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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from University of Amsterdam
Based on 224 articles published since 2008
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These are the 224 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from University of Amsterdam during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9
1 Editorial Resting Versus Hyperemic Coronary Pressure Measurements for Stenosis Evaluation: The New Kids Have Come to Stay. 2017

van de Hoef, Tim P. ·AMC Heartcenter, Academic Medical Center - University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; and the Tergooi Hospital, Blaricum, the Netherlands. Electronic address: t.p.vandehoef@amc.uva.nl. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28365262.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Very late scaffold thrombosis after bioresorbable scaffold implantation: an unexpected new enemy on the horizon… or just a false alarm? 2016

Collet, Carlos / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #27753593.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Promising, but still a matter of debate. 2016

Sotomi, Yohei / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · NHLI, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27619745.

ABSTRACT: Several trials failed to demonstrate the efficacy of plaque modification device in patients with severely calcified coronary lesions. Safety and efficacy of the Diamondback 360® Coronary OAS have been demonstrated by the ORBIT II trial. The 2-year follow-up of the ORBIT II trial extends the favorable results previously shown at 30-day and 1-year follow-up. The single arm, non-randomized character of the trial with indirect historical comparison may restrict the results to hypothesis generating and entail further prospective randomized trials.

4 Editorial Coronary bifurcations in clinical practice: Tell me what we can do better. 2016

Collet, Carlos / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27400637.

ABSTRACT: In bifurcation lesion, a precise evaluation of lesion severity and disease extension requires the use of bifurcation (three branches) quantitative coronary angiography. The use of Intravascular imaging to guide PCI in bifurcation has shown to reduce clinical events. Selection and duration of the dual antiplatelet therapy after bifurcation lesion PCI require further investigation.

5 Editorial Polymer Biodegradation Kinetics: Do They Matter? 2016

Collet, Carlos / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, NHLI, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27173038.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Aortic wave speed: two-point and peripheral pressure methods compared with the gold standard. 2015

Westerhof, Nico / Westerhof, Berend E. ·aDepartment of Pulmonary Diseases, Institute for Cardiovascular Research, ICaR-VU, VU University Medical Center bEdwards Lifesciences BMEYE cHeart Failure Research Center, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #25909694.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial What value is there in an electrocardiogram X years before your cardiovascular event? 2015

Postema, Pieter G. ·Department of Cardiology, Heart Center, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: p.g.postema@cardiologie-amc.nl. ·J Electrocardiol · Pubmed #25465859.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Pre-angioplasty instantaneous wave-free ratio pullback and virtual revascularization: the pressure wire as a crystal ball. 2014

Piek, Jan J / van de Hoef, Tim P. ·AMC Heartcenter, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: j.j.piek@amc.uva.nl. · AMC Heartcenter, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25459528.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Standardizing definitions for hybrid coronary revascularization. 2014

Harskamp, Ralf E / Bonatti, Johannes O / Zhao, David X / Puskas, John D / de Winter, Robbert J / Alexander, John H / Halkos, Michael E. ·Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke Medicine, Durham, NC; Department of Cardiology of the Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: r.e.harskamp@gmail.com. · Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Ohio, and Cleveland Clinic, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. · Heart and Vascular Center of Excellence at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC. · Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga. · Department of Cardiology of the Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke Medicine, Durham, NC. ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #24280716.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review The STENTYS self-apposing stent technology in coronary artery disease: literature review and future directions. 2018

Lu, Huangling / De Winter, Robbert J / Koch, Karel T. ·a Department of Cardiology , Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. ·Expert Rev Med Devices · Pubmed #29927344.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Coronary stent designs have been through extensive developments in the past few decades. Since the introduction of the self-apposing STENTYS stent, several theoretical advantages of its nitinol platform have been clinically evaluated. This paper reviews the current status, ongoing work, and future directions of this device. Areas covered: The OPEN (STENTYS Coronary Bifurcation Stent System fOr the PErcutaNeous treatment of de novo lesions in native bifurcated coronary arteries) trials revealed high technical success rates of the STENTYS performance in bifurcation lesions. The Assessment of the Safety and Performance of the STENTYS self-expanding Coronary Stent in Acute Myocardial Infarction (APPOSITION) trials demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the device in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Optical coherence tomography showed better short-term strut apposition in patients treated with the STENTYS stent in APPOSITION IV. The clinical outcomes of the device in saphenous vein graft lesions and left main coronary artery disease are favorable. Expert commentary: Despite numerous theoretical advantages of the nitinol platform, superiority of the STENTYS self-apposing stent over currently available drug-eluting stents has not yet been proven. However, the ongoing registries evaluating the performance of the STENTYS Xposition will provide more insights in its clinical performance.

11 Review Current evidence for the safety and efficacy of the bio-engineered dual therapy COMBO stent. 2018

Kalkman, Deborah N / Chandrasekhar, Jaya / de Winter, Robbert J / Mehran, Roxana. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA. · Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA - Roxana.Mehran@mountsinai.org. ·Minerva Cardioangiol · Pubmed #29381028.

ABSTRACT: The novel dual-therapy COMBO stent aims to promote vessel healing after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with coronary artery disease. The pro-healing technique consists of an anti-CD34+ antibody layer that attracts circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which bind to the stent surface and allow rapid endothelialization by differentiation of the EPCs into normal endothelial cells. The COMBO stent combines this pro-healing technique with an abluminal drug elution of sirolimus. The promise of this dual-therapy stent is that it may safely allow a shortened duration of dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after stent placement. Moreover, with a mature endothelial layer, lower rates of in-stent restenosis may be expected. Clinical outcomes after COMBO stent implantation have been recently evaluated in both randomized trials and large, prospective, multicenter registries, showing low clinical event rates of in-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis. Randomized clinical trials (HARMONEE and RECOVERY) have demonstrated the non-inferiority of COMBO versus "first in class" second generation and newer generation drug-eluting stents. Safety and efficacy of 3 months of DAPT after COMBO stent placement in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome has been evaluated in the large REDUCE randomized controlled trial, showing non-inferiority to standard duration of 12-month DAPT. In this review we provide an overview of the current pre-clinical and clinical evidence for the performance of the COMBO stent.

12 Review Imaging assessment of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds. 2018

Sotomi, Yohei / Suwannasom, Pannipa / Tenekecioglu, Erhan / Collet, Carlos / Nakatani, Shimpei / Okamura, Takayuki / Muramatsu, Takashi / Ishibashi, Yuki / Tateishi, Hiroki / Miyazaki, Yosuke / Asano, Taku / Katagiri, Yuki / von Zur Muehlen, Constantin / Tanabe, Kengo / Kozuma, Ken / Ozaki, Yukio / Serruys, Patrick W / Onuma, Yoshinobu. ·Department of Cardiology, Osaka Police Hospital, Osaka, Japan. · Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Faculty of Medicine, Northern Region Heart Center, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · ThoraxCenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Japan. · Department of Cardiology, Fujita Health University Hospital, Toyoake, Japan. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan. · Faculty of Medicine, Heart Center Freiburg University, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Division of Cardiology, Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, Mitsui Memorial Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Teikyo University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · NHLI, Imperial College London, London, UK. patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. · , P.O. Box 2125, 3000 CC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. patrick.w.j.c.serruys@gmail.com. · Cardialysis, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. ·Cardiovasc Interv Ther · Pubmed #28766253.

ABSTRACT: Vascular reparative therapy has become a reality with bioresorbable scaffolds (BRSs). To assess acute and long-term performance of the device, multimodality imaging would be essential. Radiopacity of metal hinders the imaging assessment, whereas radiolucent polymeric scaffolds allow for a precise imaging assessment with either invasive or non-invasive modality at baseline and at follow-up, which is one of the advantages of polymeric BRSs. Recent large trials evaluating clinical results of the first-generation BRS technology raised concerns about the safety and efficacy of these devices, namely, scaffold thrombosis. Intensive research with multimodality imaging in the field is being conducted to have in-depth understanding of the issues, which will facilitate the improvement of implantation techniques and the development of the next-generation BRSs. The current review focuses on the clinical application of the imaging modalities to assess the short- and long-term performance of the Absorb BVS.

13 Review Familial hypercholesterolaemia. 2017

Defesche, Joep C / Gidding, Samuel S / Harada-Shiba, Mariko / Hegele, Robert A / Santos, Raul D / Wierzbicki, Anthony S. ·Department of Clinical Genetics, Academic Medical Centre, PO Box 22 660, University of Amsterdam, 1100 DD Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Nemours Cardiac Center, Alfred I. DuPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware, USA. · Department of Molecular Innovation in Lipidology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Suita, Osaka, Japan. · Department of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, Ontario, Canada. · Robarts Research Institute, 4288A 1151 Richmond Street North, University of Western Ontario, N6A 5B7 London, Ontario, Canada. · Lipid Clinic Heart Institute (Incor), University of São Paulo, Medical School Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil. · Preventive Medicine Centre and Cardiology Program Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. · Metabolic Medicine and Chemical Pathology, Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospitals, London, UK. ·Nat Rev Dis Primers · Pubmed #29219151.

ABSTRACT: Familial hypercholesterolaemia is a common inherited disorder characterized by abnormally elevated serum levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from birth, which in time can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most cases are caused by autosomal dominant mutations in LDLR, which encodes the LDL receptor, although mutations in other genes coding for proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism or LDLR function and processing, such as APOB and PCSK9, can also be causative, although less frequently. Several sets of diagnostic criteria for familial hypercholesterolaemia are available; common diagnostic features are an elevated LDL cholesterol level and a family history of hypercholesterolaemia or (premature) CVD. DNA-based methods to identify the underlying genetic defect are desirable but not essential for diagnosis. Cascade screening can contribute to early diagnosis of the disease in family members of an affected individual, which is crucial because familial hypercholesterolaemia can be asymptomatic for decades. Clinical severity depends on the nature of the gene that harbours the causative mutation, among other factors, and is further modulated by the type of mutation. Lifelong LDL cholesterol-lowering treatment substantially improves CVD-free survival and longevity. Statins are the first-line therapy, but additional drugs, such as ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, PCSK9 inhibitors and other emerging therapies, are often required.

14 Review Culprit Vessel-Only Versus Multivessel Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Cardiogenic Shock Complicating ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Collaborative Meta-Analysis. 2017

Kolte, Dhaval / Sardar, Partha / Khera, Sahil / Zeymer, Uwe / Thiele, Holger / Hochadel, Matthias / Radovanovic, Dragana / Erne, Paul / Hambraeus, Kristina / James, Stefan / Claessen, Bimmer E / Henriques, Jose P S / Mylotte, Darren / Garot, Philippe / Aronow, Wilbert S / Owan, Theophilus / Jain, Diwakar / Panza, Julio A / Frishman, William H / Fonarow, Gregg C / Bhatt, Deepak L / Aronow, Herbert D / Abbott, J Dawn. ·From the Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Brown University, Providence, RI (D.K., H.D.A., J.D.A.) · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (P.S., T.O.) · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, New York Medical College at Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla (S.K., W.S.A., D.J., J.A.P., W.H.F.) · Department of Cardiology, Institut für Herzinfarktforschung Ludwigshafen, Germany (U.Z., M.H.) · Department of Cardiology, University Heart Center Lübeck, Medical Clinic II, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Germany (H.T.) · German Cardiovascular Research Center (DZHK), Partner Site Hamburg/Kiel/Lübeck, Germany (H.T.) · AMIS Plus Data Center, University of Zurich, Switzerland (D.R., P.E.) · Department of Cardiology, Falun Hospital, Sweden (K.H.) · Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden (K.H., S.J.) · Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands (B.E.C., J.P.S.H.) · Department of Cardiology, Galway University Hospital, SAOLTA Healthcare Group, National University of Ireland (D.M.) · Department of Cardiology, Ramsay Générale de Santé, Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud, Hopital Privé Jacques Cartier, Massy, France (P.G.) · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, David-Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles (G.C.F.) · and Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart and Vascular Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29146672.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The optimal revascularization strategy in patients with multivessel disease presenting with cardiogenic shock complicating ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Databases were searched from 1999 to October 2016. Studies comparing immediate/single-stage multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention (MV-PCI) versus culprit vessel-only PCI (CO-PCI) in patients with multivessel disease, ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, and cardiogenic shock were included. Primary end point was short-term (in-hospital or 30 days) mortality. Secondary end points included long-term mortality, cardiovascular death, reinfarction, and repeat revascularization. Safety end points were in-hospital stroke, renal failure, and major bleeding. The meta-analysis included 11 nonrandomized studies and 5850 patients (1157 MV-PCI and 4693 CO-PCI). There was no significant difference in short-term mortality with MV-PCI versus CO-PCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81-1.43; CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis of nonrandomized studies suggests that in patients with cardiogenic shock complicating ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, there may be no significant benefit with single-stage MV-PCI compared with CO-PCI. Given the limitations of observational data, randomized trials are needed to determine the role of MV-PCI in this setting.

15 Review State of the art: the inception, advent and future of fully bioresorbable scaffolds. 2017

Katagiri, Yuki / Stone, Gregg W / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #28844034.

ABSTRACT: To overcome the limitations of metallic stents, the development of the bioresorbable vascular scaffold started about 30 years ago. Researchers anticipated a transformative revolution from "vascular reparative therapy" by BRS at the beginning of its development. To date, there are five commercially available bioresorbable scaffolds which have already gained CE mark. However, recent studies, including randomised trials and meta-analyses evaluating clinical results of BRS, have raised concerns about the safety and efficacy of the device in the first few years prior to its complete bioresorption, compared to contemporary metallic DES. As one of the efforts to address these concerns, the impact of implantation technique was investigated. In addition, there are several aspects to be improved such as mechanical integrity, strut configuration, and late structural discontinuity. Intensive researches into the underlying causes of the greater device thrombosis rates with BRS have stimulated improvement of implantation technique and the development of next-generation BRS. Just as we have witnessed the evolution from first- to second-generation metallic DES, we anticipate that future generations of BRS with thinner struts and enhanced mechanical properties will result in substantially improved intermediate-term outcomes and safety.

16 Review State of the art: coronary angiography. 2017

Collet, Carlos / Grundeken, Maik J / Asano, Taku / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Wijns, William / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #28844026.

ABSTRACT: In the early days of coronary angiography, the precise quantification of luminal narrowing was challenging. The introduction of balloon angioplasty (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty [PTCA]) by Andreas Grüntzig in 1977 was perhaps the greatest incentive to the development of quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). QCA has played a crucial role in evaluating interventional techniques and assessing the results of new technologies. With the advent of drug-eluting stents (DES), QCA metrics such as late lumen loss and diameter stenosis (restenosis) proved to be instrumental in assessing new technologies. Refinements in QCA with the advent of dedicated bifurcation analysis and three-dimensional (3D) QCA have broadened the application of QCA. Beyond angiographic metrics, new developments in the field of QCA have introduced the functional component in the assessment of coronary lesions. Angiography-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) may be a good tool for diagnosing ischaemia-producing lesions in patients with non-complex coronary artery disease. Furthermore, the incremental functional information can be used to expand the traditional late lumen loss (LLL) and restenosis concepts.

17 Review The influence of training characteristics on the effect of exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease: Systematic review and meta-regression analysis. 2017

Kraal, Jos J / Vromen, Tom / Spee, Ruud / Kemps, Hareld M C / Peek, Niels. ·Department of Medical Informatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: j.kraal@mmc.nl. · Department of Medical Informatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Maxima Medical Center, Veldhoven, The Netherlands. · Health eResearch Centre, Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #28735757.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation improves exercise capacity of coronary artery disease patients, it is unclear which training characteristic determines this improvement. Total energy expenditure and its constituent training characteristics (training intensity, session frequency, session duration and programme length) vary considerably among clinical trials, making it hard to compare studies directly. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-regression analysis to assess the effect of total energy expenditure and its constituent training characteristics on exercise capacity. METHODS: We identified randomised controlled trials comparing continuous aerobic exercise training with usual care for patients with coronary artery disease. Studies were included when training intensity, session frequency, session duration and programme length was described, and exercise capacity was reported in peakVO RESULTS: Twenty studies were included in the analyses. The mean difference in peakVO CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the design of an exercise programme should primarily be aimed at optimising total energy expenditure rather than on one specific training characteristic.

18 Review Safety and efficacy of the Tryton Side Branch Stent™ for the treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions: an update. 2017

Grundeken, Maik J / de Winter, Robbert J / Wykrzykowska, Joanna J. ·a Department of Cardiology , Academic Medical Center - University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. ·Expert Rev Med Devices · Pubmed #28581348.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) involving coronary bifurcation lesions are associated with adverse outcomes compared with non-bifurcation lesions. The Tryton Side Branch Stent has been developed to improve clinical outcomes after bifurcation PCI. Areas covered: We will discuss observational data (clinical registries and intravascular imaging studies) and randomized data from the TRYTON trial (comparing Tryton [used in combination with a main branch drug-eluting stent (DES)] with side branch balloon angioplasty [in combination with a main branch DES; also referred to the provisional strategy]). Expert commentary: The published data showed that the use of Tryton was feasible (successful stent placement in ~95%) and safe (stent thrombosis rates ~0.5% at 9-12 months; no cardiac deaths in the TRYTON trial). Its use resulted in excellent acute angiographic results. However, the TRYTON trial also showed that due to neo-intimal tissue growth, luminal dimension at 9 months were similar between Tryton and the provisional strategy. Furthermore, the trial showed an increased risk of peri-procedural myocardial infarction when Tryton was used in small side branches. Based on all data available, the provisional strategy should still be considered as the default strategy in the majority of bifurcation cases, although the use of Tryton may be considered in complex bifurcation anatomies with extensive disease in large side branches, especially when the device will be further improved by a drug-coating.

19 Review Systematic review of cost-effectiveness of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in patients with ischaemic heart disease: A report from the cardiovascular committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. Endorsed by the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging. 2017

Trägårdh, Elin / Tan, Siok Swan / Bucerius, Jan / Gimelli, Alessia / Gaemperli, Oliver / Lindner, Oliver / Agostini, Denis / Übleis, Christopher / Sciagrà, Roberto / Slart, Riemer H / Underwood, S Richard / Hyafil, Fabien / Hacker, Marcus / Verberne, Hein J. ·Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Lund University and Skåne University Hospital, Inga Marie Nilssons gata 49, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. · Erasmus University Rotterdam, Institute for Medical Technology Assessment, Burgemeester Oudlaan 50, 3062 PA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University Medical Center, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany. · Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Via Guiseppe Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa, Italy. · Cardiac Imaging and Interventional Cardiology, University Heart Centre, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland. · Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Centre North Rhine-Westphalia, University Hospital of the Ruhr University Bochum, Georgstrasse 11, 32545 Bad Oeynhausen, Germany. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Caen and Normandie Université, Avenue de la Côte de Nacre, 104009 CEDEX 1 Caen, France. · Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich, Germany. · Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla 3, 50134 Florence, Italy. · Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, PO Box 30001, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Biomedical Photonic Imaging, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede, The Netherlands. · National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals, Sydney Street, SW3 6NP, London, UK. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bichat University Hospital, DHU FIRE, Inserm 1148, University of Paris Diderot, 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28549119.

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major cause of death and disability. Several diagnostic tests, such as myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS), are accurate for the detection of CAD, as well as having prognostic value for the prediction of cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, the diagnostic and prognostic value of these tests should be cost-effective and should lead to improved clinical outcome. We have reviewed the literature on the cost-effectiveness of MPS in different circumstances: (i) the diagnosis and management of CAD; (ii) comparison with exercise electrocardiography (ECG) and other imaging tests; (iii) as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography (ICA), (iv) the impact of appropriate use criteria; (v) acute chest pain, and (vi) screening of asymptomatic patients with type-2 diabetes. In total 57 reports were included. Although most non-invasive imaging tests are cost-effective compared with alternatives, the data conflict on which non-invasive strategy is the most cost-effective. Different definitions of cost-effectiveness further confound the subject. Computer simulations of clinical diagnosis and management are influenced by the assumptions made. For instance, diagnostic accuracy is often defined against an anatomical standard that is wrongly assumed to be perfect. Conflicting data arise most commonly from these incorrect or differing assumptions.

20 Review Targeting the dominant mechanism of coronary microvascular dysfunction with intracoronary physiology tests. 2017

Mejía-Rentería, Hernán / van der Hoeven, Nina / van de Hoef, Tim P / Heemelaar, Julius / Ryan, Nicola / Lerman, Amir / van Royen, Niels / Escaned, Javier. ·Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, 28040, Madrid, Spain. · Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC), Madrid, Spain. · VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · AMC Heart Centre, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, 28040, Madrid, Spain. escaned@secardiologia.es. · Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain. escaned@secardiologia.es. · Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC), Madrid, Spain. escaned@secardiologia.es. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28501910.

ABSTRACT: The coronary microcirculation plays a key role in modulating blood supply to the myocardium. Several factors like myocardial oxygen demands, endothelial and neurogenic conditions determine its function. Although there is available evidence supporting microvascular dysfunction as an important cause of myocardial ischaemia, with both prognostic and symptomatic implications, its diagnosis and management in clinical practice is still relegated to a second plane. Both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are hampered by the broadness of the concept of microvascular dysfunction, which fails addressing the plurality of mechanisms leading to dysfunction. Normal microcirculatory function requires both structural integrity of the microcirculatory vascular network and preserved signalling pathways ensuring adequate and brisk arteriolar resistance shifts in response to myocardial oxygen demands. Pathological mechanisms affecting these requirements include structural remodelling of microvessels, intraluminal plugging, extravascular compression or vasomotor dysregulation. Importantly, not every diagnostic technique provides evidence on which of these pathophysiological mechanisms is present or predominates in the microcirculation. In this paper we discuss the mechanisms of coronary microvascular dysfunction and the intracoronary tools currently available to detect it, as well as the potential role of each one to unmask the main underlying mechanism.

21 Review Late thrombotic events after bioresorbable scaffold implantation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. 2017

Collet, Carlos / Asano, Taku / Miyazaki, Yosuke / Tenekecioglu, Erhan / Katagiri, Yuki / Sotomi, Yohei / Cavalcante, Rafael / de Winter, Robbert J / Kimura, Takeshi / Gao, Runlin / Puricel, Serban / Cook, Stéphane / Capodanno, Davide / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam-Zuidoost, Netherlands. · Department of Interventional Cardiology, 's-Gravendijkwal 230, 3015 CE Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto University Hospital, Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyo Ward, Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture 606-8507, Japan. · Department of Cardiology, Fu Wai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 10 Beijing, China. · Department of Cardiology, Fribourg University and Hospital, Avenue de l'Europe 20, 1700 Fribourg, Switzerland. · Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, Ferrarotto Hospital, University of Catania, Via Salvatore Citelli, 6, 95124 Catania CT, Italy. · Imperial Department of Medicine, Imperial College of London, Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #28430908.

ABSTRACT: Aims: To compare the long-term safety and efficacy of bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) with everolimus-eluting stent (EES) after percutaneous coronary interventions. Methods and results: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials comparing clinical outcomes of patients treated with BVS and EES with at least 24 months follow-up was performed. Adjusted random-effect model by the Knapp-Hartung method was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The primary safety outcome of interest was the risk of definite/probable device thrombosis (DT). The primary efficacy outcome of interest was the risk of target lesion failure (TLF). Five randomized clinical trials (n = 1730) were included. Patients treated with Absorb BVS had a higher risk of definite/probable DT compared with patients treated with EES (OR 2.93, 95%CI 1.37-6.26, P = 0.01). Very late DT (VLDT) occurred in 13 patients [12/996 (1.4%, 95%CI: 0.08-2.5) Absorb BVS vs. 1/701 (0.5%, 95%CI: 0.2-1.6) EES; OR 3.04; 95%CI 1.2-7.68, P = 0.03], 92% of the VLDT in the BVS group occurred in the absence of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Patients treated with Absorb BVS had a trend towards higher risk of TLF (OR 1.48, 95%CI 0.90-2.42, P = 0.09), driven by a higher risk of target vessel myocardial infarction and ischaemia-driven target lesion revascularization. No difference was found in the risk of cardiac death. Conclusion: Compared with EES, the use of Absorb BVS was associated with a higher rate of DT and a trend towards higher risk of TLF. VLDT occurred in 1.4% of the patients, the majority of these events occurred in the absence of DAPT.

22 Review Bioresorbable Scaffold: The Emerging Reality and Future Directions. 2017

Sotomi, Yohei / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Collet, Carlos / Tenekecioglu, Erhan / Virmani, Renu / Kleiman, Neal S / Serruys, Patrick W. ·From the Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Y.S., C.C.) · ThoraxCenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Y.O., E.T.) · Cardialysis, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Y.O.) · CVPath, Institute Inc, Gaithersburg, MD (R.V.) · Department of Cardiology (NSK), Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Texas (N.S.K.) · and NHLI, Imperial College London, United Kingdom (P.W.S.). ·Circ Res · Pubmed #28408454.

ABSTRACT: In the era of drug-eluting stents, large-scale randomized trials and all-comer registries have shown excellent clinical results. However, even the latest-generation drug-eluting stent has not managed to address all the limitations of permanent metallic coronary stents, such as the risks of target lesion revascularization, neoatherosclerosis, preclusion of late lumen enlargement, and the lack of reactive vasomotion. Furthermore, the risk of very late stent, although substantially reduced with newer-generation drug-eluting stent, still remains. These problems were anticipated to be solved with the advent of fully biodegradable devices. Fully bioresorbable coronary scaffolds have been designed to function transiently to prevent acute recoil, but have retained the capability to inhibit neointimal proliferation by eluting immunosuppressive drugs. Nevertheless, long-term follow-up data of the leading bioresorbable scaffold (Absorb) are becoming available and have raised a concern about the relatively higher incidence of scaffold thrombosis. To reduce the rate of clinical events, improvements in the device, as well as implantation procedure, are being evaluated. This review will focus on the current CE-mark approved bioresorbable scaffolds, their basic characteristics, and clinical results. In addition, we summarize the current limitations of bioresorbable scaffold and their possible solutions.

23 Review Evaluation of the MiStent sustained sirolimus eluting biodegradable polymer coated stent for the treatment of coronary artery disease: does uniform sustained abluminal drug release result in earlier strut coverage and better safety profile? 2017

Tijssen, Ruben Y G / Kraak, Robin P / Lu, Huangling / Mifek, Jeffrey G / Carlyle, Wenda C / Donohoe, Dennis J / De Winter, Robbert J / Koch, Karel T / Wykrzykowska, Joanna J. ·a AMC Heartcenter, Academic Medical Center , University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · b Micell Technologies INC , Durham , NC , USA. ·Expert Rev Med Devices · Pubmed #28402204.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Treatment of coronary artery disease has made strides over the last decades. Development of drug eluting stents (DES), coated with a polymer layer and an anti-proliferative drug to reduce neointimal hyperplasia, has reduced the incidence of in-stent-restenosis relative to treatment with bare metal stents. Patients treated with first generation DES more likely suffer from (very) late events which can be cause by the permanent presence of a polymer. Therefore second generation DES with more biocompatible coatings, and third generation DES, with very thin struts coated with biodegradable polymers, were developed. Areas covered: The MiStent SES is one of these third generation DES and is designed to limit the duration of polymer exposure, optimize coronary vessel healing and more precisely and consistently control drug elution to improve safety and clinical outcomes. This review provides a detailed description of the technique behind the MiStent SES, and describes the pre-clinical and clinical trials conducted with this device to date. Expert commentary: Recent clinical trials have shown non-inferiority of very thin strut biodegradable polymer coated DES compared to durable polymer coated DES, whilst maintaining an excellent safety profile. Longer follow-up, to see the real potential benefits of these devices, is mandatory however.

24 Review Coronary flow capacity: concept, promises, and challenges. 2017

van de Hoef, Tim P / Echavarría-Pinto, Mauro / Escaned, Javier / Piek, Jan J. ·AMC Heart Center, Academic Medical Center - University of Amsterdam, Room B2-250, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. t.p.vandehoef@amc.uva.nl. · AMC Heart Center, Academic Medical Center - University of Amsterdam, Room B2-250, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, ISSSTE General Hospital, Querétaro, Mexico. · Faculty of Medicine, Autonomous University of Querétaro, Querétaro, Mexico. · Cardiovascular Institute, Hospital Universitario Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28353034.

ABSTRACT: The vasodilator capacity of the coronary circulation is an important diagnostic and prognostic characteristic, and its accurate assessment is therefore an important frontier. The coronary flow capacity (CFC) concept was introduced to overcome the limitations associated with the use of coronary flow reserve (CFR) for this purpose, which are related to the sensitivity of CFR to physiological alterations in systemic and coronary hemodynamics. CFC was developed from positron emission tomography, and was subsequently extrapolated to invasive coronary physiology. These studies suggest that CFC is a robust framework for the identification of clinically relevant coronary flow abnormalities, and improves identification of patients at risk for adverse events over the use of CFR alone. This Review will discuss the concept of CFC, its promises in the setting of ischaemic heart disease, and its challenges both in theoretical and practical terms.

25 Review Single or dual antiplatelet therapy after PCI. 2017

Miyazaki, Yosuke / Suwannasom, Pannipa / Sotomi, Yohei / Abdelghani, Mohammad / Tummala, Karthik / Katagiri, Yuki / Asano, Taku / Tenekecioglu, Erhan / Zeng, Yaping / Cavalcante, Rafael / Collet, Carlos / Onuma, Yoshinobu / Serruys, Patrick W. ·Erasmus University Medical Center, 's-Gravendijkwal 230, 3015 CE, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, B2-127, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Northern Region Heart Center, Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intavaroros Road, Sripoom District, Muang, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand. · Department of Cardiology, Siddhartha Medical College and Government General Hospital, Ring Road, Gunadala, Vijayawada-520 008, Andhra Pradesh, India. · Cardialysis, Westblaak 98, 3012 KM, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Imperial College London, Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK. ·Nat Rev Cardiol · Pubmed #28181585.

ABSTRACT: The optimal duration and type of antiplatelet therapy after implantation of a drug-eluting stent (DES) remains uncertain. At the time of the first-in-man implantation of the sirolimus DES in 1999, the protocol-defined dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) duration was only 2 months. Subsequently, DAPT duration was extended to 1 year on the basis of anecdotal historical data, and this practice was then incorporated into clinical guidelines. For >1 decade, trialists have sought to compare the safety and efficacy of abbreviated (<6 months) and prolonged (>12 months) DAPT regimens. However, the body of evidence is limited by the heterogeneity of end points, time of randomization, and bleeding criteria used in each trial. Pharmaceutical advances led to the introduction of new ADP-receptor antagonists, which are thought to be more effective than clopidogrel. The ADP-receptor antagonists moved the focus from the optimal duration of DAPT to the potential efficacy of single antiplatelet therapy after DES implantation. In this Review, we summarize the current evidence on the duration of DAPT and the risk of bleeding and adverse cardiac events after DES implantation, and describe the pitfalls of trial interpretation. The ongoing, prospective trials to test single antiplatelet therapy after DES implantation are also discussed.

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