcium Scanning: The Agatston Score and Beyond. 2016

Berman, Daniel S / Arnson, Yoav / Rozanski, Alan. ·Department of Imaging, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: bermand@cshs.org. · Department of Imaging, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Cardiology, Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospital, Mount Sinai Heart, and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27931526.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Integrating FFRCT Into Routine Clinical Practice: A Solid PLATFORM or Slippery Slope? 2016

Sevag Packard, René R / Karlsberg, Ronald P. ·Division of Cardiology, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles, California; David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California; Cardiovascular Research Foundation of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California; Cardiovascular Research Foundation of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; Cedars Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: karlsberg@cvmg.com. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27470450.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Editorial Commentary: Multiple arterial grafting for coronary revascularization: We are not perplexed but choose ignorance. 2016

Ramzy, Danny. ·Division of Cardiac Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address: danny.ramzy@cshs.org. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #27396553.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Temporal Change in CAC Score and Prognosis: Follow-Up Score Is Simpler and as Good as a Change in Score. 2016

Shah, Prediman K. ·Oppenheimer Atherosclerosis Research Center, Cedars Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: Shahp@cshs.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27372020.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Extending the Use of Coronary Calcium Scanning to Clinical Rather Than Just Screening Populations: Ready for Prime Time? 2016

Rozanski, Alan / Slomka, Piotr / S Berman, Daniel. ·From the Division of Cardiology, Mt Sinai St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospital, Mount Sinai Heart, and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (A.R.) · and Department of Imaging, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA (P.S., D.B.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27165701.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Coronary plaque burden regression and high-risk plaque reversal: Potential biomarkers for secondary prevention? 2016

Wei, Janet / Berman, Daniel S / Li, Debiao. ·Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address: janet.wei@cshs.org. · Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #26386886.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Going beyond the hard endpoints: "quality of life" may be dependent on quality of available data. 2015

Henry, Timothy D / Gershlick, Anthony. ·Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: henryt@cshs.org. · Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester and National Institute of Health Research Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #26541922.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial In search of the vulnerable plaque: is there any light at the end of the catheter? 2014

Kaul, Sanjay / Narula, Jagat. ·Division of Cardiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: sanjay.kaul@cshs.org. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #25500238.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Absolute myocardial blood flow quantification with SPECT/CT: is it possible? 2014

Slomka, Piotr J / Berman, Daniel S / Germano, Guido. ·Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA, slomkap@cshs.org. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #25294433.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Can carotid plaque predict coronary plaque? 2013

Shah, Prediman K. ·Division of Cardiology and Oppenheimer Atherosclerosis Research Center, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: shahp@cshs.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #24229769.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Jekyll and Hyde of HDL: a lipoprotein with a split personality. 2013

Shah, Prediman K. ·Division of Cardiology and Oppenheimer Atherosclerosis Research Center, Cedars Sinai Heart Institute and Department of Medicine at Cedars Sinai Medical Center and UCLA, CA, USA. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #24062336.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Review The State of the Absorb Bioresorbable Scaffold: Consensus From an Expert Panel. 2017

Bangalore, Sripal / Bezerra, Hiram G / Rizik, David G / Armstrong, Ehrin J / Samuels, Bruce / Naidu, Srihari S / Grines, Cindy L / Foster, Malcolm T / Choi, James W / Bertolet, Barry D / Shah, Atman P / Torguson, Rebecca / Avula, Surendra B / Wang, John C / Zidar, James P / Maksoud, Aziz / Kalyanasundaram, Arun / Yakubov, Steven J / Chehab, Bassem M / Spaedy, Anthony J / Potluri, Srini P / Caputo, Ronald P / Kondur, Ashok / Merritt, Robert F / Kaki, Amir / Quesada, Ramon / Parikh, Manish A / Toma, Catalin / Matar, Fadi / DeGregorio, Joseph / Nicholson, William / Batchelor, Wayne / Gollapudi, Raghava / Korngold, Ethan / Sumar, Riyaz / Chrysant, George S / Li, Jun / Gordon, John B / Dave, Rajesh M / Attizzani, Guilherme F / Stys, Tom P / Gigliotti, Osvaldo S / Murphy, Bruce E / Ellis, Stephen G / Waksman, Ron. ·Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: sripalbangalore@gmail.com. · Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Medicine, HonorHealth and the HonorHealth Heart Group, Scottsdale, Arizona. · Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado. · Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medicine, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York. · Department of Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. · Department of Medicine, Tennova Healthcare, Knoxville, Tennessee. · Department of Medicine, Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Medicine, North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo, Mississippi. · Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC. · Department of Medicine, Advocate Christ Hospital and Medical Center, Oak Lawn, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Medicine, UNC/Rex Healthcare, Raleigh, North Carolina. · Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Research Institute of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas. · Department of Medicine, Seattle Heart and Vascular Institute, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Medicine, OhioHealth, Columbus, Ohio. · Department of Medicine, University of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas. · Department of Medicine, Missouri Heart Center, Columbia, Missouri. · Department of Medicine, The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano, Plano, Texas. · Department of Medicine, St. Joseph's/Trinity Hospital, Syracuse, New York. · Department of Medicine, DMC Heart Hospital/Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Medicine, Mercy Hospital and Clinic, Springfield, Missouri. · Department of Medicine, Heart & Vascular Institute, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Medicine, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute, Baptist Health, Miami, Florida. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. · Department of Medicine, Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, Englewood, New Jersey. · Department of Medicine, York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Tallahassee Memorial Hospital/Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida. · Department of Medicine, San Diego Cardiac Center, San Diego, California. · Department of Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Medicine, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona. · Department of Medicine, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Department of Medicine, Geisinger Holy Spirit, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. · Department of Medicine, Seton Heart Institute, Austin, Texas. · Department of Medicine, Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Department of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29216997.

ABSTRACT: Significant progress has been made in the percutaneous coronary intervention technique from the days of balloon angioplasty to modern-day metallic drug-eluting stents (DES). Although metallic stents solve a temporary problem of acute recoil following balloon angioplasty, they leave behind a permanent problem implicated in very late events (in addition to neoatherosclerosis). BRS were developed as a potential solution to this permanent problem, but the promise of these devices has been tempered by clinical trials showing increased risk of safety outcomes, both early and late. This is not too dissimilar to the challenges seen with first-generation DES in which refinement of deployment technique, prolongation of dual antiplatelet therapy, and technical iteration mitigated excess risk of very late stent thrombosis, making DES the treatment of choice for coronary artery disease. This white paper discusses the factors potentially implicated in the excess risks, including the scaffold consideration and deployment technique, and outlines patient and lesion selection, implantation technique, and dual antiplatelet therapy considerations to potentially mitigate this excess risk with the first-generation thick strut Absorb scaffold (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Park, Illinois). It remains to be seen whether these considerations together with technical iterations will ultimately close the gap between scaffolds and metal stents for short-term events while at the same time preserving options for future revascularization once the scaffold bioresorbs.

20 Review Early Coronary Angiography for Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests Without ST Elevation. 2017

Goldfarb, Michael / Cercek, Bojan. ·From the *Divisions of Cardiology and Pulmonary and Critical Care, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; and †Division of Cardiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. ·Cardiol Rev · Pubmed #28984671.

ABSTRACT: There are over 300,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OOHCA) in the United States each year, and the long-term survival rate is less than 10%. Despite improvements in postarrest management, the greatest drop-off in survival occurs during hospitalization, mostly due to myocardial dysfunction and neurological injury. Coronary artery disease is common in postcardiac arrest patients, with an incidence of approximately 60-80%. In patients with a chest pain syndrome and an ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction pattern evident on the presenting electrocardiogram, immediate revascularization is recommended by cardiovascular societies due to established mortality benefits. However, it is less clear whether immediate or urgent coronary angiography for OOHCA survivors without ST elevation on the presenting electrocardiogram is beneficial. The current evidence base suggests that many OOHCA survivors, particularly when an acute coronary event is suspected, stand to benefit from early coronary angiography, although prospective trial data are lacking. Further studies are needed to identify whether all or even a subset of OOHCA survivors without ST elevation should undergo routine early coronary angiography.

21 Review Coronary Artery Plaque Imaging. 2017

Xie, Yibin / Jin, Hang / Zeng, Mengsu / Li, Debiao. ·Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd., PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA. · Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Feng Lin Road, Shanghai, China. · Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd., PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA. debiao.li@cshs.org. · Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. debiao.li@cshs.org. ·Curr Atheroscler Rep · Pubmed #28779432.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This short review summarizes the recent development in clinical and experimental imaging techniques for coronary atherosclerosis. RECENT FINDINGS: Coronary atherosclerosis is the underlying disease of myocardial infarction, the leading cause of death in the industrialized world. Conventional ways of risk assessment, including evaluation of traditional risk factors and interrogation of luminal stenosis, have proven imprecise for the prediction of major events. Rapid advances in noninvasive imaging techniques including MRI, CT, and PET, as well as catheter-based methods, have opened the doors to more in-depth interrogation of plaque burden, composition, and many crucial pathological processes such as inflammation and hemorrhage. These emerging imaging modalities and methodologies, combined with conventional imaging evidences of anatomy and ischemia, offer the promises to provide comprehensive information of the disease status. There is tremendous clinical potential for imaging to improve the current management of coronary atherosclerosis, including the identification of high-risk patients for aggressive therapies and guiding personalized treatment. In this review, we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art coronary plaque imaging techniques focusing on their respective strengths and weaknesses, as well as their clinical outlook.

22 Review The elusive role of myocardial perfusion imaging in stable ischemic heart disease: Is ISCHEMIA the answer? 2017

Xie, Joe X / Winchester, David E / Phillips, Lawrence M / Hachamovitch, Rory / Berman, Daniel S / Blankstein, Ron / Di Carli, Marcelo F / Miller, Todd D / Al-Mallah, Mouaz H / Shaw, Leslee J. ·Department of Cardiology, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, 1462 Clifton Road NE, Room 529, Atlanta, Georgia. joe.xie@emory.edu. · Department of Cardiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Ministry of National Guard, Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · Department of Cardiology, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, 1462 Clifton Road NE, Room 529, Atlanta, Georgia. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #28752313.

ABSTRACT: The assessment of ischemia through myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is widely accepted as an index step in the diagnostic evaluation of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD). Numerous observational studies have characterized the prognostic significance of ischemia extent and severity. However, the role of ischemia in directing downstream SIHD care including coronary revascularization has remained elusive as reductions in ischemic burden have not translated to improved clinical outcomes in randomized trials. Importantly, selection bias leading to the inclusion of many low risk patients with minimal ischemia have narrowed the generalizability of prior studies along with other limitations. Accordingly, an ongoing randomized controlled trial entitled ISCHEMIA (International Study of Comparative Health Effectiveness with Medical and Invasive Approaches) will compare an invasive coronary revascularization strategy vs a conservative medical therapy approach among stable patients with moderate to severe ischemia. The results of ISCHEMIA may have a substantial impact on the management of SIHD and better define the role of MPI in current SIHD pathways of care.

23 Review Recent Advances in Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: Techniques and Applications. 2017

Salerno, Michael / Sharif, Behzad / Arheden, Håkan / Kumar, Andreas / Axel, Leon / Li, Debiao / Neubauer, Stefan. ·From the Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville (M.S.) · Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (B.S., D.L.) · Department of Clinical Sciences, Clinical Physiology, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Sweden (H.A.) · Cardiology Division, Department of Medicine, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sudbury, Canada (A.K.) · Department of Radiology and Department of Medicine, New York University, New York (L.A.) · and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Oxford Center for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Oxford, London, United Kingdom (S.N.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28611116.

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for evaluating myocardial function, volumes, and scarring. Additionally, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is unique in its comprehensive tissue characterization, including assessment of myocardial edema, myocardial siderosis, myocardial perfusion, and diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has become an indispensable tool in the evaluation of congenital heart disease, heart failure, cardiac masses, pericardial disease, and coronary artery disease. This review will highlight some recent novel cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging techniques, concepts, and applications.

24 Review Incidental coronary calcifications on routine chest CT: Clinical implications. 2017

Pakdaman, Michael N / Rozanski, Alan / Berman, Daniel S. ·Department of Imaging, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; Department of Medicine, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA. · Division of Cardiology, Mount Sinai St. Lukes Hospital, Mount Sinai Heart, New York, NY; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. · Department of Imaging, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; Department of Medicine, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address: Daniel.Berman@cshs.org. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #28583439.

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a marker of atherosclerosis and an independent risk factor for cardiac-related mortality, with much of the 50% decline in mortality over the past 30 years being attributed to early detection of coronary disease and intervention of modifiable risk factors. With over 10 million computed tomography (CT) examinations of the chest performed in the United States yearly, CAC can be identified in a very large number of patients. In this review, we discuss the clinical evidence underlying the relationship between radiologic identification of CAC, atherosclerosis, and cardiac outcomes and the implications of its assessment on standard chest CT. We conclude that reporting of incidental coronary calcification found on non-gated chest CT would have a great impact on both management and mortality and thus, in the appropriate setting, should be noted in the impression of the radiologic report when identified.

25 Review Enhancing Cardiac PET by Motion Correction Techniques. 2017

Rubeaux, Mathieu / Doris, Mhairi K / Alessio, Adam / Slomka, Piotr J. ·Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd Taper A238, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA. · Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, Scotland, UK. · Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Old Fisheries Center, Room 222, 4000 15th Avenue NE, Box 357987, Seattle, WA, 98195-7987, USA. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd Taper A238, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA. piotr.slomka@cshs.org. · David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. piotr.slomka@cshs.org. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd Ste. A047N, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA. piotr.slomka@cshs.org. ·Curr Cardiol Rep · Pubmed #28185169.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) images often contain errors due to cardiac, respiratory, and patient motion during relatively long image acquisition. Advanced motion compensation techniques may improve PET spatial resolution, eliminate potential artifacts, and ultimately improve the research and clinical capabilities of PET. RECENT FINDINGS: Combined cardiac and respiratory gating has only recently been implemented in clinical PET systems. Considering that the gated image bins contain much lower counts than the original PET data, they need to be summed after correcting for motion, forming motion-corrected, high-count image volume. Furthermore, automated image registration techniques can be used to correct for motion between CT attenuation scan and PET acquisition. While motion correction methods are not yet widely used in clinical practice, approaches including dual-gated non-rigid motion correction and the incorporation of motion correction information into the reconstruction process have the potential to markedly improve cardiac PET imaging.

Next