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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from University of Jyvaskyla
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
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These are the 3 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from University of Jyvaskyla during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Cardiac Rehabilitees' Technology Experiences Before Remote Rehabilitation: Qualitative Study Using a Grounded Theory Approach. 2019

Anttila, Marjo-Riitta / Kivistö, Heikki / Piirainen, Arja / Kokko, Katja / Malinen, Anita / Pekkonen, Mika / Sjögren, Tuulikki. ·Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. · Faculty of Education and Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. · Peurunka Rehabilitation, Laukaa, Finland. ·J Med Internet Res · Pubmed #30730298.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Even though technology is becoming increasingly common in rehabilitation programs, insufficient data are as yet available on rehabilitees' perceptions and experiences. It is important to understand their abilities when using technology for remote rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: This is a qualitative study on technology experiences of persons affected by cardiovascular disease assessed before remote rehabilitation. The aim of the study was to explore rehabilitees' experiences and attitudes toward technology before 12 months of remote rehabilitation. METHODS: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 rehabilitees in four focus groups. The subjects were aged 34 to 77 years (average age 54.8 years) and 74% (29/39) of them were male. They had been diagnosed with coronary artery disease and were undergoing treatment in a rehabilitation center. The interviews were conducted between September 2015 and November 2016. Data were analyzed using Glaser's mode of the grounded theory approach. RESULTS: The result of the study was an "identifying e-usage" experience category, which refers to the rehabilitees' notions of the use of information and communication technologies (e-usage) in the process of behavior change. The main category comprises four subcategories that define the rehabilitees' technology experience. These subcategories are "feeling outsider," "being uninterested," "reflecting benefit," and "enthusiastic using." All rehabilitees expected that technology should be simple, flexible, and easy to use and learn. The results reflecting their technology experience can be used in e-rehabilitation programs. Rehabilitees who feel like outsiders and are not interested in technology need face-to-face communication for the major part of rehabilitation, while rehabilitees who reflect benefit and are enthusiastic about the use of technology need incrementally less face-to-face interaction and feel that Web-based coaching could offer sufficient support for rehabilitation. CONCLUSIONS: The findings show that persons affected by heart disease had different experiences with technology and expectations toward counseling, while all rehabilitees expected technology to be easy to use and their experiences to be smooth and problem-free. The results can be used more widely in different contexts of social and health care for the planning of and training in remote rehabilitation counseling and education. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN61225589; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN61225589 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/74jmrTXFD).

2 Article Genome-Wide Association Study for Incident Myocardial Infarction and Coronary Heart Disease in Prospective Cohort Studies: The CHARGE Consortium. 2016

Dehghan, Abbas / Bis, Joshua C / White, Charles C / Smith, Albert Vernon / Morrison, Alanna C / Cupples, L Adrienne / Trompet, Stella / Chasman, Daniel I / Lumley, Thomas / Völker, Uwe / Buckley, Brendan M / Ding, Jingzhong / Jensen, Majken K / Folsom, Aaron R / Kritchevsky, Stephen B / Girman, Cynthia J / Ford, Ian / Dörr, Marcus / Salomaa, Veikko / Uitterlinden, André G / Eiriksdottir, Gudny / Vasan, Ramachandran S / Franceschini, Nora / Carty, Cara L / Virtamo, Jarmo / Demissie, Serkalem / Amouyel, Philippe / Arveiler, Dominique / Heckbert, Susan R / Ferrières, Jean / Ducimetière, Pierre / Smith, Nicholas L / Wang, Ying A / Siscovick, David S / Rice, Kenneth M / Wiklund, Per-Gunnar / Taylor, Kent D / Evans, Alun / Kee, Frank / Rotter, Jerome I / Karvanen, Juha / Kuulasmaa, Kari / Heiss, Gerardo / Kraft, Peter / Launer, Lenore J / Hofman, Albert / Markus, Marcello R P / Rose, Lynda M / Silander, Kaisa / Wagner, Peter / Benjamin, Emelia J / Lohman, Kurt / Stott, David J / Rivadeneira, Fernando / Harris, Tamara B / Levy, Daniel / Liu, Yongmei / Rimm, Eric B / Jukema, J Wouter / Völzke, Henry / Ridker, Paul M / Blankenberg, Stefan / Franco, Oscar H / Gudnason, Vilmundur / Psaty, Bruce M / Boerwinkle, Eric / O'Donnell, Christopher J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. · Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America. · Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland. · University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. · Human Genetics Center, and Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, United States of America. · Boston University's and National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, United States of America. · Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States of America. · Department of Statistics, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · Interfaculty Institute for Genetics and Functional Genomics, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), partner site, Greifswald, Germany. · Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University College, Cork, Ireland. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States of America. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America. · Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, United States of America. · Sticht Center on Aging, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology, Merck Research Laboratories, Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., Whitehouse Station, NJ, United States of America. · Robertson Centre for Biostatistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Internal Medicine B, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America. · Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States of America. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States of America. · Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States of America. · Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Pasteur Institute of Lille, Lille, France. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, EA 3430, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States of America. · Group Health Research Institute, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, United States of America. · Departments of Cardiology and Epidemiology, Toulouse University Hospital, Toulouse, France. · National Institute of Health and Medical Research (U258), Paris, France. · Seattle Epidemiologic Research and Information Center of the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research and Development, Seattle, WA, United States of America. · Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, 250 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA, United States of America. · The New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY, United States of America. · Department of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. · Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Torrance, CA, United States of America. · Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, United States of America. · UKCRC Centre of Excellence for Public Health Research (Northern Ireland), Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom. · Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America. · Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States of America. · Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Institute for Molecular Medicine FIMM, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology & Prevention, Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, United States of America. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Netherlands Genomics Initiative (NGI)-sponsored Netherlands Consortium for Healthy Aging (NCHA), Leiden, The Netherlands. · Durrer Center for Cardiogenetic Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of General and Interventional Cardiology, University Heart Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States of America. · Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · Division of Intramural Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States of America. · Cardiology Section, Department of Medicine, Boston Veteran's Administration Healthcare, Boston, MA, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26950853.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Data are limited on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for incident coronary heart disease (CHD). Moreover, it is not known whether genetic variants identified to date also associate with risk of CHD in a prospective setting. METHODS: We performed a two-stage GWAS analysis of incident myocardial infarction (MI) and CHD in a total of 64,297 individuals (including 3898 MI cases, 5465 CHD cases). SNPs that passed an arbitrary threshold of 5×10-6 in Stage I were taken to Stage II for further discovery. Furthermore, in an analysis of prognosis, we studied whether known SNPs from former GWAS were associated with total mortality in individuals who experienced MI during follow-up. RESULTS: In Stage I 15 loci passed the threshold of 5×10-6; 8 loci for MI and 8 loci for CHD, for which one locus overlapped and none were reported in previous GWAS meta-analyses. We took 60 SNPs representing these 15 loci to Stage II of discovery. Four SNPs near QKI showed nominally significant association with MI (p-value<8.8×10-3) and three exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold when Stage I and Stage II results were combined (top SNP rs6941513: p = 6.2×10-9). Despite excellent power, the 9p21 locus SNP (rs1333049) was only modestly associated with MI (HR = 1.09, p-value = 0.02) and marginally with CHD (HR = 1.06, p-value = 0.08). Among an inception cohort of those who experienced MI during follow-up, the risk allele of rs1333049 was associated with a decreased risk of subsequent mortality (HR = 0.90, p-value = 3.2×10-3). CONCLUSIONS: QKI represents a novel locus that may serve as a predictor of incident CHD in prospective studies. The association of the 9p21 locus both with increased risk of first myocardial infarction and longer survival after MI highlights the importance of study design in investigating genetic determinants of complex disorders.

3 Article Coronary artery calcium and physical performance as determinants of mortality in older age: the AGES-Reykjavik Study. 2013

von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B / Groffen, Danielle A I / Vidal, Jean-Sebastien / Rantanen, Taina / Jonsson, Palmi V / Garcia, Melissa / Aspelund, Thor / Eiriksdottir, Gudny / Siggeirsdóttir, Kristin / Launer, Lenore / Gudnason, Vilmundur / Harris, Tamara B / Anonymous2901022. ·Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography and Biometry, National Institute on Aging, MD, USA; Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. Electronic address: mikaela.vonbonsdorff@jyu.fi. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #23414742.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Coronary artery calcium (CAC) and physical performance have been shown to be associated with mortality, but it is not clear whether one of them modifies the association. We investigated the association between the extent of CAC and physical performance among older individuals and explored these individual and combined effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and non-CVD mortality. METHODS: We studied 4074 participants of the AGES-Reykjavik Study who were free from coronary heart disease, had a CAC score calculated from computed tomography scans and had data on mobility limitations and gait speed at baseline in 2002-2006 at a mean age of 76 years. Register-based mortality was available until 2009. RESULTS: Odds for mobility limitation and slow gait increased according to the extent of CAC. Altogether 645 persons died during the follow-up. High CAC, mobility limitation and slow gait were independent predictors of CVD mortality and non-CVD mortality. The joint effect of CAC and gait speed on non-CVD mortality was synergistic, i.e. compared to having low CAC and normal gait, the joint effect of high CAC and slow gait exceeded the additive effect of these individual exposures on non-CVD mortality. For CVD mortality, the effect was additive i.e. the joint effect of high CAC and slow gait did not exceed the sum of the individual exposures. CONCLUSIONS: The extent of CAC and decreased physical performance were independent predictors of mortality and the joint presence of these risk factors increased the risk of non-CVD mortality above and beyond the individual effects.