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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Imperial College School of Medicine
Based on 392 articles published since 2008
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These are the 392 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Imperial College School of Medicine during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16
1 Editorial Contrast fractional flow reserve: Attractive alternative to non-hyperaemic pressure ratios for coronary disease evaluation. 2019

Maznyczka, Annette / Berry, Colin. ·British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK; West of Scotland Heart and Lung Centre, Golden Jubilee National Hospital, Clydebank, UK. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #30509373.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Assessing coronary disease in patients with severe aortic stenosis: the need for a 'valid' gold standard for validation studies? 2018

Sen, Sayan / Ahmad, Yousif / Davies, Justin. ·International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #29345238.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Cardiac investigation for prognosis in coronary artery disease: where negative is positive. 2017

Senior, Roxy / Khattar, Rajdeep S. ·Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, Biomedical Research Unit, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, Sydney street SW3 6NP, London, UK. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28402438.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Editorial commentary: Dissecting the gender differences in nonobstructive coronary artery disease: How do we bridge the gap? 2017

Khamis, Ramzi Y. ·National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK. Electronic address: r.khamis@imperial.ac.uk. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #27751734.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Is FFR 2017

Davies, Justin E / Cook, Christopher M. ·International Centre for Circulatory Health, NHLI- Cardiovascular Sciences Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: justin.davies@imperial.ac.uk. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, NHLI- Cardiovascular Sciences Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27743947.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Promising, but still a matter of debate. 2016

Sotomi, Yohei / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · NHLI, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27619745.

ABSTRACT: Several trials failed to demonstrate the efficacy of plaque modification device in patients with severely calcified coronary lesions. Safety and efficacy of the Diamondback 360® Coronary OAS have been demonstrated by the ORBIT II trial. The 2-year follow-up of the ORBIT II trial extends the favorable results previously shown at 30-day and 1-year follow-up. The single arm, non-randomized character of the trial with indirect historical comparison may restrict the results to hypothesis generating and entail further prospective randomized trials.

7 Editorial Coronary bifurcations in clinical practice: Tell me what we can do better. 2016

Collet, Carlos / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27400637.

ABSTRACT: In bifurcation lesion, a precise evaluation of lesion severity and disease extension requires the use of bifurcation (three branches) quantitative coronary angiography. The use of Intravascular imaging to guide PCI in bifurcation has shown to reduce clinical events. Selection and duration of the dual antiplatelet therapy after bifurcation lesion PCI require further investigation.

8 Editorial Polymer Biodegradation Kinetics: Do They Matter? 2016

Collet, Carlos / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, NHLI, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27173038.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Screening for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk Using Ultrasound. 2016

Nicolaides, Andrew / Panayiotou, Andrie G. ·Department of Vascular Surgery, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Nicosia Medical School, University of Nicosia, Nicosia, Cyprus. Electronic address: anicolai@cytanet.com.cy. · Cyprus International Institute for Environmental and Public Health in association with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #26988946.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Coronary artery disease: screen or treat? 2016

Francis, Darrel P / Cole, Graham D. ·International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London W2 1LA, UK d.francis@imperial.ac.uk. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London W2 1LA, UK. ·BMJ · Pubmed #26987757.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Balancing idealism with realism to safeguard the welfare of patients: The importance of Heart Team led decision-making in patients with complex coronary artery disease. 2016

Farooq, Vasim / Di Mario, Carlo / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester and Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. Electronic address: vasimfarooq@icloud.com. · NIHR Cardiovascular BRU, Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust and Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Emeritus Professor of Medicine with a Chair in Interventional Cardiology at the Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; International Centre for Circulatory Health, NHLI, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. ·Indian Heart J · Pubmed #26896257.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Snowshoe Versus Ice Skate for Scaffolding of Disrupted Vessel Wall. 2015

Serruys, Patrick W / Suwannasom, Pannipa / Nakatani, Shimpei / Onuma, Yoshinobu. ·International Center for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. · Department of Interventional Cardiology, Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26088509.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Experience and accuracy can result in parity of outcomes following one or two stents for left main stem bifurcation disease. 2015

Colombo, Antonio / Ruparelia, Neil. ·Department of Interventional Cardiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · EMO-GVM, Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy. · Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25999274.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial When you ask yourself the question "should I protect the side branch?": the answer is "yes". 2015

Colombo, Antonio / Ruparelia, Neil. ·San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: info@emocolumbus.it. · San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25616816.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Is "the bigger the better" still valid for drug-eluting stents? 2014

Panoulas, Vasileios F / Colombo, Antonio. ·Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Interventional Cardiology Unit, EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy; National Heart and Lung Institute (Division of ICL), Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24753167.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Death (after percutaneous coronary intervention) is no longer what it used to be. 2014

Steg, Philippe Gabriel / Cheong, Adrian Piers. ·From Université Paris-Diderot, DHU FIRE, Paris, France (P.G.S.) · Hôpital Bichat, Paris, France (P.G.S., A.P.C.) · INSERM U-1148, Paris, France (P.G.S.) · NHLI, Imperial College, ICMS, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK (P.G.S.) · Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, China (A.P.C.) · and The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China (A.P.C.). ·Circulation · Pubmed #24515992.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Can anatomy be used as a surrogate for physiology? The IVUS conundrum. 2013

Sen, Sayan / Davies, Justin. ·Imperial College, 59-61, North Wharf Road, Paddington, London, W21LA, United Kingdom. Electronic address: sayan.sen@imperial.ac.uk. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #23647600.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable coronary artery disease. 2019

Al-Lamee, Rasha K / Nowbar, Alexandra N / Francis, Darrel P. ·Imperial College London, London, UK. · Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK. ·Heart · Pubmed #30242142.

ABSTRACT: The adverse consequences of stable coronary artery disease (CAD) are death, myocardial infarction (MI) and angina. Trials in stable CAD show that percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) does not reduce mortality. PCI does appear to reduce spontaneous MI rates but at the expense of causing some periprocedural MI. Therefore, the main purpose of PCI is to relieve angina. Indeed, patients and physicians often choose PCI rather than first attempting to control symptoms with anti-anginal medications as recommended by guidelines. Nevertheless, it is unclear how effective PCI is at relieving angina. This is because, whereas anti-anginal medications are universally required to be tested against placebo, there is no such requirement for procedural interventions such as PCI. The first placebo-controlled trial of PCI showed a surprisingly small effect size. This may be because it is overly simplistic to assume that the presence of a stenosis and inducible ischaemia in a patient means that the clinical chest pain they report is caused by ischaemia. In this article, we review the evidence base and argue that if we as a medical specialty wish to lead the science of procedures for symptom control, we should recognise the special merit of placebo-controlled experiments.

19 Review Imaging-guided pre-dilatation, stenting, post-dilatation: a protocolized approach highlighting the importance of intravascular imaging for implantation of bioresorbable scaffolds. 2018

Ali, Ziad A / Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan / Shlofmitz, Richard / Maehara, Akiko / Mintz, Gary S / Abizaid, Alexandre / Chamié, Daniel / Hill, Jonathan / Serruys, Patrick W / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Stone, Gregg W. ·a Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation , New York , NY , USA. · b Department of Cardiology , NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center , New York , NY , USA. · c Department of Cardiology , St Francis Hospital , Roslyn , NY , USA. · d Department of Cardiology , Instituto Dante Pazzanese of Cardiology , São Paulo , Brazil. · e Department of Cardiology , Cardiovascular Research Center , São Paulo , Brazil. · f Department of Cardiology , King's College , London , UK. · g Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine , London , UK. · h Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center , Rotterdam , The Netherlands. ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #29732926.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The advent of the fully bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) is the latest step in a series of advancements in the design of intracoronary stents over the past few decades. The novelty of this technology is in providing temporary vessel scaffolding and local antiproliferative therapy to prevent neointimal hyperplasia after percutaneous coronary intervention followed by gradual resorption of the scaffold to restore the native vessel anatomy and physiology - a process termed vascular reparative therapy. Areas covered: The first generation of BVS has not been able to fully match the high benchmark in safety and efficacy set by contemporary metallic drug-eluting stents. These shortcomings of BVS may be due to factors related to the device itself, the complexity of the underlying lesion, or the implantation technique. Expert commentary: Here, how intravascular imaging may be used to minimize these shortcomings is described and moreover, an imaging-guided step-by-step approach for BVS implantation that integrates the recently described pre-dilatation, stenting, post-dilatation (PSP) strategy is explained.

20 Review A Practical Approach to Assessing Stent Results with IVUS or OCT. 2018

Hachinohe, Daisuke / Mitomo, Satoru / Candilio, Luciano / Latib, Azeem. ·aSAN RAFFAELE SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTE, MILAN, ITALY. · bEMO-GVM CENTRO CUORE COLUMBUS, MILAN, ITALY. · cHAMMERSMITH HOSPITAL, IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM. ·Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J · Pubmed #29623170.

ABSTRACT: Coronary angiography is routinely used to assess the extent and severity of coronary artery disease and for decision-making during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). However, it is sometimes inadequate for deciding a strategy and defining optimal stenting outcomes. In this review, we present a comprehensive and practical approach to PCI using intravascular ultrasound or optical coherence tomography to optimize stent deployment and assess procedural complications after stent implantation.

21 Review Past, Present and Future of Coronary Physiology. 2018

Warisawa, Takayuki / Cook, Christopher M / Akashi, Yoshihiro J / Davies, Justin E. ·International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: justin.davies@imperial.ac.uk. ·Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) · Pubmed #29551700.

ABSTRACT: It is well known that the apparent significant coronary stenosis on angiography sometimes does not cause significant ischemia, and vice versa. For this reason, decision-making based on coronary physiology is becoming more and more important. Fractional flow reserve (FFR), which has emerged as a useful tool to determine which lesions need revascularization in the catheterization laboratory, now has a class IA indication in the European Society of Cardiology guidelines. More recently, the instantaneous wave-free ratio, which is considered easier to use than FFR, has been graded as equivalent to FFR. This review discusses the concepts of FFR and instantaneous wave-free ratio, current evidence supporting their use, and future directions in coronary physiology.

22 Review Mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting versus percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting for coronary artery disease: a pooled analysis of individual patient data. 2018

Head, Stuart J / Milojevic, Milan / Daemen, Joost / Ahn, Jung-Min / Boersma, Eric / Christiansen, Evald H / Domanski, Michael J / Farkouh, Michael E / Flather, Marcus / Fuster, Valentin / Hlatky, Mark A / Holm, Niels R / Hueb, Whady A / Kamalesh, Masoor / Kim, Young-Hak / Mäkikallio, Timo / Mohr, Friedrich W / Papageorgiou, Grigorios / Park, Seung-Jung / Rodriguez, Alfredo E / Sabik, Joseph F / Stables, Rodney H / Stone, Gregg W / Serruys, Patrick W / Kappetein, Arie Pieter. ·Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: s.head@erasmusmc.nl. · Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; Peter Munk Cardiac Centre and the Heart and Stroke Richard Lewar Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Norwich Medical School University of East Anglia and Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. · Heart Institute (InCor), University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. · Richard L Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. · Department of Cardiac Surgery, Herzzentrum Universität Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Cardiac Unit, Otamendi Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department Surgery, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Institute of Cardiovascular Medicine and Science, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Columbia University Medical Center and the Center for Clinical Trials, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA. · Imperial College London, London, UK. ·Lancet · Pubmed #29478841.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Numerous randomised trials have compared coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for patients with coronary artery disease. However, no studies have been powered to detect a difference in mortality between the revascularisation strategies. METHODS: We did a systematic review up to July 19, 2017, to identify randomised clinical trials comparing CABG with PCI using stents. Eligible studies included patients with multivessel or left main coronary artery disease who did not present with acute myocardial infarction, did PCI with stents (bare-metal or drug-eluting), and had more than 1 year of follow-up for all-cause mortality. In a collaborative, pooled analysis of individual patient data from the identified trials, we estimated all-cause mortality up to 5 years using Kaplan-Meier analyses and compared PCI with CABG using a random-effects Cox proportional-hazards model stratified by trial. Consistency of treatment effect was explored in subgroup analyses, with subgroups defined according to baseline clinical and anatomical characteristics. FINDINGS: We included 11 randomised trials involving 11 518 patients selected by heart teams who were assigned to PCI (n=5753) or to CABG (n=5765). 976 patients died over a mean follow-up of 3·8 years (SD 1·4). Mean Synergy between PCI with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX) score was 26·0 (SD 9·5), with 1798 (22·1%) of 8138 patients having a SYNTAX score of 33 or higher. 5 year all-cause mortality was 11·2% after PCI and 9·2% after CABG (hazard ratio [HR] 1·20, 95% CI 1·06-1·37; p=0·0038). 5 year all-cause mortality was significantly different between the interventions in patients with multivessel disease (11·5% after PCI vs 8·9% after CABG; HR 1·28, 95% CI 1·09-1·49; p=0·0019), including in those with diabetes (15·5% vs 10·0%; 1·48, 1·19-1·84; p=0·0004), but not in those without diabetes (8·7% vs 8·0%; 1·08, 0·86-1·36; p=0·49). SYNTAX score had a significant effect on the difference between the interventions in multivessel disease. 5 year all-cause mortality was similar between the interventions in patients with left main disease (10·7% after PCI vs 10·5% after CABG; 1·07, 0·87-1·33; p=0·52), regardless of diabetes status and SYNTAX score. INTERPRETATION: CABG had a mortality benefit over PCI in patients with multivessel disease, particularly those with diabetes and higher coronary complexity. No benefit for CABG over PCI was seen in patients with left main disease. Longer follow-up is needed to better define mortality differences between the revascularisation strategies. FUNDING: None.

23 Review Imaging assessment of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds. 2018

Sotomi, Yohei / Suwannasom, Pannipa / Tenekecioglu, Erhan / Collet, Carlos / Nakatani, Shimpei / Okamura, Takayuki / Muramatsu, Takashi / Ishibashi, Yuki / Tateishi, Hiroki / Miyazaki, Yosuke / Asano, Taku / Katagiri, Yuki / von Zur Muehlen, Constantin / Tanabe, Kengo / Kozuma, Ken / Ozaki, Yukio / Serruys, Patrick W / Onuma, Yoshinobu. ·Department of Cardiology, Osaka Police Hospital, Osaka, Japan. · Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Faculty of Medicine, Northern Region Heart Center, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · ThoraxCenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Japan. · Department of Cardiology, Fujita Health University Hospital, Toyoake, Japan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan. · Faculty of Medicine, Heart Center Freiburg University, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Division of Cardiology, Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, Mitsui Memorial Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Teikyo University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · NHLI, Imperial College London, London, UK. patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. · , P.O. Box 2125, 3000 CC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. · Cardialysis, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. ·Cardiovasc Interv Ther · Pubmed #28766253.

ABSTRACT: Vascular reparative therapy has become a reality with bioresorbable scaffolds (BRSs). To assess acute and long-term performance of the device, multimodality imaging would be essential. Radiopacity of metal hinders the imaging assessment, whereas radiolucent polymeric scaffolds allow for a precise imaging assessment with either invasive or non-invasive modality at baseline and at follow-up, which is one of the advantages of polymeric BRSs. Recent large trials evaluating clinical results of the first-generation BRS technology raised concerns about the safety and efficacy of these devices, namely, scaffold thrombosis. Intensive research with multimodality imaging in the field is being conducted to have in-depth understanding of the issues, which will facilitate the improvement of implantation techniques and the development of the next-generation BRSs. The current review focuses on the clinical application of the imaging modalities to assess the short- and long-term performance of the Absorb BVS.

24 Review Intravascular imaging in cardiovascular ageing. 2018

Bourantas, Christos V / Crake, Tom / Zhang, Yao-Jun / Ozkor, Mick / Ahmed, Javed / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Barts Heart Centre, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK; Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University College London, London, UK. Electronic address: christos.bourantas@bartshealth.nhs.uk. · Barts Heart Centre, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Department of Cardiology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. · Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; International Centre for Circulatory Health, NHLI, Imperial College London, London, UK. ·Exp Gerontol · Pubmed #28522312.

ABSTRACT: Ageing is related to complex molecular, inflammatory and biochemical changes that affect coronary pathology and often lead to coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events. Intravascular imaging is considered as the ideal technique to study coronary plaque morphology and assess its burden. Over the recent years several studies have been performed that investigated the association between pathophysiological mechanisms that promote vascular ageing and plaque morphology. In addition, several reports have compared plaque pathology in different age groups and a few studies included serial intravascular imaging to assess changes in the atheroma burden and compositional characteristics of the plaque. This review article summarizes the evidence derived from intravascular imaging studies about the implications of vascular ageing on coronary artery morphology and discusses the potential of coronary imaging in assessing atherosclerotic evolution.

25 Review Local Hemodynamic Forces After Stenting: Implications on Restenosis and Thrombosis. 2017

Ng, Jaryl / Bourantas, Christos V / Torii, Ryo / Ang, Hui Ying / Tenekecioglu, Erhan / Serruys, Patrick W / Foin, Nicolas. ·From the National Heart Centre Singapore (J.N., H.Y.A., N.F.) · Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (J.N.) · Departments of Cardiovascular Sciences (C.V.B.) and Mechanical Engineering (R.T.), University College London, United Kingdom · Department of Cardiology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom (C.V.B.) · Thoraxcenter, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam Erasmus University, The Netherlands (E.T., P.W.S.) · National Heart & Lung Institute, Imperial College London, United Kingdom (P.W.S.) · and Duke-NUS Medical School, National University of Singapore (N.F.). ·Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol · Pubmed #29122816.

ABSTRACT: Local hemodynamic forces are well-known to modulate atherosclerotic evolution, which remains one of the largest cause of death worldwide. Percutaneous coronary interventions with stent implantation restores blood flow to the downstream myocardium and is only limited by stent failure caused by restenosis, stent thrombosis, or neoatherosclerosis. Cumulative evidence has shown that local hemodynamic forces affect restenosis and the platelet activation process, modulating the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to stent failure. This article first covers the pathophysiological mechanisms through which wall shear stress regulates arterial disease formation/neointima proliferation and the role of shear rate on stent thrombosis. Subsequently, the article reviews the current evidence on (1) the implications of stent design on the local hemodynamic forces, and (2) how stent/scaffold expansion can influence local flow, thereby affecting the risk of adverse events.

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