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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Universita Vita-Salute San Raffaele
Based on 236 articles published since 2010
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These are the 236 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Universita Vita-Salute San Raffaele during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10
1 Editorial Psoriasis and acute coronary syndrome risk. 2019

Sachinidis, Alexandros / Nikolic, Dragana / Rizzo, Manfredi / Cianflone, Domenico. ·PROMISE Department, School of Medicine, University of Palermo, Italy. · PROMISE Department, School of Medicine, University of Palermo, Italy. Electronic address: manfredi.rizzo@unipa.it. · San Raffaele Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #30878239.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Bioresorbable Scaffolds: A Complex Journey to the "Promised Land". 2017

Colombo, Antonio / Azzalini, Lorenzo. ·Division of Interventional Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: colombo.antonio@hsr.it. · Division of Interventional Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29216998.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Percutaneous treatment of left main disease: Still learning about the optimal PCI strategy. 2016

Ancona, Marco / Chieffo, Alaide. ·Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: chieffo.alaide@hsr.it. ·Cardiovasc Revasc Med · Pubmed #27988083.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Multimodality evaluation of percutaneous closure of coronary fistula using AMPLATZER Vascular Plug IV. 2016

Regazzoli, Damiano / Giglio, Manuela / Besana, Francesca / Leone, Pier Pasquale / Tanaka, Akihito / Ancona, Marco Bruno / Mangieri, Antonio / Montorfano, Matteo / Giannini, Francesco / De Angelis, Giuseppe / Colombo, Antonio / Latib, Azeem. ·Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele University Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Center for Cardiovascular Prevention, San Raffaele University Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Cardiology Unit, ASST Rhodense, Rho, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele University Hospital, Milan, Italy; Interventional Cardiology Unit, EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele University Hospital, Milan, Italy; Interventional Cardiology Unit, EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: alatib@gmail.com. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #27760415.

ABSTRACT: Congenital coronary-pulmonary fistulas are uncommon coronary anomalies. We present a case of a 63-year-old woman with a tortuous fistula between the proximal left anterior descending and main pulmonary artery which was effectively closed using an AMPLATZER Vascular Plug IV.

5 Editorial A coronary solution to manage a vascular peripheral obstruction post transcatheter aortic valve implantation. 2016

Yazdani, Kaveh O / Jabbour, Richard J / Mangieri, Antonio / Cacucci, Michele / Colombo, Antonio / Latib, Azeem. ·Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Interventional Cardiology Unit, EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy. · Cardiology Department, Ospedale Maggiore, Crema, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Interventional Cardiology Unit, EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: info@emocolumbus.it. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #27522383.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial The Clinical Significance and Management Implications of Chronic Total Occlusion Associated With Surgical Coronary Artery Revascularization. 2016

Azzalini, Lorenzo. ·San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: azzalini.lorenzo@hsr.it. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #27140947.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Experience and accuracy can result in parity of outcomes following one or two stents for left main stem bifurcation disease. 2015

Colombo, Antonio / Ruparelia, Neil. ·Department of Interventional Cardiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · EMO-GVM, Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy. · Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25999274.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial When you ask yourself the question "should I protect the side branch?": the answer is "yes". 2015

Colombo, Antonio / Ruparelia, Neil. ·San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: info@emocolumbus.it. · San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25616816.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Decision making between percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery in multi-vessel coronary disease. 2014

Buchanan, Gill Louise / Giustino, Gennaro / Chieffo, Alaide. ·Department of Cardiology, North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust, Carlisle, United Kingdom. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Hospital, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: chieffo.alaide@hsr.it. ·Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) · Pubmed #24863589.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Coronary stenosis and transmural perfusion across the left ventricular wall. 2014

Camici, Paolo G / Rimoldi, Ornella E. ·Vita Salute University and Scientific Institute, San Raffaele, Milan, Italy camici.paolo@hsr.it. · Vita Salute University and Scientific Institute, San Raffaele, Milan, Italy CNR IBFM Segrate, Italy. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #24847153.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Is "the bigger the better" still valid for drug-eluting stents? 2014

Panoulas, Vasileios F / Colombo, Antonio. ·Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Interventional Cardiology Unit, EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy; National Heart and Lung Institute (Division of ICL), Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24753167.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial One versus two stents: the cause or the effect? 2014

Colombo, Antonio / Chieffo, Alaide. ·Interventional Cardiology Unit, EMO GVM Columbus and San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: colombo.antonio@hsr.it. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, EMO GVM Columbus and San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24529930.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Review Medical Therapy for Long-Term Prevention of Atherothrombosis Following an Acute Coronary Syndrome: JACC State-of-the-Art Review. 2018

Gallone, Guglielmo / Baldetti, Luca / Pagnesi, Matteo / Latib, Azeem / Colombo, Antonio / Libby, Peter / Giannini, Francesco. ·Unit of Cardiovascular Interventions, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Division of Cardiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Città della Scienza e della Salute Hospital, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Unit of Cardiovascular Interventions, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Cardiology, Montefiore Medical Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: https://twitter.com/azeemlatib. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, GVM Care & Research Maria Cecilia Hospital, Cotignola, Italy. Electronic address: colombo.antonio@hsr.it. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, GVM Care & Research Maria Cecilia Hospital, Cotignola, Italy. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #30522652.

ABSTRACT: Following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), heightened predisposition to atherothrombotic events may persist for years. Advances in understanding the pathobiology that underlies this elevated risk furnish a mechanistic basis for devising long-term secondary prevention strategies. Recent progress in ACS pathophysiology has challenged the focus on single "vulnerable plaques" and shifted toward a more holistic consideration of the "vulnerable patient," thus highlighting the primacy of medical therapy in secondary prevention. Despite current guideline-directed medical therapy, a consistent proportion of post-ACS patients experience recurrent atherothrombosis due to unaddressed "residual risk": contemporary clinical trials underline the pivotal role of platelets, coagulation, cholesterol, and systemic inflammation and provide a perspective on a personalized, targeted approach. Emerging data sheds new light on heretofore unrecognized residual risk factors. This review aims to summarize evolving evidence relative to secondary prevention of atherothrombosis, with a focus on recent advances that promise to transform the management of the post-ACS patient.

14 Review A Practical Approach to the Management of Complications During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. 2018

Giannini, Francesco / Candilio, Luciano / Mitomo, Satoru / Ruparelia, Neil / Chieffo, Alaide / Baldetti, Luca / Ponticelli, Francesco / Latib, Azeem / Colombo, Antonio. ·Unit of Cardiovascular Interventions, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: giannini.francesco@hsr.it. · Unit of Cardiovascular Interventions, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Cardiovascular Department, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Unit of Cardiovascular Interventions, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #30236352.

ABSTRACT: Percutaneous coronary intervention relieves symptoms in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease resistant to optimal medical therapy and alters the natural history of acute coronary syndromes. However, adverse procedural outcomes may occur during the intervention. Knowledge of possible complications and their timely management are essential for the practicing cardiologist and can be life-saving for the patient. In this review, the authors summarize potential complications of percutaneous coronary intervention focusing on their practical management.

15 Review Percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft in left main coronary artery disease: a comprehensive meta-analysis of adjusted observational studies and randomized controlled trials. 2018

Bertaina, Maurizio / De Filippo, Ovidio / Iannaccone, Mario / Colombo, Antonio / Stone, Gregg / Serruys, Patrick / Mancone, Massimo / Omedè, Pierluigi / Conrotto, Federico / Pennone, Mauro / Kimura, Takeshi / Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi / Zoccai, Giuseppe Biondi / Sheiban, Imad / Templin, Christian / Benedetto, Umberto / Cavalcante, Rafael / D'Amico, Maurizio / Gaudino, Mario / Moretti, Claudio / Gaita, Fiorenzo / D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio. ·Division of Cardiology, Città Della Salute e della Scienza, Molinette Hospital, Turin. · Interventional Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Cardiovascular Research and Education Columbia University Medical Center, Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA. · Department of Interventional Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Nephrology, Anesthesiology and Geriatric Sciences, University 'La Sapienza' of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto University, Japan. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina. · Department of AngioCardioNeurology, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli. · Cardiology Department, Pederzoli Hospital, Verona, Italy. · University Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Bristol Heart Institute, University of Bristol, School of Clinical Sciences, Bristol, United Kingdom. · Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) · Pubmed #30095584.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Treatment of patients with ULMCA (unprotected left main coronary artery disease) with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been compared with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), without conclusive results. METHODS: All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies with multivariate analysis comparing PCI and CABG for ULMCA were included. Major cardiovascular events (MACEs, composite of all-cause death, MI, definite or probable ST, target vessel revascularization and stroke) were the primary end points, whereas its single components were the secondary ones, along with stent thrombosis, graft occlusion and in-hospital death and stroke. Subgroup analyses were performed according to Syntax score. RESULTS: Six RCTs (4717 patients) and 20 observational studies with multivariate adjustment (14 597 patients) were included. After 5 (3-5.5) years, MACE rate was higher for PCI [odds ratio (OR) 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.14], without difference in death, whereas more relevant risk of MI was because of observational studies. Coronary stenting increased risk of revascularization (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.34-1.72). At meta-regression, performance of PCI was improved by use of intra-coronary imaging and worsened by first generation stents, whereas two arterial grafts increased benefit of CABG. For patients with Syntax score less than 22, MACE rates did not differ, whereas for higher values, CABG reduced MACE because of lower risk of revascularization. Incidence of graft occlusion was 3.24% (2.25-4.23), whereas 2.13% (1.28-2.98: all CI 95%) of patients experienced stent thrombosis. CONCLUSION: Surgical revascularization reduces risk of revascularization for ULMCA patients, especially for those with Syntax score greater than 22, with a higher risk of in-hospital death. Intra-coronary imaging and use of arterial grafts improved performance of revascularization strategies.

16 Review Cardiovascular disease burden among human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals. 2018

Demir, Ozan M / Candilio, Luciano / Fuster, Daniel / Muga, Robert / Barbaro, Giuseppe / Colombo, Antonio / Azzalini, Lorenzo. ·Interventional Cardiology Division, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Department of Cardiology, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College NHS Healthcare Trust, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Internal Medicine, Addiction Unit, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Badalona, Spain. · Department of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Policlinico Umberto Primo, Rome, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Division, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Division, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: azzalini.lorenzo@hsr.it. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #29885686.

ABSTRACT: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection affects 36.7 million people worldwide, it accounted for 1.1 million deaths in 2015. The advent of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has been associated with a decrease in HIV-related morbidity and mortality. However, there are increasing concerns about long-lasting effects of chronic inflammation and immune activation, leading to premature aging and HIV-related mortality. Cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary artery disease, are among the leading causes of death in HIV-infected patients, accounting for up to 15% of total deaths in high income countries. Furthermore, as cART availability expands to low-income countries, the burden of cardiovascular related mortality is likely to rise. Hence, over the next decade HIV-associated cardiovascular disease burden is expected to increase globally. In this review, we summarize our understanding of the pathogenesis and risk factors associated with HIV infection and cardiovascular disease, in particular coronary artery disease.

17 Review Update in the Percutaneous Management of Coronary Chronic Total Occlusions. 2018

Tajti, Peter / Burke, M Nicholas / Karmpaliotis, Dimitri / Alaswad, Khaldoon / Werner, Gerald S / Azzalini, Lorenzo / Carlino, Mauro / Patel, Mitul / Mashayekhi, Kambis / Egred, Mohaned / Krestyaninov, Oleg / Khelimskii, Dmitrii / Nicholson, William J / Ungi, Imre / Galassi, Alfredo R / Banerjee, Subhash / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·Minneapolis Heart Institute, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Division of Invasive Cardiology, University of Szeged, Second Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology Center, Szeged, Hungary. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Department of Cardiology, Columbia University, New York, New York. · Department of Cardiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Medizinische Klinik I (Cardiology and Intensive Care), Klinikum Darmstadt GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany. · Division of Interventional Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Cardiology, UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center and VA San Diego Healthcare System, La Jolla, California. · Division of Cardiology and Angiology II, University Heart Center Freiburg Bad Krozingen, Bad Krozingen, Germany. · Department of Cardiology, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. · Meshalkin Siberian Federal Biomedical Research Center, Ministry of Health of Russian Federation, Novosibirsk, Russian Federation. · Department of Cardiology, WellSpan York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania. · Division of Invasive Cardiology, University of Szeged, Second Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology Center, Szeged, Hungary. · Department of Medical Sciences and Pediatrics, Catheterization Laboratory and Cardiovascular Interventional Unit, Cannizzaro Hospital, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. · VA North Texas Health Care System and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, Minnesota; VA North Texas Health Care System and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Electronic address: esbrilakis@gmail.com. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29550088.

ABSTRACT: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusions (CTOs) has been rapidly evolving during recent years. With improvement in equipment and techniques, high success rates can be achieved at experienced centers, although overall success rates remain low. Prospective, randomized-controlled data regarding optimal use and indications for CTO PCI remain limited. CTO PCI should be performed when the anticipated benefit exceeds the potential risk. New high-quality studies of the clinical outcomes and techniques of CTO PCI are needed, as is the expansion of expert centers and operators that can achieve excellent clinical outcomes in this challenging patient and lesion subgroup. In the current review the authors summarize the latest publications in CTO PCI and provide an overview of the current state of the field.

18 Review Patient selection and percutaneous technique of unprotected left main revascularization. 2018

Testa, L / Latib, A / Bollati, M / Bedogni, F. ·Department of Cardiology, IRCCS Pol. S. Donato, S. Donato Milanese, Milan, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, EMO GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29521440.

ABSTRACT: Increasing evidence suggests that percutaneous coronary intervention with newer generation drug-eluting stents may be an acceptable alternative, or even preferred in selected cases to the surgical approach, in patients with left main disease. This review will discuss the anatomic factors, the clinical variables, and the procedural strategies to consider, including physiology assessment and imaging guidance, in order to optimize outcomes.

19 Review Revascularization in 2017: Technical and diagnostic improvements in PCI: more pieces in the puzzle. 2018

Colombo, Antonio / Mangieri, Antonio. ·IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy. ·Nat Rev Cardiol · Pubmed #29238060.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Review International standardization of diagnostic criteria for microvascular angina. 2018

Ong, Peter / Camici, Paolo G / Beltrame, John F / Crea, Filippo / Shimokawa, Hiroaki / Sechtem, Udo / Kaski, Juan Carlos / Bairey Merz, C Noel / Anonymous4440923. ·Department of Cardiology, Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Stuttgart, Germany. Electronic address: Peter.Ong@rbk.de. · Vita Salute University and San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy. · The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Institute of Cardiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. · Department of Cardiology, Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Stuttgart, Germany. · Cardiovascular and Cell Sciences Research Institute, St George's, University of London, London, UK. · Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #29031990.

ABSTRACT: Standardization of diagnostic criteria for ischemic symptoms due to coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is needed for further investigation of patients presenting with anginal chest pain consistent with "microvascular angina" (MVA). At the annual Coronary Vasomotion Disorders International Study Group (COVADIS) Summits held in August 2014 and 2015, the following criteria were agreed upon for the investigative diagnosis of microvascular angina: (1) presence of symptoms suggestive of myocardial ischemia; (2) objective documentation of myocardial ischemia, as assessed by currently available techniques; (3) absence of obstructive CAD (<50% coronary diameter reduction and/or fractional flow reserve (FFR) >0.80) (4) confirmation of a reduced coronary blood flow reserve and/or inducible microvascular spasm. These standardized criteria provide an investigative structure for mechanistic, diagnostic, prognostic and clinical trial studies aimed at developing an evidence base needed for guidelines in this growing patient population. Standardized criteria will facilitate microvascular angina registries and recruitment of suitable patients into clinical trials. Mechanistic research will also benefit from the implementation of standardized diagnostic criteria for MVA.

21 Review The Reducer device in patients with angina pectoris: mechanisms, indications, and perspectives. 2018

Konigstein, Maayan / Giannini, Francesco / Banai, Shmuel. ·Department of Cardiology, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, 6 Weizman Street, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel. · Unit of Cardiovascular Interventions, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina Milano 60, 20132, Milan, Italy. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #29020417.

ABSTRACT: Despite available pharmacological and interventional therapies, refractory angina is a common and disabling clinical condition, and a major public health problem, which affects patients' quality-of-life, and has a significant impact upon health care resources. Persistent angina is common not only in patients who are not good candidates for revascularization, but also in patients following successful revascularization. Clearly, there is a need for additional treatment options for refractory angina beyond currently available pharmacological and interventional therapies. It is of pivotal importance, in this condition, to practice a patient-centred health assessment approach, measuring success of a new therapy by its effects on patients' symptoms, functional status, and quality-of-life, rather than hard clinical endpoints as used in clinical studies. The coronary sinus Reducer is a novel technology designed to reduce disabling symptoms and improve quality-of-life of patients suffering from refractory angina. This review serves to update the clinician as to current evidence and future perspectives of the optimal utilization of this innovative technology.

22 Review Impact of design of coronary stents and length of dual antiplatelet therapies on ischaemic and bleeding events: a network meta-analysis of 64 randomized controlled trials and 102 735 patients. 2017

D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio / Iannaccone, Mario / Saint-Hilary, Gaelle / Bertaina, Maurizio / Schulz-Schüpke, Stefanie / Wahn Lee, Cheol / Chieffo, Alaide / Helft, Gerard / Gili, Sebastiano / Barbero, Umberto / Biondi Zoccai, Giuseppe / Moretti, Claudio / Ugo, Fabrizio / D'Amico, Maurizio / Garbo, Roberto / Stone, Gregg / Rettegno, Sara / Omedè, Pierluigi / Conrotto, Federico / Templin, Christian / Colombo, Antonio / Park, Seung-Jung / Kastrati, Adnan / Hildick-Smith, David / Gasparini, Mauro / Gaita, Fiorenzo. ·Department of Cardiology, Città Della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, Corso Bramante 88/90, 10126 Turin, Italy. · Department of Cardiology, San Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Piazza del Donatore di Sangue 3, 10154 Turin, Italy. · Department of Mathematical Sciences "G. L. Lagrange", Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin, Italy. · Department of Cardiology, Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München Lazarettstrasse 36, Munich 80636, Germany. · Department of Cardiology, The Heart Institute, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 05505, Korea. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina Milano, 60, 20132 Milan, Italy. · Department of Cardiology, Cardiology Institute, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, UPMC, APHP, 47-83 Boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · Department of Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome, Italy. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Corso Della Repubblica 79, 04100 Latina, Italy. · Department of AngioCardioNeurology, IRCCS Neuromed, Via Atinense, 18, 86077 Pozzilli, Italy. · Department of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, USA Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 161 Ft. Washington Ave. Herbert Irving Pavilion 6th Floor, New York, NY 10032 212.305.7060, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Sussex Cardiac Centre, Barry Building, Eastern Rd, Brighton BN2 5BE, UK. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #29020300.

ABSTRACT: Aims: The differential impact on ischaemic and bleeding events of the type of drug-eluting stent [durable polymer stents [DES] vs. biodegradable polymer stents vs. bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS)] and length of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) remains to be defined. Methods and results: Randomized controlled trials comparing different types of DES and/or DAPT durations were selected. The primary endpoint was Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events (MACE) [a composite of death, myocardial infarction (MI), and target vessel revascularization]. Definite stent thrombosis (ST) and single components of MACE were secondary endpoints. The arms of interest were: BRS with 12 months of DAPT (12mDAPT), biodegradable polymer stent with 12mDAPT, durable polymer stent [everolimus-eluting (EES), zotarolimus-eluting (ZES)] with 12mDAPT, EES/ZES with <12 months of DAPT, and EES/ZES with >12 months of DAPT (DAPT > 12 m). Sixty-four studies with 150 arms and 102 735 patients were included. After a median follow-up of 20 months, MACE rates were similar in the different arms of interest. EES/ZES with DAPT > 12 m reported a lower incidence of MI than the other groups, while BRS showed a higher rate of ST when compared to EES/ZES, irrespective of DAPT length. A higher risk of major bleedings was observed for DAPT > 12 m as compared to shorter DAPT. Conclusion: Durable and biodegradable polymer stents along with BRS report a similar rate of MACE irrespective of DAPT length. Fewer MI are observed with EES/ZES with DAPT > 12 m, while a higher rate of ST is reported for BRS when compared to EES/ZES, independently from DAPT length. Stent type may partially affect the outcome together with DAPT length.

23 Review Current Risk of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Coronary Angiography and Intervention: A Reappraisal of the Literature. 2017

Azzalini, Lorenzo / Candilio, Luciano / McCullough, Peter A / Colombo, Antonio. ·Division of Interventional Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: azzalini.lorenzo@hsr.it. · Division of Interventional Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Baylor University Medical Center and Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute, Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital, Dallas, Texas, USA. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #28941604.

ABSTRACT: Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is the acute impairment of renal function further to the intravascular administration of iodinated contrast media, and occurs most frequently after coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, and contrast-enhanced computed tomography. CI-AKI has been associated with the development of acute renal failure, worsening of chronic kidney disease, requirement for dialysis, prolonged hospital stay, and higher mortality rates and health care costs. Recently, a number of studies suggested that contrast media exposure might not be the causative agent in the occurrence of acute kidney injury, particularly in stable patients who receive small to moderate amounts of contrast media. However, those who undergo coronary angiography and intervention are indeed subject to an increased hazard of CI-AKI, in view of a more significant contrast media exposure as well as the presence of concomitant risk factors. Solid randomized clinical trials are therefore required to identify preventative strategies to reduce the risk of CI-AKI and its complications in these patients.

24 Review New generation bioresorbable scaffold technologies: an update on novel devices and clinical results. 2017

Regazzoli, Damiano / Leone, Pier Pasquale / Colombo, Antonio / Latib, Azeem. ·Interventional Cardiology Unit, Cardiology and Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, San Raffaele University Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Interventional Cardiology Unit, EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan, Italy. ·J Thorac Dis · Pubmed #28894604.

ABSTRACT: Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) represent a novel horizon in interventional cardiology and may lead to some potential long-term advantages including the restoration of vasomotion, positive remodeling and a reduced incidence of late and very-late scaffold thrombosis (ScT). This technology, introduced to overcome limitations of current metallic drug-eluting stents (DES), is constantly and rapidly evolving with many companies working on bioresorbable devices. The aim of this review is to present an update on the most promising scaffolds that are under development.

25 Review Should We Still Have Bare-Metal Stents Available in Our Catheterization Laboratory? 2017

Colombo, Antonio / Giannini, Francesco / Briguori, Carlo. ·Unit of Cardiovascular Interventions, Istituto Di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: colombo.antonio@hsr.it. · Unit of Cardiovascular Interventions, Istituto Di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #28750704.

ABSTRACT: The introduction of bare-metal stents (BMS) has represented a major advancement over plain old balloon angioplasty in the management of coronary artery disease. However, the high rates of target lesion revascularization associated with use of BMS have led to the development of drug-eluting stents, which require prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy due to the increased risk of late and very late stent thrombosis. The improvements in newer-generation drug-eluting stents have translated into better safety and efficacy compared with earlier generation and BMS, thus allowing shorter dual antiplatelet therapy duration. Here, we aim to provide reasons as to why we still need BMS in our cardiac catheterization laboratory.

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