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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
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These are the 5 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Progression of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. 2018

Yun, Jae-Seung / Park, Yong-Moon / Cha, Seon-Ah / Ahn, Yu-Bae / Ko, Seung-Hyun. ·Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Ji-dong, Paldal-gu, Suwon, 16247, South Korea. · Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, Durham, NC, USA. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Ji-dong, Paldal-gu, Suwon, 16247, South Korea. kosh@catholic.ac.kr. ·Cardiovasc Diabetol · Pubmed #30071872.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To examine whether the progression rate of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) stage is an independent predictive factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Standardized cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests (CARTs) using traditional Ewing method were performed at baseline. The follow-up CARTs was recommended once every two years. We estimated the primary CVD endpoint, defined as coronary artery disease and ischemic stroke. The association between the progression rate of CAN stage and CVD was examined using time-dependent Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: At baseline, 578 patients completed follow-up CARTs; the cohort comprised 329 women (56.9%) with a mean age of 58.3 ± 10.3 years and a mean diabetes duration of 10.1 ± 6.2 years. One hundred and seventy-six patients (30.4%) developed CAN progression between baseline and follow-up CARTs. In the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, patients with CAN progression demonstrated a 3.32 times higher risk (95% confidence interval, CI 1.81-6.14, P < 0.001) of CVD than those without CAN progression. Patients who experienced CAN progression from the normal to definite stage had the greatest risk of CVD compared to other patients (hazard ratio 4.91, 95% CI 2.05-11.77, P for trend = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: CAN stage progression was associated with an increased risk of CVD in this type 2 diabetes cohort. Patients with rapid CAN progression had the greatest risk of CVD. Thus, regular screening and risk management of CAN progression is necessary to prevent CVD.

2 Article Strategies to decrease oxidative stress biomarker levels in human medical conditions: A meta-analysis on 8-iso-prostaglandin F 2018

van 't Erve, Thomas J. ·Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, 27709 NC, USA; Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, 27709 NC, USA. Electronic address: thomas.vanterve@nih.gov. ·Redox Biol · Pubmed #29775960.

ABSTRACT: The widespread detection of elevated oxidative stress levels in many medical conditions has led to numerous efforts to design interventions to reduce its effects. Efforts have been wide-ranging, from dietary changes to administration of antioxidants, supplements, e.g., omega-3-fatty acids, and many medications. However, there is still no systemic assessment of the efficacy of treatments for oxidative stress reduction across a variety of medical conditions. The goal of this meta-analysis is, by combining multiple studies, to quantitate the change in the levels of the popular oxidative stress biomarker 8-iso-prostaglandin F

3 Article A Novel Protective Function of 5-Methoxytryptophan in Vascular Injury. 2016

Ho, Yen-Chun / Wu, Meng-Ling / Su, Chen-Hsuan / Chen, Chung-Huang / Ho, Hua-Hui / Lee, Guan-Lin / Lin, Wei-Shiang / Lin, Wen-Yu / Hsu, Yu-Juei / Kuo, Cheng-Chin / Wu, Kenneth K / Yet, Shaw-Fang. ·Institute of Cellular and System Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan. · Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. · National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Metabolomic Research Center and Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. · Department of Medical Sciences and Institute of Biotechnology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #27146795.

ABSTRACT: 5-Methoxytryptophan (5-MTP), a 5-methoxyindole metabolite of tryptophan metabolism, was recently shown to suppress inflammatory mediator-induced cancer cell proliferation and migration. However, the role of 5-MTP in vascular disease is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether 5-MTP protects against vascular remodeling following arterial injury. Measurements of serum 5-MTP levels in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) showed that serum 5-MTP concentrations were inversely correlated with CAD. To test the role of 5-MTP in occlusive vascular disease, we subjected mice to a carotid artery ligation model of neointima formation and treated mice with vehicle or 5-MTP. Compared with vehicle-treated mice, 5-MTP significantly reduced intimal thickening by 40% 4 weeks after ligation. BrdU incorporation assays revealed that 5-MTP significantly reduced VSMC proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, 5-MTP reduced endothelial loss and detachment, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the ligated arterial wall, suggesting attenuation of endothelial dysfunction. Signaling pathway analysis indicated that 5-MTP mediated its effects predominantly via suppressing p38 MAPK signaling in endothelial and VSMCs. Our data demonstrate a novel vascular protective function of 5-MTP against arterial injury-induced intimal hyperplasia. 5-MTP might be a therapeutic target for preventing and/or treating vascular remodeling.

4 Article Cytochrome P450-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and coronary artery disease in humans: a targeted metabolomics study. 2016

Oni-Orisan, Akinyemi / Edin, Matthew L / Lee, John Andrew / Wells, Michael A / Christensen, Erin S / Vendrov, Kimberly C / Lih, Fred B / Tomer, Kenneth B / Bai, Xue / Taylor, Joan M / Stouffer, George A / Zeldin, Darryl C / Lee, Craig R. ·Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. · Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC. · Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. · Department of Pathology and Lab Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. · Department of Pathology and Lab Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC McAllister Heart Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. · McAllister Heart Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Division of Cardiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. · Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC McAllister Heart Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC craig_lee@unc.edu. ·J Lipid Res · Pubmed #26555503.

ABSTRACT: Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) exhibit potent cardiovascular protective effects in preclinical models, and promoting the effects of EETs has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for coronary artery disease (CAD). The relationship between circulating EET levels and CAD extent in humans, however, remains unknown. A panel of free (unesterified) plasma eicosanoid metabolites was quantified in 162 patients referred for coronary angiography, and associations with extent of CAD [no apparent CAD (N = 39), nonobstructive CAD (N = 51), and obstructive CAD (N = 72)] were evaluated. A significant relationship between free EET levels and CAD extent was observed (P = 0.003) such that the presence of obstructive CAD was associated with lower circulating EET levels. This relationship was confirmed in multiple regression analysis where CAD extent was inversely and significantly associated with EET levels (P = 0.013), and with a biomarker of EET biosynthesis (P < 0.001), independent of clinical and demographic factors. Furthermore, quantitative enrichment analysis revealed that these associations were the most pronounced compared with other eicosanoid metabolism pathways. Collectively, these findings suggest that the presence of obstructive CAD is associated with lower EET metabolite levels secondary to suppressed EET biosynthesis. Novel strategies that promote the effects of EETs may have therapeutic promise for patients with obstructive CAD.

5 Minor Reply-Letter to the Editor-Different dietary approaches and coronary plaque morphology. 2018

Park, Yong-Moon Mark / Merchant, Anwar T. ·Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA. Electronic address: mark.park@nih.gov. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. ·Clin Nutr · Pubmed #29409660.

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